About this topic
Summary Philosophy of Psychiatry and Psychopathology occurs at the intersection of general philosophy of science, philosophy of mind, and ethics. It aims to develop answers to a set of theoretical and practical questions pertaining to the nature of mental disorders, mental health research, and practice.
Key works [BROKEN REFERENCE: RADDAEw]#MURPIT Radden 2004 Graham 2002 Fulford 2006 Poland 2011 Thornton 2007 Sadler 2004 Hacking 1995 Flanagan 1999 Schaffner 1993
Introductions Fulford & Sadler 2009 [BROKEN REFERENCE: NATTNPw]#MARPN
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  1. From Habits to Compulsions: Losing Control?Juliette Vazard - forthcoming - Philosophy, Psychiatry, & Psychology.
    In recent years, there has been a trend in psychiatry to try and explain disorders of action in terms of an over-reliance on the habitual mode of action. In particular, it has been hypothesized that compulsions in obsessive-compulsive disorder are driven by maladaptive habits. In this paper, I argue that this view of obsessive-compulsive disorder does not fit the phenomenology of the disorder in many patients and that a more refined conceptualization of habit is likely to be helpful in clarifying (...)
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  2. Accounting for the Preference for Literal Meanings in ASC.Agustin Vicente & Ingrid Lossius Falkum - forthcoming - Mind and Language.
    Impairments in pragmatic abilities, that is, difficulties with appropriate use and interpretation of language – in particular, non-literal uses of language – are considered a hallmark of Autism Spectrum Conditions (ASC). Despite considerable research attention, these pragmatic difficulties are poorly understood. In this paper, we discuss and evaluate existing hypotheses regarding the literalism of ASC individuals, that is, their tendency for literal interpretations of non-literal communicative intentions, and link them to accounts of pragmatic development in neurotypical children. We present evidence (...)
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  3. Writing the History of Postcolonial and Transcultural Psychiatry in Africa.Ana Antic - forthcoming - History of the Human Sciences:095269512199370.
  4. Anorexia: That Body I Am-With.Drew Leder - 2021 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 28 (1):59-61.
    Lucy Osler's piece, "Controlling the noise: A phenomenological account of Anorexia Nervosa and the threatening body," lays out an important new interpretation of anorexia. Anorexia Nervosa is no longer viewed as primarily a perceptual distortion of body-image, an obsession with thinness, or an attempt to dematerialize—to free the subject from its inert thing-like body. Rather, the body itself, and the visceral body in particular, takes on a "voice" which the anorexic experiences as demanding and threatening. Anorexic monitoring and self-starvation beckons (...)
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  5. Anorexia Nervosa, the Visceral Body, and the Sense of Ownership.Michelle Maiese - 2021 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 28 (1):63-65.
    In this insightful and well-argued article, Osler aims to provide a more fine-grained, phenomenological account of anorectic bodily experience. She notes that although anorexia nervosa often is understood in terms of a distorted body image, this approach does not exhaustively or accurately reflect many subjects' bodily experiences, and also unduly privileges a third-person perspective over first-person accounts. In addition, focusing primarily on body image gives rise to the impression that AN is a form of radical dieting gone wrong as a (...)
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  6. Key Concept: Loneliness.Valeria Motta - 2021 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 28 (1):71-81.
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  7. Controlling the Noise: A Phenomenological Account of Anorexia Nervosa and the Threatening Body.Lucy Osler - 2021 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 28 (1):41-58.
    Anorexia Nervosa (AN) is a complex disorder characterised by self-starvation, an act of self-destruction. It is often described as a disorder marked by paradoxes and, despite extensive research attention, is still not well understood. Much AN research focuses upon the distorted body image that individuals with AN supposedly experience. However, based upon reports from individuals describing their own experience of AN, I argue that their bodily experience is much more complex than this focus might lead us to believe. Such research (...)
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  8. (Un)Wanted Feelings in Anorexia Nervosa: Making the Visceral Body Mine Again.Lucy Osler - 2021 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 28 (1):67-69.
    In my article "Controlling the noise," I present a phenomenological investigation of bodily experience in anorexia nervosa. Turning to descriptions of those who have suffered from AN, which repeatedly detail the experience of finding their bodies threatening, out of control and noisy, I suggest that the phenomenological conceptions of body-as-object, body-as-subject and visceral body can help us unpack the complex bodily experience of AN throughout its various stages. My claim is that self-starvation is enacted by a bodily-subject who wishes to (...)
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  9. From the Dialectics of Recognition to Common Humanity.Konrad Banicki - 2021 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 28 (1):19-21.
    Among the many strengths of the article by Lorenzo Gilardi and Giovanni Stanghellini one can find its open-ended character most directly reflected by the fact that these are "questions for further research," rather than a set of definitive theses, that are provided as concluding remarks. But it is not the mere occurrence of such a setting that is crucial. After all, even if somewhat atypical, the latter does happen to be used in scholarly literature. What makes the open-endedness of the (...)
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  10. Schizophrenia as a Transformative Evaluative Concept: Perspectives on the Psychiatric Significance of the Personal Self in the Ethics of Recognition.Anna Bergqvist - 2021 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 28 (1):23-26.
    Psychiatric diagnosis serves many functions in the struggle for recognition, such as access to public mental health systems and legal compensation, but it is not necessarily well-equipped for the task of self-understanding and reconfiguration of personal values in the recovery process – and the likelihood of optimal outcome that is geared to the individual person's quality of life. Call this the transformative dimension of recognition in the complex journey from diagnosis to therapeutic empathy in the doctor–patient relationship.Patients who are diagnosed (...)
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  11. The Human Need for Recognition.Elizabeth Flanagan - 2021 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 28 (1):27-29.
    How lovely to see an article co-authored by a person with schizophrenia and his psychiatrist! For hundreds of years, the perspectives of people receiving services was never published in medical/psychiatric journals. Then, some journals had a special section for "voices of lived experience" where people receiving services could write short, personal pieces—often they told dark and negative stories about all the pain they have experienced. Later, people with lived experience were on research teams and people with mental health challenges would (...)
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  12. Curing Psychiatry's Schizophrenia: A Commentary in Values-Based PHD Mental Health Practice.K. W. M. Fulford - 2021 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 28 (1):15-17.
    From the perspective of values-based practice, there is much of interest in Lorenzo Gilardi and Giovanni Stanghellini's "I am a Schizophrenic." Their dialogue exhibits many of the key elements of VBP, it exemplifies the particular challenges presented by VBP in mental health, it illustrates the power of phenomenology in meeting these challenges, and it points by extension to an insight into contemporary psychiatry's professional identity as a medical profession.VBP is a resource for working with values—with what matters or is important (...)
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  13. Madness, Moral Agency, and Recovery.Neely Myers - 2021 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 28 (1):31-34.
    All the world's a stage,/And all the men and women merely players; They have their exits and entrances; And one man in his time plays many parts.This piece, co-authored by a doctor and patient in dialogue with one another, points to the promise of prioritizing moral agency in clinical interactions and how this can promote recovery. This response will consider the broader social, philosophical and clinical context of madness in the United States. It will also signal the relevance of this (...)
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  14. From Diagnosis to Therapeutic Empathy: A Journey Into Recognition.Francesca Brencio - 2021 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 28 (1):11-13.
    Conceptually, recognition claims a cardinal role in many prominent philosophical theories. Kant, in the Critique of Pure Reason, uses the German word Rekognition—a term that in many ways has no antecedent in prior tradition—to signify the identification, the grasping of, a unified meaning through thought. However, it is through Hegel that a substantial step in practical philosophy is taken, and recognition is put into dialogue with self-consciousness and freedom. Hegel uses the German word Anerkennung, in the period of Jena Realphilosophie, (...)
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  15. I Am Schizophrenic, Believe It or Not! A Dialogue About the Importance of Recognition.Lorenzo Gilardi & Giovanni Stanghellini - 2021 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 28 (1):1-10.
    We are glad to acknowledge the wide spectrum of topics posited by our commentators and at the same time the recognition of the thematic issue of our project: that the mentally ill is still a person, and that this humane dimension of his existence must be brought to the fore in psychopathological studies and kept always in the fore in the therapeutic process.We are also glad to have encountered appreciation for the fact that long gone is the time when the (...)
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  16. Impact of Divergent Thinking Training on Teenagers’ Emotion and Self-Efficacy During the COVID-19 Pandemic.Bin Zuo, Qi Wang, Lan Y. Qiao, Yu Ding & Fangfang Wen - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    Currently due to the COVID-19 pandemic, young people are experiencing a decrease in self-efficacy and an increase in mental illness. Though previous studies have shown that self-efficacy and divergent thinking training are positively related, little is known about the impact of divergent thinking training on self-efficacy and emotions. Therefore, our study seeks this answer to support teenagers injured psychologically during disastrous periods. We randomly assigned 70 students to a 2 × 2 mixed design. Participants in the experimental group were given (...)
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  17. A Pluralistic Account of Degrees of Control in Addiction.Federico Burdman - forthcoming - Philosophical Studies.
    While some form of loss of control is often assumed to be a common feature of the diverse manifestations of addiction, it is far from clear how loss of control should be understood. In this paper, I put forward a concept of decrease in control in addiction that aims to fill this gap and thus provide a general framework for thinking about addictive behavior. The development of this account involves two main steps. First, I present a view of degrees of (...)
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  18. Addictive Desires and Reasons-Responsiveness.Federico Burdman - manuscript
    In this paper, I look into one of the particular ways in which decreased reasons-responsiveness in addiction may come about, by focusing on certain anomalous features of addictive desires. The account I offer centers on two prominent features of these desires: the recalcitrance of standing or long-term dispositional addictive desires to use drugs in the face of contrary considerations, and the recurrent, intrusive nature of episodes of occurrently wanting to use drugs that addicted agents experience. Both the recalcitrance and the (...)
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  19. Gender Medicine and Phenomenological Embodiment.Tania Gergel - 2016 - In The Bloomsbury Companion to Contemporary Philosophy of Medicine. Bloomsbury.
  20. The Integration and Development of Piano Art and Media Education and Its Influence on the Long-Term Care and Happiness of the Elderly People.Xuan Chen, Fangwei Huang & Yingfeng Wang - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    To analyze the influence of the integration of piano art and media on long-term care of the elderly in the aging society, and to improve the living standard and happiness of the elderly, based on educational psychology, several scales of self-compiled personal information, the Ackerson personality inventory, and the memorial university of Newfoundland happiness scale were introduced for statement, and questionnaire method was adopted for information collection. Then, the mechanism of the integration of piano art and media on the happiness (...)
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  21. The Positive Spiral Between Problem-Solving Management and Trust: A Study in Organizations for Individuals With Intellectual Disability.Yolanda Estreder, Vicente Martínez-Tur, Inés Tomás, Alice Maniezki, José Ramos & Luminiţa Pătraş - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    To achieve their goals, organizations for individuals with intellectual disability have to stimulate high-quality relationships between professionals and family members. Therefore, achieving professionals’ trust in family members has become a challenge. One relevant factor in explaining professional’s trust in families is the degree to which family members use the “problem-solving” conflict management strategy in their disputes–disagreements with professionals. It is reasonable to argue that when family members use problem-solving conflict management, professionals’ trust increases. Professionals’ trust, in turn, stimulates the use (...)
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  22. Loneliness and Negative Effects on Mental Health as Trade-Offs of the Policy Response to COVID-19.Elena Popa - 2021 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 43 (1):1-5.
    This note introduces a framework incorporating multiple sources of evidence into the response to COVID-19 to overcome the neglect of social and psychological causes of illness. By using the example of psychological research on loneliness and its effects on physical and mental health with particular focus on aging and disability, I seek to open further inquiry into how relevant psychological and social aspects of health can be addressed at policy level.
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  23. Self-Oriented Empathy and Compassion Fatigue: The Serial Mediation of Dispositional Mindfulness and Counselor’s Self-Efficacy.Lin Zhang, Zhihong Ren, Guangrong Jiang, Dilana Hazer-Rau, Chunxiao Zhao, Congrong Shi, Lizu Lai & Yifei Yan - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    This study aimed to explore the association between self-oriented empathy and compassion fatigue, and examine the potential mediating roles of dispositional mindfulness and the counselor’s self-efficacy. A total of 712 hotline psychological counselors were recruited from the Mental Health Service Platform at Central China Normal University, Ministry of Education during the outbreak of Corona Virus Disease 2019, then were asked to complete the questionnaires measuring self-oriented empathy, compassion fatigue, dispositional mindfulness, and counselor’s self-efficacy. Structural equation modeling was utilized to analyze (...)
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  24. Owen Whooley. On the Heels of Ignorance: Psychiatry and the Politics of Not Knowing. Xiii + 296 Pp., Notes, Bibl., Index. Chicago/London: University of Chicago Press, 2019. $30 (Paper); ISBN 9780226616384. Cloth and E-Book Available. [REVIEW]Jonathan Sadowsky - 2020 - Isis 111 (4):861-862.
  25. Together Against COVID-19 Concerns: The Role of the Dyadic Coping Process for Partners’ Psychological Well-Being During the Pandemic.Silvia Donato, Miriam Parise, Ariela Francesca Pagani, Margherita Lanz, Camillo Regalia, Rosa Rosnati & Raffaella Iafrate - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    The situation caused by the 2019 coronavirus disease has been representing a great source of concern and a challenge to the psychological well-being of many individuals around the world. For couples in particular, this extraordinary rise in concern, combined with the stress posed by the virus containment measures, such as prolonged cohabitation and lack of support networks, may have increased the likelihood of couple problems. At the same time, however, COVID-19 concerns may have been a stimulus to activate couples’ stress (...)
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  26. Pathologies of Agency.Lubomira V. Radoilska - forthcoming - In The Routledge Handbook of the Philosophy of Agency.
    This chapter aims to distinguish between pathologies of agency in the strict sense and mere sources of impediments or distortion. Expanding on a recent notion of necessarily less-than-successful agency, it complements a mainstream approach to mental disorders and anomalous psychological conditions in the philosophy of mind and action. According this approach, the interest of such clinical case studies is heuristic, to differentiate between facets of agency that are functionally and conceptually separate even though they typically come together. Yet, in the (...)
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  27. A Postcard From Italy: Challenges and Psychosocial Resources of Partners Living With and Without a Chronic Disease During COVID-19 Epidemic.Giada Rapelli, Giulia Lopez, Silvia Donato, Ariela Francesca Pagani, Miriam Parise, Anna Bertoni & Raffaella Iafrate - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    The new Coronavirus has been declared a global pandemic by the World Health Organization. The sudden outbreak of this new virus and the measure of lockdown adopted to contain the epidemic have profoundly changed the lifestyles of the Italian population, with an impact on people’s quality of life and on their social relationships. In particular, due to forced and prolonged cohabitation, couples may be subject to specific stressors during the epidemic. In addition, living with a chronic health condition may add (...)
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  28. Embodiment as Procedures: Physical Cleansing Changes Goal Priming Effects.Ping Dong & Spike W. S. Lee - 2017 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 146 (4):592-605.
    Physical cleansing reduces the influence of numerous psychological experiences, such as guilt from immoral behavior, dissonance from free choice, and good/bad luck from winning/losing. How do these domain-general effects occur? We propose an integrative account of cleansing as an embodied procedure of psychological separation. By separating physical traces from a physical target object (e.g., detaching dirt from hands), cleansing serves as the embodied grounding for the separation of psychological traces from a psychological target object (e.g., dissociating prior experience from the (...)
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  29. Reproach Without Blameworthiness.Daphne Brandenburg & Derek Strijbos - 2020 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 27 (4):399-401.
    In her commentary, Kennett helpfully reiterates Pickard’s criticism of Strawsonian theories of blame. Angry forms of blame like resentment are, according to Pickard, characterized by a sense of entitlement and are counterproductive to therapy. Some disagree that entitlement is a necessary condition for emotional blame, but also more permissive understandings of Strawsonian emotional blame have been considered inappropriate and counterproductive in a therapeutic relationship and on a psychiatric ward.We proposed to bracket definitional issues about the meaning of emotional blame and (...)
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  30. Self-Management as Socially Embedded Endeavor.Jan Bransen & Gerrit Glas - 2020 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 27 (4):425-430.
    When we first anticipated the research project concluded with this special issue, about 8 years ago, it seemed timely and appropriate to investigate the opportunities and the challenges of self-management in mental health care. At the time self-management was well on the rise in general health care, offering both empowerment to patients and efficiency and cost-effectiveness to the health care system. It seemed a most promising approach in an era that celebrates individualistic self-reliance. And we were sure about our insight (...)
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  31. Narratives of Illness and the Function of Diagnoses.Gaston Franssen - 2020 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 27 (4):423-424.
    The distinction that De Haan and Korsten foreground in their valuable commentary between, on the one hand, medical files, and, on the other, illness records is very helpful, as it underlines that illness narratives are not bound to a specific truth regime. They operate in, and at times even across, a variety of truth regimes, within which their status and function can radically differ. In that light, De Haan and Korsten have a point when they state that “any patient’s experience” (...)
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  32. Narratives of Undiagnosability: Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Life-Writing and the Indeterminacy of Illness Memoirs.Gaston Franssen - 2020 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 27 (4):403-418.
  33. The Status of Documents: Medical Files and Literary Genres-The Case of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.Joost Haan & Frans-Willem Korsten - 2020 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 27 (4):419-421.
    Gaston Franssen’s essay touches on important medical and literary topics: the experience of patients with unexplained somatic complaints, the importance of giving their symptoms a name or diagnosis, the verbal representation of what bothers them, or the uncertainty all parties have to live with when an underlying cause of the symptoms is missing. A diagnosis or name such as chronic fatigue syndrome can be a relief for its sufferers, as is expressed by one of the patients in the article: “I (...)
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  34. Blame, Reproach, and Responsibility.Jeanette Kennett - 2020 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 27 (4):395-397.
    In the study reported in their rich article, Brandenburg and Strijbos investigate the attitudes of clinicians, in a facility for adults with autism, to norm transgressions by service users. In doing so they interrogate Hanna Pickard’s responsibility without blame approach to therapy and ask whether it applies across different clinical settings.Pickard draws a distinction between responsibility for an action in the sense of being the agent of the action and so, by definition, having some control over it, and moral responsibility (...)
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  35. The Clinical Stance and the Nurturing Stance: Therapeutic Responses to Harmful Conduct by Service Users in Mental Healthcare.Daphne Brandenburg & Derek Strijbos - 2020 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 27 (4):379-394.
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  36. Managing the Self: Some Philosophical Issues.Leon de Bruin - 2020 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 27 (4):371-373.
    Strijbos and Slors argue against what they call the “naïve common-sense” view of self-management as taking direct control over one’s mental health conditions. Their argument consists of two steps. First, they claim that self-management is often better understood as a form of facilitation, like a drover steering the herd. The drover is not in the position to directly intervene on the course the herd is taking, but instead manipulates it by exploiting her knowledge of the context-dependency of the herd’s behavior. (...)
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  37. The Need for Relational Authenticity Strategies in Psychiatry.Sanneke de Haan - 2020 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 27 (4):349-351.
    Psychiatric disorders involve changes in how you feel, think, perceive, and/or act—and the same goes for psychotropic medication. How then do you know whether certain thoughts or feelings are genuine expressions of yourself, or whether they are colored by your psychiatric illness, or by the medication you take? Or, as Karp nicely sums up the problem: “if I experience X, is it because of the illness, the medication, or is it “just me’?” Such “self-illness ambiguity” seems to be quite an (...)
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  38. Dealing with Self-Illness Ambiguity: A Rebuttal.Gerrit Glas & Roy Dings - 2020 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 27 (4):353-354.
    We thank Sanneke de Haan for her thoughtful response. We agree with what she says and consider it as a further specification of our intentions. We particularly endorse the two main points she raises, that is, that dealing with self-illness ambiguity requires a relational perspective; and that relying on reflection solely is problematic since it plays an only modest role in the resolution of self-illness ambiguity. We discuss both points in reverse order.With respect to the role of reflection, we have, (...)
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  39. Causation in Self-Management.Derek Strijbos & Marc Slors - 2020 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 27 (4):375-377.
    In his thoughtful commentary, De Bruin invites us to say more about the notion of causation in our two-dimensional model of self-management in health care. In particular, he thinks there is a tension between 1) self-management-as-facilitation being causally efficacious and 2) “surgical” self-management interventions on specific variables being practically impossible in psychiatric conditions due to their complex dynamic nature. In particular, he asks us: “How can we establish the causal efficacy of these intentions if we are dealing with complex dynamic (...)
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  40. What Kind of "Management" Is Self-Management? A Two-Dimensional Approach to Self-Management in Mental Health Care.Derek Strijbos & Marc Slors - 2020 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 27 (4):355-370.
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  41. Self-Management in Psychiatry as Reducing Self-Illness Ambiguity.Roy Dings & Gerrit Glas - 2020 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 27 (4):333-347.
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  42. Self-Management in Psychiatry and Psychomatic Medicine—Part 2.Marc Slors & Derek Strijbos - 2020 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 27 (4):329-332.
    This special issue is a follow-up on a previous issue in this journal on self-management in psychiatry and psychosomatic medicine. It is the concluding chapter of a research project that sought to unpack and develop the implications of an understanding of self-management in psychiatry and psychosomatic medicine as “management of the self.”Over the last, 20 years, self-management has gained a central place in treatment programs across various medical disciplines. It positions patients as “expert-clients,” who share knowledge, responsibilities and expertise with (...)
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  43. Out of Our Heads: Addiction and Psychiatric Externalism.Shane Glackin, Tom Roberts & Joel Krueger - 2021 - Behavioral Brain Research 398:1-8.
    In addiction, apparently causally significant phenomena occur at a huge number of levels; addiction is affected by biomedical, neurological, pharmacological, clinical, social, and politico-legal factors, among many others. In such a complex, multifaceted field of inquiry, it seems very unlikely that all the many layers of explanation will prove amenable to any simple or straightforward, reductive analysis; if we are to unify the many different sciences of addiction while respecting their causal autonomy, then, what we are likely to need is (...)
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  44. Monothematic Delusions and the Limits of Rationality.Adam Bradley & Quinn Hiroshi Gibson - forthcoming - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science.
    Monothematic delusions are delusions whose contents pertain to a single subject matter. Examples include Capgras delusion, the delusion that a loved one has been replaced by an impostor, and Cotard delusion, the delusion that one is dead or does not exist. Two-factor accounts of such delusions hold that they are the result of both an experiential deficit, for instance flattened affect, coupled with an aberrant cognitive response to that deficit. In this paper we develop a new expressivist two-factor account of (...)
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  45. Psychiatric Euthanasia, Mental Capacity, and a Sense of the Possible.Matthew Ratcliffe - 2020 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 27 (3):1-15.
    At the time of writing, euthanasia for psychiatric conditions is legal in Belgium and the Netherlands, in cases that are judged to involve unbearable and untreatable suffering. There is a difference between ‘euthanasia’ and ‘assisted suicide’ or ‘assisted dying’. Although I will refer for the most part to ‘psychiatric euthanasia,’ my points apply equally to assisted dying. Even where these practices are legal, they are highly controversial. One case, in particular, received considerable media attention. In the Netherlands, on January 26, (...)
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  46. The False Binary Between Biology and Behavior.Awais Aftab - 2020 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 27 (3):317-319.
    This article comments on the following previously published article: Moncrieff, J., “ It Was the Brain Tumor That Done It!” Szasz and Wittgenstein on the Importance of Distinguishing Disease from Behavior and Implications for the Nature of Mental Disorder. Philosophy, Psychiatry, & Psychology, 27, 169–181.Joanna Moncrieff’s philosophical views on the nature of mental illness represent in many ways the enduring legacy of Thomas Szasz in philosophy of psychiatry. She articulates a defense of Szaszian thinking about disease, with connections to Wittgenstein’s (...)
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  47. Buried in Silence: Homosexuality and the Feighner Criteria.Stewart Justman - 2020 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 27 (3):283-298.
    The publication in January 1972 of what came to be known as the Feighner criteria marked an epoch in the history of American psychiatry. At a time when many psychiatrists were indifferent or even hostile to the niceties of diagnosis, and when conflicting interpretations of similar cases threatened the reputation of the profession itself, the Feighner criteria laid out specific rules for the diagnosis of 16 disorders, from depression to hysteria, from alcoholism to anorexia. Never before had the identifiers of (...)
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  48. Not in Our Brains: On the Complex Relationship Between Biology and Behavior.Joanna Moncrieff - 2020 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 27 (3):321-323.
    Awais Aftab’s response to my article is informative because it expresses what I suspect is a widespread but confused inclination among psychiatrists to “have their cake and eat it.” On the one hand they do not want to be branded as reductionists, so they deny they are equating mental disorder with brain disease or brain mechanisms. Yet, they want to maintain a role for physical causation in mental disorder, because without it the link between psychiatry and medicine starts to look (...)
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  49. Specific Phobia Is an Ideal Psychiatric Kind.Alexander Pereira - 2020 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 27 (3):299-315.
    The causes and underlying natures of common mental disorders are, for the most part, quite mysterious. Our best taxonomies acknowledge this poverty of causal knowledge about minds, brains, society, and whatever else, to instead classify psychopathology based on clusters of detectable signs and symptoms: what it is to be, say, depressed, is simply to exhibit the minimum number of typical features for the right amount of time. Nothing in this approach references what causes and maintains a characteristic set of symptoms, (...)
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  50. Hermeneutic Haunting: The Interpretation of Violence and the Violence of Interpretation.Sarah Kamens - 2020 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 27 (3):277-281.
    It is a pleasure to respond to these thought-provoking commentaries by Laurence J. Kirmayer and Nancy Nyquist Potter. Rather than addressing their comments one-by-one—and rather than entering into the same meditative attitude that produced my original essay, an unusual and exploratory text—I will take the liberty of responding to a theme that appears in both commentaries: the potential epistemic violence done by interpretation. It is perhaps no mistake that interpretative violence is thematized in commentaries on the topic of haunting—the haunting (...)
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