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  1. Action-Oriented Research in Education: A Comparative Study on A Western and An Islamic View.Khosrow Bagheri Noaparast & Mohammad Zoheir Bagheri Noaparast - 2012 - AMERICAN JOURNAL OF ISLAMIC SOCIAL SCIENCES 29 (2):43-63.
    Comparative studies among cultures, particularly Western and Eastern ones, are vital and necessary. In this essay, we are presenting a comparison between Western and Islamic views. The focus of this study is on action-oriented educational research based on Charles Clark’s view as a more recent action-oriented view on educational research. The comparison between Clark’s view and the one we suggest that is inspired by the Islamic view of human action and shows that there are considerable commonalities between the two views (...)
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  2. How Should We Train PhD Students in the Biosciences?Jonathan Bard - 1994 - Bioessays 16 (8):529-530.
  3. Perceived Weaknesses of Philosophical Inquiry: A Comparison to Psychology.Wesley Buckwalter & John Turri - 2016 - Philosophia 44 (1):33-52.
    We report two experiments exploring the perception of how contemporary philosophy is often conducted. We find that (1) participants associate philosophy with the practice of conducting thought experiments and collating intuitions about them, and (2) that this form of inquiry is viewed much less favourably than the typical form of inquiry in psychology: research conducted by teams using controlled experiments and observation. We also found (3) an effect whereby relying on intuition is viewed more favorably in the context of team (...)
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  4. The Parallels Between Philosophical Inquiry and Scientific Inquiry: Implications for Science Education.Burgh Gilbert & Nichols Kim - 2012 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (10):1045-1059.
    The ‘community of inquiry’ as formulated by C. S. Peirce is grounded in the notion of communities of discipline-based inquiry engaged in the construction of knowledge. The phrase ‘transforming the classroom into a community of inquiry’ is commonly understood as a pedagogical activity with a philosophical focus to guide classroom discussion. But it has a broader application. Integral to the method of the community of inquiry is the ability of the classroom teacher to actively engage in the theories and practices (...)
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  5. Citizenship as a Learning Process: Democratic Education Without Foundationalism.Gilbert Burgh - 2010 - In Darryl R. J. Macer & Souria Saad-Zoy (eds.), Asian-Arab Philosophical Dialogues on Globalization, Democracy and Human Rights. Bangkok: pp. 59-69.
    Reprinted with permission and previously published in: Farhang: Quarterly Journal of the Institute for Humanities and Cultural Studies (Tehran, Iran), 22(69), pp. 117-138. -/- One of the aims of this paper is to explore the relationship between democracy and epistemology. This inevitably raises questions about the purpose and aims of education consistent with conceptions of democracy. These ultimately rest on the practical applicability and outcomes of competing visions of democracy without appeal to pre-political or prior goods, nor to certain knowledge (...)
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  6. Reconstruction in Philosophy Education: The Community of Inquiry as a Basis for Knowledge and Learning.Gilbert Burgh - 2009 - In Philosophy of Education Society of Australasia (ed.), The Ownership and Dissemination of Knowledge, 36th Annual Conference of the Philosophy of Education Society of Australasia, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia, 4–7 December 2008. Claremont, WA, Australia: Philosophy of Education Society of Australasia (PESA). pp. 1-12.
    The ‘community of inquiry’ as formulated by CS Peirce is grounded in the notion of communities of disciplinary-based inquiry engaged in the construction of knowledge. The phrase ‘converting the classroom into a community of inquiry’ is commonly understood as a pedagogical activity with a philosophical focus to guide classroom discussion. But it has a broader application, to transform the classroom into a community of inquiry. The literature is not clear on what this means for reconstructing education and how it translates (...)
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  7. Professional Development and Training.Gilbert Burgh - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 27:5-13.
    The task of teaching students how to think well rests formally with schools and the classroom teachers who work within them. The education system has a responsibility to fulfil the need for relevance in the school curriculum. A corollary is that the teaching profession, through collective efforts, needs to transform the ways in which curriculum and teaching are conceived. This is not to say that teachers cannot or should not work with existing curriculum, but rather that we need to reconceptualise (...)
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  8. Ethics and the Community of Inquiry: Education for Deliberative Democracy.Gilbert Burgh, Terri Field & Mark Freakley - 2006 - South Melbourne: Cengage/Thomson.
    Ethics and the Community of Inquiry gets to the heart of democratic education and how best to achieve it. The book radically reshapes our understanding of education by offering a framework from which to integrate curriculum, teaching and learning and to place deliberative democracy at the centre of education reform. It makes a significant contribution to current debates on educational theory and practice, in particular to pedagogical and professional practice, and ethics education.
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  9. Inoculation Against Wonder: Finding an Antidote in Camus, Pragmatism and the Community of Inquiry.Gilbert Burgh & Simone Thornton - 2016 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 48 (9):884-898.
    In this paper, we will explore how Albert Camus has much to offer philosophers of education. Although a number of educationalists have attempted to explicate the educational implications of Camus’ literary works, these analyses have not attempted to extrapolate pedagogical guidelines towards developing an educational framework for children’s philosophical practice in the way Matthew Lipman did from John Dewey’s philosophy of education, which informed his philosophy for children curriculum and pedagogy. We focus on the phenomenology of inquiry; that is, inquiry (...)
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  10. Lucid Education: Resisting Resistance to Inquiry.Gilbert Burgh & Simone Thornton - 2016 - Oxford Review of Education 42 (2):165–177.
    Within the community of inquiry literature, the absence of the notion of genuine doubt is notable in spite of its pragmatic roots in the philosophy of Charles Sanders Peirce, for whom the notion was pivotal. We argue for the need to correct this oversight due to the educational significance of genuine doubt—a theoretical and experiential understanding of which can offer insight into the interrelated concepts of wonder, fallibilism, inquiry and prejudice. In order to detail these connections, we reinvigorate the ideas (...)
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  11. Engagement as Dialogue: Camus, Pragmatism and Constructivist Pedagogy.Gilbert Burgh & Simone Thornton - 2015 - Education as Philosophies of Engagement, 44th Annual Conference of the Philosophy of Education Society of Australasia, Kingsgate Hotel, Hamilton, New Zealand, 22–25 November 2014.
    In this paper we will explore how Albert Camus has much to offer philosophers of education. Although a number of educationalists have attempted to explicate the educational implications of Camus’ literary works (Denton, 1964; Oliver, 1965; Götz, 1987; Curzon-Hobson, 2003; Marshall, 2007, 2008; Weddington, 2007; Roberts, 2008, 2013; Gibbons, 2013; Heraud, 2013; Roberts, Gibbons & Heraud, 2013) these analyses have not attempted to extrapolate pedagogical guidelines to develop an educational framework for children’s philosophical practice in the way Matthew Lipman did (...)
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  12. Communities of Inquiry: Politics, Power and Group Dynamics.Gilbert Burgh & Mor Yorshansky - 2011 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (5):436-452.
    The notion of a community of inquiry has been treated by many of its proponents as being an exemplar of democracy in action. We argue that the assumptions underlying this view present some practical and theoretical difficulties, particularly in relation to distribution of power among the members of a community of inquiry. We identify two presuppositions in relation to distribution of power that require attention in developing an educational model that is committed to deliberative democracy: (1) openness to inquiry and (...)
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  13. Introduction, Philosophy Through Teaching.Michael Cholbi - 2014 - In E. Esch R. Kraft & K. Hermberg (eds.), Philosophy through Teaching. Philosophy Documentation Center.
  14. Intentional Learning as a Model for Philosophical Pedagogy.Michael Cholbi - 2007 - Teaching Philosophy 30 (1):35-58.
    The achievement of intentional learning is a powerful paradigm for the objectives and methods of the teaching of philosophy. This paradigm sees the objectives and methods of such teaching as based not simply on the mastery of content, but as rooted in attempts to shape the various affective and cognitive factors that influence students’ learning efforts. The goal of such pedagogy is to foster an intentional learning orientation, one characterized by self-awareness, active monitoring of the learning process, and a desire (...)
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  15. Humility, Listening and ‘Teaching in a Strong Sense’.Andrea R. English - 2016 - Logos and Episteme 7 (4):529-554.
    My argument in this paper is that humility is implied in the concept of teaching, if teaching is construed in a strong sense. Teaching in a strong sense is a view of teaching as linked to students’ embodied experiences (including cognitive and moral-social dimensions), in particular students’ experiences of limitation, whereas a weak sense of teaching refers to teaching as narrowly focused on student cognitive development. In addition to detailing the relation between humility and strong sense teaching, I will also (...)
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  16. Improving Teacher Education Students’ Ethical Thinking Using the Community of Inquiry Approach.Mark Freakley & Gilbert Burgh - 1999 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 19 (1):38-45.
    The notion of a community of inquiry has been treated by many of its proponents as being an exemplar of democracy in action. We argue that the assumptions underlying this view present some practical and theoretical difficulties, particularly in relation to distribution of power among the members of a community of inquiry. We identify two presuppositions in relation to distribution of power that require attention in developing an educational model that is committed to deliberative democracy: (1) openness to inquiry and (...)
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  17. Ethical Competence for Teachers: A Possible Model.Roxana-Maria Ghiațău - 2015 - Symposion: Theoretical and Applied Inquiries in Philosophy and Social Sciences 2 (3):387–403.
    In Education Sciences, the notion of ‘competence’ is widely used, both as an aim to be reached with students and as performance in teachers’ education. This article advances a type of competence that is highly relevant for teachers’ work, namely the ‘ethical competence.’ Ethical competence enables teachers to responsibly deal with the daily challenges arising from their professional roles. In this study, I put forward a definition of ethical competence and I propose a conceptual structure, both meant to support the (...)
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  18. Teacher and Education Versus Aggression and Violence at School.Marta Gluchmanová - 2012 - Ethics and Bioethics (in Central Europe) 2 (1-2):88-100.
    At present, an increase has been observed in aggressive behaviour and actions in students in as well as outside schools in Slovakia and other post-communist countries. This is often considered a manifestation of moral crises in the family and society. Socio-cultural changes also bring about negative phenomena, which are often present in the mentality and actions of children and the young. Moral problems in the teaching profession are a reflection of problems in society as such. It is the task of (...)
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  19. Narrative Pedagogy for Introduction to Philosophy.Kevin J. Harrelson - 2012 - Teaching Philosophy 35 (2):113-141.
    This essay offers a rationale for the employment of narrative pedagogies in introductory philosophy courses, as well as examples of narrative techniques, assignments, and course design that have been successfully employed in the investigation of philosophical topics. My hope is to undercut the sense that “telling stories in class” is just a playful diversion from the real material, and to encourage instructors to treat storytelling as a genuine philosophical activity that should be rigorously developed. I argue that introductory courses focused (...)
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  20. Thinking Through the Body: Yoga, Philosophy, and Physical Education.Cressida J. Heyes, Natalie Helberg & Jaclyn Rohel - 2009 - Teaching Philosophy 32 (3):263-284.
    Philosophers sometimes hope that our discipline will be transformative for students, perhaps especially when we teach so-called philosophy of the body. To that end, this article describes an experimental upper-level undergraduate course cross-listed between Philosophy and Physical Education, entitled “Thinking Through the Body: Philosophy and Yoga.” Drawing on the perspectives of professor and students, we show how a somatic practice (here, hatha yoga) and reading texts (here, primarily contemporary phenomenology) can be integrated in teaching and learning. We suggest that the (...)
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  21. International Handbook of Academic Research and Teaching: Proceedings of Intellectbase International Consortium, Vol 22, Spring 2012, San Antonio, TX, USA, 298-306.David King & Karina Dyer (eds.) - 2012 - Intellectbase International Academic Consortium.
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  22. Pedagogies of Reflection: Dialogical Professional-Development Schools in Israel.Arie Kizel - 2014 - Advances in Research on Teaching 22:113 – 136.
    This chapter discusses a form of pedagogy of reflection suggested to be defined as the dialogical-reflective professional-development school (DRPDS)  a framework that develops and empowers students by engaging them in a process of continual improvement, responding to diverse situations, providing stimuli for learning, and giving anchors for mediation. The pedagogy of reflection relates to dialogue not only from a theoretical historical context but also by way of example  that is, it offers empowering dialogues within the traditional teacher-training framework. (...)
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  23. The Philosophy of Social Segregation in Israel's Democratic Schools.Arie Kizel - 2013 - Philosophy Study 3 (11):1042 – 1050.
    Democratic private schools in Israel are a part of the neo-liberal discourse. They champion the dialogic philosophy associated with its most prominent advocates—Martin Buber, Emmanuel Levinas—together with Paulo Freire’s critical pedagogy, the humanistic psychology propounded by Carl Rogers, Nel Noddings’s pedagogy of care and concern, and even Gadamer’s integrative hermeneutic perspective. Democratic schools form one of the greatest challenges to State education and most vocal and active critique of the focus conservative education places on exams and achievement. This article describes (...)
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  24. Araucaria as a Tool for Diagramming Arguments in Teaching and Studying Philosophy .F. Macagno, D. Walton, G. Rowe & C. Reed - 2006 - Teaching Philosophy 29 (2):111-124,.
    This paper explains how to use a new software tool for argument diagramming available free on the Internet, showing especially how it can be used in the classroom to enhance critical thinking in philosophy. The user loads a text file containing an argument into a box on the computer interface, and then creates an argument diagram by dragging lines from one node to another. A key feature is the support for argumentation schemes, common patterns of defeasible reasoning historically know as (...)
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  25. Assessing Concept Possession as an Explicit and Social Practice.Alessia Marabini & Luca Moretti - forthcoming - Journal of Philosophy of Education.
    We focus on issues of learning assessment from the point of view of an investigation of philosophical elements in teaching. We contend that assessment of concept possession at school based on ordinary multiple-choice tests might be ineffective because it overlooks aspects of human rationality illuminated by Robert Brandom’s inferentialism––the view that conceptual content largely coincides with the inferential role of linguistic expressions used in public discourse. More particularly, we argue that multiple-choice tests at schools might fail to accurately assess the (...)
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  26. Cognitive Mechanisms Matter - but They Do Not Explain the Absence of Teaching in Chimpanzees.Richard Moore & Claudio Tennie - 2015 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 38:e50.
  27. Using a Writing Portfolio Project to Teach Critical Thinking Skills.Jennifer Wilson Mulnix - 2010 - Teaching Philosophy 33 (1):27-54.
    In this paper, we present an especially effective tool for helping students to learn and apply the skills of critical reasoning. Our Writing Portfolio Project is a set of nine progressively staged writing assignments that guide students through the formulation and development of an argumentative paper. The set of assignments are designed to reinforce, reintroduce, and repeat critical reasoning skills. In this paper, we articulate the potential uses for the Writing Portfolio Project, give a brief explanation of the reasoning behind (...)
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  28. "Doing Philosophy--The Sooner the Better".Jennifer Wilson Mulnix & M. J. Mulnix - 2014 - In Emily Esch, Kevin Hermberg & Rory E. Kraft Jr (eds.), Philosophy Through Teaching. Charlottesville, USA: Philosophy Documentation Center. pp. 245-249.
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  29. Polling as Pedagogy: Experimental Philosophy as a Valuable Tool for Teaching Philosophy.Thomas Nadelhoffer & Eddy Nahmias - 2008 - Teaching Philosophy 31 (1):39-58.
    First, we briefly familiarize the reader with the emerging field of “experimental philosophy,” in which philosophers use empirical methods, rather than armchair speculation, to ascertain laypersons’ intuitions about philosophical issues. Second, we discuss how the surveys used by experimental philosophers can serve as valuable pedagogical tools for teaching philosophy—independently of whether one believes surveying laypersons is an illuminating approach to doing philosophy. Giving students surveys that contain questions and thought experiments from philosophical debates gets them to actively engage with the (...)
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  30. Teaching Philosophy Through Lincoln-Douglas Debate.Jacob Nebel, Ryan W. Davis, Peter van Elswyk & Ben Holguin - 2013 - Teaching Philosophy 36 (3):271-289.
    This paper is about teaching philosophy to high school students through Lincoln-Douglas (LD) debate. LD, also known as “values debate,” includes topics from ethics and political philosophy. Thousands of high school students across the U.S. debate these topics in class, after school, and at weekend tournaments. We argue that LD is a particularly effective tool for teaching philosophy, but also that LD today falls short of its potential. We argue that the problems with LD are not inevitable, and we offer (...)
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  31. Reconstruction of Thinking Across the Curriculum Through the Community of Inquiry.Kim Nichols, Gilbert Burgh & Liz Fynes-Clinton - 2017 - In Maughn Rollins Gregory, Joanna Haynes & Karin Murris (eds.), The Routledge International Handbook of Philosophy for Children. Abingdon: Routledge. pp. 245-252.
    Thinking skills pedagogies like those employed in a community of inquiry (COI) provide a powerful teaching method that fosters reconstruction of thinking in both teachers and students. This collaborative, dialogic approach enables teachers and students to think deeply about the thinking process within a supportive, structured learning environment, by fostering the transformative potential of lived experience. This paper explores the potential for cognitive dissonance (genuine doubt) during students’ experiences of inquiry to be transformed into impetus for the acquisition and improvement (...)
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  32. Fachdidaktik und Kompetenzorientierung im altsprachlichen Unterricht.Rainer Nickel - 2015 - In Magnus Frisch (ed.), Alte Sprachen - neuer Unterricht (Ars Didactica; Bd. 1). pp. 35-52.
    Kompetenzorientierung ist eine grundlegende Aufgabe eines modernen altsprachlichen Unterrichts. Diese These wird nicht allgemein akzeptiert. Sie muss vielmehr gegen massive altphilologische Kritik verteidigt und begründet werden. Mit der Kompetenzorientierung wird ein fachdidaktischer Perspektivenwechsel angebahnt, der den Anwendungs- und Handlungsbezug schulischen Lernens deutlich in den Vordergrund stellt und dabei die fachspezifischen Kompetenzen des altsprachlichen Unterrichts stark betont: Dazu gehören u. a. die begründete Konstruktion des Wertvollen, das Begreifen des "Klassischen" als das Ergebnis eines Rezeptionsprozesses, der permanente Nachweis, dass das Übersetzen altsprachlicher (...)
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  33. You Are Not Your Brain: Against 'Teaching to the Brain'.Gregory M. Nixon - 2012 - Review of Higher Education and Self-Learning 5 (15):69-83.
    Since educators are always looking for ways to improve their practice, and since empirical science is now accepted in our worldview as the final arbiter of truth, it is no surprise they have been lured toward cognitive neuroscience in hopes that discovering how the brain learns will provide a nutshell explanation for student learning in general. I argue that identifying the person with the brain is scientism (not science), that the brain is not the person, and that it is the (...)
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  34. Constructive Realism and Science Education.Khosrow Bagheri Noaparast - 2013 - Journal of Curriculum Studies 7 (28):81-92.
    Constructive realism (CR) is an attempt to overcome the difficulties associated with naïve realism and radical constructivism. There are different versions for CR. In this paper, I defend a particular version of CR. Complexity of reality, on the one hand, and the impact of human mind, language, and culture, on the other, leads to the inevitable contribution of constructs in knowledge development. According to the CR, even if mental, linguistic and cultural side of constructs could not be avoided in principle, (...)
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  35. Philosophy of Education in the UK: The Historical and Contemporary.Alis Oancea & David Bridges - 2009 - Oxford Review of Education 35 (5):553-568.
    Questions of a philosophical nature are central to every significant debate in the field of educational theory, policy, practice and research. Of all disciplines, philosophy is perhaps the one in which analysis, argumentation and critique are given most central, systematic and comprehensive attention. In addition, philosophy is connected with practice and policy through nurturing democratic conversation about education, and supporting practical deliberation at all levels and on all aspects of educational practice. In the UK, although systematically excluded from initial teacher (...)
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  36. Mathematical Foundations of a Cultural Project or Ramchandra's Treatise “Through the Unsentimentalised Light of Mathematics”.Dhruv Raina - 1992 - Historia Mathematica 19 (4).
    The nineteenth century witnessed a number of projects of cultural rapprochement between the knowledge traditions of the East and West. This paper discusses the attempt to render elementary calculus amenable to an Indian audience in the indigenous mathematical idiom, undertaken by an Indian polymath, Ramchandra. The exercise is specifically located in his book A Treatise on the Problems of Maxima and Minima. The paper goes on to discuss the “vocation of failure” of the book within the context of encounter and (...)
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  37. A Triage Theory of Grading: The Good, the Bad, and the Middling.William J. Rapaport - 2011 - Teaching Philosophy 34 (4):347–372.
    This essay presents and defends a triage theory of grading: An item to be graded should get full credit if and only if it is clearly or substantially correct, minimal credit if and only if it is clearly or substantially incorrect, and partial credit if and only if it is neither of the above; no other (intermediate) grades should be given. Details on how to implement this are provided, and further issues in the philosophy of grading (reasons for and against (...)
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  38. Unamuno: el catedrático y su misión educativa.Emanuel J. Maroco Dos Santos - 2016 - Revista Sul-Americana de Filosofia E Educação 26:57-81.
    Unamuno, en cuanto rector de la Universidad de Salamanca, fue un intelectual comprometido con la realidad académica que dirigía. De sus preocupaciones educativas, se destaca su insistente crítica al catedrático de la Universidad española de finales del siglo XIX y principios del XX. El presente estudio pretende recuperar y precisar los motivos de dicha crítica, así como las propuestas del autor para la reformulación de las funciones y misión educativas del profesor universitario.
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  39. Unamuno y la "poiesis" educativa: la demagogía, en cuanto educación del pueblo, y sus métodos de enseñanza.Emanuel J. Maroco Dos Santos - 2015 - Cuadernos Del Tomás 7:91-126.
    En este artículo nos proponemos exponer los rasgos esenciales de la poiesis educativa de Unamuno, en su aspecto demagógico* o demopédico*. Por cuestiones metodológicas, expondremos, en primer lugar, las razones que nuestro autor ha sostenido para legitimar la necesidad de dicha educación, que debería alejarse del especialismo* germánico (Fachmann), con vistas a determinar las técnicas de enseñanza de su labor educativa popular, que, en su pensamiento, asume rasgos esencialmente ético-normativos (Gentleman).
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  40. Unamuno y las pedagogías vigentes en España a finales del siglo XIX y principios del XX.Emanuel J. Maroco Dos Santos - 2015 - Revista de Educación y Desarrollo 33:5-13.
    En este estudio, que intenta analizar la relación que Unamuno mantuvo con las pedagogías vigentes en España a finales del siglo XIX y principios del XX, procuraremos determinar los aspectos que han alejado al insigne rector salmantino de los métodos pedagógicos de los jesuitas (emulación), de la escolástica (retórica) y de las Escuelas del Avemaría (juego), que, como es bien sabido, han estructurado la enseñanza en España durante el susodicho período. Pero, más allá de su enfoque histórico, este estudio permitirá (...)
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  41. Tao of Teaching.Stefan Schindler - unknown1991 - College Teaching 39.
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  42. Some Thoughts on Thinking and Teaching Styles.Alan Schwerin - 1996 - Inquiry : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 16 (1):48-54.
    Descartes provides us with an invaluable framework for thinking critically. And his views on personhood can serve both as a guide for critical thinking and as a means to sharpen some of the concepts central to these programs. My paper is an attempt to illustrate the effectiveness of the seventeenth century Cartesian conception of thinking for scholars today who stress critical thinking in the classroom.
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  43. Heidegger's Hermeneutic Method in Tertiary Education.Robert Keith Shaw - 2011 - In Fowler Pip, Strongman Luke & Kobeleva Polly (eds.), Writing the Future. Tertiary Writing Network.
    Heidegger’s hermeneutic method and his account of pedagogy are useful in teaching students how to think and write. This paper interprets the method of thinking which Martin Heidegger taught to his students and indicates strategies that have been used to introduce that method to New Zealand students in an online course. The method appears to philosophers as a technique of conceptual analysis, although Heidegger may not have agreed with that characterisation or its use in this way. To tertiary teachers it (...)
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  44. The Violence in Learning.Robert Keith Shaw - 2010 - Analysis and Metaphysics 9:76-100.
    This paper argues that learning is inherently violent. It examines the way in which Heidegger uses – and refrains from using – the concept in his account of Dasein. Heidegger explicitly discussed “learning” in 1951 and he used of the word in several contexts. Although he confines his use of “learning” to the ontic side of the ontic-ontological divide, there are aspects of what he says that open the door to an ontological analogue of the ontic learning. In this discussion (...)
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  45. Pedagogic Thinking That Grounds E-Learning for Secondary School Science Students in New Zealand.Robert Keith Shaw - 2007 - E-Learning and Digital Media 4 (4):471-481.
    Course designers adopted a language-learners approach to the online teaching of New Zealand secondary school students in the subject of astronomy. This was possible because the curriculum for astronomy that was in 2004 established as a part of New Zealand's national curriculum was specifically designed to engage underachieving students in science and technology. A criterion-referenced assessment regime was established and an Internet platform was built specifically to facilitate this form of assessment. This platform contrasts with the norm-referenced assessment programmes that (...)
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  46. A Heideggerian Analysis in the Teaching of Science to Maori Students.Robert Keith Shaw & Dan Love - 2007 - He Kupu 1 (3):31-43.
    Teachers frequently find that their teaching is unsuccessful with a particular group of students. This paper describes how Heidegger’s ontology was useful to teachers as they developed a distance education platform to teach astronomy to culturally diverse Aotearoa New Zealand secondary school students. Māori students do not perform well within their State’s model of normalising education, and academic authors ascribe this “failure” to the effects of cultural difference and imperialism. This paper conjectures that Māori are not merely “culturally different” but (...)
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  47. The Blog-Assisted Seminar.Robert Boyd Skipper - 2011 - Teaching Philosophy 34 (2):119-132.
    Four years ago, I tried assigning blogs as homework to ensure that students came to class prepared for seminar discussions. From the start, it was clear that blogging was having a good effect, but I needed to make many refinements before I was satisfied that I was squeezing the greatest benefit from this device. In this paper, I summarize and explain the fully developed method on which I eventually settled. I first explain what I’m hoping will happen to students over (...)
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  48. Lab Notes: Write-Up of an Experiment in Collaborative Anthropology.Meg Stalcup - 2011 - In P. Rabinow (ed.), The Accompaniment: Assembling the Contemporary. University of Chicago. pp. 132-139.
    What are the actual practices of intellectual co-laboring? In the spring of 2006, we began an experiment in collaborative anthropology. There was a dual impetus to our efforts: a desire to deal head-on with inadequacies in our academic environment; and a strong feeling that the classic norms of qualitative inquiry needed to become contemporary. Collaboration struck us as potentially key to both. We drew a parallel to laboratory experiments. In the textbook version, one begins with a question, formulates a hypothesis, (...)
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  49. Teaching Virtue: Changing Attitudes.Alessandra Tanesini - 2016 - Logos and Episteme 7 (4):503-527.
    In this paper I offer an original account of intellectual modesty and some of its surrounding vices: intellectual haughtiness, arrogance, servility and self-abasement. I argue that these vices are attitudes as social psychologists understand the notion. I also draw some of the educational implications of the account. In particular, I urge caution about the efficacy of direct instruction about virtue and of stimulating emulation through exposure to positive exemplars.
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  50. Why Do Women Leave Philosophy? Surveying Students at the Introductory Level.Morgan Thompson, Toni Adleberg, Sam Sims & Eddy Nahmias - 2016 - Philosophers' Imprint 16.
    Although recent research suggests that women are underrepresented in philosophy after initial philosophy courses, there have been relatively few empirical investigations into the factors that lead to this early drop-off in women’s representation. In this paper, we present the results of empirical investigations at a large American public university that explore various factors contributing to women’s underrepresentation in philosophy at the undergraduate level. We administered climate surveys to hundreds of students completing their Introduction to Philosophy course and examined differences in (...)
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