Philosophy of Psychiatry and Psychopathology

Edited by Şerife Tekin (State University of New York (SUNY))
Assistant editor: Jaipreet Mattu (University of Western Ontario)
About this topic
Summary Philosophy of Psychiatry and Psychopathology occurs at the intersection of general philosophy of science, philosophy of mind, and ethics. It aims to develop answers to a set of theoretical and practical questions pertaining to the nature of mental disorders, mental health research, and practice.
Key works [BROKEN REFERENCE: RADDAEw]#MURPIT Radden 2004 Graham 2002 Fulford 2006 Poland 2011 Thornton 2007 Sadler 2005 Hacking 1995 Flanagan 1999 Schaffner 1993
Introductions Fulford & Sadler 2009 [BROKEN REFERENCE: NATTNPw]#MARPN
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  1. theory of mind.Foerstl J. (ed.) - 2020 - Munich: Flick Flack.
    Die Theory of Mind (ToM) ist eine au fwendige, zu sammengesetzte Leistung, die auf mehreren kognitiven Voraussetzungen aufbaut. Sie wird in Laborsituationen mit anspruchsvollen Paradigmen untersucht. Diesen Ansprüchen sind ältere Menschen aus u nterschiedlichen Gründen oft nicht mehr gewachsen. Schreiten altersassoziierte Probleme wie Herz-Kreislauf-Krankheiten, Seh- und Hörstörungen fort oder entwickeln sich besondere Hirnerkrankungen wie vaskuläre und neurodegenerative Demenzen (zum Beispiel eine frontotemporale Lobärdegeneration), so fällt es zu nehmend schwer, passende Antworten auf schwierige soziale Fragen finden. Überdies muss ToM regelmässig trainiert (...)
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  2. "It starts on TikTok": Looping Effects and The Impact of Social Media on Psychiatric Terms.Owen Chevalier - 2024 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 31 (2):163-174.
    This paper examines the impact of TikTok on the public's understanding and engagement with psychiatric and psychological concepts. The rise of mental health-related content on social media has been linked to an increase in adults seeking a diagnosis of ADHD (Yeung et al., 2022). By reviewing a case study: the revision of the term "object permanence" from a developmental stage to an attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptom, I argue that a looping effect, modeled after Hacking (1999), can explain the pattern of language (...)
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  3. The Meaning(s) of Humiliation According to the Empirical Evidence.Sandy Rea, Jane Mills, Nerina Caltabiano & James Dimmock - 2024 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 31 (2):175-192.
    Despite the advances made in understanding the effects of humiliation, no univocal position regarding its meaning exists. Indeed, so indiscreet is its meaning, the emotion is commonly conflated with other related emotions such as shame, embarrassment, and anger. Employing a scoping review design, this review aimed to scope the empirical literature concerning the meaning of humiliation from the perspective of two definitional parameters: i) status, subsuming the values descriptive and prescriptive, and ii) format, subsuming the values intension and extension. CINAHL, (...)
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  4. Democratizing Psychiatric Research: Recognizing the Potential and the Limits of Experiential Expertise.Phoebe Friesen - 2024 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 31 (2):143-149.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Democratizing Psychiatric ResearchRecognizing the Potential and the Limits of Experiential ExpertiseThe author reports no conflict of interests.First, I want to express my gratitude for such thoughtful and generative responses to the manuscript "Why Democratize Psychiatric Research?," which has been in development for several years and is the product of much reflection that has taken place in academic, advocacy, and interpersonal contexts. I am delighted to see such insightful engagement (...)
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  5. How is a Therapist like a Modeler?Anya Plutynski - 2024 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 31 (2):151-161.
    This paper argues that the process of modeling in science and the process of encountering and working with a client in clinical psychotherapy overlap. In briefer terms: what makes a good therapist is much like what makes a good scientific modeler. Both modeling and psychotherapy are iterative processes, requiring careful observation, generation and testing of hypotheses. Both processes also face similar epistemic and pragmatic trade-offs. Heuristics and biases can shape both practices, for better and worse. Implications are considered for both (...)
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  6. An Interesting Framework That Deserves to Be Developed and Used Widely.David Crepaz-Keay - 2024 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 31 (2):139-141.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:An Interesting Framework That Deserves to Be Developed and Used WidelyThe author reports no conflict of interests.Friesen's "Why Democratize Psychiatric Research?" is an important piece of work and makes a compelling epistemic and ethical case. As someone who has spent decades in the field of (in chronological order): survivor involvement, service user involvement, patient and public involvement and now lived experience; I am delighted when I see a robust (...)
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  7. Scientific Expertise, Service Users and Democratising Psychiatric Research.Sam Fellowes - 2024 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 31 (2):135-137.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Scientific Expertise, Service Users and Democratising Psychiatric ResearchThe author reports no conflict of interests.Friesen outlines six different reasons for democratizing scientific research. Three of them are epistemic and three are ethical. In this commentary I consider how service users might relate to values if significant levels of scientific knowledge are required to understand those values. I specifically consider the traditional theoretical virtues discussed by philosophers of science (Psillos, 1999; (...)
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  8. Why Democratize Psychiatric Research?Phoebe Friesen - 2024 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 31 (2):117-133.
    Building on decades of rich discussions of why 'nothing about us without us' matters in the field of psychiatry, this paper aims to illuminate the justifications underlying participatory research in psychiatry, and how these justifications might shape participatory methodologies. This is accomplished through the examination of several epistemic and ethical features of psychiatry that underlie the importance of engaging in participatory research in the field, unpacking their connection to participatory research, and offering suggestions related to their implications for research methodologies. (...)
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  9. Are Mental Health "Peer Support Workers" Experts by Experience?Mohammed Abouelleil Rashed - 2024 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 31 (2):113-115.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Are Mental Health "Peer Support Workers" Experts by Experience?The author reports no conflict of interests.In this well-argued paper, Dr. Abdi Sanati asks whether a person's experience of mental illness could be the basis for professional expertise and concludes that, "on its own," it cannot be. Elsewhere he states that "the different forms of knowledge that are required for expertise … could not be produced solely on the basis of (...)
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  10. Is Expertise-by-Experience Impossible?Anastasios Dimopoulos - 2024 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 31 (2):109-111.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Is Expertise-by-Experience Impossible?The author reports no conflict of interests.In his article, "Experience and expertise: Can personal experience of mental illness make someone an expert?" Abdi Sanati uses Wittgenstein's arguments on private language and Ryle's philosophy of knowledge to critique the concept of Expertise-by-Experience. The principal argument is that introspection on personal experiences cannot constitute the basis for knowledge underpinning expertise. From the start, and in various sections of the (...)
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  11. Experience and expertise: Could a Person's Experience of Mental Illness Be the Basis of Professional Expertise?Abdi Sanati - 2024 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 31 (2):95-108.
    The title Expert-by-Experience has been used frequently in mental health literature and policy making in recent years. The implication is that by virtue of suffering from a mental disorder, the person has access to a unique form of knowledge that would separate them from others, affording them the status of an expert. In this article, the concept is put under philosophical scrutiny. I use Wittgenstein's Private Language Argument and Ryle's work on introspection to show that personal experience could not be (...)
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  12. Tribute to an Altruistic Editor.Werdie van Staden - 2024 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 31 (2):93-94.
    This editorial celebrates the altruistic work of Professor John Sadler during his tenure as editor of Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology. Since its founding about 31 years ago, he has done this behind-the-scenes work, principally to the benefit of our scholarly community, creating a space and opportunity for excellence in advancing the common interests of philosophers, psychiatrists, psychologists and the people they serve professionally. Much of this dedication and efforts never reach the limelight whilst the journal enjoys increasing visibility and impact, (...)
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  13. Editorial changes at PPP: Welcomes and Thanks.John Z. Sadler - 2024 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 31 (2):91-92.
    After 30 years of co-editing (with Bill Fulford) and editing Philosophy, Psychiatry, & Psychology, I thought it was time for me to step down, and last fall the Association for the Advancement of Philosophy and Psychiatry Executive Council assembled an international search team to select a new Editor-in-Chief. This thoughtful and efficient group, led by Robyn Bluhm, completed the search and selection in a matter of a few months! All of us in the field are grateful to the search committee (...)
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  14. "It starts on TikTok": Looping Effects and The Impact of Social Media on Psychiatric Terms.Owen Chevalier - 2024 - Philosophy Psychiatry and Psychology 31 (2):163-174.
    This paper examines the impact of TikTok on the public's understanding and engagement with psychiatric and psychological concepts. The rise of mental health-related content on social media has been linked to an increase in adults seeking a diagnosis of ADHD (Yeung et al., 2022). By reviewing a case study: the revision of the term "object permanence" from a developmental stage to an attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptom, I argue that a looping effect, modeled after Hacking (1999), can explain the pattern of language (...)
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  15. Is Expertise-by-Experience Impossible?Anastasios Dimopoulos - 2024 - Philosophy Psychiatry and Psychology 31 (2):109-111.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Is Expertise-by-Experience Impossible?The author reports no conflict of interests.In his article, "Experience and expertise: Can personal experience of mental illness make someone an expert?" Abdi Sanati uses Wittgenstein's arguments on private language and Ryle's philosophy of knowledge to critique the concept of Expertise-by-Experience. The principal argument is that introspection on personal experiences cannot constitute the basis for knowledge underpinning expertise. From the start, and in various sections of the (...)
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  16. Experience and expertise: Could a Person's Experience of Mental Illness Be the Basis of Professional Expertise?Abdi Sanati - 2024 - Philosophy Psychiatry and Psychology 31 (2):95-108.
    The title Expert-by-Experience has been used frequently in mental health literature and policy making in recent years. The implication is that by virtue of suffering from a mental disorder, the person has access to a unique form of knowledge that would separate them from others, affording them the status of an expert. In this article, the concept is put under philosophical scrutiny. I use Wittgenstein's Private Language Argument and Ryle's work on introspection to show that personal experience could not be (...)
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  17. Are Mental Health "Peer Support Workers" Experts by Experience?Mohammed Abouelleil Rashed - 2024 - Philosophy Psychiatry and Psychology 31 (2):113-115.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Are Mental Health "Peer Support Workers" Experts by Experience?The author reports no conflict of interests.In this well-argued paper, Dr. Abdi Sanati asks whether a person's experience of mental illness could be the basis for professional expertise and concludes that, "on its own," it cannot be. Elsewhere he states that "the different forms of knowledge that are required for expertise … could not be produced solely on the basis of (...)
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  18. Scientific Expertise, Service Users and Democratising Psychiatric Research.Sam Fellowes - 2024 - Philosophy Psychiatry and Psychology 31 (2):135-137.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Scientific Expertise, Service Users and Democratising Psychiatric ResearchThe author reports no conflict of interests.Friesen outlines six different reasons for democratizing scientific research. Three of them are epistemic and three are ethical. In this commentary I consider how service users might relate to values if significant levels of scientific knowledge are required to understand those values. I specifically consider the traditional theoretical virtues discussed by philosophers of science (Psillos, 1999; (...)
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  19. How is a Therapist like a Modeler?Anya Plutynski - 2024 - Philosophy Psychiatry and Psychology 31 (2):151-161.
    This paper argues that the process of modeling in science and the process of encountering and working with a client in clinical psychotherapy overlap. In briefer terms: what makes a good therapist is much like what makes a good scientific modeler. Both modeling and psychotherapy are iterative processes, requiring careful observation, generation and testing of hypotheses. Both processes also face similar epistemic and pragmatic trade-offs. Heuristics and biases can shape both practices, for better and worse. Implications are considered for both (...)
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  20. Democratizing Psychiatric Research: Recognizing the Potential and the Limits of Experiential Expertise.Phoebe Friesen - 2024 - Philosophy Psychiatry and Psychology 31 (2):143-149.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Democratizing Psychiatric ResearchRecognizing the Potential and the Limits of Experiential ExpertiseThe author reports no conflict of interests.First, I want to express my gratitude for such thoughtful and generative responses to the manuscript "Why Democratize Psychiatric Research?," which has been in development for several years and is the product of much reflection that has taken place in academic, advocacy, and interpersonal contexts. I am delighted to see such insightful engagement (...)
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  21. An Interesting Framework That Deserves to Be Developed and Used Widely.David Crepaz-Keay - 2024 - Philosophy Psychiatry and Psychology 31 (2):139-141.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:An Interesting Framework That Deserves to Be Developed and Used WidelyThe author reports no conflict of interests.Friesen's "Why Democratize Psychiatric Research?" is an important piece of work and makes a compelling epistemic and ethical case. As someone who has spent decades in the field of (in chronological order): survivor involvement, service user involvement, patient and public involvement and now lived experience; I am delighted when I see a robust (...)
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  22. Why Democratize Psychiatric Research?Phoebe Friesen - 2024 - Philosophy Psychiatry and Psychology 31 (2):117-133.
    Building on decades of rich discussions of why 'nothing about us without us' matters in the field of psychiatry, this paper aims to illuminate the justifications underlying participatory research in psychiatry, and how these justifications might shape participatory methodologies. This is accomplished through the examination of several epistemic and ethical features of psychiatry that underlie the importance of engaging in participatory research in the field, unpacking their connection to participatory research, and offering suggestions related to their implications for research methodologies. (...)
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  23. The Meaning(s) of Humiliation According to the Empirical Evidence.Sandy Rea, Jane Mills, Nerina Caltabiano & James Dimmock - 2024 - Philosophy Psychiatry and Psychology 31 (2):175-192.
    Despite the advances made in understanding the effects of humiliation, no univocal position regarding its meaning exists. Indeed, so indiscreet is its meaning, the emotion is commonly conflated with other related emotions such as shame, embarrassment, and anger. Employing a scoping review design, this review aimed to scope the empirical literature concerning the meaning of humiliation from the perspective of two definitional parameters: i) status, subsuming the values descriptive and prescriptive, and ii) format, subsuming the values intension and extension. CINAHL, (...)
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  24. Polythematic Delusions and Logico-theoretical vs. Experimentalist Turn of Mind.Paul Franceschi - 2013 - Journal for Neurocognitive Research 55:67–73.
    This article aims to contribute to cognitive therapy of polythematic delusions by proposing a preliminary step to the implementation of traditional cognitive therapy, based on the construction of alternative hypotheses to delusions and testing of the latter. This additional step resides in the construction in the patient of the necessary skills to use the general experimentalist method of knowledge acquisition. Such an approach is based on the contrast between the logico-theoretical and the experimentalist turn of mind. Some elements such as (...)
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  25. Differential Cognitive Treatment of Polythematic Delusions and Generalized Anxiety Disorder.Paul Franceschi - 2011 - Journal de Thérapie Comportementale Et Cognitive 21 (4):121-125.
    Schizophrenia is often associated with other physical and mental problems. Generalized anxiety disorder is notably one of the comorbid disorders which is often linked to schizophrenia. The association of polythematic delusions and of ideas resulting from generalized anxiety disorder complicates the exercise of the corresponding cognitive therapy, for the resulting ideas are most often inextricably intertwined. In what follows, we endeavour to propose a methodology for the differential treatment of polythematic delusions inherent to schizophrenia when combined with ideas originating from (...)
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  26. Theory of Cognitive Distortions: Personalization.Paul Franceschi - 2007 - Journal de Thérapie Comportementale Et Cognitive 20 (2):51-55.
    In a previous paper (Compléments pour une théorie des distorsions cognitives, Journal de Thérapie Comportementale et Cognitive, 2007), we did present some elements aimed at contributing to a general theory of cognitive distortions. Based on the reference class, the duality and the system of taxa, these elements led to distinguish between the general cognitive distortions (dichotomous reasoning, disqualification of one pole, minimization, maximization) and the specific cognitive distortions (disqualifying the positive, selective abstraction, catastrophism). By also distinguishing between three levels of (...)
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  27. Theory of Cognitive Distortions: Application to Generalised Anxiety Disorder.Paul Franceschi - 2008 - Journal de Thérapie Comportementale Et Cognitive 18:127-131.
    In a previous paper (Compléments pour une théorie des distorsions cognitives, Journal de Thérapie Comportementale et Cognitive, 2007), we did present some elements aimed at contributing to a general theory of cognitive distortions. The latter elements, based on the reference class, the duality and the system of taxa, are applied here to generalised anxiety disorder. This allows to describe, on the one hand, the specific distortions related to generalised anxiety disorder, consistently with recent work emphasising the role played by uncertain (...)
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  28. Understanding, The Manifest Image, and 'Postmodernism' in Philosophy of Psychiatry.Quinn Hiroshi Gibson - 2024 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 31 (1):21-24.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Understanding, The Manifest Image, and 'Postmodernism' in Philosophy of PsychiatryThe author reports no conflicts of interest.Despite how he begins, suggesting that it is somehow a problem for me that I think "there is such a thing as philosophy, which could then be useful for psychopathology," (Ghaemi, 2024 p. 17, emphasis added), ultimately it is clear that the possibility of philosophy is not the issue for Ghaemi. Rather, his issue (...)
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  29. Deconstructing the Distinction Between Religious Experience and Psychopathology.Mohammed Abouelleil Rashed - forthcoming - Philosophy Psychiatry and Psychology.
    Debates on the distinction between religious experience and mental disorder tend to assume, rather than argue for, the existence of unique types of experience: the religious and the psychopathological. This paper interrogates this approach to the problem. It deconstructs the distinction by examining what the distinction is about beyond the terms in which it is presented and whether it matters who is trying to make it. A key idea is that one’s standpoint in the debate—that is, whether one adopts a (...)
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  30. Torturous withdrawal: Emotional compulsion in addiction.Arthur Krieger - 2024 - European Journal of Philosophy:1-17.
    Withdrawal involves emotional pain that motivates much addictive behavior. In this paper, I argue that the emotional pain of withdrawal compels much addictive behavior. Researchers have noticed this possibility but it is widely underappreciated. Among philosophers, only Hanna Pickard has discussed emotional compulsion in addiction, and the emotional aspect of withdrawal has been almost completely neglected. Accounts of emotional compulsion in the philosophical literature (from Tappolet, Elster, and Furrow) probably do not capture how the distress of withdrawal compels, so I (...)
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  31. Book Review: Åsa Jansson, From Melancholia to Depression: Disordered Mood in Nineteenth-Century Psychiatry. [REVIEW]George Tudorie - 2024 - History of Psychiatry 35 (2).
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  32. The Ethics of Automating Therapy.Jake Burley, James J. Hughes, Alec Stubbs & Nir Eisikovits - 2024 - Ieet White Papers.
    The mental health crisis and loneliness epidemic have sparked a growing interest in leveraging artificial intelligence (AI) and chatbots as a potential solution. This report examines the benefits and risks of incorporating chatbots in mental health treatment. AI is used for mental health diagnosis and treatment decision-making and to train therapists on virtual patients. Chatbots are employed as always-available intermediaries with therapists, flagging symptoms for human intervention. But chatbots are also sold as stand-alone virtual therapists or as friends and lovers. (...)
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  33. The varieties of anomalous self experiences in schizophrenia: Splitting of the mind at a crossroad.Sohee Park & Henry A. Nasrallah - 2014 - Schizophrenia Research 152 (1):1-4.
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  34. Associations among domains of self-disturbance in schizophrenia.Mallory J. Klaunig, Christi L. Trask, Aaron M. Neis, Jonathan R. Cohn, Xuefang Chen, Alysia M. Berglund & David C. Cicero - 2018 - Psychiatry Research 267:187-194.
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  35. Aberrant Salience, Self-Concept Clarity, and Interview-Rated Psychotic-Like Experiences.David C. Cicero, Anna R. Docherty, Theresa M. Becker, Elizabeth A. Martin & John G. Kerns - 2015 - Journal of Personality Disorders 29 (1):79-99.
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  36. Schizophrenia and Corollary Discharge: A Neuroscientific Overview and Translational Implications.Rujuta Parlikar, Anushree Bose & Ganesan Venkatasubramanian - 2019 - Clinical Psychopharmacology and Neuroscience 17 (2):170-182.
  37. The social cognition of psychopaths: recent scientific findings.Silvio José Lemos Vasconcellos, Roberta Salvador-Silva, Fernanda de Vargas, Fernanda Xavier Hoffmeister, Priscila Flores Prates & Renan Meirelles da Silva - 2017 - Estudos de Psicologia (Campinas) 34 (1):151-159.
    Resumo O psicopata apresenta traços na personalidade relacionados à ausência de remorso e uma maior dominância social, expressos muitas vezes como manipulação de outros indivíduos. Em estudos atuais sugere-se que psicopatas podem apresentar deficiências no processamento de estímulos emocionais em uma situação de interação social. Este estudo tem por objetivo realizar uma revisão teórica, não sistemática, discutindo pesquisas recentes sobre o tema. A partir da leitura, conclui-se que novas considerações revelam-se pertinentes, pois nem sempre o tipo de disfunção da cognição (...)
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  38. How semantic deficits in schizotypy help understand language and thought disorders in schizophrenia: a systematic and integrative review.Hélio Anderson Tonelli - 2014 - Trends in Psychiatry and Psychotherapy 36 (2):75-88.
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  39. Psychological Perspectives on Perceptions of Black Victimhood in the United States.Michael J. Perez & Phia S. Salter - 2022 - Polity 54 (4):858-865.
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  40. In Defense of Introspective Affordances.David Miguel Gray - 2024 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology:1-19.
    Psychological and philosophical studies have extended J. J. Gibson’s notion of affordances. Affordances are possibilities for bodily action presented to us by the objects of our perception. Recent work has argued that we should extend the actions afforded by perception to mental action. I argue that we can extend the notion of affordance itself. What I call ‘Introspective Affordances’ are possibilities for mental action presented to us by introspectively accessible states. While there are some prima facie worries concerning the non-perceptual (...)
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  41. Proper Functions are Proximal Functions.Harriet Fagerberg & Justin Garson - forthcoming - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science.
    This paper argues that proper functions are proximal functions. In other words, it rejects the notion that there are distal biological functions – strictly speaking, distal functions are not functions at all, but simply beneficial effects normally associated with a trait performing its function. Once we rule out distal functions, two further positions become available: dysfunctions are simply failures of proper function, and pathological conditions are dysfunctions. Although elegant and seemingly intuitive, this simple view has had surprisingly little uptake in (...)
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  42. Spit for Science and the Limits of Applied Psychiatric Genetics.Eric Turkheimer & Sarah Rodock Greer - forthcoming - Philosophy Psychiatry and Psychology.
    The research program Spit For Science was launched at Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) in 2011. Since then, more than 10,000 freshmen have been enrolled in the program, filling out extensive questionnaires about their drinking, general substance use, and related behaviors, and also contributing saliva for genotyping. The goals of the program, as initially stated by the investigators, were to find the genes underlying the heritability of alcohol use and related behaviors, and in addition to put genetic knowledge to work in (...)
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  43. Validity Drifts in Psychiatric Research.Matthias Michel - forthcoming - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science.
    Psychiatric research is in crisis because of repeated failures to discover new drugs for mental disorders. Lack of measurement validity could partly account for these failures. If researchers do not actually measure the effects of drugs on the disorders they aim to investigate, one should expect suboptimal treatment outcomes. I argue that this is the case, focusing on depression, and fear & anxiety disorders. In doing so, I show how psychiatric research illustrates a more general phenomenon that I call “validity (...)
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  44. Understanding, The Manifest Image, and 'Postmodernism' in Philosophy of Psychiatry.Quinn Hiroshi Gibson - 2024 - Philosophy Psychiatry and Psychology 31 (1):21-24.
    Despite how he begins, suggesting that it is somehow a problem for me that I think "there is such a thing as philosophy, which could then be useful for psychopathology," ultimately it is clear that the possibility of philosophy is not the issue for Ghaemi. Rather, his issue is with academic philosophy of psychiatry, as he sees it, and with my failure to ask what underlying assumptions typically operate in it.I do not dispute that someone like Jaspers would want to (...)
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  45. Does Addiction Cause Addictive Behavior?Arthur Krieger - 2024 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 31 (1):79-88.
    Is addiction a behavioral pattern, or the underlying cause of a behavioral pattern? Both views are found in prominent accounts of addiction, but theorists generally do not notice that they are taking a controversial position, let alone justify it. A third possibility is that addiction consists in both addictive behavior and its causes, though this view is less obviously present in the literature. I argue that two important considerations favor the "cause view" over the "behavior" and "hybrid" views. The first (...)
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  46. How Narrative Counts in Phenomenological Models of Schizophrenia.Elizabeth Pienkos - 2024 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 31 (1):71-73.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:How Narrative Counts in Phenomenological Models of SchizophreniaThe author reports no conflicts of interest.Rosanna Wannberg (2024) offers an intriguing and novel critique of the predominant phenomenological model of schizophrenia, the ipseity disturbance hypothesis. According to this model, which was initially proposed by Sass and Parnas (2003), schizophrenia is best understood as arising from a disturbance or instability of minimal or basic self-hood, the sense of being present to oneself (...)
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  47. The Social, the Outer and the Reflexive: Some More Dimensions of Subjectivity, Schizophrenia, and Its Recovery.Rosanna Wannberg - 2024 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 31 (1):75-78.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:The Social, the Outer and the ReflexiveSome More Dimensions of Subjectivity, Schizophrenia, and Its RecoveryThe author reports no conflicts of interest.First of all, I want to express my gratitude to the Association for the Advancement of Philosophy and Psychiatry, Philosophy, Psychiatry, & Psychology, and the Karl Jaspers Award Committee for their recognition of my paper "Institution or individuality? Some reflections on the lessons to be learned from personal accounts (...)
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  48. Phenomenological Interviews and Tourette's.Lisa Curtis-Wendlandt & Jack Reynolds - 2024 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 31 (1):49-53.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Phenomenological Interviews and Tourette'sThe authors report no conflicts of interest.We appreciate the responses from the two clinicians, Efron and Mathieson. We agree with their reminder about the holistic nature of clinician's engagement (mood, sociality, and work life) and with their emphasis on patient-reported outcome measures, although this is not quite what we did in our interviews. As has recently been recognized in section 24 of the Victorian Mental Health (...)
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  49. Recovering One's Self from Psychosis: A Philosophical Analysis.Paul B. Lieberman - 2024 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 31 (1):67-70.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Recovering One's Self from PsychosisA Philosophical AnalysisThe author reports no conflicts of interest.Rosanna Wannberg (2024) has given us a dense but helpful introduction to certain philosophical questions raised by the fact that many patients recovering from psychotic illnesses describe their recovery in terms of gaining or regaining a 'sense of self' and a 'sense of agency,' which often involves acceptance of the 'fact' of being mentally ill, for example, (...)
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  50. Institution or Individuality? Some Reflections on the Lessons To Be Learned From Personal Accounts of Recovery From Schizophrenia.Rosanna Wannberg - 2024 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 31 (1):55-66.
    In this paper, I argue for a social conception of subjectivity, via a philosophical reading of first-person accounts of recovery from schizophrenia, published in the _Schizophrenia Bulletin_. Following the hypothesis that these accounts exemplify a more general tension between, on the one hand, normative and social dimensions of the self, and on the other, experiential and psychological dimensions, the first section of the paper formulates the problem from a philosophical perspective inspired by Ludwig Wittgenstein's grammatical approach. The second section explores (...)
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