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  1. Il lettore sedotto o della circolarità ermeneutica di retorica ed estetica.Marco Castagna - 2003 - In S. Bonfiglioli & C. Marmo (eds.), Retorica e scienze del linguaggio. Teorie e pratiche dell'argomentazione e della persuasione. Roma RM, Italia: pp. 351-360.
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  2. Narrative Fiction and Epistemic Injustice.Zoë Cunliffe - 2019 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 77 (2):169-180.
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  3. The Fear of Aesthetics in Art and Literary Theory.Sam Rose - 2017 - New Literary History 48 (2):223-244.
    Is aesthetics, as has recently been claimed, now able to meet the accusations often levelled against it? This essay examines counters to three of the most common: that aesthetics is based around overly narrow conceptions of "art" and "the aesthetic"; that aesthetics is politically disengaged; and that aesthetics fails to engage with actual art objects and their histories.
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  4. Tales of Dread.Mark Windsor - forthcoming - Estetika.
    ‘Tales of dread’ is a genre that has received scant attention in aesthetics. In this paper, I aim to elaborate an account of tales of dread which effectively distinguishes these from horror stories, and helps explain the close affinity between the two, accommodating borderline cases. I briefly consider two existing accounts of the genre – namely, those of Noël Carroll and of Cynthia Freeland – and show why they are inadequate for my purposes. I then develop my own account of (...)
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  5. The Individual ‘We’ Narrator.Mattia Gallotti & Raphael Lyne - 2019 - British Journal of Aesthetics 59:ayy051.
    The prevailing assumption in literary studies tends to be that a ‘we’ narrative voice is either that of an individual purporting to speak for a group, or that of a collective of people whose perspectives have coalesced into a unified one. Recent work on social agency across the cognitive humanities suggests another way of understanding what might be conveyed by such a ‘we’. Social cognition research shows that individuals can have their capacities changed and enhanced when they interact with others, (...)
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  6. Reading Oneself in the Text: Cavell and Gadamer’s Romantic Conception of Reading.David Liakos - 2019 - Journal of Aesthetics and Phenomenology 6 (1):79-87.
    ABSTRACTCan we gain knowledge by reading literature? This essay defends an account of reading, developed by Stanley Cavell and Hans-Georg Gadamer, that phenomenologically describes the experience of acquiring self-knowledge by reading literary texts. Two possible criticisms of this account will be considered: first, that reading can provide other kinds of knowledge than self-knowledge; and, second, that the theory involves illegitimately imposing subjective meaning onto a text. It will be argued, in response, that the self-knowledge gained in reading allows one to (...)
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  7. “Antigone’s Stance Amongst Slovenia’s Undead.”.Rachel Aumiller - 2017 - Studia Ethnologica Croatica 29:19-42.
    Memorialization in the form of the architectural statue can suggest that our stance towards the past is concrete while memorials in the form of repeated social activity represent reconciliation with the past as a continual process. Enacted memorials suggest that reconciliation with the past is not itself a thing of the past. Each generation must grapple with its inherited memories, guilt, and grief and self-consciously take its own stance towards that which came before it. This article considers Dominik Smole’s post (...)
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  8. The Performance of Reading: An Essay in the Philosophy of Literature.Inês Morais - 2010 - Disputatio 3 (28):329-334.
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  9. Verlegenheit.Katrin Trüstedt - 2013 - In Eva Horn & Michèle Lowrie (eds.), Denkfiguren/Figures of Thought. Berlin, Deutschland: pp. 187-190.
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  10. Das Nach-leben auf der Bühne des Geistes.Katrin Trüstedt - 2014 - In Carolin Blumenberg, Alexandra Heimes, Erica Weitzman & Sophie Witt (eds.), Suspensionen: Über das Untote. München, Deutschland: pp. 161-167.
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  11. "[A] Thing That Was Nothing Had Happened“: Hamlets (Un-)Dinge in Samuel Becketts Watt.Katrin Trüstedt - 2016 - In K. Kröger & Armin Schäfer (eds.), Null, Nichts und Negation. Bielefeld, Deutschland: Verlag. pp. 75–93.
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  12. Anselm Haverkamp: Geschichte und Latenz.Katrin Trüstedt - 2010 - In Dirk Quadflieg & Stefan Moebius (eds.), Kultur. Theorien der Gegenwart. Wiesbaden, Deutschland: pp. 530–540.
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  13. Wittgenstein and Modernism.Michael Fischer - 2018 - Philosophy and Literature 42 (2):463-466.
    Even in a journal with the welcoming title Philosophy and Literature, contributors rightly feel obliged to explain why they are relating philosophical and literary texts to one another. Seeing literature as an engagingly vivid, "speaking picture" "figuring forth" the difficult abstractions of philosophy was once a default way of linking the two. But such a connection shortchanges the thinking at work in literature, reducing it to a popularizing tool, and overlooks the stories, examples, and metaphors that inform some powerful works (...)
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  14. Two Responses to Moral Luck.Andrew Ingram - 2018 - Philosophy and Literature 42 (2):434-439.
    I am going to discuss two fictional characters, each of whom embodies opposite reactions to the problem of moral luck identified by Thomas Nagel and Bernard Williams. The two characters are Noah Cross, played by John Huston in Roman Polanski's film Chinatown, and Father Zosima from Fyodor Dostoyevsky's novel The Brothers Karamazov. Cross takes the existence of moral luck as a reason to fly from moral responsibility. Zosima leaps in the opposite direction, toward unlimited moral responsibility. The responses are the (...)
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  15. Beauty and Sublimity: A Cognitive Aesthetics of Literature and the Arts by Patrick Colm Hogan.Radhika Koul - 2018 - Philosophy and Literature 42 (2):467-470.
    The classic questions of philosophical aesthetics—how and why human beings find certain works of art beautiful or sublime—suffered from something of a hiatus in the twentieth century, but the study of beauty has seen a return in recent years, often calling on rapidly evolving research in cognitive science and neuroscience for assistance. Patrick Colm Hogan's Beauty and Sublimity: A Cognitive Aesthetics of Literature and the Arts is an important contribution to the burgeoning interdisciplinary field of cognitive aesthetics. The book makes (...)
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  16. Two Myths of Sisyphus.Bruce Milem - 2018 - Philosophy and Literature 42 (2):440-443.
    [We present below a preliminary translation of an ancient Greek manuscript, recently discovered by Dr. __________, containing two variations on the myth of Sisyphus. The document is in fragments, with gaps at the beginning and partway through.… [Upon] his capture, Sisyphus was brought before the council of the gods, who were informed of all his crimes. After withdrawing from the chamber for many hours, they returned to sentence Sisyphus to his fate. He was doomed to roll a rock up a (...)
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  17. A Report on Experience.David Wemyss - 2018 - Philosophy and Literature 42 (2):444-462.
    In November 2002, a series of tutorials was advertised within the University of Cambridge. Neville Critchley—a lecturer in philosophy with a reputation for preferring literature—placed advertisements on college notice boards saying he wanted to hear from students not just philosophically or intellectually intrigued by language but literally made unwell by it. Four young people replied, one of whom subsequently provided me with an account of what passed in Room C28 at Emmanuel College. Almost thirteen years afterwards, this account was published (...)
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  18. "Poetry" Versus "History" in Aristotle's Poetics.David Gallop - 2018 - Philosophy and Literature 42 (2):420-433.
    History, according to Aristotle, relates "things that happen ; whereas poetry's function is to relate the kinds of things that happen—that is, are possible in terms of probability or necessity."1 A generic clause, expressing "the kinds of things that happen" to certain kinds of agents, distinguishes the task of the poet from that of the historian.2 History speaks of "particulars," whereas poetry speaks more of "universals." A historian might assert, for example, that Alcibiades urged the Athenians to invade Sicily, or (...)
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  19. The Meaning of "Tyrannus" in Oedipus Tyrannus.Roy Glassberg - 2018 - Philosophy and Literature 42 (2):416-419.
    What are we to make of Sophocles's use of the term "Tyrannus"1 in the title of his tragedy Oedipus Tyrannus? Did he simply mean "king," as most translators would have it, or did he mean "tyrant" in the sense of despot—or some combination of both? A sampling of translations offered by Amazon yields seventeen titles using either "Rex" or "King," on the one hand, and three using "Tyrant."H. G. Liddell and Robert Scott define tyrannus as meaning an "absolute monarch unlimited (...)
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  20. "Expel the Barbarian From Your Heart": Intimations of the Cyclops in Euripides's Hecuba.Zdravko Planinc - 2018 - Philosophy and Literature 42 (2):403-415.
    In memoriam: Mira Balija PlanincEuripides's Hecuba is not one of the best-known tragedies. The story is vividly memorable, however. Troy has fallen. The Greeks have finished their killing and plundering and have begun their homeward journey. As soon as they cross the Hellespont and make camp on what some might call the European side, in Thrace, they bury Achilles. The Trojan queen, Hecuba, is enslaved, as are the only two of her daughters who remain alive, Polyxena and Cassandra, the latter (...)
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  21. Consciousness: A Story.Robert Allan Richardson - 2018 - Philosophy and Literature 42 (2):394-402.
    Consciousness is known by the company it keeps. Story is its constant companion. This is the case even when it addresses itself to itself and says what it sees. It is like the pilot of a ship in one tale, but a thinking "I" in another. It is a theater where perceptions come and go, or an aviary where thoughts fly in and out like birds, or a stream. It is the manifestation of an immortal soul, or perhaps the first (...)
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  22. Owen, Wittgenstein, and the Postwar Battle with Language.Ron Ben-Tovim - 2018 - Philosophy and Literature 42 (2):344-360.
    Differences in the work philosophy does and the work art does need not be slighted if it turns out that they cross paths, even to some extent share paths—for example, where they contest the ground on which the life of another is to be examined, call it the ground of therapy.The battlefields of war are often described as a separate world, planet, or universe, far removed from ordinary life. Literary examples of this perception can be seen in several modern works (...)
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  23. When Nothing Follows: Rousseau's Literary Works as Science and Consolation.Joel From - 2018 - Philosophy and Literature 42 (2):361-375.
    In a letter drafted at age forty-eight, Jean-Jacques Rousseau confessed that he passed his days "vainly looking for solid attachments."1 Two years later, he again lamented that he had wasted much time pursuing attachments that "did not exist."2 At age fifty-eight, he confessed that he had "always felt some void."3 And, at the very end of his life, he still bemoaned that he had been cast "into the whirlwind of the world" only to discover that he "was not made to (...)
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  24. David Hume in To the Lighthouse.Justin W. Keena - 2018 - Philosophy and Literature 42 (2):376-393.
    Imagine a reader expert in the scholarship on To the Lighthouse and yet ignorant of the novel itself. What would such a person, when finally sitting down to read it for the first time, know—or think they know—about its relationship to philosophy? Based solely on the reams of articles, book chapters, and monographs that place the novel in dialogue with one or more philosophers, the first-time reader of To the Lighthouse would predict with confidence and precision which thinkers are most (...)
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  25. A Look and a Nod: Merleau-Ponty, Shakespeare, Heaney, and the Mediation of Form.Arthur A. Brown - 2018 - Philosophy and Literature 42 (2):311-322.
    The painter "takes his body with him."Nevertheless, Renoir was looking at the sea.Close! stand close to me, Starbuck; let me look into a human eye.The painter takes his body with him—he looks at what he sees and what he sees looks back at him. Perception takes place in the exchange, in time and in the world, not only between people or between living things but also between "subject" and "object," between perceiver and perceived. In this exchange that Maurice Merleau-Ponty calls (...)
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  26. Shelley's Vestimentary Poetics.Alexander Freer - 2018 - Philosophy and Literature 42 (2):292-310.
    Poetry appears in veils but is not concealed. The subjects of poetry are "clothed in its Elysian light" not to serve the vanity of poets but to make visible a measure of their inspiration.1 This claim, central to Percy Shelley's Defence of Poetry, finds few sympathetic ears. The metaphor of poetry's dress suggests to some that poets engage in obfuscation, if not reckless cover-up. William Hazlitt says as much in an 1824 review of Shelley's Posthumous Poems: "His Muse offers her (...)
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  27. Nietzsche Among the Novelists.Theodore Ziolkowski - 2018 - Philosophy and Literature 42 (2):323-343.
    The Weimar Nietzsche-Bibliographie, which is available online along with an exhaustive index, contains hundreds of entries, ranging from "absolute Musik" to "Zynismus." But despite references to his treatment in film and to the names of several novelists, it provides no rubric for Friedrich Nietzsche in novels or otherwise as a fictional figure.Yet the twenty-first century alone has already produced at least four such works, in addition to two others over the preceding eighty years—not to mention films in Italian and French. (...)
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  28. What Novels Speak About.Thomas Pavel - 2018 - Philosophy and Literature 42 (2):279-291.
    The first, easiest answer to the question "What do novels speak about?" is D. H. Lawrence's conviction that novels are about "man alive," as quoted at the beginning of Guido Mazzoni's recent book on the theory of the novel.1 In a slightly more explicit accounting, one could say that novels speak about human actions and passions. These answers are the first, because they are plausible and general. They are the easiest, because they state the obvious. And yet, precisely because they (...)
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  29. The Offense of Poetry. [REVIEW]Zachary Gartenberg - 2009 - MLN 125:1211-1215.
    Review of Hazard Adams, The Offense of Poetry. For the Comparative Literature Edition of MLN (2009).
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  30. Husserl, Bakhtin, and the Other I. Or: Mikhail M. Bakhtin – a Husserlian?Carina Pape - 2016 - HORIZON. Studies in Phenomenology 5 (2):271-289.
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  31. Gusto. Pensare la frattura. [REVIEW]Fabio Vergine - 2015 - Doppiozero 1.
  32. The Magical Life and Creative Works of Paulo Coelho: A Psychobiographical Investigation.Claude-Hélène Mayer & David Maree - 2018 - Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 18 (sup1):1-16.
    Based on a psychobiographical approach, this study addresses magical thinking across the life span of Paulo Coelho. Paulo Coelho, who was born in Brazil in the 1940s, has become one of the most sold and famous contemporary authors in the world. In his life, as well as in his books, which are mainly autobiographical accounts, magic and magical thinking, spirituality, meaningfulness, and the living of one’s dream, are key themes. The aim of this study was to explore magic and magical (...)
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  33. Moonstruck, or How to Ruin Everything.William Day - 1995 - Philosophy and Literature 19 (2):292-307.
    A reading of the film Moonstruck (1987) is presented in two movements. The first aligns Moonstruck with certain Hollywood film comedies of the 1930s and 40s, those Stanley Cavell calls comedies of remarriage. The second turns to some aspects of Emerson's writing – in particular his interest in our relation to human greatness, and his coinciding interest in our relation to the words of a text – and shows how Moonstruck inherits these Emersonian, essentially philosophical interests.
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  34. The Promise of World Literature.Theodore George - 2014 - Internationales Jahrbuch für Hermeneutik 13 (1):128-143.
    In this essay, the author argues that Gadamer's approach to world literature contributes to the call for us mutually to discover our solidarities with those from different traditions, and, thus also, different linguistic traditions. He holds that the discovery of global solidarities is urgent because current prospects to address the world's political, social and economic challenges have been put in jeopardy by the increasingly ubiquitous use of calculative rationality to manage human relations. Gadamer's concern for us to discover solidarities, however, (...)
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  35. Commiserating with Devastated Things: Milan Kundera and the Entitlement of Thinking.David Pollard - 2018 - British Journal of Aesthetics 58 (3):330-332.
    Commiserating with Devastated Things: Milan Kundera and the Entitlement of ThinkingWIRTHJASON M.fordham university press. 2016. pp. 227227. £54.00..
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  36. The Value of Literature.Britt Harrison - 2018 - British Journal of Aesthetics 58 (3):332-336.
    The Value of LiteratureMcGregorRafe rowman and littlefield international. 2016. pp. xi + 161. £80.00.
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  37. Conversations on Art and Aesthetics.Hans Maes - 2017 - Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
    What is art? What counts as an aesthetic experience? Does art have to beautiful? Can one reasonably dispute about taste? What is the relation between aesthetic and moral evaluations? How to interpret a work of art? Can we learn anything from literature, film or opera? What is sentimentality? What is irony? How to think philosophically about architecture, dance, or sculpture? What makes something a great portrait? Is music representational or abstract? Why do we feel terrified when we watch a horror (...)
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  38. Kan böcker vara moraliska eller omoraliska?Marco Tiozzo - 2011 - Filosofisk Tidskrift 32 (4).
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  39. Melville and Nietzsche: Living the Death of God.Mark Anderson - 2016 - Philosophy and Literature 40:59-75.
    Herman Melville was so estranged from the religious beliefs of his time and place that his faith was doubted during his own lifetime. In the middle of the twentieth century some scholars even associated him with nihilism. To date, however, no one has offered a detailed account of Melville in relation to Nietzsche, who first made nihilism a topic of serious concern to the Western philosophical tradition. In this essay, I discuss some of the hitherto unexplored similarities between Melville’s ideas (...)
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  40. Sartre’s Nausea as Liar Paradox.Richard Michael McDonough - forthcoming - Philosophy and Literature 43.
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  41. The Philosophy of Art and Aesthetics, Psychology, and Neuroscience: Studies in Literature, Music, and Visual Arts.Noel Carroll, Margaret Moore & William Seeley - 2012 - In Arthur P. Shimamura & Stephen E. Palmer (eds.), Aesthetic Science: Connecting Minds, Brains, and Experience. New York, NY, USA: pp. 31-62.
  42. Neuroscience and Literature.William Seeley - 2016 - In John Gibson and Noel Carroll (ed.), The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Literature. New York, NY, USA: pp. 267-278.
    The growing general interest in understanding how neuroscience can contribute to explanations of our understanding and appreciation of art has been slow to find its way to philosophy of literature. Of course this is not to say that neuroscience has not had any influence on current theories about our engagement, understanding, and appreciation of literary works. Colin Martindale developed a scientific approach to literature in his book The Clockwork Muse (1990). His prototype-preference theory drew heavily on early artificial neural network (...)
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  43. Neuroscience, Narrative, and Emotion Regulation.William Seeley - 2018 - In Roger Kurtz (ed.), Trauma and Literature. New York, NY, USA: pp. 153-166.
    Recent findings in affective and cognitive neuroscience underscore the fact that traumatic memories are embodied and inextricably integrated with the affective dimensions of associated emotional responses. These findings can be used to clarify, and in some cases challenge, traditional claims about the unrepresentability of traumatic experience that have been central to trauma literary studies. The cognitive and affective dimensions experience and memory are closely integrated. Recollection is always an attenuated form of embodied reenactment. Further, situation models for narrative comprehension show (...)
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  44. Stanley Cavell and Literary Studies: Consequences of Skepticism.Bernie Rhie & Richard Eldridge - 2011 - New York, NY, USA: Bloomsbury.
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  45. Virtue Ethics and Literary Imagination.Jay R. Elliott - 2018 - Philosophy and Literature 42 (1):244-256.
    Did Plato see something that Aristotle missed? According to a familiar narrative, Plato regarded literature as dangerous to the aims of philosophy, and he accordingly exiled the poets from his ideal republic. By contrast, Aristotle is supposed to have reconciled literature and philosophy, not only through his appreciative account of epic and tragedy in the Poetics but also through his invocations of literary examples at crucial junctures elsewhere in his corpus, for example his use of the Trojan legend of Priam (...)
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  46. Wittgenstein and the Creativity of Language Ed. By Sebastian Sunday Grève and Jakub Mácha.Elinor Hållén - 2018 - Philosophy and Literature 42 (1):257-259.
    What is creativity? It is clearly something we know by seeing it manifested in a multitude of different ways and contexts. It could perhaps stand as an emblematic example of the limitations of a general explanative account. In this anthology the editors have orchestrated an exceptionally inspiring collection of essays that explore the vast examples of creative language used in Wittgenstein's philosophical practice and the creative potentiality of language overall. The anthology consists of eleven essays divided into introduction, overture, and (...)
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  47. Literature and Happiness.D. J. Moores - 2018 - Philosophy and Literature 42 (1):260-277.
    Let your verse be the happy occurrenceSomehow within the restless morning windWhich goes about smelling of mint and thyme...And all the rest is literature.It's not lIterary unless it's depressing. Although this statement is unfounded, I often hear it from beginning students and nonacademics who believe that literature is always dark and dreary, and that literariness is tantamount to depictions of suffering, struggle, and tragedy. I typically respond to such comments in the usual English-professor way, pointing out that literature represents the (...)
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  48. But Then, A Moral Experiment.Petar Ramadanovic - 2018 - Philosophy and Literature 42 (1):230-235.
    Once upon a time, there was this pilot. His plane was about to crash and he had to choose whether to steer his plane to a less or a more inhabited area. You'd think his choice would be simple, right? But before you give your response, consider the following situation that is practically the same, only a bit different.A judge faces rioters. The crowd demands that the culprit be found guilty for a certain crime or else they will take revenge (...)
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  49. Wittgenstein and the Craft of Reading: On Reckoning with the Imagination: Wittgenstein and the Aesthetics of Literary Experience, By Charles Altieri.Fred Rush - 2018 - Philosophy and Literature 42 (1):236-243.
    Charles Altieri's Reckoning with the Imagination: Wittgenstein and the Aesthetics of Literary Experience addresses a perceived problem in literary theory.1 That problem is how to reintegrate practices of "close reading" in a field dominated by "grand theory": deconstruction, postcolonial studies, queer studies, New Historicism, and other regimens. Unlike the New Criticism that controlled the reading, writing, and teaching of serious literature in the United States through the 1940s and '50s, in which intricate analysis of text as text was all, Altieri (...)
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  50. Richards and Williams: Spring and All and the Invention of Modernist Form.Dongho Cha - 2018 - Philosophy and Literature 42 (1):217-221.
    "The chief characteristic of poets," writes I. A. Richards in his well-known essay, "Science and Poetry," "is their amazing command of words".1 By this Richards does not mean that poetry can be written "by cunning and study, by craft and contrivance," that is, by "the technique of poetry added to a desire to write some"; his point is rather that "the ordering of the words" must spring from "an actual supreme ordering of experience." The true vocation of "genuine poetry" consists (...)
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