About this topic
Summary

When many people hear "philosophy of film" they think "philosophy through film." That is, they think of work on the philosophical contributions made by film.  This middle category is home to work that explores the philosophy found in movies and philosophy done in conjunction with a film. It contains both philosophy in film and philosophy through film. The most common approach is that addressing a single film. Less common, some address the philosophy of a filmmaker. And, even less common, some work on the philosophical insights to be had from particular genres of film, such screwball comedy and the western.

Key works The special issue of the Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism on the philosophy of film (Smith & Wartenberg 2006) features several essays exploring the philosophic potential of film.  The exchange between Livingston 1991 and Smuts 2009 provides a good introduction to question, Can film do philosophy? Grau 2005 is an excellent example of philosophy through film.
Introductions Livingston 2010 provides an introduction to the area.
Related categories
Siblings:

209 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 209
  1. Love, Death and Life's Summum Bonum: The Before Trilogy as Memento Mori.Anna Christina Ribeiro - manuscript
    I argue that Before Sunrise, Before Sunset, and Before Midnight are best seen as an example of memento mori art. Memento mori, the admonition to remember death, can take many forms, but the idea remains the same, namely that an awareness of our inevitable end should bear on how we live. I show how Richard Linklater’s warning works in each of the movies and argue that with the Before trilogy he makes a Frankfurt-style case that romantic love is life’s summum (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Philosophers on Film: Before Sunrise, Before Sunset, Before Midnight.Hans Maes & Katrien Schaubroeck (eds.) - 2021 - Routledge.
    Richard Linklater’s celebrated Before trilogy chronicles the love of Jesse (Ethan Hawke) and Céline (Julie Delpy) who first meet up in Before Sunrise, later reconnect in Before Sunset and finally experience a fall-out in Before Midnight. Not only do these films present storylines and dilemmas that invite philosophical discussion, but philosophical discussion itself is at the very heart of the trilogy. This book, containing specially commissioned chapters by a roster of international contributors, explores the many philosophical themes that feature so (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Aguirre, Caché, and Creating Anti-Colonialist Puzzles: A Normative Perspective.Yusuf Yuksekdag - 2021 - In Handbook of Research on Contemporary Approaches to Orientalism in Media and Beyond. Hershey, PA, USA: pp. 165-180.
    This chapter explores the anti-colonial narrative potential of certain works of cinema taking Aguirre, the Wrath of God and Caché as a case in point. To do so, this chapter first and mainly draws upon the theoretical and normative lens put forward by Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak on the representation of the colonized other and her resulting political and intellectual call for self-reflection on one's privileged Western intellectual positioning. This lens has many normative implications for the ways in which the colonized (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. When Dinosaurs Ruled the Earth: The Horror of Being Prey and Forgetting Nature, Yet Again, in Jurassic Park and Jurassic World.Eric Godoy - 2020 - In Jonathan Beever (ed.), Philosophy, Film, and the Dark Side of Interdependence. Lanham: Lexington Books. pp. 141-155.
    We constantly forget our interdependence with nature as we lose track of what “natural” means. Consider especially the American nostalgia for an imagined past believed to be lost; a past in which our relationship with nature was more authentic, more natural. Yet, as I argue below, such a past never really existed. The scary thing is, so long as that nostalgia guides our desire for a return to a “proper” relationship with nature, we’re bound to be misguided and forget again (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Chile 1988: Trauma and Resistance in Pablo Larrain's No (2012).Marguerite La Caze - 2020 - In Amy L. Hubbell, Natsuko Akagawa, Sol Rojas-Lizana & Annie Pohlman (eds.), Places of Traumatic Memory: A Global Context. London: pp. 285-307.
    No presents the television campaign for the 1988 plebiscite on whether the Pinochet regime should stay as the government for eight more years (‘Yes’) or hold democratic elections (‘No’). The ‘No’ campaign uses the Aristotelian idea that happiness is an intrinsic value and thus the best concept to galvanise a traumatised nation in favour of change. My paper examines the film’s presentation of how a response to the trauma of the regime becomes transformed into resistance through the idea of a (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Facing the Responsibility of Parenthood in the Films of the Dardenne Brothers.John McAteer - 2020 - Soundings: An Interdisciplinary Journal 103 (3):346-366.
    This article analyzes the way the films of Belgian writer-directors Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne portray characters taking responsibility for children and children allowing others to take responsibility for them. Though the philosophy of Emmanuel Levinas provides a starting point, this article focuses primarily on a close reading of the Dardennes' films themselves. It argues that these films illuminate the nature of parenthood and suggest a unified definition of parenthood that encompasses both biological parenthood and adoption. In both cases a parent (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Der Mensch im Spiegel seiner (Bild-) Schöpfung: Die ästhetisierte Anthropologie des Kamera-Auges in „Chelovek s kino-apparatom“ und „Blade Runner“.Peter Remmers - 2020 - Internationales Jahrbuch für Philosophische Anthropologie 9 (1):277-294.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. The Dark Night of Ecological Despair: Awaiting Reconsecration in Paul Schrader’s First Reformed.Chandler D. Rogers & Tober Corrigan - 2020 - In Philosophy, Film, and the Dark Side of Interdependence. Lanham, Maryland: Lexington. pp. 69-81.
  9. The Eyes of God.Nigel R. Shadbolt & Paul Smart - 2020 - In Timothy Shanahan & Paul R. Smart (eds.), Blade Runner 2049: A Philosophical Exploration. Abingdon, UK: pp. 206–227.
  10. The Philosophy of Werner Herzog.M. Blake Wilson & Christopher Turner (eds.) - 2020 - Lexington Books.
    Legendary director, actor, author, and provocateur Werner Herzog has incalculably influenced contemporary cinema for decades. This essay collection by professional philosophers and film theorists from around the globe offers a diversity of perspectives on how the thinking behind the camera is revealed in the action Herzog captures in front of it.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. “You Ain’T Gonna Get Away Wit’ This, Django”: Fantasy, Fiction and Subversion in Quentin Tarantino’s, Django Unchained.Jack Black - 2019 - Quarterly Review of Film and Video 36 (7):611-637.
    From 2009 to 2015, U.S. director, Quentin Tarantino, released three films that were notable for their focus on particular historical events, periods and individuals (Inglorious Basterds 2009; Django Unchained 2012; The Hateful Eight 2015). Together, these films offered a specifically “Tarantinian” rendering of history: rewriting, manipulating and, for some, unethically deploying history for aesthetic effect. With regard to Django Unchained, this article examines how Tarantino’s historical revisionism provides a valuable point of inquiry into the ways in which “history” is depicted (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. Philosophical Dimensions of Cinematic Experience.David Davies - 2019 - In Christina Rawls, Diana Neiva & Steven Gouveia (eds.), Philosophy and Film: Bridging Divides. New York: Routledge. pp. 135-156.
    This chapter critically examines the idea that some cinematic artworks “do philosophy”. It is argued that any interesting “film as philosophy” thesis must satisfy two conditions: (FP1) In any advance in philosophical understanding attributable to a cinematic artwork, the philosophical content through which such an advance is accomplished must be articulated in a manner that is distinctively cinematic, on a proper understanding of the latter; (FP2) The advance in philosophical understanding attributable to a cinematic artwork must occur in the course (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  13. European Cinema and Continental Philosophy: Film as Thought Experiment, by Thomas Elsaesser. [REVIEW]Ekin Erkan - 2019 - Alphaville 18:232–238.
    Thomas Elsaesser’s recent scholarship has examined the “mind-game film”, a phenomenon in Hollywood that is broadly characterised by multi-platform storytelling, paratextual narrative feedback loops, nonlinear storytelling, and unreliable character perspectives. While “mind-game” or “puzzle” films have become a contentious subject amongst post-cinema scholars concerned with Hollywood storytelling, what is to be said of contemporary European independent cinema? Elsaesser’s timely publication, European Cinema and Continental Philosophy, examines an amalgam of politically inclined European auteurs to resolve this query. Elsaesser concedes that there (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. Navigating Agamben’s Cinematic Paradox Via Laruellean Immanence: A Hacktivist Cast Study.Ekin Erkan - 2019 - MediaCommons 8:1-23.
    While many film theorists declare Agamben as, in equal part, a Deleuzian film theorist, I pose that, through this Benjaminian lens, we can parse distinctive cinematic questions that Agamben exclusively pursues - in particular, cinema's potential as a repurposive counter-dispositif to combat dominant forms via critique. This is not to suggest that parallels do not exist between Agamben and Deleuze’s approaches: as Meillassoux has noted, Deleuze's logic of representation (also known as "correlationism") develops an "image of thought that attempts to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. Philosophical Experience and Experimental Film.Chris Falzon - 2019 - In Christina Rawls, Diana Neiva & Steven Gouveia (eds.), Philosophy and Film: Bridging Divides. New York: Routledge. pp. 159-173.
    One way that philosophy can be related to film is via the notion of experiment. This connection is usually discussed in terms of similarities between film and the thought experiments that can be found within philosophical texts. However, rather than subsuming film to the philosophical thought experiment, which risks missing what film itself contributes to the proceedings, it is more interesting to see how the cinematic medium might allow for forms of experimentation that go beyond what can be undertaken within (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  16. Introducing Cinematic Humanism: A Solution to the Problem of Cinematic Cognitivism.Britt Harrison - 2019 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 19 (2):331-349.
    A Cinematic Humanist approach to film is committed inter alia to the following tenet: Some fiction films illuminate the human condition thereby enriching our understanding of ourselves, each other and our world. As such, Cinematic Humanism might reasonably be regarded as an example of what one might call ‘Cinematic Cognitivism’. This assumption would, however, be mistaken. For Cinematic Humanism is an alternative, indeed a corrective, to Cinematic Cognitivism. Motivating the need for such a corrective is a genuine scepticism about the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. The Bold Thesis Retried: On Cinema as Philosophy.Paisley Livingston - 2019 - In Christina Rawls, Diana Neiva & Steven Gouveia (eds.), Philosophy and Film: Bridging Divides. New York: Routledge. pp. 81-91.
    This paper begins by presenting a simple model that maps some salient positions on the topic of cinema as philosophy, including the very strong claims that are constitutive of what has been stipulated to be “the bold thesis.” It is contended that examples that have been adduced in the literature as substantiating that bold thesis in fact only support weaker claims. It is argued in favor of accepting some such theses on the topic. It is then introduced a number of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  18. The Palgrave Handbook of Posthumanism in Film and Television by Michael Hauskeller, Thomas Philbeck, and Curtis Carbonell (Review). [REVIEW]Lantz Fleming Miller - 2019 - Film and History 49 (2):94-96.
    Science fiction has served the film industry like a dreamy stepchild. It gets only scant accolades from its master but must do heavy lifting: that is, make money. While science-fiction films often emphasize spectacle and action, they also inspire philosophical contemplation. Why? Science fiction, dating back to Shelley and Verne, came into existence speculating about humanity's social and physical worlds. Many books and articles over the past several years discuss the philosophical issues that films raise. One fairly new school of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. The Wartenberg-Smith Film as Philosophy Debate: Review of Current Controversies in Philosophy of Film. [REVIEW]Diana Neiva - 2019 - American Society for Aesthetics Graduate E-Journal 11 (1):1-13.
  20. Are There Definite Objections to Film as Philosophy? Metaphilosophical Considerations.Diana Neiva - 2019 - In Christina Rawls, Diana Neiva & Steven Gouveia (eds.), Philosophy and Film: Bridging Divides. Nova Iorque, NY, Estados Unidos: pp. 116-134.
    The “film as philosophy” (FAP) hypothesis turned into a field if its own right during the 2000s, after S. Mulhall’s On Film (2001). In this work, Mulhall defended that some films philosophize for themselves. This caused controversy. Around the same time of On Film’s release, B. Russell published the article “The philosophical limits of film” (2000). This article had one of the first attacks against FAP, posing some main objections based on metaphilosophical grounds, which were called the “generality” and the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  21. Could a Heptapod Act? Language and Agency in Arrival.James Pearson - 2019 - Film and Philosophy 23:48-68.
    Arrival offers a useful thought experiment in the philosophy of mind and language. Assessing human linguists' interpretive efforts to understand the alien heptapod form of life in both the movie and the novella from which it was adapted (Ted Chiang’s “Story of Your Life”) teach us how our understanding of selfhood shapes our conception of agency. Arrival’s reflexive commentary on the cinematic experience is also an argument for the value of learning to communicate in cinematic language.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. Cinéthique.Hugo Clémot - 2018 - Paris, France: Vrin.
    The moral importance of films to viewers is a dimension of the cinematic experience that has long been neglected. By describing the moral education powers of film, this book aims to encourage philosophers to practice the ethical reading of film works. This exercise helps to make intelligible important features of our lives, which academic forms of discourse tend to overlook. Taking our experience of films seriously should even reorient our conception of the tasks of ethics and the ways of doing (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. Філософія кіно, метод моделювання та проблема декадентського кінотвору.Olga Kirillova - 2018 - NaUKMA Research Papers. History and Theory of Culture 1:17-23.
    Статтю присвячено реконструкції узагальненої моделі твору декадентського кінематографа як стилізованого кінематографа moderne, що є яскравим прикладом застосування філософської інтерпретації до кінематографа і феномену кінореальності. Ця модель має такі рівні: морфологічний, стилістичний, інтертекстуальний, ритмічний, аудіальний, тактильний, монтажний, специфічно-антропологічний і специфічно-наративний.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24. Cinematic Realism: A Defence From Plato to Gaut.Rafe McGregor - 2018 - British Journal of Aesthetics 58 (3):225-239.
    The purpose of this paper is to defend a particular kind of cinematic realism, anti-illusionism, which is the thesis that cinematic motion is real. Following a brief introduction to realism and cinema in Section 1, I analyse Berys Gaut’s taxonomy of cinematic realism and define anti-illusionism in Section 2. Section 3 contrasts the anti-illusionist theories of Gregory Currie and Trevor Ponech with the illusionist theories of Andrew Kania and Gaut. I reconceptualize the debate in terms of Tom Gunning’s cinematic animation (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. Can Films Philosophize? The Rationality and Imposition Objections.Diana Neiva - 2018 - Dialectic Journal 12 (I):22-29.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  26. Can Film Show What Philosophy Won't Say? The "Film as Philosophy" Debate, and a Reading of Rashomon.Jônadas Techio - 2018 - Dissertatio 47 (S6):69-105.
    Seguindo os passos de Stanley Cavell e de Stephen Mulhall, argumentarei neste artigo que o cinema pode oferecer contribuições genuínas para a filosofia. Para tanto procurarei mostrar que os principais obstáculos para considerar o cinema como capaz de fazer filosofia derivam de pontos de vista bastante restritivos sobre a natureza da racionalidade, da cognição, do significado - e, finalmente, da filosofia e do cinema eles mesmos. Apresentarei alguns desses obstáculos e indicarei formas de removê-los, adotando uma interpretação mais ampla dessas (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27. The Phantasmatic Reality: A Phenomenological Study of the Cinematic Imagination.Przemysław Bursztyka - 2017 - In Christine Reeh & José Manuel Martins (eds.), Thinking Reality and Time through Film. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge Scholars Publishing. pp. 35-47.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28. Поезія і/чи проза: до археології однієї дискусії в радянському кіно.Briukhovetska Olga - 2017 - NaUKMA Research Papers. History and Theory of Culture 191:33-41.
    У дослідженні проаналізовано теоретичні джерела і політичні наслідки статті московського кінокритика М. Блеймана «Архаїсти чи новатори?» (1970), яку вважають обґрунтуванням заборони школи українського поетичного кіно як «безперспективного» напряму. Статтю М. Блеймана вміщено в контекст дискусії про поетичне і прозаїчне кіно, яку систематизовано щодо двох підходів: нормативного, який вважає лише один із напрямів кіно релевантним його природі (йому відповідає сполучник «чи»), і плюралістичного, який розглядає обидва напрями як актуалізації різних кінематографічних потенцій згідно з тими завданнями, що ставлять режисери (йому відповідає сполучник (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29. Volodymyr Vynnychenko and the Early Ukrainian Decadent Film (1917–1918).Kirillova Olga - 2017 - NaUKMA Research Papers. History and Theory of Culture 191:52-55.
    The article is focused on the phenomenon of the early Ukrainian decadent cinema, in particular, in relation to filmings of Volodymyr Vynnychenko’s dramaturgy. One of the brightest examples of ‘film decadence’ in Vynnychenko’s oevre is “The Lie” directed by Vyacheslav Vyskovs’ky in 1918, discovered recently in the film archives. This film displays the principles of ‘ethical symbolism’, ‘dark’ expressionist aesthetics and remains the unique masterpiece of specifically Ukranian film decadence.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30. Cinephilia and Philosophia: Or, Why I Don't Show The Matrix in Philosophy 101.Timothy Yenter - 2017 - In Rashna Wadia Richards & David T. Johnson (eds.), For the Love of Cinema: Teaching Our Passion In and Outside the Classroom. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press.
    The shelves of film and philosophy books should have made it considerably easier to teach with films in introductory philosophy classes, and certainly many philosophers have found them useful. However, shortcomings of many of these pop culture volumes (which I discuss in the next section) make these works rarely useful in the classroom. I propose instead a new model for how to teach film in a philosophy class. The model develops the virtues inherent in cinephilia and connects those virtues to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31. Le plan subjectif réversible: Sur le point de vue au cinéma à partir des écrits de Merleau-Ponty.Anna Caterina Dalmasso - 2016 - Studia Phaenomenologica 16:135-162.
    When I am watching a movie, I perceive on the screen a space, which is united and lived, even if it appears as fragmented and separated from the world in which I live. But is the space of the cinematic frame equivalent or commensurable with the one I see through my own eyes? Are they opposed to each other or do they merge together? The most amazing example of the possible convergence of gaze and frame the film realizes is the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32. Horrible Heroes: Liberating Alternative Visions of Disability in Horror.Melinda Hall - 2016 - The Disability Studies Quarterly 36 (1).
    Understanding disability requires understanding its social construction, and social construction can be read in cultural products. In this essay, I look to one major locus for images of persons with disabilities—horror. Horror films and fiction use disability imagery to create and augment horror. I first situate my understanding of disability imagery in the horror genre using a case study read through the work of Julia Kristeva. But, I go on to argue that trademark moves in the horror genre, which typically (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  33. A View to a Kill: Perspectives on Faux-Snuff and Self.Steve Jones - 2016 - In Neil Jackson, Shaun Kimber, Johnny Walker & Thomas Watson (eds.), Snuff: Real Death and Screen Media. Bloomsbury Academic. pp. 277-294.
    Scholarly debate over faux-snuff’s content has predominantly focused on realism and affect. This paper seeks to offer an alternative interpretation, examining what faux-snuff’s form reveals about self. Faux-snuff is typically presented from a first-person perspective (killer-cam), and as such is foundationally invested in the killer’s experiences as they record their murder spree. First then, I propose that the simulated-snuff form reifies self-experience in numerous ways. Faux-snuff’s characteristic formal attributes capture the self’s limited, fractured qualities, for example. Second, I contend that (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34. The Relevance of Heidegger’s Conception of Philosophy to the Film-as-Philosophy Debate.Shawn Loht - 2016 - Film and Philosophy 19:34-53.
    Provides an account of philosophy adopted from Being and Time and later works of Heidegger in order to respond to key questions in the film-as-philosophy debate. I follow the school of Stanley Cavell, Robert Sinnerbrink, and Stephen Mulhall in the view that philosophy occurs in film in phenomenological ways that transcend mere argumentative discourse and logical analysis. Some of the views I counter include those of Bruce Russell and Paisley Livingston.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35. Rivette’s The Nun: Religion Between Sadism and Masochism.Stellino Paolo - 2016 - Journal of Religion and Film 20 (1):Article 8.
  36. Philosophy and the Patience of Film in Cavell and Nancy.Daniele Rugo - 2016 - Palgrave.
    With a foreword by Jean-Luc Nancy -/- Philosophy and the Patience of Film presents a comparative study of the work of Jean-Luc Nancy and Stanley Cavell. It discusses the effect of their philosophical engagement with film, and proposes that the interaction between philosophy and film produces a power of patience capable of turning our negation of the world into a relation with it. -/- Through detailed readings of cinematic works ranging from Hollywood classics to contemporary Iranian cinema, this book describes (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37. Consumerism, Aristotle and Fantastic Mr. Fox.Matt Duncan - 2015 - Film-Philosophy 19 (1):249-269.
    Wes Anderson's Fantastic Mr. Fox is about Mr. Fox's attempt to flourish as both a wild animal and a consumer. As such, this film raises some interesting and difficult questions about what it means to be a member of a certain kind, what is required to flourish as a member of that kind, and how consumerism either promotes or inhibits such flourishing. In this paper I use Fantastic Mr. Fox as an entry point into an examination of the relationship between (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38. Kantian Themes in The Elephant Man.Christopher Grau - 2015 - Film and Philosophy 19:164-173.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39. Portraits of Egoism in Classic Cinema II: Negative Portrayals.Gary James Jason - 2015 - Reason Papers 37 (1).
    In this essay, I look at two negative portrayals of egoism. I summarize in detail the superb All About Eve—which won six Academy Awards, including Best Picture. The movie is about the rise of a ruthlessly ambitious actress, and how she treats her main competitor. Eve Harrington worms her way into top theatrical actress Margo Channing’s inner circle by pretending to be an admirer, but she is really a schemer who wants to eclipse Margo’s star in the theater universe. However, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  40. Torture Pornopticon: (In)Security Cameras, Self-Governance and Autonomy.Steve Jones - 2015 - In Linnie Blake & Xavier Aldana Reyes (eds.), Digital Horror: Haunted Technologies, Network Panic and the Found Footage Phenomenon. I.B. Tauris. pp. 29-41.
    ‘Torture porn’ films centre on themes of abduction, imprisonment and suffering. Within the subgenre, protagonists are typically placed under relentless surveillance by their captors. CCTV features in more than 45 contemporary torture-themed films (including Captivity, Hunger, and Torture Room). Security cameras signify a bridging point between the captors’ ability to observe and to control their prey. Founded on power-imbalance, torture porn’s prison-spaces are panoptical. Despite failing to encapsulate contemporary surveillance’s complexities (see Haggerty, 2011), the panopticon remains a dominant paradigm within (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41. The Cognitive Value of Blade Runner.McGregor Rafe - 2015 - Aesthetic Investigations 1 (2).
    The purpose of this essay is to argue that Blade Runner: The Final Cut (Ridley Scott, 2007) has cognitive value which is inseparable from its value as a work of cinema. I introduce the cinematic philosophy debate in §1. §2 sets out my position: that the Final Cut affirms the proposition there is no necessary relation between humanity and human beings. I outline the combination of cinematic depiction with distinctive features of the narrative’s peripeteia in §3. In §4, I explain (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42. La philosophie d'après le cinéma. Une lecture de La projection du monde de Stanley Cavell.Hugo Clémot - 2014 - Rennes, France: Presses Universitaires de Rennes.
    It is around The World Viewed, a famous book by Stanley Cavell (1979), that the reflections of this work are aggregated. By reading the writer's work slowly and patiently, Hugo Clémot offers a reading of his cinematographic and philosophical thought, enlightened by Wittgensteinian sources and by Cavell's work as a whole.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43. How Movies Do Philosophy.Wack Daniel - 2014 - Film and Philosophy 18:89-104.
  44. Film as Ethical Philosophy and the Question of Philosophical Arguments in Film: A Reading of The Tree of Life.Shawn Loht - 2014 - Film and Philosophy 18:164-183.
    Responds to the seminal claim of Bruce Russell that films cannot present philosophical arguments. Provides a reading of The Tree of Life (Terrence Malick, 2011) in order to illustrate how this film presents an environmental ethics argument. Some reference to the environmental philosophy of Holmes Rolston III as well as Martin Heidegger.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  45. Scotland as a Site of Sacrifice.Marmysz John - 2014 - Film International 12 (2):6-17.
    Friedrich Nietzsche delineates three stages of sacrificial behavior. The first stage consists of the sacrifice of particular human beings to a god. The second stage involves the sacrifice of one’s own instincts to a god, and the third stage culminates in the sacrifice of God himself. This last stage describes the death of God and signals the “final cruelty” of our present times. Our age is the age of nihilism, the point in history during which humans “sacrifice God for the (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46. The Myth of Scotland as Nowhere in Particular.John Marmysz - 2014 - International Journal of Scottish Theatre and Screen 7 (1):28-44.
    In a number of recent films, Scotland has served as the setting for dramas that could have taken place anywhere. This has occurred in two related ways: First, there are films such as Perfect Sense (2011) and Under the Skin (2013). These films involve storylines that, while they do take place in Scotland, do not require the country as a setting. Second, there are films such as Prometheus (2012),The Dark Knight Rises (2012), Cloud Atlas (2012), and World War Z (2013). (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47. Cinematic Philosophy: Experiential Affirmation in Memento.Rafe Mcgregor - 2014 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 72 (1):57-66.
    This article demonstrates that Memento (Christopher Nolan, 2000) meets both conditions of Paisley Livingston's bold thesis of cinema as philosophy. I delineate my argument in terms of Aaron Smuts's clarifications of Livingston's conditions. The results condition, which is concerned with the nature of the philosophical content, is developed in relation to Berys Gaut's conception of narrational confirmation, which I designate ‘experiential affirmation.’ Because experiential affirmation is a function of cinematic depiction, it meets Livingston's means condition, which is concerned with the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  48. Why Moral Philosophers Should Watch Sci-Fi Movies.Nikil Mukerji - 2014 - In Fiorella Battaglia & Nathalie Weidenfeld (eds.), Roboethics in Film. Pisa University Press. pp. 79-92.
    In this short piece, I explore why we, as moral philosophers, should watch sci-fi movies. Though I do not believe that sci-fi material is ne- cessary for doing good moral philosophy, I give three broad reasons why good sci-fi movies should nevertheless be worth our time. These reasons lie in the fact that they can illustrate moral-philosophical pro- blems, probe into possible solutions and, perhaps most importantly, an- ticipate new issues that may go along with the use of new technologies. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49. Runaway Memes.Brendan Shea - 2014 - In Nicolas Michaud & Jessica Watkins (eds.), Jurassic Park and Philosophy: The Truth is Terrifying. Open Court. pp. 29-39.
    Charles Darwin famously argued that that life on earth was not the product of intelligent design, and that it instead had arisen through the entirely natural of process of evolution via natural selection. Darwin’s theory of evolution (together with Mendel’s theory of genetics) now forms the foundation of all the biological sciences. Jurassic Park, however, raises an interesting question: just how does Darwin’s theory apply to lifeforms that are the products of explicit, intelligent design? In this essay, I examine cluster (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50. You Can't Choose Your Family: Impartial Morality and Personal Obligations in Alias.Brendan Shea - 2014 - In Patricia Brace & Robert Arp (eds.), The Philosophy of J.J. Abrams. The University Press of Kentucky. pp. 173-189.
    In this essay, I critically examine the ways in which the characters of Alias attempt to balance their impartial moral obligations (e.g. duties toward humanity) and their personal obligations (e.g. duties toward one's children). I specifically examine three areas of conflict: (1) choices between saving loved ones and maximizing consequences, (2) choices to maintain or sever relationships with characters who are vicious or immoral, and (3) choices to seek or not seek revenge on the behalf of loved ones. I conclude (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 209