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  1. Depressive Delusions.Magdalena Antrobus & Lisa Bortolotti - 2016 - Filosofia Unisinos 17 (2):192-201.
    In this paper we have two main aims. First, we present an account of mood-congruent delusions in depression (hereafter, depressive delusions). We propose that depressive delusions constitute acknowledgements of self-related beliefs acquired as a result of a negatively biased learning process. Second, we argue that depressive delusions have the potential for psychological and epistemic benefits despite their obvious epistemic and psychological costs. We suggest that depressive delusions play an important role in preserving a person’s overall coherence and narrative identity at (...)
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  2. Do People Defy Generalizations?: Examining the Case Against Evidence-Based Medicine in Psychiatry.Gloria Ayob - 2008 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 15 (2):167-174.
  3. Commentary on "Edmund Husserl's Influence on Karl Jaspers's Phenomenology".Jean-Michel Azorin & Jean Naudin - 1997 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 4 (1):37-39.
  4. Clinical Anecdotes: A Painful Lack of Wounds.Christopher Bailey - 2009 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 16 (3):223-224.
  5. Connective Conceptual Analysis and Psychology.Konrad Banicki - 2012 - Theory and Psychology 22 (3):310-323.
    Conceptual analysis, like any exclusively theoretical activity, is far from overrated in current psychology. Such a situation can be related both to the contingent influences of contextual and historical character and to the more essential metatheoretical reasons. After a short discussion of the latter it is argued that even within a strictly empirical psychology there are non-trivial tasks that can be attached to well-defined and methodologically reliable, conceptual work. This kind of method, inspired by the ideas of Ludwig Wittgenstein, Peter (...)
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  6. Review of Bortolotti's Delusions and Other Irrational Beliefs. [REVIEW]Emily Barrett & Cory Wright - 2015 - Philosophical Quarterly 65 (260):600–603.
  7. Clinical Practice: Between Explicit and Tacit Knowledge, Between Dialogue and Technique.Else Margrethe Berg - 2008 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 15 (2):151-157.
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  8. Doomed by Nature: The Inevitable Failure of Our Naturally Selected Functions.Andreas Blocdek - 2005 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 12 (4):343-348.
  9. The Epistemology of Randomized, Controlled Trials and Application in Psychiatry.Derek Bolton - 2008 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 15 (2):159-165.
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  10. Costs and Benefits of Realism and Optimism.Lisa Bortolotti & Magdalena Antrobus - 2015 - Current Opinion in Psychiatry 28 (2):194-198.
    Purpose of review: What is the relationship between rationality and mental health? By considering the psychological literature on depressive realism and unrealistic optimism it was hypothesized that, in the context of judgments about the self, accurate cognitions are psychologically maladaptive and inaccurate cognitions are psychologically adaptive. Recent studies recommend being cautious in drawing any general conclusion about style of thinking and mental health. Recent findings: Recent investigations suggest that people with depressive symptoms are more accurate than controls in tasks involving (...)
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  11. Affective Dimensions of the Phenomenon of Double Bookkeeping in Delusions.Lisa Bortolotti & Matthew Broome - 2012 - Emotion Review 4 (2):187-191.
    It has been argued that schizophrenic delusions are “behaviourally inert.” This is evidence for the phenomenon of “double bookkeeping,” according to which people are not consistent in their commitment to the content of their delusions. The traditional explanation for the phenomenon is that people do not genuinely believe the content of their delusions. In the article, we resist the traditional explanation and offer an alternative hypothesis: people with delusions often fail to acquire or to maintain the motivation to act on (...)
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  12. Self-Deception, Delusion and the Boundaries of Folk Psychology.Lisa Bortolotti & Matteo Mameli - 2012 - Humana Mente 20:203-221.
    In this paper we argue that both self-deception and delusions can be understood in folk-psychological terms.
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  13. From Szasz to Foucault: On the Role of Critical Psychiatry.Pat Bracken & Philip Thomas - 2010 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 17 (3):219-228.
    Because psychiatry deals specifically with ‘mental’ suffering, its efforts are always centrally involved with the meaningful world of human reality. As such, it sits at the interface of a number of discourses: genetics and neuroscience, psychology and sociology, anthropology, philosophy, and the humanities. Each of these provides frameworks, concepts, and examples that seek to assist our attempts to understand mental distress and how it might be helped. However, these discourses work with different assumptions, methodologies, values, and priorities. Some are in (...)
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  14. Listening to Foucault.Patrick Bracken - 2002 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 9 (2):187-188.
  15. The Academic Face of Psychoanalysis: Papers in Philosophy, the Humanities, and the British Clinical Tradition.Louise Braddock & Michael Lacewing (eds.) - 2007 - Routledge.
    Ever since Freud, psychoanalysts have explored the connections between psychoanalysis and literature and psychoanalysis and philosophy, while literary criticism, social science and philosophy have all reflected on and made use of ideas from psychoanalytic theory. The Academic Face of Psychoanalysis presents contributions from these fields and gives the reader an insight into different understandings and applications of psychoanalytic theory. This book comprises twelve contributions from experts in their fields covering philosophy, psychoanalysis, sociology and literary theory. The chapters are divided into (...)
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  16. Controversy in Psychiatry.John Paul Brady & H. Keith H. Brodie (eds.) - 1978 - Saunders.
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  17. Duševne bolesti i rasprava o biološkim funkcijama (Eng. Mental ilness and the debate on biological functions).Zdenka Brzović - 2016 - In Snježana Prijić-Samaržija, Luca Malatesti & Elvio Baccarini (eds.), Moralni, Politički I Epistemološki Odgovori Na Društvene Devijacije (Eng. Moral, Political, and Epistemological Responses to Antisocial Deviation). Rijeka: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences in Rijeka. pp. 183-199.
    In this paper, I discuss the question whether objective criteria could be provided for judging something to be a mental illness. I consider the two most prominent objectivist or naturalistic accounts of mental illness, evolutionary and bio-statistical account, which offer such a criterion by relying on the notion of biological function. According to such suggestions, illness is a condition in which there is dysfunciton in some feature of an organism. In this context, I consider different accounts for ascribing functions in (...)
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  18. Il modello medico forte e i disturbi antisociali della personalità (Eng. The strong medical model and antisocial personality disorders)).Zdenka Brzović, Marko Jurjako & Luca Malatesti - 2018 - Sistemi Intelligenti 30 (1):175-188.
    Dominic Murphy in several influential publications has formulated and defended what he calls the strong medical model of mental illness. At the core of this project is the objectivist requirement of classifying mental illness in terms of their aetiologies, preferably characterised by multilevel mechanistic explanations of dysfunctions in neurocomputational processes. We are sympathetic to this project and we devise an argument to support it based on a conception of psychiatric kinds. Murphy has, moreover, maintained that there are some open issues (...)
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  19. The Shift to Mechanistic Explanation and Classification.Kelso Cratsley - 2017 - In S. Tekin & J. Poland (eds.), Extraordinary Science and Psychiatry: Responses to the Crisis in Mental Health Research. MIT Press. pp. 163-196.
    Despite widespread recognition that psychiatry would be better served by a classificatory system based on etiology rather than mere description, it goes without saying that much of the necessary work is yet to be done. In this chapter I take up the increasingly important question of how mechanistic explanation fits into the larger effort to build a scientifically sound etiological and nosological framework. I sketch a rough picture of what mechanistic explanation should look like in the context of psychiatric research, (...)
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  20. Cognitive Science and Explanations of Psychopathology.Kelso Cratsley & Richard Samuels - 2013 - In K. W. M. Fulford (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy and Psychiatry. Oxford University Press. pp. 413-433.
    This chapter examines the core explanatory strategies of cognitive science and their application to the study of psychopathology. In addition to providing a taxonomy of different strategies, we illustrate their application, with special attention to Autism Spectrum Disorder and Major Depressive Disorder. We conclude by considering two challenges to the prospects of a developed cognitive science of psychopathology.
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  21. Introducing a" Deleuze Effect" Into Psychiatry.Larry Davidson & Golan Shahar - 2007 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 14 (3):243-247.
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  22. Stimulating Good Practice - What an Embodied Cognition Approach Could Mean for Deep Brain Stimulation Practice.Sanneke de Haan, Erik Rietveld & Damiaan Denys - 2014 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 5 (4).
    We whole-heartedly agree with Mecacci and Haselager(2014) on the need to investigate the psychosocial effects of deep brain stimulation (DBS), and particularly to find out how to prevent adverse psychosocial effects. We also agree with the authors on the value of an embodied, embedded, enactive approach (EEC) to the self and the mind–brain problem. However, we do not think this value primarily lies in dissolving a so-called “maladaptation” of patients to their DBS device. In this comment, we challenge three central (...)
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  23. Effects of Deep Brain Stimulation on the Lived Experience of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Patients.Sanneke de Haan, Erik Rietveld, Martin Stokhof & Damiaan Denys - 2015 - PLoS ONE 10 (8):1-29.
    Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) is a relatively new, experimental treatment for patients suffering from treatment-refractory Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD). The effects of treatment are typically assessed with psychopathological scales that measure the amount of symptoms. However, clinical experience indicates that the effects of DBS are not limited to symptoms only: patients for instance report changes in perception, feeling stronger and more confident, and doing things unreflectively. Our aim is to get a better overview of the whole variety of changes that (...)
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  24. The Phenomenology of Deep Brain Stimulation-Induced Changes in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Patients: An Enactive Affordance-Based Model.Sanneke de Haan, Erik Rietveld, Martin Stokhof & Damiaan Denys - 2013 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:1-14.
    People suffering from Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) do things they do not want to do, and/or they think things they do not want to think. In about 10 percent of OCD patients, none of the available treatment options is effective. A small group of these patients is currently being treated with deep brain stimulation (DBS). Deep brain stimulation involves the implantation of electrodes in the brain. These electrodes give a continuous electrical pulse to the brain area in which they are implanted. (...)
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  25. The Politics of Mental Illness.Ronald de Sousa - 1972 - Inquiry : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 15 (1-4):187-202.
  26. Meaning, Truth, and the Self: Commentary on Campbell and Parnas and Sass.Naomi Eilan - 2001 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 8 (2):121-132.
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  27. Lalumera, E. 2016. Saving the DSM-5? Descriptive Conceptions and Theoretical Concepts of Mental Disorders.Lalumera Elisabetta - forthcoming - Medicina E Storia 9.
    At present, psychiatric disorders are characterized descriptively, as the standard within the scientific community for communication and, to a certain extent, for diagnosis, is the DSM, now at its fifth edition. The main reasons for descriptivism are the aim of achieving reliability of diagnosis and improving communication in a situation of theoretical disagreement, and the Ignorance argument, which starts with acknowledgment of the relative failure of the project of finding biomarkers for most mental disorders. Descriptivism has also the advantage of (...)
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  28. Assumptions About Human Nature and the Impact of Philosophical Concepts on Professional Issues: A Questionnaire-Based Study with 800 Students From Psychology, Philosophy, and Science.Jochen Fahrenberg & Marcus Cheetham - 2007 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 14 (3):183-201.
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  29. The Evaluation of Implicit Anthropologies.Jochen Fahrenberg & Marcus Cheetham - 2007 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 14 (3):213-214.
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  30. Response to the Commentaries.Lloyd Fields - 1996 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 3 (4):291-292.
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  31. Clinicians' Folk Taxonomies of Mental Disorders.Elizabeth H. Flanagan & Roger K. Blashfield - 2007 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 14 (3):249-269.
  32. Phenomenology and Modern Behavioral Psychology.Lindsay B. Fletcher & Steven C. Hayes - 2008 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 15 (3):255-258.
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  33. A Place for Subjectivity in Psychiatry.Phoebe Friesen - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 8 (2):116-117.
  34. Taking the Long View: An Emerging Framework for Translational Psychiatric Science.Bill Fulford, Lisa Bortolotti & Matthew Broome - 2014 - World Psychiatry 13 (2):110-117.
    Understood in their historical context, current debates about psychiatric classification, prompted by the publication of the DSM-5, open up new opportunities for improved translational research in psychiatry. In this paper, we draw lessons for translational research from three time slices of 20th century psychiatry. From the first time slice, 1913 and the publication of Jaspers’ General Psychopathology, the lesson is that translational research in psychiatry requires a pluralistic approach encompassing equally the sciences of mind (including the social sciences) and of (...)
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  35. Editors' Introduction.K. W. M. Fulford & John Z. Sadler - 2009 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 16 (3):221-221.
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  36. The Hiddenness of Psychological Symptom Amplification: Some Historical Observations.Justin Garson - 2016 - In Daniel Moseley & Gary Gala (eds.), Philosophy and Psychiatry: Problems, Intersections, and New Perspectives. New York: Routledge. pp. 29-35.
    This book chapter is a short response to a paper by the psychiatrist Nicholas Kontos, on the phenomenon of psychological symptom amplification (PSA). PSA takes place when patients present symptoms to clinicians that they do not actually have, or, perhaps more commonly, they exaggerate symptoms they do have. Kontos argues that, because of modern medical training, it is very difficult for clinicians to recognize that the patient's presented symptoms are exaggerated or nonexistent. I argue that the hiddenness of PSA is (...)
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  37. Schizophrenia and the Dysfunctional Brain.Justin Garson - 2010 - Journal of Cognitive Science 11:215-246.
    Scientists, philosophers, and even the lay public commonly accept that schizophrenia stems from a biological or internal ‘dysfunction.’ However, this assessment is typically accompanied neither by well-defined criteria for determining that something is dysfunctional nor empirical evidence that schizophrenia satisfies those criteria. In the following, a concept of biological function is developed and applied to a neurobiological model of schizophrenia. It concludes that current evidence does not warrant the claim that schizophrenia stems from a biological dysfunction, and, in fact, that (...)
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  38. The Philosophy of Psychiatry: A Companion.Bernard Gert & Charles M. Culver - 2004 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
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  39. Electroconvulsive Therapy and the Fear of Deviance.James Giles - 2002 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 32 (1):61–87.
    After reaching the verge of obsolescence, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is once again on the increase. There remains, however, no sound theoretical basis for its use. By 1948 at least 50 different theories had been proposed to account for the workings of ECT. Today there are numerous more. Further, there is no good evidence for its therapeutic effectiveness. Although some studies show what are claimed to be positive results, others show significant amount of relapse, even with severe depression (the disorder against (...)
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  40. Pathology of the Mind: Disorder Versus Disability.Richard G. T. Gipps - 2008 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 15 (4):341-344.
  41. Nonlinear Dynamics at the Cutting Edge of Modernity: A Postmodern View.Gordon G. Globus - 2005 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 12 (3):229-234.
  42. Alien Landscapes? Interpreting Disordered Minds.Jonathan Glover - 2014 - Harvard University Press.
    We have made huge progress in understanding the biology of mental illnesses, but comparatively little in interpreting them at the psychological level. The eminent philosopher Jonathan Glover believes that there is real hope of progress in the human interpretation of disordered minds. -/- The challenge is that the inner worlds of people with psychiatric disorders can seem strange, like alien landscapes, and this strangeness can deter attempts at understanding. Do people with disorders share enough psychology with other people to make (...)
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  43. Philosophical Psychopathology.George Graham & G. Lynn Stephens - 1994 - MIT Press.
  44. Can Delusions Play a Protective Role?Rachel Gunn & Lisa Bortolotti - 2018 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences:1-21.
    After briefly reviewing some of the empirical and philosophical literature suggesting that there may be an adaptive role for delusion formation, we discuss the results of a recent study consisting of in-depth interviews with people experiencing delusions. We analyse three such cases in terms of the circumstances preceding the development of the delusion; the effects of the development of the delusion on the person’s situation; and the potential protective nature of the delusional belief as seen from the first-person perspective. We (...)
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  45. Phenomenological Methods in Psychiatry: A Necessary First Step.Mona Gupta & L. Rex Kay - 2002 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 9 (1):93-96.
  46. Kinds of People: Moving Targets.Ian Hacking - 2007 - In Proceedings of the British Academy, Volume 151, 2006 Lectures. pp. 285-318.
  47. The Social Construction of What?Ian Hacking - 1999 - Harvard University Press.
    Especially troublesome in this dispute is the status of the natural sciences, and this is where Hacking finds some of his most telling cases, from the conflict ...
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  48. Kinds of Kinds: A Conceptual Taxonomy of Psychiatric Categories.Nick Haslam - 2002 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 9 (3):203-217.
    A pluralistic view of psychiatric classification is defended, according to which psychiatric categories take a variety of structural forms. An ordered taxonomy of these forms—non-kinds, practical kinds, fuzzy kinds, discrete kinds, and natural kinds—is presented and exemplified. It is argued that psychiatric categories cannot all be understood as pragmatically grounded, and at least some reflect naturally occurring discontinuities without thereby representing natural kinds. Even if essentialist accounts of mental disorders are generally mistaken, they are not implied whenever a psychiatric category (...)
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  49. Jakob Friedrich Fries und die moderne Psychiatrie.Kay Herrmann - 2016 - E-Journal Philosophie der Psychologie 22 (2016).
    Dieser Aufsatz will zeigen, dass die Beiträge von Jakob Friedrich Fries (1773–1843) zur Psychiatrie leider (zu Unrecht) vergessen, aber überaus aktuell sind. Seine Überlegungen sowie die der Wissenschaftler, die ihm gefolgt sind, haben in den Darstellungen der Geschichte der Psychiatrie mehr Beachtung verdient.
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  50. Jakob Friedrich Fries und der Psychologismusstreit.Kay Herrmann - 2015 - Archiv für Begriffsgeschichte 57:176–196.
    To assert its position as the “Queen of the sciences,” philosophy responded to the developing trend in the mid-19th century to divide psychology from philosophy by coining the battle slogan of ‘psychologism’. However, specifically with regard to the philosopher Jakob Friedrich Fries (1773–1843), who was viewed as the principal representative of psychologism, this appellation truly does not apply. Fries never took seriously any ‘anthropologized apriori’ of the kind represented by evolutionary epistemology (for example, Konrad Lorenz). For Fries, the laws of (...)
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