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  1. On the Work of Recollection in the Theater and for the Dead.Timothy Stock - 2017 - In Kierkegaard und das Theater. Tübingen, Germany:
    Recollection is a central component of Kierkegaard’s dramaturgical aesthetics, as it is recollection that allows for the actor and audience to accomplish continuity between the past and present, and, crucially, the private and the public. This continuity is accomplished imaginatively, wherein an actor or a poet seeks to elicit mood and establish an interpersonal dimension to inwardness, hence allowing the act of recollection to have both existential and social significance. My task is to articulate this aspect of his dramaturgical aesthetics (...)
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  2. The Murder of Professor Schlick: The Rise and Fall of the Vienna Circle by David Edmonds.David Herman - 2022 - Philosophy and Literature 46 (1):248-250.
    The main title and subtitle of this well-researched, lucidly written, and engaging book reflect the author's double-sided approach. On the one hand, David Edmonds uses individual life stories as a route of access to key philosophical, political, and sociocultural issues and trends in the first half of the twentieth century. On the other hand, in chronicling the broader history of the origins, aims, and legacy of the Vienna Circle, he shows how individual lives were caught up in—and shaped by—the group's (...)
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  3. Giving Way: Thoughts on Unappreciated Dispositions by Steven Connor.Rick de Villiers - 2022 - Philosophy and Literature 46 (1):244-247.
    In "Who the Meek Are Not," poet Mary Karr thinks it unlikely that peasants, serfs, and the socially low will inherit the earth. Puzzling out that beatitude, she instead conjures the image of "a great stallion at full gallop / in a meadow, who—/at his master's voice—seizes up to a stunned / but instant halt."1 We are then invited to picture his muscles rippling even when at rest, to see in that rippling an immense power purposely held back. Blessed are (...)
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  4. Analytic Philosophy and the World of the Play by Michael Y. Bennett.Brice Ezell - 2022 - Philosophy and Literature 46 (1):241-243.
    There is no better time than the present to be studying the intersections of drama, theater, and philosophy. Since 2000, numerous monographs have been published on the interrelation between those subjects, and organizations such as the Performance Philosophy Network continue to promote innovative research by theater professionals and academics alike. However, a lacuna remains in this bustling scholarly enterprise. This scholarship, by and large, tends to draw from either ancient philosophy or from Continental European thought. As is often the case (...)
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  5. Machiavelli, Philosopher and Playwright.Roy Glassberg - 2022 - Philosophy and Literature 46 (1):238-240.
    In his Epistle to the Pisos, Horace advises aspiring playwrights to use their work to teach and delight,1 a dictum that has resonated down through the ages and has been referred to as the "Horatian platitude."2 In the preface to his comedy Clizia, Niccolò Machiavelli echoes Horace: "Comedies were discovered in order to benefit and to delight the spectators. Truly it is a great benefit to any man, and especially to a youth, to know the avarice of an old man, (...)
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  6. "Money for Which My Buttocks Had Labored so Vigorously": John Locke and Sexual Labor in The London Jilt.Yoojung Choi - 2022 - Philosophy and Literature 46 (1):223-237.
  7. The Virtue of Erotic Curiosity.Rachel Aumiller - 2022 - Philosophy and Literature 46 (1):208-222.
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  8. Narration, Lying, and the Orienting Response.David Lehner - 2022 - Philosophy and Literature 46 (1):181-194.
    What is the orienting response, and what does it have to do with narrative? How is narrative related to lying? And what is the motive force of narrative? What we shall see is that the mental activity of writers creating fictions, readers reading them, liars fashioning lies, and listeners when they detect a lie, all share distinct and significant cognitive functions in common.
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  9. Don't Lie to Me About Fictional Characters: Meinongian Incomplete Objects to the Rescue of Truth in Fiction.Vera Albrecht - 2022 - Philosophy and Literature 46 (1):162-180.
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  10. Don't Feed the Liars! On Fraudulent Memoirs, and Why They're Bad.Joshua Landy - 2022 - Philosophy and Literature 46 (1):137-161.
    For me, this all began with a conversation about James Frey. You know James Frey: he's the chap who went on Oprah with a memoir about his life as an alcoholic, then ended up having to go back on Oprah to get ripped into, well, a million little pieces for having made a bunch of it up. In thinking his book a calamitous thing to happen to the world of letters, I didn't imagine I was being particularly original or controversial. (...)
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  11. Divination and Correlative Thinking: Origins of an Aesthetic in the Book of Changes and Book of Songs.Ming Dong Gu - 2022 - Philosophy and Literature 46 (1):120-136.
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  12. Why Do Philosophers Neglect the Short Story?Aaron Meskin - 2022 - Philosophy and Literature 46 (1):100-119.
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  13. Agency, Luck, and Tragedy.Charles Nussbaum - 2022 - Philosophy and Literature 46 (1):68-85.
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  14. From Heideggerian Dasein to Melvillean Masquerade: Historiology and Imaginative Excursion in Philip Roth's The Facts.James Duban - 2022 - Philosophy and Literature 46 (1):54-67.
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  15. Shakespeare Faciebat: Non-Finito Aesthetics in Timon of Athens.Marinela Golemi - 2022 - Philosophy and Literature 46 (1):38-53.
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  16. Flann O'Brien, Wittgenstein, and the Idling of Language.Andrew Gaedtke - 2022 - Philosophy and Literature 46 (1):22-37.
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  17. On Wittgenstein, Lydia Davis, and Other Uncanny Grammarians.Ben Roth - 2022 - Philosophy and Literature 46 (1):1-21.
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  18. 'Borges' Love Affair with Heraclitus'.James Lesher - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 41:303-314.
    References to Heraclitus and the simile of the ever-flowing river into which one cannot step twice occur frequently in the poetry of Jorge Luis Borges. Borges understood the constantly flowing river to represent both the inevitable passage of time and the constantly changing nature of human existence. On occasion, however, Borges indicates that a Heraclitean identification of our personal existence with an ever-flowing river cannot be the whole story. As he suggests in ‘Year’s End’, ‘There is something in us that (...)
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  19. MacNeice the Heraclitean.James Lesher - 2021 - Philosophy and Literature 45 (2):315-328.
    Many of the poems of Louis MacNeice display a knowledge of the philosophical theories he studied during his undergraduate years in Oxford. In his ‘Variation on Heraclitus’ and in several other poems, MacNeice alludes to the ‘doctrine of flux’ Plato attributed to the Greek thinker Heraclitus of Ephesus. In ‘Plurality’, his most extended exploration of the conflict between the life-affirming doctrine of flux and a life-suppressing monism, MacNeice embraces the reality of change and rejects the monism he credits to the (...)
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  20. ‘Odysseás Elytis’ Conversation with Heraclitus: “Of Ephesus”,.James Lesher - 2020 - Philosophy and Literature 44:226-236.
    ‘Of Ephesus’ begins with a series of vivid impressions of a wild and free nature—vineyards rolling across the landscape, an untrammeled sky, a runaway donkey, flaming pinecones, roosters, and colorful kites and flags. Fire in some form (wildfires, the sun, flames, torches, lightning, sunlight) is the hallmark of a dynamic reality. The reference to ‘St. Heraclitus’ supports this interpretation: Elytis, like Heraclitus, seeks to alert his audience to the possible existence of a higher realm of being. So he fashions a (...)
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  21. Moral Education Through Literary Aesthetic Experience: A Moral Study of the Harry Potter Series.Nirbhay Kumar Mishra & Rupkatha Ghosh - 2022 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 56 (2):101-119.
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  22. Learning to Read: A Problem for Adam Smith and a Solution From Jane Austen.Lauren Kopajtic - 2022 - In Fictional Worlds and Philosophical Reflection. pp. 49-78.
    What might Adam Smith have learned from Jane Austen and other novelists of his moment? This paper finds and examines a serious problem at the center of Adam Smith’s moral psychology, stemming from an unacknowledged tension between the effort of the spectator to sympathize with the feelings of the agent and that of the agent to moderate her feelings. The agent’s efforts will result in her opacity to spectators, blocking their attempts to read her emotions. I argue that we can (...)
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  23. Weather.Travis Holloway - 2022 - The Philosopher 1 (110):62-66.
    Strange weather is one of the growing ways human beings experience climate change phenomenologically or beyond abstract scientific data. Even those who do not “believe” in climate change experience it. Odd weather is also one of first things human beings talk about with one another or share, today and at least since the great flood in the Epic of Gilgamesh. This article considers how increasingly violent weather is ushering in a new type of narrative and art and announcing a new (...)
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  24. Montaigne's Perfect Friendship and Perfect Society: Philosophical Fictions as Useful Reminders.Christopher Edelman - 2021 - Philosophy and Literature 45 (2):367-382.
    Montaigne’s “Of friendship” is often read as a celebration of his relationship with his late friend, Étienne La Boétie. This is not wrong, but rather, incomplete. Drawing on the chapters of Montaigne’s Essays that immediately follow “Of friendship,” this essay argues that Montaigne’s chapter on friendship is part of a larger project in which he employs philosophical fictions—specifically, his “perfect friendship” with La Boétie and the “perfect society” that he depicts in “Of cannibals”—to reorient us in our relationships not only (...)
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  25. Upbringing and Agency: Three Perspectives.Stewart Justman - 2021 - Philosophy and Literature 45 (2):348-366.
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  26. From the Margin a Silent Tick: On the Traces of Performative Judgment in Literary Works.Paul Magee - 2021 - Philosophy and Literature 45 (2):329-347.
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  27. Jealousy and the Sense of Self: Unamuno and the Contemporary Philosophy of Emotion.Íngrid Vendrell Ferran - 2021 - Philosophy and Literature 45 (2):295-314.
  28. MacNeice the Heraclitean.J. H. Lesher - 2021 - Philosophy and Literature 45 (2):315-328.
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  29. Making Sense of Suffering: Merleau-Ponty and Keats's "Vale of Soul-Making".David Lo - 2021 - Philosophy and Literature 45 (2):279-294.
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  30. German Romantic Philosophy: "Underhand Theology"?Theodore Ziolkowski - 2021 - Philosophy and Literature 45 (2):269-278.
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  31. The Logic of Sentiment: Stowe, Hawthorne, and Melville by Kenneth Dauber.Russell Sbriglia - 2021 - Philosophy and Literature 45 (2):499-505.
    As a work of philosophically grounded literary criticism in the tradition of Stanley Cavell's ordinary language philosophy, Kenneth Dauber's The Logic of Sentiment: Stowe, Hawthorne, and Melville will be an altogether welcomed book among those for whom it is more instructive to think sentimentality alongside literary authors than to merely historicize—to "archeologize" or "genealogize"—it from an all-too-safe critical distance. Though primarily a book on sentiment, its theoretical through line is to think skepticism outside of the epistemological, to think it in (...)
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  32. On Having Three Names.Bruce B. Suttle - 2021 - Philosophy and Literature 45 (2):496-498.
    This morning, as I ate breakfast, I started David Foster Wallace's short story "Good People."1 I began. … Wait a minute! Damn it! Why not Wallace's, or David Wallace's short story? I've never seen nor heard his name other than as a trio; the same is so with others, such as Louisa May Alcott, William Carlos Williams, Joyce Carol Oates, Robert Louis Stevenson, Katherine Anne Porter, et al. One finds it even in operas—for example, in Giacomo Puccini's Turandot we have (...)
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  33. Wittgenstein and Dostoevsky: Happiness and Subjectivity.Piotr Dehnel - 2021 - Philosophy and Literature 45 (2):470-488.
  34. In Defense of Abstract Creationism: A Recombinatorial Approach.Michael Y. Bennett - 2021 - Philosophy and Literature 45 (2):489-495.
    As a version of creationism—which claims that fictional charac- ters are created by authors who write characters into existence by penning their names in their works—abstract creationism claims that fictional objects are abstract entities. However, I want to modify the conception of what constitutes a fictional object. In short, I am going to give a defense of abstract creationism that offers answers to the questions, as outlined by Stuart Brock, of ontology, identity, and plenitude by developing a claim that—except for (...)
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  35. Even Better Than the Real Thing: Dostoevsky's Absurd Realism.Aaron Closson - 2021 - Philosophy and Literature 45 (2):463-469.
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  36. To Live a Meaningful Life: Reading Mary Shelley's Frankenstein Through Heideggerian Techne.Tara Cuthbertson - 2021 - Philosophy and Literature 45 (2):447-462.
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  37. "Deus in Animo": Kantian Ugliness and the Narrative Aesthetic of Frankenstein.Karen Hadley - 2021 - Philosophy and Literature 45 (2):435-446.
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  38. Frankenstein, the Frankfurt School, and the Domination of Nature.Sid Simpson - 2021 - Philosophy and Literature 45 (2):416-434.
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  39. Of "Just Compassion": Sympathy, Justice, and the French Exiles in Charlotte Smith's The Emigrants.Shiqin Chen - 2021 - Philosophy and Literature 45 (2):383-396.
  40. Thoreau's "Life Without Principle" and the Art of Living and Getting a Living.David B. Raymond - 2021 - Philosophy and Literature 45 (2):397-415.
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  41. Entrevista al doctor Wilfredo Penco. “No hay elemento más político que la lengua. Sin esta, es evidente que la política no sería concebible”.Jesús Miguel Delgado Del Aguila - 2022 - Aularia. Revista Digital de Educomunicación 11 (1):97-100.
    La entrevista realizada al doctor Wilfredo Penco indaga acerca de las constantes confrontaciones que existen en las disciplinas de la Literatura y la política; sobre todo, en el tema del compromiso del autor con su respectiva sociedad. En ese sentido, las respuestas que se obtendrán partirán de dos referentes esenciales: los sucesos históricos y los casos particulares que se han apreciado en el ámbito académico, en la que los intelectuales y los escritores cumplen un rol determinante. Uno de los interrogantes (...)
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  42. Panorama del teatro peruano contemporáneo. Entrevista a César Ernesto Arenas Ulloa.Jesús Miguel Delgado Del Aguila - 2021 - Argus-A. Artes and Humanidades (42):1-15.
    César Ernesto Arenas Ulloa nació el 15 de septiembre de 1988 en Chiclayo (Lambayeque, Perú). Realizó estudios literarios en la Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, hasta obtener el grado de licenciado. En el 2012, obtuvo un reconocimiento académico por ocupar el primer puesto a nivel de toda la escuela de Literatura. En el 2018, presentó su tesis titulada Autonomía y especificidad de la obra dramática: una lectura semiológica de El sistema Solar de Mariana de Althaus. Asimismo, tiene intereses en (...)
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  43. A Philosophy of First Contact: Stanisław Lem and the Myth of Cognitive Universality.Massimiliano Simons - 2021 - Pro-Fil: An Internet Journal of Philosophy 3 (22):65-77.
    Within science fiction the topic of ‘first contact’ is a popular theme. How will an encounter with aliens unfold? Will we succeed in communicating with them? Although such questions are present in the background of many science fiction novels, they are not always explicitly dealt with and even if so, often in a poor way. In this article, I will introduce a typology of five dominant types of solutions to the problem of first contact in science fiction works. The first (...)
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  44. Camus and Sartre on the Absurd.Hannah H. Kim - 2021 - Philosophers' Imprint 21 (32).
    In this paper, I highlight the philosophical differences between Camus’s and Sartre’s notions of the absurd. “The absurd” is a technical term for both philosophers, and they mean different things by it. The Camusian absurd is a mismatch between theoretical reasoning and practical reasoning. The Sartrean absurd, in contrast, is our theoretical inability to explain contingency or existence. For Sartre, there is only relative, local absurdity; for Camus, the absurd is universal and absolute. I show how their different understandings of (...)
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  45. Philosophy, Literature and Understanding: On Reading and Cognition (Book Review). [REVIEW]Christopher Earley - forthcoming - British Journal of Aesthetics 62 (2).
    A review of Jukka Mikkonen's 'Philosophy, literature and understanding: On reading and cognition' (2021).
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  46. Dilection: On the Phenomenology of Child Drawing and the Genesis of Poetic Expression.Thomas Gould - 2021 - Substance 50 (3):162-183.
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  47. From 'Pathetic Fallacy' to Affective Attunement: Reading Virgil's Eclogues Through the Lens of Material Ecocriticism.Stefano Rozzoni - 2021 - Substance 50 (3):115-132.
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  48. What is It Not Like to Be a Skylark? Apophatic Form in Nature Writing.Cord-Christian Casper - 2021 - Substance 50 (3):93-114.
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  49. Introduction: Ecocriticism and Narrative Form.Liza B. Bauer, Cord-Christian Casper, Hannah Klaubert & Anna Sophia Tabouratzidis - 2021 - Substance 50 (3):3-13.
    Narrative has proven itself a continuous as well as adaptable means for environmentally oriented expression. Its role goes beyond the mediation of pre-existing knowledge imported into the realm of storytelling from other domains; rather, influential models of the natural world tend to circulate as storyworlds. This special issue of SubStance proceeds from the premise that narratives are not only a sequence of signs encoding a story but also “invisible, elusive representations that exist only in the mind”. Narrative forms generate and (...)
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  50. Ulisse Dogà, “Port Bou – deutsch?” Paul Celan liest Walter Benjamin (Rimbaud Verlag, Aachen 2009). [REVIEW]Johannes Steizinger - 2010 - International Walter Benjamin Society.
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