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  1. Arguments From Aesthetic Merit to Fictional Content.Adrian Bruhns, Tobias Klauk & Tilmann Köppe - 2020 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 78 (2):209-218.
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  2. Curating Interdisciplinarity in Literature-Art: A Review of Mukhaputa.Srajana Kaikini - 2018 - Rupkatha Journal On Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities 10 (2):251 - 259.
    This is a philosophical review of the exhibition dedicated to Literature – Art titled Mukhaputa (Cover page) held on occasion of the Manipal International Literature and Arts Platform 2017 in Manipal, India. The curatorial strategy of the exhibition explores the intersectional relationships between literature and visual arts at large. The context of this critical review is the recent past of modern literature journals in print that encouraged artists and illustrators to converse with literature and in turn poets and authors to (...)
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  3. Provoking Things: Homer, Humpty, and Heidegger.Sally Cloke - 2020 - Philosophy and Literature 44 (1):176-183.
    "It is a—most—provoking—thing," [Humpty Dumpty] said at last,"when a person doesn't know a cravat from a belt!"—Lewis Carroll, Through the Looking-Glass, chap. 6, n.p.1Homer's Odysseus and Lewis Carroll's Humpty Dumpty. An unlikely pairing, perhaps, but should they ever meet at some wayside inn or afternoon tea table they may find they have plenty to talk about. Both inhabit tales that involve journeys into strange lands, alarming characters, and peculiar dinner companions, and both use their wits to compete in complex language (...)
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  4. Ted Cohen on Sharing the World.Michael Fischer - 2020 - Philosophy and Literature 44 (1):188-198.
    In "Stanley Cavell and the Limits of Appreciation," Ted Cohen restates his hatred of Richard Wagner's music. Cohen hears something "very nasty" in Wagner's music, "an element of Nazism," to borrow Thomas Mann's phrase for what Mann, too, found disturbing in Wagner.1 Whereas Mann was still able to value Wagner's music, Cohen despises listening to it. Cohen realizes that his revulsion sets him apart not only from Mann but also from W. H. Auden, who praised Wagner's "consummate skill" in creating (...)
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  5. The Causes of Action in Oedipus Tyrannus.Roy Glassberg - 2020 - Philosophy and Literature 44 (1):184-187.
    Why do things happen as they do in the universe of Oedipus Tyrannus, consisting of the play itself coupled with the myth that surrounds and informs it? Why is Oedipus fated to kill his father and marry his mother? What part does Oedipus play in his own destruction? What role do divinities play? And what of human free will? In what follows I consider the power of curses, prophecy, prayer, fate, the gods, and human self-determination as they serve to effect (...)
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  6. The Meaning of Community Under the Pen of Wordsworth.Yin Qi-Ping - 2020 - Philosophy and Literature 44 (1):158-175.
    The meaning of "community" in William Wordsworth's poems deserves further exploration. Recent studies have shown an increasing interest in Wordsworth's thoughts and feelings regarding community. Of all the ongoing debates, the most interesting is the one between Lucy Newlyn and Simon J. White. In an article whose subtitle is "Community in The Prelude," Newlyn argues that in writing The Prelude Wordsworth's "aim was nothing less than to show how the foundations of a benevolent society might be laid using 'the growth (...)
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  7. The Art of Being: Poetics of the Novel and Existentialist Philosophy by Yi-Ping Ong.Corina Stan - 2020 - Philosophy and Literature 44 (1):199-206.
    Yi-Ping Ong's The Art of Being: Poetics of the Novel and Existentialist Philosophy is a highly innovative book. It teases out from essays by Søren Kierkegaard, Jean-Paul Sartre, and Simone de Beauvoir an existentialist poetics of the novel, which then inspires thoughtful readings of freedom and self-consciousness, situated worldhood, and unfinished works of art in nineteenth-century novels. At every step, Ong carefully articulates the insights that set her study apart from established ways of understanding the novel as form, the legacy (...)
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  8. Meaning and Exemplarity in Poetics and Literary Theory.Andrew Bennett - 2020 - Philosophy and Literature 44 (1):140-157.
    Knowledge, Robert Rowland Smith remarks, is "derived by inference from specific cases in respect to a general order."1 The meaning of a literary work—our knowledge of it in that sense—is determined, according to this model, by the relationship between these two categories: between the "specific case" and the "general order." To gain knowledge of a text would be to understand what it means; and to understand what it means, one needs to negotiate from the particular to the general—thematically, contextually, generically, (...)
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  9. The Many Sources of Meaning.Péter Hajdu - 2020 - Philosophy and Literature 44 (1):124-139.
    When we speak about the source of meaning, we are using a metaphor that is probably dead, but may still retain some of its heuristic force.1 There are several ways the human mind can understand a phenomenon. One of them is through understanding its cause. We can cope with something if we understand why it happens. Apart from the realm of cognition, the metaphor of the source also applies to legitimacy. If a piece of information has a source, it is (...)
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  10. On Theory-Centrism: The "Literary Theory" Void of Literature.Zhang Jiang - 2020 - Philosophy and Literature 44 (1):88-104.
    From the end of the nineteenth century to the late twentieth century, the development of Western literary theory witnessed three important stages: from "author oriented," to "text oriented," and then to "reader oriented." Each of these three historical stages generated several important theories and schools, each with its own advantages, with infiltration and cross-thematic debates from time to time. However, we can now form the judgment that, after one hundred years of development and evolution, the overall pattern of Western literary (...)
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  11. Introduction.Wang Ning - 2020 - Philosophy and Literature 44 (1):80-87.
    As literary scholars, we are often puzzled by these questions raised from among the reading public: What is the meaning of this literary work? How does the author express his/her intention to portray the characters or narrate the story? How shall we as literary critics interpret the meaning of the literary work? Can a certain literary work have only one meaning? Obviously this is not the case. In order to answer the above questions, we present this special cluster of articles (...)
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  12. Textual Meaning in the Complex System of Literature.Zhou Xian - 2020 - Philosophy and Literature 44 (1):105-123.
    One of the most disputed issues in twentieth-century literary theories and critical studies is what literary textual meaning rests upon. A further question is whether textual meaning is ascertainable or not. The two questions are interrelated. The first one looks into the origin of textual meaning in literary texts: is it derived from authorial intent, or from sentences and rhetorical devices, or actualized in the process of readerly activities and critical interpretation? As John Searle sees it, three theories focused on (...)
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  13. Literature, the Emotions, and Learning.Noël Carroll - 2020 - Philosophy and Literature 44 (1):1-18.
    The subject of this essay is the way in which literature, by engaging our emotions, contributes to our emotional intelligence. In reading works of literature, we are almost constantly called upon—or mandated—to mobilize our emotions in the process of understanding the text. In this way, the literary text ineludibly guides us through a rehearsal of the pertinent portions of our affective repertoire.For example, we do not fully understand Iago unless we despise him, nor do we understand Dorothea Brooke adequately without (...)
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  14. Reading and Seeing: The Artistic Use of Visual Features in Contemporary Novels.Bradley Elicker - 2020 - Philosophy and Literature 44 (1):19-34.
    On reading Irvine Welsh's novel Filth for the first time, I quickly noticed that something was amiss. I followed the apparent food poisoning of amoral Detective Sergeant Bruce Robertson all the way down page twenty-three. Then, as I turned the page, something entirely unexpected happened. The text became obscured by what appeared to be the black outlines of intestines. What's more, though Robertson's first-person account of his own illness was obscured, a new narrative voice appeared within the intestines: "I am (...)
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  15. The Rules and Politics of Storyworlds: Fictionalizing the Everyday in E. F. Benson's Mapp and Lucia Novels.James Phillips - 2020 - Philosophy and Literature 44 (1):52-65.
    Astory is an instruction manual of sorts, containing rules for the manufacture of fictional objects. Consider the opening sentence from E. F. Benson's Mapp and Lucia: "Though it was nearly a year since her husband's death, Emmeline Lucas still wore the deepest and most uncompromising mourning."1 As the sentence does not describe someone who exists, it does not press a truth claim that could be substantiated by observing the person in question. Instead, it is an invitation to construction: the reader (...)
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  16. Brancusi's Golden Bird and Loy's "Brancusi's Golden Bird": A Spinozist Encounter.Christopher Thomas - 2020 - Philosophy and Literature 44 (1):66-79.
    While the work of Benedict de Spinoza has been a source of inspiration and curiosity for a variety of literary and artistic figures,1 his grounding philosophical principles are often cited as a hindrance for a productive engagement with art and art theory. Certain commentators cite Spinoza's "naturalism" and "rationalism" as reasons for his philosophy's "hostility" to art and culture.2 But these criticisms only prevail if: one holds that works of art and literature ought to have an ontological ground other than (...)
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  17. Freud on the Uncanny: A Tale of Two Theories.Mark Windsor - 2020 - Philosophy and Literature 44 (1):35-51.
    Since its publication nearly a century ago, Freud's essay on the uncanny has attracted much attention in the humanities, and has become a key point of reference for many discussions of literature and art.1 In spite of this, Freud's essay is often poorly understood. Freud's theory of the uncanny is typically referred to in the literature as the "return of the repressed." Indeed, at one point in the essay, Freud does define the uncanny as "something which is secretly familiar … (...)
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  18. Kan böcker vara moraliska eller omoraliska?Marco Tiozzo - 2011 - Filosofisk Tidskrift 32 (4).
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  19. Philosophical Art History: David Carrier's Method.Richard Kuhns - 1998 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 32 (4):27.
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  20. One Could Say: "There but for the Grace of God..E. F. Kaelin - 1998 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 32 (1):65.
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  21. Sparshott and the Philosophy of Philosophy.Roger A. Shiner - 1997 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 31 (2):3.
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  22. Reader Response and the Act of Reading: Seven Studies in Review.W. John Harker - 1994 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 28 (4):67.
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  23. What's It All About? The Critical Method of Analysis as Applied to Drama.Donald L. Cleary - 1991 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 25 (2):89.
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  24. Interpretation and the Implied Author: A Descriptive Project.Szu-Yen Lin - 2018 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 56 (1):83-100.
    The utterance model is a popular basis for theories of interpretation in the contemporary analytic philosophy of literature. This model suggests that interpretation should be constrained by a work's identity‐relevant factors in its context of production because a work, like an utterance, acquires its identity and content in part from its relations with that context. From a descriptive point of view, I argue that the implied author account of interpretation best describes critical practice following the current positions based on the (...)
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  25. Intimations of Immortality.Peter Fifield & Matthew Broome - 2012 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 19 (2):141-144.
    Young’s paper (2012) offers an interesting and fruitful extension to recent work on Cotard’s syndrome, and in particular, a philosophical investigation of how and why beliefs around death and non-existence frequently co-occur with beliefs around immortality. In this brief response, we discuss a few issues from the paper. Namely, the issue of Cotard delusion being a natural kind, the seeming paradox of death and immortality and its relation to wider culture and literature, and the utility of the concept of misplaced (...)
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  26. Strangers in a Strange Land: Wittgenstein, Flies, Us Too.William Eaton - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 41 (2):233-249.
    Overview. It has been said that the roots of one of the British psychoanalyst Wilfred Bion’s theories about the experiences of infants may be found in Bion’s experiences as a soldier in the trenches of the First World War. That is, that experience gave him insight, right or wrong, into challenges infants face. Similarly, this paper will connect with Ludwig Wittgenstein’s philosophy how, in his childhood home, both his life and his autonomy were threatened, and how this led him to (...)
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  27. The Role of the Arts in Male Courtship Display: Billy Collins's "Serenade".Judith P. Saunders - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 41 (2):264-271.
    Research in the field of evolutionary psychology underlines the importance of masculine display in the mate-selection process. Men seek opportunities to exhibit qualities women find desirable; hence they invite inspection of their resources and status, their physical and mental prowess. They also advertise specialized skills and abilities, including artistic performance and creativity. Men seeking to impress potential mates hope to benefit not only from displaying survival-oriented skills as toolmakers or hunters but also from publishing adeptness in less utilitarian realms such (...)
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  28. Abhinavabhāratī. Abhinavagupta - 2006 - In M. M. Ghosh (ed.), Nāṭyaśāstra of Bharatamuni: Text, Commentary of Abhinava Bharati by Abhinavaguptacarya and English Translation. Delhi: New Bharatiya Book Corporation.
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  29. Utopian Performatives and the Social Imaginary: Toward a New Philosophy of Drama/Theater Education.Monica Prendergast - 2011 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 45 (1):58.
    Philosophy is not a theory but an activity. My interest in aesthetic philosophy and performance theory has offered me the opportunity to engage with the recent work of political philosopher Charles Taylor and performance theorist Jill Dolan.2 As I read these studies, I see interesting and potentially useful contributions to be drawn from their philosophical investigations toward the beginning moments of a new philosophy of drama education that is rooted in the collective creation of socially imagined performative utopias. It is (...)
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  30. Borges Scoops Gettier.M. DeVries Scott - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 41 (1A):288-302.
    In 1963, Edmund Gettier wrote a short paper that appeared in the journal Analysis where he demonstrated that justified, true belief defined as knowledge does not obtain. Formally, the argument is that it is not the case that: S knows that P iff P is true, S believes that P, and S is justified in believing that P.1 S knows that P iffP is true,S believes that P, andS is justified in believing that P.1The critique of the definition has to (...)
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  31. Borges's Love Affair with Heraclitus.J. H. Lesher - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 41 (1A):303-314.
    In an early poem, "Year's End", Jorge Luis Borges takes the turning of the year as an occasion to consider how "something in us" endures, despite the fact that we are products of "infinite random possibilities" and "droplets in the stream of Heraclitus": It is not the emblematic detail of replacing a two with a three, nor that barren metaphor that brings together a time that dies and another coming up nor yet the rounding out of some astronomical process that (...)
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  32. Prologues and the Idols of Criticism: Borges on Ficciones.Nicholas D. More - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 41 (1A):272-287.
    Scholars still struggle to characterize, evaluate, and understand the mesmerizing prose pieces of Ficciones that raised Jorge Luis Borges to the first ranks of literary fame. Speaking to Philosophy and Literature, Borges once described his work as "the fiction of philosophy," and the two prologues he wrote for Ficciones leave enticing clues about what this means in practice. I argue that these long-neglected prologues open critical space for Ficciones, slyly mocking three idols of literary cant: that genre informs a work, (...)
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  33. Borges and Levinas Face-to-Face: Writing and the Riddle of Subjectivity.Shlomy Mualem - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 41 (1A):315-343.
    One fine day, Hermann Sörgel receives the complete memory of William Shakespeare. A scholar who has devoted his life to studying the bard's works, the professor understands that he has been given a priceless treasure. With the key to understanding the poet's consciousness in his hand, he will be able to perfectly interpret all his writings. Gradually, Shakespeare's memories are being absorbed into his mind. He is surprised to realize, however, that possession of the bard's memory has only given him (...)
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  34. On Sincere Apologies: Saying "Sorry" in Hamlet.Escobedo Andrew - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 41 (1A):155-177.
    Consider two infelicitous apologies from modern American public life. The first comes from the former boxer Mike Tyson, who in 1997 bit off part of his opponent Evander Holyfield's ear in a match. He offered a public apology shortly thereafter: "Evander, I am sorry. You are a champion and I respect that. I am only saddened that this fight did not go further so that the boxing fans of the world might see for themselves who would come out on top. (...)
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  35. Thinking About Judgment with Shakespeare.Robert B. Pierce - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 41 (1A):142-154.
    What sort of thing is judgment?1 Looking at the sense of "judgment" as a human capacity as opposed to the result of exercising that capacity, whether in ordinary behavior or in some legal or political framework, I intend to offer a definition proposal for the term and then to discuss how judgment so defined operates in human behavior, what constitutes good judgment, whether it can be cultivated, and, if so, how. The example I will focus on is drawn from Shakespeare's (...)
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  36. Art World: Grudger, Sucker, Cheat.Christopher Perricone - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 41 (1):31-44.
    A picture lives by companionship.In Art as Experience, John Dewey is clear that art, like life, goes on in an environment—or, more emphatically, art, like life, goes on "not merely in it but because of it, through interaction with it.... The career and destiny of a living being are bound up with its interchange with its environment, not externally but in the most intimate way."2 Later, Dewey says: "The word 'esthetic' refers, as we have already noted, to experience as appreciative, (...)
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  37. 文人维特根斯坦.John Gibson & Wolfgang Huemer (eds.) - 2008 - Sanhui.
    Translation of _The Literary Wittgenstein_ (ed. by John Gibson and Wolfgang Huemer, London: Routledge, 2004). Simplified Chinese. ISBN 978-7-80762-896-5.
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  38. 导论:维特根斯坦.语言与文学哲学.Wolfgang Andreas Huemer - 2008 - In John Gibson & Wolfgang Andreas Huemer (eds.), 文人维特根斯坦. Shanghai: Sanhui. pp. 1-18.
  39. Oedipus the Tyrant: A View of Catharsis in Eight Sentences.Glassberg Roy - 2016 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (2):579-580.
    The following is an attempt at something new, an experiment in micro-criticism that proposes to solve the conundrum of Aristotelian catharsis in fewer than two hundred words. Reference is made to Oedipus Tyrannus.According to Aristotle, the catharsis of pity and fear is a primary goal of tragedy.1Pity is a response to “unmerited misfortune”.Fear depends upon pity—with the spectator fearing that he, too, may be subject to unmerited misfortune.Unmerited misfortune is an abomination, a condition suggestive of a defective moral order.Aristotle regards (...)
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  40. Six Scenes of Instruction in Stanley Cavell's Little Did I Know.Peter Dula - 2016 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (2):465-479.
    Stanley Cavell ends his autobiography with a long stretch of dialogue at his elderly, ailing father’s hospital bedside. His father, we know from the memoir’s earliest and most powerful pages, could be a brutish man, prone to unaccountable rages, permanently scarring the child Cavell. Because of the central role the father plays in beginning the story, Cavell’s decision to return to his father at the end demands close attention. The reader arriving at the final pages, still haunted by the way (...)
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  41. Lateness and the Inhospitable in Stanley Cavell and Don DeLillo.Áine Mahon & Fergal McHugh - 2016 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (2):446-464.
    Theodor Adorno’s “Late Style in Beethoven” is the first philosophically sophisticated attempt to chronicle, if not fully characterize, movements of the mature artwork. With direct reference to Beethoven’s third and final phase, Adorno offers a complex formulation of aging and artistry. He attempts to capture, ambitiously, the content and internal structure of the late artwork, the forms to which that internal structure is responsible, the artistic conventions governing that structure, the sociohistorical conditions in which the work was produced and, finally, (...)
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  42. Kantian Anti-Theodicy and Job's Sincerity.Sari Kivistö & Sami Pihlström - 2016 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (2):347-365.
    This essay is based on a double perspective provided by literary reading and philosophy for approaching the problem of evil through a critical analysis of certain texts and characters constructed and represented in them, particularly Kant’s theodicy essay and its most important pre-text, the Book of Job. This methodology yields a novel approach to the familiar issue of theodicy vs. anti-theodicy. Our methodology differs from the more standard ways of examining philosophical ideas expressed in literature. In the case discussed here, (...)
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  43. Le Temple du Go Ut.Elie Voltaire & France) Carcassonne - 1938 - Droz Giard.
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  44. Literary Universals and the Sciences of the Mind.Jonathan Gottschall - 2004 - Philosophy and Literature 28 (1):202.
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  45. John "Kekes's Moral Tradition and Individuality".Richard Eldridge - 1990 - Philosophy and Literature 14 (2):387.
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  46. Jacques Derrida's "the Ear of the Other: Otobiography, Transference, Translation".E. Warwick Slinn - 1990 - Philosophy and Literature 14 (2):379.
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  47. In Defense of Sentimentality.Robert C. Solomon - 1990 - Philosophy and Literature 14 (2):304.
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  48. Mallarme Contra Wagner. E. Gans - 2001 - Philosophy and Literature 25 (1):14-30.
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  49. In Defense of Trimming. E. Goodheart - 2001 - Philosophy and Literature 25 (1):46-58.
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  50. The Fortunes of Avant-Garde Poetry.M. A. O. Neil - 2001 - Philosophy and Literature 25 (1):142-154.
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1 — 50 / 13386