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  1. Tuke’s Healing Discipline.Louis C. Charland - 2003 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, Psychology 9 (2):183-186.
    THE TARGET OF ERICA LILLELEHT'S interesting comparison between 19th-century moral treatment and 20th-century psychiatric rehabilitation is contemporary psychiatric rehabilitation. Using Foucault's (1979) Discipline and Punish as her critical foil, she argues that psychiatric rehabilitation is "an approach to madness fraught with paradox." The paradox lies in the fact that the techniques of psychiatric rehabilitation can be practiced in a manner that contradicts its professed humanitarian intentions; notably, liberating the mad from "resource dependency and segregated living." The lesson to be drawn (...)
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  2. The Varieties of Compulsion in Addiction.Louis C. Charland - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics 2 (2):50-51.
    Pickard’s attempt to undermine the disease view of addiction by arguing that addiction is never a matter of irresistible compulsion fails on two accounts. First, it fallaciously hinges on the construction of a straw figure, a metaphysical postulate that misrepresents the nature and complexity of the real empirical issues at hand. Second, it goes on to frame the issues according to a false dichotomy, an all-or-nothing opposition between irresistible compulsion and its metaphysical counterpart, the philosopher’s free will.
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  3. Passion and Decision-Making Capacity in Anorexia Nervosa.Louis C. Charland - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 6 (4):66-68.
    The question of decision-making capacity for informed consent to experimental brain surgery for severely ill anorectic patients is about as dramatic an ethical issue one can imagine. Sabine Muller and her co-authors (2015) should be commended for this extremely timely and original clinical and ethical discussion of decision-making capacity in relation to the issues raised by informed consent to such therapies. In this commentary, I elaborate on the new account of the nature of anorexia nervosa that the authors allude to (...)
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  4. Moral Treatment.Louis C. Charland - 2015 - In Robin L. Cautin & Scott O. Lilienfeld (eds.), The Encyclopedia of Clinical Psychology. New York, NY, USA:
    Moral treatment refers to a psychological approach to treating mental disorder that arose across Europe and North America around the turn of the eighteenth century. It is mostly associated with the French physician Philippe Pinel (1745–1826) and the English Quaker philanthropist William Tuke (1732–1819). Pinel and Tuke each independently developed their own distinct models of the once popular therapy known as moral treatment. Although moral treatment is often considered to have been a successful therapy in its early years, it was (...)
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  5. Jean-Etienne Esquirol (1772-1840).Louis C. Charland - 2015 - In Robin L. Cautin & Scott O. Lilienfeld (eds.), The Encyclopedia of Clinical Psychology. New York, NY, USA:
    Along with Philippe Pinel (1745–1826), Jean‐Étienne Esquirol (1772–1840) is often considered one of the fathers of clinical psychiatry. While his indebtedness to the views of his teacher, Pinel, is indisputable, his own later contributions to the diagnosis and treatment of mental disorder are often considered to be clinically superior and more sophisticated than those of his mentor. Esquirol's contributions to the psychopathology of affectivity are especially important and differ in many important respects from those of Pinel, who also stressed the (...)
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  6. Philippe Pinel (1745-1826).Louis C. Charland - 2015 - In Robin L. Cautin & Scott O. Lilienfeld (eds.), The Encyclopedia of Clinical Psychology. New York, NY, USA:
    Philippe Pinel (1745–1826) is often said to be the father of modern clinical psychiatry. He is most famous for being a committed pioneer and advocate of humanitarian methods in the treatment of the mentally ill, and for the development of a mode of psychological therapy known as moral treatment. Pinel also made important contributions to nosology and the diagnosis and treatment of mental disorder, especially the psychopathology of affectivity, stressing the role of the passions in mental disorder. Pinel also conducted (...)
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  7. Moral Treatment and the Personality Disorders.Louis C. Charland - 2004 - In Jennifer Radden (ed.), The Philosophy of Psychiatry: A Companion. Oxford, UK: pp. 64-77.
    This chapter argues that the conditions under the umbrella “personality disorders” actually constitute two very different kinds of theoretical entities. In particular, several core personality disorders are actually moral, and not medical, conditions. Thus, the categories that are held to represent them are really moral, and not medical, theoretical kinds. The chapter works back from the possibility of treatment to the nature of the kinds that are allegedly treated, revisiting 18th-century ideas of moral treatment along the way. The discussion closes (...)
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  8. Moral Treatment in the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century.Louis C. Charland - 2012 - In Abraham Rudnick & David Roe (eds.), Serious Mental Illness: Person-Centered Approaches. Oxford, UK: pp. 19-25.
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  9. Mental Competence and Value: The Problem of Normativity in the Assessment of Decision-Making Capacity.Louis C. Charland - 2001 - Psychiatry, Psychology and Law 8 (2):135-145.
    Mental competence, or decision‐making capacity, is an important concept in law, psychiatry, and bioethics. A major problem faced in the development and implementation of standards for assessing mental competence is the issue of objectivity. The problem is that objective standards are hard to formulate and apply. The aim here is to review the limited philosophical literature on the place of value in competence in an attempt to introduce the issues to a wider audience. The thesis that the assessment of competence (...)
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  10. Benevolent Theory: Moral Treatment at the York Retreat.Louis C. Charland - 2007 - History of Psychiatry 18 (1):61-80.
    The York Retreat is famous in the histor y of nineteenth-centur y psychiatr y because of its association with moral treatment. Although there exists a substantial historical literature on the evolution of moral treatment at the Retreat, several interpretive problems continue to obscure its unique therapeutic legacy. The nature of moral treatment as practised at the Retreat will be clarified and discussed in a historical perspective. It will be argued that moral treatment at the Retreat was pr imar ily a (...)
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  11. Ethical and Conceptual Issues in Eating Disorders.Louis C. Charland - 2013 - Current Opinion in Psychiatry 26 (6):562-565.
    Purpose of review This review considers the literature on ethical and conceptual issues in eating disorders from the last 18 months. Some reference to earlier work is necessary in order to provide context for the recent findings from research that is ongoing. -/- Recent findings Empirical ethics research on anorexia nervosa includes novel ethical and conceptual findings on the role of authenticity and personal identity in individuals’ reports of their experience, as well as new evidence on the role of affective (...)
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  12. John Locke on Madness: Redressing the Intellectualist Bias.Louis C. Charland - 2014 - History of Psychiatry 25 (2):137-153.
    Locke is famous for defining madness as an intellectual disorder in the realm of ideas. Numerous commentators take this to be his main and only contribution to the history of psychiatry. However, a detailed exegetical review of all the relevant textual evidence suggests that this intellectualist interpretation of Locke’s account of madness is both misleading and incomplete. Affective states of various sorts play an important role in that account and are in fact primordial in the determination of human conduct generally. (...)
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  13. Lost in Myth, Lost in Translation: Philippe Pinel’s 1809 Medico-Philosophical Treatise on Mental Alienation.Louis C. Charland - 2018 - International Journal of Mental Health 47 (3):245-249.
    Philippe Pinel is widely regarded as one of the founders of modern evidence-based psychiatry. Yet, until recently, his most important contributions to psychiatric theory and practice were effectively lost in myth, or lost in translation. It is instructive to review the history of these developments in order to correct any errors or omissions that may stand in the way of an accurate recognition of Pinel’s contributions to psychiatry, while at the same time highlighting some of his achievements that have been (...)
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  14. Voces que no lo son: Los problemas del concepto de pseudoalucinación.Pablo Lopez-Silva - 2020 - Revista Chilena de Neuropsiquiatría 58 (1).
  15. Core Affect Dynamics: Arousal as a Modulator of Valence.Valentina Petrolini & Marco Viola - forthcoming - Review of Philosophy and Psychology:1-19.
    According to several researchers, core affect lies at the foundation of our affective lives and may be characterized as a consciously accessible state combining arousal and valence. The interaction between these two dimensions is still a matter of debate. In this paper we provide a novel hypothesis concerning their interaction, by arguing that subjective arousal levels modulate the experience of a stimulus’ affective quality. All things being equal, the higher the arousal, the more a given stimulus would be experienced as (...)
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  16. Delusion, Reality, and Intersubjectivity: A Phenomenological and Enactive Analysis.Thomas Fuchs - 2020 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 27 (1):61-79.
    Normal convictions are formed in a context of social living and common knowledge. Immediate experience of reality survives only if it can fit into the frame of what is socially valid or can be critically tested. … Each single experience can always be corrected but the total context of experience is something stable and can hardly be corrected at all. The source for incorrigibility therefore is not to be found in any single phenomenon by itself but in the human situation (...)
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  17. Obsessive–Compulsive Akrasia.Samuel Kampa - forthcoming - Mind and Language.
    Epistemic akrasia is the phenomenon of voluntarily believing what you think you should not. Whether epistemic akrasia is possible is a matter of controversy. I argue that at least some people who suffer from obsessive–compulsive disorder are genuinely epistemically akratic. I advance an account of epistemic akrasia that explains the clinical data and provides broader insight into the nature of doxastic attitude‐formation.
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  18. The North African Syndrome: Traversing the Distance to the Cultural ‘Other’.Bryan Mukandi - 2019 - In Serife Tekin & Robyn Bluhm (eds.), Bloomsbury Companion to the Philosophy of Psychiatry. New York, NY, USA: pp. 413-428.
    Towards the end of Tsitsi Dangarembga’s Nervous Conditions, Nyasha is taken to a psychiatrist who dismisses her family’s concerns based on his belief that Africans cannot suffer metal illness. Frantz Fanon explores a similar theme in his 1952 essay, ‘The “North African Syndrome”’. In both cases, the veil of sterility behind which the clinical encounter is often presumed to take place is rent, and the clinician and patient are exposed as coloniser and colonised or ‘white’ and ‘raced’ first. Similarly, the (...)
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  19. What Is the Subject in Question?João José R. L. De Almeida - 2019 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 26 (2):99-101.
    Arguing for the theoretical importance of the concept of “subject” or “self” on behalf of the “psychiatric/psycho-pathological thinking” is justified in so far as, as Costa, Bezerra Jr., and Gama say, “this is still an indispensable concept for understanding the conditions for the gestation and functioning of psychological life.” In what sense are these concepts “indispensable?”All the hints suggest them as necessary complements for neurobiological investigations to become useful for clinical employment. So, if we consider that it is possible to (...)
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  20. Spór o depresję. Czy fenomenologicznie zorientowana filozofia psychiatrii rozwiąże problemy psychiatrii redukcjonistycznej?Maja Białek - 2019 - Diametros 59:1-22.
    The aim of my paper is to review the discussion concerning various difficulties which surround the definition of depression and the methods of diagnosing and treating the disease against the background of the now dominant reductionist paradigm in psychiatry, as well as to answer the question whether a new approach to psychiatric disorders proposed by philosophers of psychiatry working within the phenomenologically inspired embodied and enactive paradigm indeed offers a solution to these difficulties. I present the issues specific to the (...)
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  21. A Strong Emergence Hypothesis of Conscious Integration and Neural Rewiring.Eric LaRock, Jeffrey Schwartz, Iliyan Ivanov & David Carreon - 2020 - International Philosophical Quarterly 60 (1):97-115.
    In this paper we discuss the two-system framework, examine its strengths, point out a fundamental weakness concerning the unity of conscious experience, and then propose a new hypothesis that avoids that weakness and other related concerns. According to our strong emergence hypothesis, what emerges are not merely mental properties in specialized, distributed neural areas, but also a new, irreducibly singular entity that functions in a recurrent manner to integrate its mental properties and to rewire its brain. We argue that the (...)
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  22. Biosemiotic and psychopathology of the ordo amoris. Biosemiotica e psicopatologia dell'ordo amoris. In dialogo con Max Scheler.Guido Cusinato - 2018 - Milano MI, Italia: FrancoAngeli.
    How comes that two organisms can interact with each other or that we can comprehend what the other experiences? The theories of embodiment, intersubjectivity or empathy have repeatedly taken as their starting point an individualistic assumption (the comprehension of the other comes after the self-comprehension) or a cognitivist one (the affective dimension follows the cognitive process). The thesis of this book is that there are no two isolated entities at the origin which successively interact with each other. There is, rather, (...)
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  23. Enactivism, Other Minds, and Mental Disorders.Joel Krueger - forthcoming - Synthese:1-25.
    Although enactive approaches to cognition vary in terms of their character and scope, all endorse several core claims. The first is that cognition is tied to action. The second is that cognition is composed of more than just in-the-head processes; cognitive activities are (at least partially) externalized via features of our embodiment and in our ecological dealings with the people and things around us. I appeal to these two enactive claims to consider a view called "direct social perception" (DSP): the (...)
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  24. Mirror Synesthesia and the Limits of Misidentification.Michael Young - 2018 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 25 (3):169-172.
    In Possibilities of Misidentification, Ashwell contends that the immunity principle developed and defended in my Pathologies of Thought and First Person Authority "doesn't show us anything about introspection or the first person—which should make us wonder whether it really captures that's at stake in discussions of IEM". Ashwell's argument hinges on two claims: IP turns on features that are not unique to introspection, to the first person, or to "subject matter that is thought to have IEM", and IP does not (...)
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  25. Privileged Access and the Agent in the Thought-Insertion.Clara S. Humpston - 2018 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 25 (3):165-167.
    In his paper, Young has eloquently put forward a novel account of how and why the phenomenon of thought-insertion seen in patients with schizophrenia does not contradict the immunity principle. He argues that, in TI, the problem lies not in misidentification but in mispredication: the individual with TI does not ascribe the right predicate to the wrong subject, but has misdetected the predicate in the first place. The author points out that an inconsistently formulated immunity principle could risk confusing the (...)
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  26. Martin Heidegger.Anthony Vincent Fernandez - forthcoming - In Giovanni Stanghellini, Matthew Broome, Anthony Vincent Fernandez, Paolo Fusar-Poli, Andrea Raballo & René Rosfort (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Phenomenological Psychopathology. Oxford:
    Martin Heidegger (1889–1976) is one of the most influential philosophers of the twentieth century. His influence, however, extends beyond philosophy. His account of Dasein, or human existence, permeates the human and social sciences, including nursing, psychiatry, psychology, sociology, anthropology, and artificial intelligence. In this chapter, I outline Heidegger’s influence on psychiatry and psychology, focusing especially on his relationships with the Swiss psychiatrists Ludwig Binswanger and Medard Boss. The first section outlines Heidegger’s early life and work, up to and including the (...)
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  27. What Biological Functions Are and Why They Matter.Justin Garson - 2019 - Cambridge University Press.
    The biological functions debate is a perennial topic in the philosophy of science. In the first full-length account of the nature and importance of biological functions for many years, Justin Garson presents an innovative new theory, the 'generalized selected effects theory of function', which seamlessly integrates evolutionary and developmental perspectives on biological functions. He develops the implications of the theory for contemporary debates in the philosophy of mind, the philosophy of medicine and psychiatry, the philosophy of biology, and biology itself, (...)
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  28. Disordered Existentiality: Mental Illness and Heidegger’s Philosophy of Dasein.Schmid Jelscha - 2018 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 17 (3):485-502.
    In this paper, I propose an existentialist-phenomenological model that conceives of mental illness through the terminology of Heidegger’s Being and Time. In particular, the concepts of existentiality, disturbance and the relation between ‘being-with’ and ‘the one’, will be implemented in order to reconstruct the experience of mental illness. The proposed model understands mental illness as a disturbance of a person’s existentiality. More precisely, mental illness is conceptualized as the disturbance of a person’s existential structure, the process of which leads to (...)
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  29. Schizophrenia, Social Practices and Cultural Values: A Conceptual Introduction.Inês Hipólito, J. Pereira & J. Gonçalves - 2018 - In Inês Hipólito, Jorge Gonçalves & João G. Pereira (eds.), Studies in Brain and Mind. Springer Verlag. pp. 1-15.
    Schizophrenia is usually described as a fragmentation of subjective experience and the impossibility to engage in meaningful cultural and intersubjective practices. Although the term schizophrenia is less than 100 years old, madness is generally believed to have accompanied mankind through its historical and cultural ontogeny. What does it mean to be “mad”? The failure to adopt social practices or to internalize cultural values of common sense? Despite the vast amount of literature and research, it seems that the study of schizophrenia (...)
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  30. Hope and Friendship: Being and Having.Y. Michael Barilan - 2012 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 19 (3):191-195.
    In its first part, the paper explores the challenge of conceptualizing the Thomist theological virtue of hope in Aristotelian terms that are compatible with non-Thomist and even atheist metaphysics as well. I argue that the key concept in this endeavor is friendship—as an Aristotelian virtue, as relational value in Thomist theology, as a recognized value in supportive care and as a kind of ‘personal hope.’ Then, the paper proceeds to examine the possible differences between hope as a virtue and hope (...)
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  31. A Phenomenological Study of Anorexia Nervsoa.Hannah Bowden - 2012 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 19 (3):227-241.
    Anorectics typically maintain that they perceive their bodies as ‘fat’ and yet also state that they are aware of being ‘too thin.’ In this study, I use phenomenological insights from the work of Merleau-Ponty and Sartre to explore this apparent contradiction. I suggest that the anorectic experiences a pathological corporealization of the body, and show how this bodily experience may be described as ‘feeling fat’ due to cultural influences. In addition, I explore how this anomalous bodily experience may lead to (...)
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  32. Hope as Virtue: Opens Up a New Space for Exploring Hopefulness at the End of Life and Raises Some Interesting Questions.Daniel Munday - 2012 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 19 (3):187-189.
    Barilan’s (2012) essay “From Hope in Palliative Care to Hope as a Virtue and a Life Skill” provides a novel way of exploring hope as experienced by people at the end of life. He proposes that hope can be usefully seen as an Aristotelian virtue; something to be “conscientiously chosen” as a “habit of behavior, perceptiveness and mental response, holistically considered” (Barilan 2012, 166). Hope coalesces with other virtues, particularly courage, in the terminally ill, to enable human flourishing even at (...)
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  33. Psychiatric Power and Its Reversals: Can We Keep Practice Humane?Miles Clapham - 2012 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 19 (1):63-65.
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  34. Foucault and Current Psychiatric Practice.Grant Gillett - 2012 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 19 (1):59-61.
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  35. Focault, the Logic of Psychiatric Power, and Its Paradoxes.John Iliopoulos - 2012 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 19 (1):67-69.
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  36. Precise Worlds for Certain Minds: An Ecological Perspective on the Relational Self in Autism.Axel Constant, Jo Bervoets, Kristien Hens & Sander Van de Cruys - 2018 - Topoi:1-12.
    Autism Spectrum Condition presents a challenge to social and relational accounts of the self, precisely because it is broadly seen as a disorder impacting social relationships. Many influential theories argue that social deficits and impairments of the self are the core problems in ASC. Predictive processing approaches address these based on general purpose neurocognitive mechanisms that are expressed atypically. Here we use the High, Inflexible Precision of Prediction Errors in Autism approach in the context of cultural niche construction to explain (...)
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  37. Authenticity, Insight and Impaired Decision-Making Capacity in Acquired Brain Injury.Gareth S. Owen, Fabian Freyenhagen & Wayne Martin - 2018 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 25 (1):29-32.
    Thanks to Barton Palmer and John McMillan for these thoughtful commentaries. We found much to agree with and it is striking how so many of the issues relating to decision-making capacity assessment find resonances outside of an English jurisdiction. California and New Zealand are clearly grappling with a very similar set of issues and the commentaries speak to the international nature of these discussions.We will pick up on some main points the commentaries raise.As Palmer notes, DMC law is vulnerable to (...)
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  38. Beyond the Ontological Difference: Heidegger, Binswanger, and the Future of Existential Analysis.Anthony Vincent Fernandez - 2018 - In Kevin Aho (ed.), Existential Medicine: Essays on Health and Illness. London: Rowman & Littlefield International. pp. 27–42.
  39. A Generalized Selected Effects Theory of Function.Justin Garson - 2017 - Philosophy of Science 84 (3):523-543.
    I present and defend the generalized selected effects theory (GSE) of function. According to GSE, the function of a trait consists in the activity that contributed to its bearer’s differential reproduction, or differential retention, within a population. Unlike the traditional selected effects (SE) theory, it does not require that the functional trait helped its bearer reproduce; differential retention is enough. Although the core theory has been presented previously, I go significantly beyond those presentations by providing a new argument for GSE (...)
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  40. Petr Kouba: The Phenomenon of Mental Disorder: Perspectives of Heidegger’s Thought in Psychopathology: Springer, New York and London: 2015, 203 Pp, +Index. [REVIEW]Anthony Fernandez - 2017 - Human Studies 40 (1):145-150.
  41. Subjective Misidentification and Thought Insertion.Matthew Parrott - 2017 - Mind and Language 32 (1):39-64.
    This essay presents a new account of thought insertion. Prevailing views in both philosophy and cognitive science tend to characterize the experience of thought insertion as missing or lacking some element, such as a ‘sense of agency’, found in ordinary first-person awareness of one's own thoughts. By contrast, I propose that, rather than lacking something, experiences of thought insertion have an additional feature not present in ordinary conscious experiences of one's own thoughts. More specifically, I claim that the structure of (...)
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  42. Lectures on Neurology and Neuriatry, Psychology and Psychiatry. [REVIEW]C. H. Hughes - 1905 - Ancient Philosophy (Misc) 15:313.
  43. The Rise and Fall of Forensic Hypnosis.Alison Winter - 2013 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 44 (1):26-35.
    This paper examines the fortunes of the controversial use of hypnosis to ‘enhance’ autobiographical memories in postwar America. From the 1950s through the early 1980s, hypnosis became increasingly popular as a means to exhume information thought to be buried within the mind. This practice was encouraged by lay understandings of memory drawn from a material culture full of new recording devices ; and during the years when the practice was becoming most popular and accepted, academic psychologists developed a contrary, reconstructive, (...)
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  44. What Philosophical Counseling Can’T Do.Lou Marinoff - 1998 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 5 (4):33-41.
    Notwithstanding recent successes of philosophical counseling, which appear to be leading to its legitimization as a professional practice in America and abroad, many forces concen to condition its emergent structure and function. This paper briefly elucidates some of the influences to which philosophical counseling is subject, that lie beyond its unilateral control. These include its portayal by the media to the public, its scope of practice, its relations with psychology and psychiatry, its foreseeable effects in particular cases, and its perception (...)
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  45. Psychiatry and the Humanities, Vol. 1. [REVIEW]Gerald C. Hay Jr - 1976 - Philosophical Studies (Dublin) 25:376-378.
  46. Mona Gupta, Is Evidence-Based Psychiatry Ethical? Reviewed By.Thomas Edward Mathien - 2016 - Philosophy in Review 36 (5):201-203.
    Gupta effectively probes the methodological and ethical presuppostions of Evidence Based Medicine, and its more contestable application to psychiatry. She concludes with an endorsement of a very modest reformulation of it as one guide to practice among many.
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  47. Mind, Meaning, and Mental Disorder: The Nature of Causal Explanation in Psychology and Psychiatry.Shaun Nichols, Derek Bolton & Jonathan Hill - 1999 - Philosophical Review 108 (4):559.
    This book offers a broad, systematic philosophical approach to mental disorder. The authors spend the first half of the book presenting their basic philosophical allegiances, and they go on to apply their philosophical approach to mental disorder. As the authors note, psychiatry has been largely neglected by contemporary philosophy of mind, and this book is a laudable attempt to rectify the situation by producing a sustained and clinically well-informed philosophical treatment of mental disorder.
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  48. Agency and Mental States in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder.Judit Szalai - 2016 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 23 (1):47-59.
    The dominant philosophical conceptions of obsessive-compulsive behavior present its subject as having a deficiency, usually characterized as volitional, due to which she lacks control and choice in acting. Compulsions (mental or physical) tend to be treated in isolation from the obsessive thoughts that give rise to them. I offer a different picture of compulsive action, one that is, I believe, more faithful to clinical reality. The clue to (most) obsessive-compulsive behavior seems to be the way obsessive thoughts, which are grounded (...)
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  49. Recent Views as to the Topical Basis of Mental Disorders.George V. N. Dearborn - 1899 - Psychological Review 6 (3):339-339.
  50. Language, Prejudice, and the Aims of Hermeneutic Phenomenology: Terminological Reflections on “Mania".Anthony Vincent Fernandez - 2016 - Journal of Psychopathology 22 (1):21-29.
    In this paper I examine the ways in which our language and terminology predetermine how we approach, investigate and conceptualise mental illness. I address this issue from the standpoint of hermeneutic phenomenology, and my primary object of investigation is the phenomenon referred to as “mania”. Drawing on resources from classical phenomenology, I show how phenomenologists attempt to overcome their latent presuppositions and prejudices in order to approach “the matters themselves”. In other words, phenomenologists are committed to the idea that in (...)
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