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  1. Seeing and Inviting Participation in Autistic Interactions.Hanne De Jaegher - forthcoming - Transcultural Psychiatry.
    What does it take to see how autistic people participate in social interactions? And what does it take to support and invite more participation? Western medicine and cognitive science tend to think of autism mainly in terms of social and communicative deficits. But research shows that autistic people can interact with a skill and sophistication that are hard to see when starting from a deficit idea. Research also shows that not only autistic people, but also their non-autistic interaction partners can (...)
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  2. Book Review: Clean Hands? Philosophical Lessons From Scrupulosity by Jesse S. Summers and Walter Sinnott-Armstrong. [REVIEW]Pei-Hua Huang - forthcoming - Journal of Applied Philosophy.
  3. Mind-Wandering: A Philosophical Guide.Zachary C. Irving & Aaron Glasser - forthcoming - Philosophical Compass.
    Philosophers have long been fascinated by the stream of consciousness––thoughts, images, and bits of inner speech that dance across the inner stage. Yet for centuries, such “mind-wandering” was deemed private and thus resistant to empirical investigation. Recent developments in psychology and neuroscience have reinvigorated scientific interest in the stream of thought, leading some researchers to dub this “the era of the wandering mind”. Despite this flurry of progress, scientists have stressed that mind-wandering research requires firmer philosophical foundations. The time is (...)
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  4. Essay Review: The Historiography of the History of Psychiatry.Dr Jerome Kroll - forthcoming - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 2 (3):267-275.
  5. Mild Mania and the Theory of Health: A Response to "Mild Mania and Well-Being".Professor Lennart Nordenfelt - forthcoming - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 1 (3):179-184.
    In this response to "Mild Mania and Well-Being" I propose a different analytic strategy and scrutinize the presented case of mild mania within the framework of a holistic theory of health. I distinguish between the following fundamental questions: (1) is mild mania a disease or illness? (2) does the mild mania of Mr. M. reduce his health significantly? and (3) should Mr. M. be recommended treatment with lithium or not? I answer the first question in the affirmative. I propose some (...)
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  6. Can Being Told You ’Re Ill Make You Ill? A Discussion of Psychiatry, Religion, and Out of the Ordinary Experiences.‘.Anastasia Philippa Scrutton - forthcoming - Think.
  7. Schizophrenia or Possession? A Reply to Kemal Irmak and Nuray Karanci.Anastasia Philippa Scrutton - forthcoming - Journal of Religion and Health.
    A recent paper in this journal argues that some cases of schizophrenia should be seen as cases of demon possession and treated by faith healers. A reply, also published in this journal, responds by raising concerns about the intellectual credibility and potentially harmful practical implications of demon possession beliefs. My paper contributes to the discussion, arguing that a critique of demon possession beliefs in the context of schizophrenia is needed, but suggesting an alternative basis for it. It also reflects on (...)
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  8. Two Christian Theologies of Depression.Anastasia Philippa Scrutton - forthcoming - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology.
    Some recent considerations of religion and psychiatry have drawn a distinction between pathological and spiritual/mystical experiences of mental phenomena typically regarded as within the realm of psychiatry (e.g. depression, hearing voices, seeing visions/hallucinations). Such a distinction has clinical implications, particularly in relation to whether some religious people who suffer from depression, hear voices, or see visions should be biomedically treated. Approaching this question from a theological and philosophical perspective, I draw a distinction between (what I call) ‘spiritual health’ (SH) and (...)
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  9. Achieving Cumulative Progress In Understanding Crime: Some Insights From the Philosophy of Science.Jacqueline Anne Sullivan - forthcoming - Psychology, Crime and Law.
    Crime is a serious social problem, but its causes are not exclusively social. There is growing consensus that explaining and preventing it requires interdisciplinary research efforts. Indeed, the landscape of contemporary criminology includes a variety of theoretical models that incorporate psychological, biological and sociological factors. These multi-disciplinary approaches, however, have yet to radically advance scientific understandings of crime and shed light on how to manage it. In this paper, using conceptual tools on offer in the philosophy of science in combination (...)
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  10. The Importance of Pluralism for Psychiatry.Elly Vintiadis - forthcoming - In Maria Kanellopoulou-Botti & Fereniki Panagopoulou (eds.), Βιοηθικοί Προβληματισμοί ΙΙ (Bioethical Reflections II). Papazisis.
  11. Eggs, Sugar, Grated Bones: Colour-Based Food Preferences in Autism, Eating Disorders, and Beyond.Mattias Strand - 2021 - Medical Humanities 47 (1):87-94.
    In 1913, eccentric French composer Erik Satie wrote a fragmentary, diary-like essay where he depicted a strikingly rigid diet consisting solely of white foods: eggs, sugar, coconuts, rice, cream cheese, fuchsia juice and so on. Satie’s brief essay has later been used as one of many puzzle pieces in attempts to retrospectively diagnose him with autism spectrum disorder. With Satie’s white meal as a starting point, this paper explores colour-based food preferences and selective eating in clinical and non-clinical populations, with (...)
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  12. Rationality in Mental Disorders: Too Little or Too Much?Valentina Cardella - 2020 - European Journal of Analytic Philosophy 16 (2):13-36.
    The idea that mental illnesses are impairments in rationality is very old, and very common (Kasanin 1944; Harvey et al. 2004; Graham 2010). But is it true? In this article two severe mental disorders, schizophrenia and delusional disorder, are investigated in order to find some defects in rationality. Through the analysis of patients’ performances on different tests, and the investigation of their typical reasoning styles, I will show that mental disorders can be deficits in social cognition, or common sense, but (...)
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  13. Rationality, Irrationality and Irrationalism in the Anti-Institutional Debate in Psychiatry Around the Second Half of the 1970s in Italy.Matteo Fiorani - 2020 - European Journal of Analytic Philosophy 16 (2):101-121.
    The movements and protests of 1968 worldwide criticized the traditional idea of normality. From the 1970s onwards, psychiatry and antipsychiatry became an ideological battleground centered on the boundaries between normality and madness. In this scenario, characterized by a deep cultural and political transformation within the Left, the traditional concept of rationality and its very connection with irrationality was called into question. As a consequence, the very ideal of reason was questioned. This paper will explore the debate on rationality, irrationality and (...)
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  14. Postcolonialism and (Anti)Psychiatry: On Hearing Voices and Ghostwriting.Sarah R. Kamens - 2020 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 27 (3):253-265.
    I can only speculate about the echo of slavery and its impact upon how theories of race are disconnected from theories of mental illness.Haunting belongs to the structure of every hegemony.Why might psychiatry need postcolonial theories? Critical discourse on psychiatry and clinical psychology—itself quite heterogeneous across the humanities and the so-called psy disciplines—has intermittently focused on the redress of power in clinical encounters, which are often constituted by an interaction between persons in very different life circumstances and with divergent positions (...)
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  15. Schizophrenia and the Scaffolded Self.Joel Krueger - 2020 - Topoi 39 (3):597-609.
    A family of recent externalist approaches in philosophy of mind argues that our psychological capacities are synchronically and diachronically “scaffolded” by external resources. I consider how these “scaffolded” approaches might inform debates in phenomenological psychopathology. I first introduce the idea of “affective scaffolding” and make some taxonomic distinctions. Next, I use schizophrenia as a case study to argue—along with others in phenomenological psychopathology—that schizophrenia is fundamentally a self-disturbance. However, I offer a subtle reconfiguration of these approaches. I argue that schizophrenia (...)
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  16. Delusions in the Two-Factor Theory: Pathological or Adaptive?Eugenia Lancellotta & Lisa Bortolotti - 2020 - European Journal of Analytic Philosophy 16 (2):37-57.
    In this paper we ask whether the two-factor theory of delusions is compatible with two claims, that delusions are pathological and that delusions are adaptive. We concentrate on two recent and influential models of the two-factor theory: the one proposed by Max Coltheart, Peter Menzies and John Sutton (2010) and the one developed by Ryan McKay (2012). The models converge on the nature of Factor 1 but diverge about the nature of Factor 2. The differences between the two models are (...)
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  17. A Desirable Convulsive Threshold. Some Reflections About Electroconvulsive Therapy (Ect).Emiliano Loria - 2020 - European Journal of Analytic Philosophy 16 (2):123-144.
    Long-standing psychiatric practice confirms the pervasive use of pharmacological therapies for treating severe mental disorders. In many circumstances, drugs constitute the best allies of psychotherapeutic interventions. A robust scientific literature is oriented on finding the best strategies to improve therapeutic efficacy through different modes and timing of combined interventions. Nevertheless, we are far from triumphal therapeutic success. Despite the advances made by neuropsychiatry, this medical discipline remains lacking in terms of diagnostic and prognostic capabilities when compared to other branches of (...)
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  18. Too Much or Too Little? Disorders of Agency on a Spectrum.Emiliano Loria & Valentina Petrolini - 2020 - European Journal of Analytic Philosophy 16 (2):5-12.
    Introduction to the special issue "The Bounds of Rationality".
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  19. Social Construction, HPC Kinds, and the Projectability of Human Categories.Jonathan Y. Tsou - 2020 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 50 (2):115-137.
    This paper addresses the question of how human science categories yield projectable inferences by critically examining Ron Mallon’s ‘social role’ account of human kinds. Mallon contends that human categories are projectable when a social role produces a homeostatic property cluster (HPC) kind. On this account, human categories are projectable when various social mechanisms stabilize and entrench those categories. Mallon’s analysis obscures a distinction between transitory and robust projectable inferences. I argue that the social kinds discussed by Mallon yield the former, (...)
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  20. Putting Minds Together: Commentary on the Interface of Ethics and Psychiatry.Gwen Adshead - 2019 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 26 (3):191-193.
    I am grateful to the editor for asking me to comment on this interesting article about interdisciplinary work between a philosopher and a psychiatrist, with which I found much to agree. As a medical student, I had no exposure to bioethical reasoning in medicine, and even now, I think it is the case that junior doctors in the UK have variable exposure to good quality ethical reasoning in clinical practice. I also agree that lectures are a poor way to learn (...)
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  21. When the Body Stands in the Way: Complex Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, Depersonalization, and Schizophrenia.Yochai Ataria - 2019 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 26 (1):19-31.
    Although not identical, this article suggests that complex posttraumatic stress disorder, depersonalization and schizophrenia share at least one feature: in all these cases, the body becomes a defective tool, an IT. In turn, those suffering from them can no longer be-in-the-world through the living body but rather experience their body as an object; they manage their lives on the level of body image.The next section outlines some cognitive and phenomenological concepts such as body schema, body image, body-as-subject and body-as-object. Thereafter, (...)
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  22. An Anthropological Perspective on Autism.Ben Belek - 2019 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 26 (3):231-241.
    In her 2006 book The Jumbled Jigsaw, Donna Williams, an autistic author and poet, presents an example of a list of traits associated with autism—one of many such lists commonly found in text books, academic publications, and information leaflets. Her list includes the following: a tendency to stick to well-tried routines and avoid change, a tendency to have a narrow range of interests, a tendency to develop irrational fears and anxieties, a tendency not to develop a sense of danger, a (...)
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  23. Teaching, Learning, and "Doing": Ethics for the Clinic and the Future of Psychiatry.Rebecca Weintraub Brendel - 2019 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 26 (3):195-197.
    Just over a decade ago, I began teaching medical students in the required preclinical course ethics and professionalism. The point of the course was to introduce basic ethical and professional norms through a small number of large group sessions, but mostly small group tutorials of 10 or 12 students engaging in weekly sessions combining readings from the literature and case scenarios highlighting real-life ethical tensions they either had, or would most likely, encounter in the future. The students wrote perceptively and (...)
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  24. The Subject of Psychopathology: Of What Plural Is It Made?Jurandir Freire Costa, Benilton Bezerra & Jairo de Almeida Gama - 2019 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 26 (2):89-97.
  25. The Ethics of Coercion and Other Forms of Influence.Kelso Cratsley - 2019 - In R. Bluhm & S. Tekin (eds.), The Bloomsbury Companion to Philosophy of Psychiatry. Bloomsbury. pp. 283-304.
    Across the health sector there is increased recognition of the ethical significance of interventions that constrain or coerce. Much of the recent interest stems from debates in public health over the use of quarantines and active monitoring in response to epidemics, as well as the manipulation of information in the service of health promotion (or ‘nudges’). But perhaps the area in which these issues remain most pressing is mental health, where the spectre of involuntary treatment has always loomed large. Indeed, (...)
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  26. Knocking on Hard Science’s Door: Has the Time Come?Mauricio Viotti Daker - 2019 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 26 (2):143-145.
    The discovery of antipsychotics and anti-depressants occurred when psychodynamic and phenomenological–anthropological approaches prevailed in psychiatry. Roland Kuhn personified that time as being one of the founders of Daseinsanalyse and also the discoverer of imipramine. Influenced by Binswanger and Scheler, Kuhn worked with the concept of “vital depressive disposition,” while emphasizing the preeminence of psychopathology over statistic methods. Consequently, he could not be satisfied with what he foresaw as “clouds of a coming disaster”:Since that time, there has been a worldwide use (...)
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  27. Some Remarks for an Agenda Regarding Phenomenologically Oriented Pharmacological Treatment of Schizophrenia.Paulo Dalgalarrondo - 2019 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 26 (2):147-150.
    The project of therapeutic approaches sensible to the very subjective experience of patients suffering from schizophrenia, especially those treatments most used in current practice, as pharmacological, is and must always be and unambiguously welcomed.Phenomenology is a rich and fertile tradition, born in modern academic philosophy, that along the development of psychopathology in the twentieth century inspired sophisticated theories and new conceptual tools for clinical descriptions and understanding of mental patients and disorders such as schizophrenia...
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  28. Review of Ecology of the Brain: The Phenomenology and Biology of the Embodied Mind, Thomas Fuchs: Oxford University Press, 2018. [REVIEW]Anya Daly - 2019 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 18 (3):627-636.
    Ecology of the Brain: The Phenomenology and Biology of the Embodied Mind joins a growing body of writings which presents a serious and compelling challenge to the neuro-centrism and physicalist reductionism that has been predominant in recent philosophy of mind and in the human sciences. This volume will not only be relevant to researchers interested in the philosophy of mind and the role to be played by the human sciences in this domain, but it will also be a valuable addition (...)
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  29. Folk and Philosophical Epistemologies: A Double Bookkeeping of Sorts by Delusion’s Theoreticians?Clarissa de Rosalmeida Dantas - 2019 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 26 (2):121-123.
    Delusions are typically regarded as beliefs of a certain kind, both by psychiatrists and by lay people. In “Double Bookkeeping and Doxasticism about Delusion,” Porcher formulates and assesses two kinds of arguments against doxasticism about delusions, the theoretical stance according to which delusions are a kind of belief. Those arguments, which Porcher calls “the argument from action guidance and the argument from phenomenology” are motivated by a phenomenon sometimes associated with delusions: double bookkeeping, a kind of ambivalence of patients, who (...)
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  30. Between Perspectives: Narratives, Lived Experience, and Culture.Octavio Domont de Serpa, Erotildes Maria Leal & Nuria Malajovich Muñoz - 2019 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 26 (2):173-176.
    We thank the commentators for the dialog and discussion they have proposed. We begin by remarking that telling and listening to stories are not an original thesis, especially if interpretive hermeneutics and phenomenology are central references. Academic and institutional settings are diverse if we consider the universe of empirical research grounded on philosophical methods and the teaching universe of practical and clinical disciplines, like psychiatry. The teaching of these disciplines frequently presents them merely as technics. A double reduction is performed: (...)
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  31. Aims, Methods, and Resources for Ethics Training.Rif El-Mallakh & Nancy Nyquist Potter - 2019 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 26 (3):215-217.
    We are pleased with the thought-provoking discussion that our article has stimulated. All of the discussants agree that the state of education and infusion of ethical principles and practices into psychiatric decision making is currently suboptimal. The ethical questions raised by the discussants, writ large, have been analyzed, reduced to a seemingly manageable 'core,' or expanded to capture nuance and subtlety, and it is invaluable for clinicians, patients, and others to explore them together.In modern times, where the prevailing Western ethical (...)
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  32. Clarifying a Dimensional Approach to Phenomenological Psychopathology.Anthony Vincent Fernandez - 2019 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 26 (1):81-85.
    Somogy Varga's criticisms and questions provide me with a welcome opportunity to clarify some key elements of my proposal. First, I briefly summarize my motivation and original proposal for a phenomenological–dimensional research program. Second, I address Varga's two challenges. Each challenge highlights an element of my proposal that was underdeveloped in the original article. I therefore provide a brief clarification of my proposal before responding directly to Varga's two challenges.My proposal is to shift phenomenological psychopathology toward a broadly dimensional, rather (...)
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  33. Phenomenological Psychopathology and Psychiatric Classification.Anthony Vincent Fernandez - 2019 - In Giovanni Stanghellini, Matthew Broome, Anthony Vincent Fernandez, Paolo Fusar-Poli, Andrea Raballo & René Rosfort (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Phenomenological Psychopathology. Oxford, UK: pp. 1016-1030.
    In this chapter, I provide an overview of phenomenological approaches to psychiatric classification. My aim is to encourage and facilitate philosophical debate over the best ways to classify psychiatric disorders. First, I articulate phenomenological critiques of the dominant approach to classification and diagnosis—i.e., the operational approach employed in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) and the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10). Second, I describe the type or typification approach to psychiatric classification, which I distinguish into three different (...)
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  34. Brain Space and Time in Mental Disorders: Paradigm Shift in Biological Psychiatry.Andrew And Alexander Fingelkurts - 2019 - International Journal of Psychiatry in Medicine 54 (1):53-63.
    Contemporary psychiatry faces serious challenges because it has failed to incorporate accumulated knowledge from basic neuroscience, neurophilosophy, and brain–mind relation studies. As a consequence, it has limited explanatory power, and effective treatment options are hard to come by. A new conceptual framework for understanding mental health based on underlying neurobiological spatial-temporal mechanisms of mental disorders (already gained by the experimental studies) is beginning to emerge.
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  35. Expanding Outcome Measures in Schizophrenia Research: Does the Research Domain Criteria Pose a Threat?Phoebe Friesen - 2019 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 26 (3):243-260.
    In the introduction to a recent anthology of contemporary issues in philosophy of psychiatry, editors Jeffrey Poland and Şerife Tekin declare this to be a moment of crisis within the field. They suggest that the state of psychiatry today reflects Thomas Kuhn's conception of a period of extraordinary science, which occurs when anomalies begin to build up, confidence in the dominant paradigm is shook, competing theories arise, and philosophical questions come to the fore. Although perhaps not all would agree that (...)
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  36. The Importance of Learning Ethics for and From Psychiatrists: A Teacher–Trainee Reflection.Cynthia Geppert & Hammam Yahya - 2019 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 26 (3):199-201.
    It is our privilege to be invited to write a commentary on the "Interface of Ethics and Psychiatry: A Philosophical Case Consultation on Psychiatric Ethics on the Ground." The article presents an innovative collaboration between a philosopher and a psychiatrist reasoning together through the ethical aspects of three clinical cases. The case consultation also offers a unique opportunity to reflect on the teaching of psychiatric ethics in clinical settings. This commentary explores those areas of the article from the perspective of (...)
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  37. Psychiatry as Normative Practice.Gerrit Glas - 2019 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 26 (1):33-48.
    One of paradoxes of current mental health care is that we never have known more about mental disorder and at the same time been more uncertain about the conceptual basis—and, therefore, the legitimacy—of psychiatry.This is remarkable. Psychiatry as a science flourishes. Over the last three decades, there has been an enormous increase in empirical research on the genetic, neurobiological, psychological, and social determinants of mental disorder. At the same time, mental health care has improved a lot, at least in most (...)
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  38. Diagnostic Reasoning in Psychiatry: Acknowledging an Explicit Role for Intersubjective Knowing.Mona Gupta, Nancy Potter & Simon Goyer - 2019 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 26 (1):49-64.
    In most areas of medicine, the physician's primary task is to diagnose the patient's presenting problem by correctly identifying the underlying pathology causing that problem. Diagnoses are established through a process of correlating the information obtained from an interview with the patient about his history of illness and circumstances, with additional evidence of the underlying disease derived from physical examination findings and/or the results of laboratory investigations and diagnostic imaging. In contemporary health care, various movements that call for a shift (...)
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  39. Why Psychiatric Ethics and Social Science Should Be Friends.Omar Sultan Haque - 2019 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 26 (3):211-213.
    The on-the-ground case conference at the interface of philosophical ethics and clinical psychiatry is an innovative idea that advances pedagogy in presenting a creative approach to teaching and practicing psychiatric ethics. In the current exercise of the proposed partnership, there was a generally positive outcome. The philosopher and the psychiatrist learned from each other, were able to find norms that made their collaboration productive, and found that clinical care was enhanced. My commentary aims to help others replicate this model, and (...)
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  40. Understanding and Explaining.Christoph Hoerl - 2019 - In Giovanni Stanghellini, Matthew Broome, Anthony Vincent Fernandez, Paolo Fusar-Poli, Andrea Raballo & Rene Rosfort (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Phenomenological Psychopathology. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 407-413.
    This chapter examines Karl Jaspers’s influential distinction between understanding and explaining, and its significance in psychiatry. It first outlines one way of interpreting the distinction, on which it is connected to the distinction between singular and general causal claims. It then discusses one reason for thinking that understanding has an essential role to play in psychiatry: Not achieving at least some level of understanding in the context of dealing with psychiatric patients would constitute a particular kind of epistemic failure—a failure (...)
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  41. The Ontological Status of a Psychiatric Diagnosis: The Case of Neurasthenia.Annemarie C. J. Köhne - 2019 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 26 (1):1-11.
    After the introduction of the fifth Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, familiar voices were raised in protest. The voices stem from ideas of which, among others, and in different ways, Michel Foucault and Thomas Szasz were influential proponents: The movement was referred to as 'antipsychiatry.' This movement reacted, among other things, to the system of categorization of mental disorders. Diagnoses, in a system of classification, were thought to be vague, arbitrary, labelling, stigmatizing, and scientifically and clinically poorly validated. (...)
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  42. Nurture Before Responsibility: Self-in-Relation Competence and Self-Harm.Camillia Kong - 2019 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 26 (1):1-18.
    Anne was sexually and physically abused as a child and adolescent. Since an adolescent, she has had episodes of engaging in self-injurious behavior, where she repetitively cuts her arms with a knife or scissors, sometimes so seriously that she has had to go to the emergency room. She is relatively high functioning as an individual, where her academic cleverness has enabled her to study for a philosophy degree at a top university. Owing to her history of deliberate self-injury, psychiatrists have (...)
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  43. What Does It Mean to Have a Meaning Problem? Meaning, Skill, and the Mechanisms of Change in Psychotherapy.Garson Leder - 2019 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 26 (3):35-50.
    Psychotherapy is effective. Since the 1970’s, meta-analyses, and meta-analyses of meta-analyses, have consistently shown a significant effect size for psychotherapeutic interventions when compared to no treatment or placebo treatments. This effectiveness is normally taken as a sign of the scientific legitimization of clinical psychotherapy. A significant problem, however, is that most psychotherapies appear to be equally effective. This poses a problem for specific psychotherapies: they may work, but likely not for the reasons that ground their theoretical explanations for their effectiveness. (...)
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  44. Generic Language and the Stigma of Mental Illness.Lisa Nowak - 2019 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 26 (3):261-275.
    Recent literature has suggested that generics can harbor and propagate worrying ideologies in a manner which is often not appreciated by speakers. In this article, I argue that the use of generics to convey information about mental illness is unhelpful, whether the knowledge structure conveyed by the generic is 'accurate' or not. Inaccurate generics contribute to insidious forms of social stereotyping and stigma by encouraging us to simplistically generalize characteristics found in very few category members to other members of that (...)
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  45. Causal Explanation in Psychiatry.Tuomas K. Pernu - 2019 - In Şerife Tekin & Robyn Bluhm (eds.), The Bloomsbury Companion to Philosophy of Psychiatry. London: Bloomsbury Academic.
  46. Psychiatry's Problem with Reductionism.Rebecca Roache - 2019 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 26 (3):219-229.
    Psychiatry uncomfortably spans biological, psychological, and social perspectives on mental illness. As a branch of medicine, psychiatry is under pressure to conform to a biomedical model, according to which diseases are characterized primarily in biological terms. But psychiatry also draws on the psychotherapeutic tradition, which explains mental distress in terms of life experience and social influences.These approaches ought to complement each other, but historically this has not happened. With no theory creating global, systematic links between the two approaches, psychiatry is (...)
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  47. Shared Modes of Narrative, on the Limits of Expressing One’s Unique Experience.Jane A. Russo - 2019 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 26 (2):169-171.
    I begin my comments with a first-person narrative. I know Octavio, Erotildes, and Nuria from the time I worked at the Institute of Psychiatry and was very close to the field of mental health. They are people whose work I admire and appreciate. I comment on this text from the point of view of someone who has never worked directly in mental health assistance and whose knowledge about severe mental illness therapy has occurred mostly from a third-person perspective. My comments (...)
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  48. Pharmacological Treatment of Schizophrenia in Light of Phenomenology.Melissa Garcia Tamelini & Guilherme Peres Messas - 2019 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 26 (2):133-142.
    The construction of the phenomenological project of psychopathology began in the 1920s. Husserl’s philosophical elaborations, which started to be drawn a few decades earlier, had a broad repercussion on the historical and cultural context of the time and was eventually incorporated into several disciplines, including psychopathology. Particularly in this field, phenomenology had a significant impact, because its epistemological foundations was a close match to the rigorous purposes of a scientific investigation of mental disorders.The phenomenological contribution has established an irrevocable and (...)
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  49. A Step Beyond Psychopathology: A New Frontier of Phenomenology in Psychiatry.Melissa Garcia Tamelini & Guilherme Peres Messas - 2019 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 26 (2):151-154.
    Critical-philosophical commentary on theses defended in scientific articles may be guided by two distinct perspectives, each leading to inquiries and styles of responses that are both distinct and complementary: an internal perspective and an external perspective. The internal commentator belongs to the same epistemological field of the authors and, as such, shares the same categorical assumptions and the same Weltanschauung explored in the text. The dialogue with this commentator emphasizes the minutiae of the observation of the shared scientific reality and (...)
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  50. The Bloomsbury Companion to Philosophy of Psychiatry.Serife Tekin & Robyn Bluhm - 2019 - London: Bloomsbury.
    This book explores the central questions and themes lying at the heart of a vibrant area of philosophical inquiry. Aligning core issues in psychiatry with traditional philosophical areas, it presents a focused overview of the historical and contemporary problems dominating the philosophy of psychiatry. -/- Beginning with an introduction to research issues, it addresses what psychiatry is and distinguishes it from other areas of medical practice, other health care professions and psychology. With each section of the companion corresponding to a (...)
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