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  1. Sounding the Virtual: Gilles Deleuze and the Theory and Philosophy of Music.Nick Nesbitt & Brian Hulse - 2010 - Routledge.
    Brian Hulse is Associate Professor of Music at the College of William and Mary, USA. Nick Nesbitt is Professor of French at Princeton University, USA.
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  2. Methodological Worries on Recent Experimental Philosophy of Music.Nemesio García-Carril Puy - 2022 - Philosophical Psychology 35 (3):410-441.
  3. The Heart of Classical Work-Performance.Andrew Kania - 2022 - British Journal of Aesthetics 62 (1):125-141.
    In this critical study of Julian Dodd’s Being True to Works of Music, I argue that the three-tier normative profile of the work-performance tradition in classical music that Dodd defends should be rejected in favour of a two-tier version. I also argue that the theory of work-performance defended in the book fits much more naturally with a contextualist ontology of musical works than with the Platonist ontology Dodd defends in Works of Music, despite his arguments to the contrary in the (...)
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  4. Music as Misdirection.Jason Leddington - forthcoming - In Jake Johnson (ed.), Viva Las Vegas: Music and Myth in America's City of Second Chances. Champaign, IL, USA:
    Magic and Vegas have a lot in common. Both have a reputation for bad taste and cheap thrills, and they’ve both generally been ignored—or at best ridiculed—by the art-critical establishment. It’s fitting, then, that no city loves magic like Vegas loves magic. Today, more than one-third of its top-selling shows feature magic, and this means that no complete treatment of art and entertainment in Sin City can afford to ignore it. But what’s at risk here is more than theoretical completeness. (...)
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  5. Immaterial: Rules in Contemporary Art.Sherri Irvin - 2022 - Oxford University Press.
    Contemporary art can seem chaotic: it may be made of toilet paper, candies you can eat, or meat that is thrown out after each exhibition. Some works fill a room with obsessively fabricated objects, while others purport to include only concepts, thoughts, or language. Immaterial argues that, despite these unruly appearances, making rules is a key part of what many contemporary artists do when they make their works, and these rules can explain disparate developments in installation art, conceptual art, time-based (...)
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  6. On the Value of Sad Music.Mario Attie-Picker, Tara Venkatesan, George E. Newman & Joshua Knobe - manuscript
    Many people appear to attach great value to sad music. But why? One way to gain insight into this question is to turn away from music and look instead at why people value sad conversations. In the case of conversations, the answer seems to be that expressing sadness creates a sense of genuine connection. We propose that sad music can also have this type of value. Listening to a sad song can give one a sense of genuine connection. We then (...)
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  7. John Cage, Henry David Thoreau, Wild Nature, Humility, and Music.Andrew J. Corsa - 2021 - Environmental Ethics 43 (3):219-234.
    John Cage and Henry David Thoreau draw attention to the indeterminacy of wild nature and imply humans cannot entirely control the natural world. This paper argues Cage and Thoreau each encourages his audience to recognize their own human limitations in relation to wildness, and thus each helps his audience to develop greater humility before nature. By reflecting on how Thoreau’s theory relates to Cage’s music, we can recognize how Cage’s music contributes to audiences’ environmental moral education. We can appreciate the (...)
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  8. Deleuze's 'Difference and Repetition -Irfan Ajvazi.Irfan Ajvazi - 2021 - Idea Books.
    Deleuze's 'Difference and Repetition -Irfan Ajvazi.
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  9. Carol Harrison, Augustine on Music, Sense, Affect and Voice (Reading Augustine). [REVIEW]Erik Kenyon - 2020 - Theology 123:225-227.
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  10. German Idealism and the Philosophy of Music.Roger Scruton - 2018 - Disputatio 7 (8).
    German Idealism began with Leibniz and lasted until Schopenhauer, with a few central European after-shocks in the work of Husserl and his followers. That great epoch in German philosophy coincided with a great epoch in German music. It is scarcely surprising, therefore, that Idealist philosophers should have paid special attention to this art form. Looking back on it, is there anything of this prolonged encounter between music and philosophy that we can consider to be a real advance, and one that (...)
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  11. Sonic Obstacles and Conceptual Nostalgia: Preliminary Considerations on Musical Conceptualism and Contemporary Art.Iain Campbell - 2021 - Philosophical Inquiries 9 (2):111-132.
    This paper is concerned with the aesthetic and discursive gap between music and contemporary art, and the recent attempts to remedy this in the field of New Music through a notion of “New Conceptualism.” It examines why, despite musical sources being central to the emergence of conceptual artistic strategies in the 1950s and ’60s, the worlds of an increasingly transmedial “generic art” and music have remained largely distinct. While it takes New Music’s New Conceptualism as its focus, it argues that (...)
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  12. Kivy’s Mystery: Absolute Music and What the Formalist Can (or Could) Hear.Garry L. Hagberg - forthcoming - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism.
    Peter Kivy has said that the power of purely instrumental music remains an unexplained wonder. With this larger question in mind, I will consider: the issues in musical aesthetics that led to what Kivy termed his enhanced formalism, his conception of expressive properties in music and how a distinction between having and understanding an emotion can help clarify this issues here, and, most importantly for Kivy’s larger mystery, the way that counterpoint, in an often unrecognized way, can present mimetic content (...)
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  13. Two Kinds of “Bad” Musical Performance: Musical and Moral Mistakes.Justin London - forthcoming - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism.
    There are many ways in which a musical performance can be “bad,” but here the focus is on two: those performances that make you laugh, and those that make you angry. These forms of musical badness, however, are not primarily compositional deficits, but either that the performer simply cannot competently deliver the music to their audience, inducing laughter, or that the performer exhibits some form of disrespect, provoking anger. Such laughter or anger stems from failure of the expected relationship between (...)
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  14. The Case of (Digital) Wagner.Peter Kivy - forthcoming - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism.
    The article argues that the proposal to produce a digital Ring cycle was not just ethically and economically misguided, but aesthetically misguided as well. Orchestras produces performances, and the proposed digital Ring would not have produced genuine performances of the Ring operas. Nevertheless, a digital musical work might allow us to reconstruct, and in that way recover and gain access to, a full-fledged musical work.
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  15. KANIA, ANDREW. Philosophy of Western Music: A Contemporary Introduction.Jennifer Judkins - forthcoming - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism.
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  16. On Music, Sense, Affect and Voice by CarolHarrison (London: Bloomsbury, 2019), Iii + 172 Pp. [REVIEW]Jeremy Begbie - 2020 - Modern Theology 36 (2):434-436.
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  17. História da Música - Textos Breves.Juliano Gustavo Dos Santos Ozga - Julik - 2019 - Ouro Preto, MG, 35400-000, Brasil: J.G.S.Ozga Editor Independente.
    PREFÁCIO -/- A descoberta do ouro no interior de Minas Gerais, sobretudo em Vila Rica, atual cidade de Ouro Preto, desencadeou na formação de uma sociedade refinada. A febre pelo sonho dourado fez crescer o número de pessoas de diversas nações que migraram para lá em busca da riqueza.
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  18. Darwinizing the Philosophy of Music Education.Jeffrey Eric Robinson - unknown
    Thesis -University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, 2011.
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  19. The Emotional Illusion of Music: Contemporary Western Musical Aesthetics in Dialogue with Ancient Eastern Philosophy.Yin Zhang - 2021 - Dissertation, CUNY Graduate Center
    This project aims to examine whether music has an emotional nature. I use the ancient Chinese text Music Has No Grief or Joy to construct three arguments for the illusion view, according to which music has no emotional nature and the emotional appearances of music are illusory. These arguments highlight representational inconstancy, expressive incapability, and evocative underdetermination as three ways to problematize the idea that music has an emotional nature. I draw on the Confucian tradition to formulate three responses to (...)
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  20. What Does ‘New Wave’ Mean?Peter Groff - forthcoming - In Andrew Krivine (ed.), Reversing into the Future: New Wave Graphics. London, UK: Pavilion Books.
    A philosophical examination of 'new wave' as a musical genre, focusing on its developmental history and relation to punk as well as its unique ethos and aesthetic. Forthcoming 2021.
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  21. Music and Memory in Vernon Lee (Violet Paget) (1856-1935).Marina Trakas - 2019 - Encyclopedia of Concise Concepts by Women Philosophers.
    The relationship between music and memory is mainly developed in Music and Its Lovers (1932), a book where Lee presents interesting psychological and philosophical insights from the analysis of the responses made by 150 people to a questionnaire about the “expressive and emotional powers of music”. In this short encyclopedic entry, I present Lee's analysis of the many different ways in which musical experience depends on memory.
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  22. The Aesthetics of Country Music.John Dyck - 2021 - Philosophy Compass 16 (5):e12729.
    Country music has not gotten much attention in philosophy. I introduce two philosophical issues that country music raises. First, country music is simple. Some people might think that its simplicity makes country music worse; I argue that simplicity is aesthetically valuable. The second issue is country music’s ideal of authenticity; fans and performers think that country should be real or genuine in a particular way. But country music scholars have debunked the idea that country authenticity gets at anything real; widespread (...)
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  23. The Philosophy of Rhythm: Aesthetics, Music, Poetics. [REVIEW]Matteo Ravasio - 2021 - British Journal of Aesthetics 61 (2):262-269.
    The Philosophy of Rhythm: Aesthetics, Music, PoeticsCHEYNEPETER, HAMILTONANDY AND PADDISONMAX oup. 2020. pp. 432. £29.99.
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  24. Aesthetic Appreciation of Silence.Erik Anderson - 2020 - Contemporary Aesthetics 18.
    We enjoy sounds. What about silence: the absence of sound? Certainly not all, but surely many of us seek out, attend to, and appreciate silence. But, if nothing is there, then there is nothing to possess aesthetic qualities that might engage aesthetic interest or reward aesthetic attention. This is at least puzzling, perhaps even paradoxical. In this paper, I attempt to dispel the sense of paradox and provide a way to understand aesthetic appreciation of silence. I argue that silence can (...)
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  25. Blurred Lines: Ravasio on “Historically Informed Performance”.Julian Dodd - 2020 - Wiley: The Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 78 (1):85-90.
    The Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism, Volume 78, Issue 1, Page 85-90, Winter 2020.
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  26. The Semiotic Foundation of Ingarden’s Analysis of Music.Hélène Leblanc - 2020 - In N. A. Michna D. Czakon (ed.), Roman Ingarden and His Times. Varsovie, Pologne: pp. 173-190.
    Based on chapter 3 “The musical Work and its score” of Roman Ingarden’s The Work of Music and the Problem of its Identity, this paper examines the semiotic theory from which the Polish philosopher develops his analysis of music.
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  27. Culturally Sustaining Music Education and Epistemic Travel.Emily Good-Perkins - 2021 - Philosophy of Music Education Review 29 (1):47.
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  28. Six Fallacies Regarding the Question of Whether We Conceive of Practices as “Musical”.Franz Kasper Krönig - 2021 - Philosophy of Music Education Review 29 (1):102.
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  29. On the Usefulness of Nothingness: A Daoist-Inspired Philosophy of Music Education.Mengchen Lu & Leonard Tan - 2021 - Philosophy of Music Education Review 29 (1):88.
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  30. “Putting a Face on It”: The Trouble with Storytelling for Social Justice in Music Education.Juliet Hess - 2021 - Philosophy of Music Education Review 29 (1):67.
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  31. Language, Music, and Revitalizing Indigeneity: Effecting Cultural Restoration and Ecological Balance Via Music Education.Anita Prest & J. Scott Goble - 2021 - Philosophy of Music Education Review 29 (1):24.
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  32. Go Ask Alice: How is a Raven Like a Band Director?Mya Katherine Magnusson Scarlato - 2021 - Philosophy of Music Education Review 29 (1):4.
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  33. Crossmodal Aesthetics: How Music and Dance Can Match.Solveig Aasen - 2021 - Philosophical Quarterly 71 (2):223-240.
    The relationship between music and dance can sometimes be a ‘match’, a remarkable fit between the audible manifestation that music is and the visual or kinaesthetic manifestation that dance is. A match between two things seems to require a common measure with respect to which the match obtains. What can this be for two so different phenomena as music and dance? I argue that the most promising answer is: movement. This answer will not be satisfactory unless the movement of music (...)
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  34. Boosting Autobiographical Memory and the Sense of Identity of Alzheimer Patients Through Repeated Reminiscence Workshops?Hervé Platel, Marie-Loup Eustache, Renaud Coppalle, Armelle Viard, Francis Eustache, Mathilde Groussard & Béatrice Desgranges - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    Despite severe amnesia, some studies showed that Alzheimer Disease patients with moderate to severe dementia keep a consistent, but impoverished representation of themselves, showing preservation of the sense of identity even at severe stages of the illness. Some studies suggest that listening to music can facilitate the reminiscence of autobiographical memories and that stimulating autobiographical memory would be relevant to support the self of these patients. Consequently, we hypothesized that repeated participation to reminiscence workshops, using excerpts of familiar songs as (...)
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  35. Empathie in der Kunst.Íngrid Vendrell-Ferran - forthcoming - In Siegmund Judith (ed.), Handbuch Kunstphilosophie.
    Dieses Kapitel handelt von der Empathie in der Kunst. Ich beginne mit einer Reflexion über die Ursprünge des Begriffes und seine Verwendung in der Ästhetik. Es folgt eine Analyse der Empathie im Vergleich zu anderen Formen der Anteilnahme an Kunstwerken. Im dritten Teil untersuche ich die Mechanismen der Empathie in der Kunst und die Funktion der Imagination. Der vierte Teil widmet sich der Bedeutung der Gefühle bei der Empathie für Kunstfiguren. Schließlich thematisiere ich den epistemischen, moralischen und ästhetischen Wert der (...)
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  36. Historically Informed Performance: A Reply to DoddDiscussion.Matteo Ravasio - 2020 - Wiley: The Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 78 (1):90-94.
    The Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism, Volume 78, Issue 1, Page 90-94, Winter 2020.
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  37. Historically Informed Performance: A Reply to DoddDiscussion.Matteo Ravasio - 2020 - Wiley: The Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 78 (1):90-94.
    The Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism, Volume 78, Issue 1, Page 90-94, Winter 2020.
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  38. Sound’s Matter: ‘Deleuzian Sound Studies’ and the Problems of Sonic Materialism.Iain Campbell - 2020 - Contemporary Music Review 39 (5):618-637.
    This article evaluates the theoretical and practical grounds of recent debates around Christoph Cox’s realist project of a ‘sonic materialism’ by returning to Gilles Deleuze, a key theoretical resource for Cox. It argues that a close engagement with Deleuze’s work in fact challenges many of the precepts of Cox’s sonic materialism, and suggests a rethinking of materialism in the context of music. Turning to some aspects of Deleuze’s work neglected by Cox, the ‘realist’ ontological inquiry Cox affirms is challenged through (...)
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  39. Una nota sulla pragmatica musicale.Salvatore Pistoia-Reda - 2020 - de Musica 1 (24):173-178.
    In questa nota si fornisce un esempio preliminare di analisi pragmatica delle strutture musicali. Nell’analisi, la stipulazione di una pragmatica musicale segue strettamente recenti proposte presentate in ambito semantico, in cui si illustrano le potenziali virtù rappresentazionali delle strutture musicali. In particolare, in questa nota si suggerisce la presenza di strategie di ricostruzione dei significati musicali le quali intervengono a prevenire la realizzazione di contenuti semantici contraddittori. L’evidenza utilizzata è ricavata da alcune misure del madrigale primo del II libro dei (...)
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  40. Jazz as Critique: Adorno and Black Expression Revisited.James B. Haile - forthcoming - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism.
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  41. “Things Begin to Speak by Themselves”: Pierre Schaeffer’s Myth of the Seashell and the Epistemology of Sound.Iain Campbell - 2021 - Sound Studies 7 (1):100-118.
    This paper considers the role of myth and phenomenology in Pierre Schaeffer’s research into music and sound, and argues that engagement with these themes allows us to rethink the legacy and contemporary value of Schaeffer’s thought in sound studies. In light of critique of Schaeffer’s project, in particular that developed by Brian Kane and Schaeffer’s own apparent self-disavowal, this paper returns to Schaeffer’s early remarks on the “myth of the seashell” in order to examine the conditions of this critique. While (...)
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  42. “Kim Had the Same Idea as Haydn”: International Perspectives on Classical Music and Music Education. Kertz-Welzel - 2020 - Philosophy of Music Education Review 28 (2):239.
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  43. Mahler Is a DJ: Reconducting Classical Music Education. Koopal, Vlieghe & de Baets - 2020 - Philosophy of Music Education Review 28 (2):220.
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  44. Incarnating the Shiver-Shimmer Factor: Toward a Dialogical Sublime. Bogdan - 2020 - Philosophy of Music Education Review 28 (2):145.
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  45. “We Must Learn to Love”: Some Reflections on the Kinship of Philosophical Thinking and Classical Music From an Educational Perspective. Holm - 2020 - Philosophy of Music Education Review 28 (2):186.
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  46. To Love or Not to Love (Western Classical Music): That is the Question. Jorgensen - 2020 - Philosophy of Music Education Review 28 (2):128.
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  47. Focusing on Slowness and Resistance: A Contribution to Sustainable Development in Music Education. Varkøy & Rinholm - 2020 - Philosophy of Music Education Review 28 (2):168.
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  48. Talking Bach in an Age of Social Justice. Whale - 2020 - Philosophy of Music Education Review 28 (2):199.
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  49. Listening to Other Minds: A Phenomenology of Pop Songs.Enrico Terrone - 2020 - British Journal of Aesthetics 60 (4):435-453.
    This paper explores some phenomenological consequences of the ontological affinity between films and pop songs. Given the central place of the recording technology in both films and pop songs, one can wonder whether pop songs can elicit from their listeners the same kind of experience that films elicit from their spectators. In other words, one can wonder whether pop songs encourage us to play a ‘game of make-believe’ analogous to that we play when we engage with films. The main part (...)
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  50. Words Fail Me. (Stanley Cavell's Life Out of Music).William Day - 2020 - In David LaRocca (ed.), Inheriting Stanley Cavell: Memories, Dreams, Reflections. New York: Bloomsbury. pp. 187-97.
    Stanley Cavell isn't the first to arrive at philosophy through a life with music. Nor is he the first whose philosophical practice bears the marks of that life. Much of Cavell's life with music is confirmed for the world in his philosophical autobiography Little Did I Know. A central moment in that book is Cavell's describing the realization that he was to leave his musical career behind – for what exactly, he did not yet know. He connects the memory-shock of (...)
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