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  1. Early Modern Accounts of Epicureanism.Stewart Duncan & Antonia LoLordo - forthcoming - In Jacob Klein & Nathan Powers (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Hellenistic Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    We look at some interesting and important episodes in the life of early modern Epicureanism, focusing on natural philosophy. We begin with two early moderns who had a great deal to say about ancient Epicureanism: Pierre Gassendi and Ralph Cudworth. Looking at how Gassendi and Cudworth conceived of Epicureanism gives us a sense of what the early moderns considered important in the ancient tradition. It also points us towards three main themes of early modern Epicureanism in natural philosophy, which we (...)
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  2. Pierre Gassendi: Humanism, Science, and the Birth of Modern Philosophy.Delphine Bellis, Daniel Garber & Carla Rita Palmerino (eds.) - 2018 - Routledge.
    Pierre Gassendi was a major figure in seventeenth-century philosophy whose philosophical and scientific works contributed to shaping Western intellectual identity. Among "new philosophers", he was considered Descartes’ main rival, and he belonged to the first rank of those attempting to carve out an alternative to Aristotelian philosophy. Given the importance of Gassendi for the history of science and philosophy, it is surprising to see that he has been largely ignored in the Anglophone world. This collection of essays constitutes the first (...)
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  3. Gassendi and Hobbes.Stewart Duncan & Antonia LoLordo - 2018 - In Stephen Gaukroger (ed.), Knowledge in Modern Philosophy. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 27-43.
    Gassendi and Hobbes knew each other, and their approaches to philosophy often seem similar. They both criticized the Cartesian epistemology of clear and distinct perception. Gassendi engaged at length with skepticism, and also rejected the Aristotelian notion of scientia, arguing instead for a probabilistic view that shows us how we can move on in the absence of certain and evident knowledge. Hobbes, in contrast, retained the notion of scientia, which is the best sort of knowledge and involves causal explanation. He (...)
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  4. Epicureanism of Pierre Gassendi.Olga Theodorou - 2018 - Proceedings of the XXIII World Congress of Philosophy 2 (3):67-77.
    Pierre Gassend, or, as he is widely known, Gassendi, was a French materialist philosopher, physicist, astronomer, theologian and Catholic priest. He was the son of Antoine Gassend2 and Françoise Fabry, and was born on January 22nd in 1592 in Champtercier, a village of Provence, and died on October 24th in 1655 in Paris. He received his first education in the cities Digne and Riez and by the age of twelve he began his initiation to Catholicism. He belonged to the Franciscan (...)
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  5. Copernicus, Epicurus, Galileo, and Gassendi.Antonia LoLordo - 2015 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 51:82-88.
    ABSTRACT. In his Letters on the motion impressed by a moving mover, Gassendi offers a theory of the motion of composite bodies that closely follows Galileo’s. Elsewhere, he describes the motion of individual atoms in very different terms: individual atoms are always in motion, even when the body that contains them is at rest; atomic motion is discontinuous although the motion of composite bodies is at least apparently continuous; and atomic motion is grounded in an intrinsic vis motrix, motive power, (...)
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  6. Carlo Borghero. Les Cartésiens Face À Newton. Turnhout: Brepols, 2011. Pp. 156. $64.88. [REVIEW]Delphine Bellis - 2013 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 3 (2):364-367.
  7. Pierre Gassendi and the Birth of Early Modern Philosophy. [REVIEW]Mihnea Dobre - 2011 - Early Science and Medicine 16 (2):168-172.
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  8. What Does History Matter to the History of Philosophy?Stephen Gaukroger - 2011 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 5 (3):406-424.
  9. Gassendi and The Seventeenth Century Atomists on Primary and Secondary Qualities.Antonia LoLordo - 2011 - In Lawrence Nolan (ed.), Primary and Secondary Qualities: The Historical and Ongoing Debate. Oxford University Press. pp. 62.
    This paper discusses how Gassendi and other 17th century atomists treated the distinction between primary and secondary qualities.
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  10. Epicureanism and Early Modern Naturalism.Antonia LoLordo - 2011 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (4):647 - 664.
    It is often suggested that certain forms of early modern philosophy are naturalistic. Although I have some sympathy with this description, I argue that applying the category of naturalism to early modern philosophy is not useful. There is another category that does most of the work we want the category of naturalism to do ? one that, unlike naturalism, was actually used by early moderns.
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  11. The Search for the Historical Gassendi.Margaret J. Osler - 2011 - Perspectives on Science 19 (2):212-229.
    Writing about the history of science and the history of philosophy involves assumptions about the role of context and about the relationships between past and present ideas. Some historians emphasize the context, concentrating on the intellectual, personal, and social factors that affect the way earlier thinkers have approached their subject. Analytic philosophers take a critical approach, considering the logic and merit of the arguments of past thinkers almost as though they are engaging in contemporary debates. Some philosophers use the ideas (...)
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  12. Il piacere dell'amicizia. Hobbes, Gassendi e il circolo neo-epicureo dell'Accademia di Montmor.Gianni Paganini - 2011 - Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia 66 (1).
    The article regards the transformation of friendship in Hobbes’s work. From simple acceptance of the Aristotelian definition in The Whole Art of Rhetoric, Hobbes passes in the Elements to a dual approach. On one hand, he goes so far as to reaffirm the natural sociability of man solely through friendship but, on the other, he subordinates the whole question of passions to the new concept of power, which involves the redefinition of friendship as an "Instrumentall power". In Leviathan this connection (...)
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  13. The Isomorphism of Space, Time and Matter in Seventeenth-Century Natural Philosophy.Carla Rita Palmerino - 2011 - Early Science and Medicine 16 (4):296-330.
    This article documents the general tendency of seventeenth-century natural philosophers, irrespective of whether they were atomists or anti-atomists, to regard space, time and matter as magnitudes having the same internal composition. It examines the way in which authors such as Fromondus, Basson, Sennert, Arriaga, Galileo, Magnen, Descartes, Gassendi, Charleton as well as the young Newton motivated their belief in the isomorphism of space, time and matter, and how this belief reflected on their views concerning the relation between geometry and physics. (...)
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  14. Absolute Time Before Newton.Emmaline Bexley - 2009 - Dissertation, The University of Melbourne
    This thesis provides a new analysis of early contributions to the development of the theory of absolute time—the notion that time exists independently of the presence or actions of material bodies and has no material cause. Though popularly attributed to Newton, I argue that this conception of time first appeared in medieval philosophy, as a solution to a peculiar theological problem generated by a widespread misrepresentation of Aristotle. I trace the subsequent evolution of the theory of absolute time through to (...)
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  15. Review of Catherine Wilson, Epicureanism at the Origins of Modernity[REVIEW]Margaret J. Osler - 2009 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (3).
  16. The German Hercules’s Heir: Pierre Gassendi’s Reception of Keplerian Ideas.Kuni Sakamoto - 2009 - Journal of the History of Ideas 70 (1):69-91.
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  17. Sobre o ceticismo moderado de Mersenne, Gassendi e Hume.Flávio Miguel de Oliveira Zimmermann - 2009 - Princípios 16 (25):171-186.
    Ultimamente bastante atençáo vem sendo dispensada ao estudo do ceticismo moderado na modernidade. O famoso historiador da filosofia Richard Popkin, em sua História do Ceticismo de Erasmo a Espinosa , cunhou a denominaçáo de ceticismo epistemológico para qualificar os membros desta corrente e nela inseriu os filósofos setecentistas Gassendi e Mersenne, considerando-os seus principais representantes. Além disso, no século XVIII temos o denominado ceticismo mitigado de Hume, que chamou a atençáo dos filósofos modernos para definir os limites do ceticismo. Este (...)
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  18. Pierre Gassendi and the Birth of Early Modern Philosophy. [REVIEW]Stephen H. Daniel - 2008 - International Philosophical Quarterly 48 (3):410-412.
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  19. Pierre Gassendi.Saul Fisher - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Pierre Gassendi (b. 1592, d. 1655) was a French philosopher, scientific chronicler, observer, and experimentalist, scholar of ancient texts and debates, and active participant in contemporary deliberations of the first half of the seventeenth century. His significance in early modern thought has in recent years been rediscovered and explored, towards a better understanding of the dawn of modern empiricism, the mechanical philosophy, and relations of modern philosophy to ancient and medieval discussions. Through an arch-empiricism—tempered by adherence to key elements of (...)
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  20. Gassendi et l’Hypothèse dans la Méthode Scientifique.Saul Fisher - 2008 - In Sylvie Taussig (ed.), Gassendi et la modernité. Turnhout, Belgium: pp. 399-425.
    Aucune méthode d'hypothèse et de raisonnement hypothétique en science ne peut être examinée dc façon critique sans que soit résolue au préalable la question de ce qui sert d'hypothèse. D'un point de vue très général, des éléments très différents peuvent servir à constituer la partie hypothétique ou conjecturale de la science. Du temps de Gassendi, il était possible de recourir à des entités hypothétiques tels les tourbillons cartésiens, à de généralisations idéalisées de phénomènes telle la loi de la chute libre, (...)
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  21. Pierre Gassendi and the Birth of Early Modern Philosophy. [REVIEW]Larry M. Jorgensen - 2008 - Philosophical Review 117 (4):615-617.
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  22. Epicurean and Galilean Motion in Gassendi's Physics.Antonia LoLordo - 2008 - Philosophy Compass 3 (2):301–314.
    This is about the tension between Epicurean and Galilean accounts of motion in Gassendi. For my more recent thoughts on this, see http://philpapers.org/rec/LOLCEG.
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  23. Pierre Gassendi and the Birth of Early Modern Philosophy - by Antonia LoLordo.Andrew Pyle - 2008 - Philosophical Books 49 (3):253-254.
  24. Pierre Gassendi and the Birth of Early Modern Philosophy (Review).Lisa T. Sarasohn - 2008 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (3):pp. 485-486.
    After a spate of monographs on Pierre Gassendi in the mid-1990s, the scholarly discussion of this most difficult French philosopher has largely been confined to the pages of scholarly journals. Except for Sylie Taussig's fine translation of Gassendi's Latin letters into French, and an issue of Dix-septième siècle devoted to the thinker, no major book-length study has appeared. Antonia LoLordo fills this gap in Pierre Gassendi and the Birth of Early Modern Philosophy. Her aim is "defamiliarizing the early modern philosophic (...)
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  25. Pierre Gassendi’s Philosophy and Science: Atomism for Empiricists. [REVIEW]Teresa Castelão‐Lawless - 2007 - Isis 98:385-386.
  26. Saul Fisher. Pierre Gassendi’s Philosophy and Science: Atomism for Empiricists. Xxviii + 436 Pp., Bibl., Index. Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers, 2005. $172.50. [REVIEW]Teresa Castelão‐Lawless - 2007 - Isis 98 (2):385-386.
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  27. Pierre Gassendi and the Birth of Early Modern Philosophy.Jude P. Dougherty - 2007 - Review of Metaphysics 61 (1):141-142.
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  28. Antonia LoLordo. Pierre Gassendi and the Birth of Early Modern Philosophy. X + 283 Pp., Bibl., Index. Cambridge/New York: Cambridge University Press, 2006. $88.95. [REVIEW]Stephen Gaukroger - 2007 - Isis 98 (4):837-838.
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  29. Aristotelian Influences in Gassendi's Moral Philosophy.Veronica Gventsadze - 2007 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 45 (2):223-242.
    The accepted view that Gassendi's ethics is a Christianized form of Epicureanism is incomplete: there is extensive and direct influence of Aristotle's works on the key concepts of Gassendi's ethics, while Epicurean ethics is itself largely informed by Aristotle's views. In the first part of this paper, the notion of freedom as choice informed by rational judgment is examined, and the foundation of Gassendi's intellectualist view of freedom is established in Aristotle's notion of prohairesis. In the second part, the nature (...)
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  30. Lucretius and the History of Science.Monte Ransome Johnson & Catherine Wilson - 2007 - In Stuart Gillespie & Philip R. Hardie (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Lucretius. Cambridge University Press.
    An overview of the influence of Lucretius poem On the Nature of Things (De Rerum Natura) on the renaissance and scientific revolution of the seventeenth century, and an examination of its continuing influence over physical atomism in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.
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  31. Review of Antonia LoLordo, Pierre Gassendi and the Birth of Early Modern Philosophy[REVIEW]Gianni Paganini - 2007 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2007 (5).
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  32. Nominalism and Constructivism in Seventeenth-Century Mathematical Philosophy.David Sepkoski - 2007 - Routledge.
    Introduction: mathematization and the language of nature -- Realists and nominalists : language and mathematics before the scientific revolution -- Ontology recapitulates epistemology : Gassendi, epicurean atomism, and nominalism -- British empiricism, nominalism, and constructivism -- Three mathematicians : constructivist epistemology and the new mathematical methods -- Conclusion: mathematization and the nature of language.
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  33. Pierre Gassendi's Philosophy and Science: Atomism for Empiricists (Review).Peter Sobol - 2007 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 45 (1):161-162.
    Peter G. Sobol - Pierre Gassendi's Philosophy and Science: Atomism for Empiricists - Journal of the History of Philosophy 45:1 Journal of the History of Philosophy 45.1 161-162 Muse Search Journals This Journal Contents Reviewed by Peter G. Sobol Mcfarland, Wisconsin Saul Fisher. Pierre Gassendi's Philosophy and Science: Atomism for Empiricists. Brill's Studies in Intellectual History 131. Leiden-Boston: Brill, 2005. Pp. xxviii + 436. Cloth, $172.50. In 1971, Richard S. Westfall described Pierre Gassendi as "the original scissors and paste man": (...)
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  34. Life as “Self Motion”: Descartes and 'The Aristotelians' on the Soul as the Life of the Body.Sarah Byers - 2006 - Review of Metaphysics 59 (4):723 - 755.
    Argues that Descartes mistook the sense of 'motion' intended by Aristotle in the latter's definition of life as the capacity for self-motion. Descartes' arguments against Aristotelian soul-as-life-principle consequently commit the 'straw man' fallacy.
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  35. The Soul as Vehicle for Genetic Information : Gassendi's Account of Inheritance.Saul Fisher - 2006 - In Justin E. H. Smith (ed.), The Problem of Animal Generation in Early Modern Philosophy. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. pp. 103-123.
    Generation and heredity theories before early modern mechanist accounts might be faulted for numerous deficits. One might cite in this regard the failure to even attempt to explain how the inheritance of traits could occur, given what is known about the generation of new individuals. On the other hand, it would be hard to allow this as a true failure against the backdrop of a generation theory that poses form, and not matter, as the key to understanding the emergence of (...)
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  36. Iiro Hirai. L Concept de Semence Dans les Theories de la Matiere a la Renaissance de Marsile Ficin a Pierre Gassendi.G. Giglioni - 2006 - Early Science and Medicine 11 (1):117.
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  37. Pierre Gassendi and the Birth of Early Modern Philosophy.Antonia LoLordo - 2006 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book offers a comprehensive treatment of the philosophical system of the seventeenth-century philosopher Pierre Gassendi. Gassendi's importance is widely recognized and is essential for understanding early modern philosophers and scientists such as Locke, Leibniz and Newton. Offering a systematic overview of his contributions, LoLordo situates Gassendi's views within the context of sixteenth- and early seventeenth-century natural philosophy as represented by a variety of intellectual traditions, including scholastic Aristotelianism, Renaissance Neo-Platonism, and the emerging mechanical philosophy. LoLordo's work will be essential (...)
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  38. Pierre Gassendi's Philosophy And Science: Atomism for Empiricists.Saul Fisher - 2005 - Leiden, Netherlands: Brill.
    This look at Gassendi’s philosophy and science illuminates his contributions to early modern thought and to the broader history of philosophy of science. Two keys to his thought are his novel picture of acquiring and judging empirical belief, and his liberal account of criteria for counting empirical beliefs as parts of warranted physical theories. By viewing his philosophical and scientific pursuits as part of one and the same project, Gassendi’s arguments on behalf of atomism can be fruitfully explained as licensed (...)
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  39. When Did Pierre Gassendi Become a Libertine?Margaret Osler - 2005 - In John Hedley Brooke & Ian Maclean (eds.), Heterodoxy in Early Modern Science and Religion. Oxford University Press.
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  40. Pierre Gassendi (1592-1655): Lettres Latines, And: Pierre Gassendi (1592-1655): Introduction a la Vie Savante (Review).Margaret J. Osler - 2005 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 43 (4):489-490.
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  41. Animation, Sensitivity, Ability. The Premise of Study of the Plant World in the'Syntagma Philosophicum'of Pierre Gassendi.L. Guerrini - 2004 - Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia 59 (4):853-876.
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  42. Gassendi's Reintrepretation of the Galilean Theory of Tides.Carla Rita Palmerino - 2004 - Perspectives on Science 12 (2):212-237.
    : In the concluding pages of his Epistolae duae de motu impresso a motore translato (1642), Pierre Gassendi provides a brief summary of the explanation of the tides found in Galileo's Dialogue over the Two Chief World Systems (1632). A comparison between the two texts reveals, however, that Gassendi surreptitiously modifies Galileo's theory in some crucial points in the vain hope of rendering it more compatible with the observed phenomena. But why did Gassendi not acknowledge his departures from the Galilean (...)
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  43. Gassendi's Atomist Account of Generation and Heredity in Plants and Animals.Saul Fisher - 2003 - Perspectives on Science 11 (4):484-512.
    In his accounts of plant and animal generation Pierre Gassendi offers a mechanist story of how organisms create offspring to whom they pass on their traits. Development of the new organism is directed by a material “soul” or animula bearing ontogenetic information. Where reproduction is sexual, two sets of material semina and corresponding animulae meet and jointly determine the division, differentiation, and development of matter in the new organism. The determination of inherited traits requires a means of combining or choosing (...)
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  44. Was Gassendi an Epicurean?Monte Ransome Johnson - 2003 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 20 (4):339 - 360.
    Pierre Gassendi was a major factor in the revival of Epicureanism in early modern philosophy, not only through his contribution to the restoration and criticism of Epicurean texts, but also by his adaptation of Epicurean ideas in his own philosophy, which was itself influential on such important figures of early modern philosophy as Hobbes, Locke, Newton, and Boyle (to name just a few). Despite his vigorous defense of certain Epicurean ideas and ancient atomism, Gassendi goes to great lengths to differentiate (...)
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  45. New Wine in Old Bottles: Gassendi and the Aristotelian Origin of Physics.Margaret J. Osier - 2002 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 26 (1):167–184.
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  46. Flesh Vs. Mind: A Study of the Debate Between Descartes and Gassendi.Antonia Lolordo - 2001 - Dissertation, Rutgers the State University of New Jersey - New Brunswick
    The 17th century's new science and new philosophy was roughly equally divided between Cartesians and Gassendists. Scholars agree that understanding Gassendi's metaphysics, epistemology and scientific method is crucial for understanding the development of modern philosophy, as Gassendis version of Epicureanism provides a third strand of influence on modern philosophy paralleling Cartesianism and scholasticism. Despite this, Gassendi is rather little understood today. I look at Gassendi in the context of his Objections and Counter-Objections to the Meditations, along with Descartes' Replies. This (...)
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  47. Hobbes, Gassendi and the Tradition of Political Epicureanism.Gianni Paganini - 2001 - Hobbes Studies 14 (1):3-24.
  48. Descartes Our Contemporary. [REVIEW]James Edwin Mahon - 1999 - The European Legacy 4 (4):98-101.
    In this review of two books, Descartes: An Intellectual Biography, by Stephen Gaukroger, and Descartes and his Contemporaries: Meditations, Objections, and Replies, edited by Roger Ariew and Marjorie Grene, I consider arguments about the motivation of Descartes for writing the Meditations on First Philosophy. According to Gaukroger, Descartes wrote the Meditations simply to legitimate his natural philosophy, which he had already worked out, for an audience of theologians and Scholastic philosophers, whom he feared would condemn it (as Galileo had been (...)
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  49. Infinite Degrees of Speed Marin Mersenne and the Debate Over Galileo's Law of Free Fall.Carla Rita Palmerino - 1999 - Early Science and Medicine 4 (4):269-328.
    This article analyzes the evolution of Mersenne's views concerning the validity of Galileo's theory of acceleration. After publishing, in 1634, a treatise designed to present empirical evidence in favor of Galileo's odd-number law, Mersenne developed over the years the feeling that only the elaboration of a physical proof could provide sufficient confirmation of its validity. In the present article, I try to show that at the center of Mersenne's worries stood Galileo's assumption that a falling body had to pass in (...)
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  50. Gassendi's Ethics: Freedom in a Mechanistic Universe (Review).Jill Vance Buroker - 1998 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 36 (2):322-324.
    322 JOURNAL OF THE HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY 36:2 APRIL 1998 little help from his congregation's rabbis -- not only from an orthodox conformity to Jewish traditions, but from any sense of Jewish identity whatsoever. Perhaps it might be more accurate to call Spinoza the "first secular citizen." One of the more contentious claims of Smith's book is his insistence that Spinoza's Treatise contains an esoteric dimension, an intentionally hidden doctrine that only the most careful readers could ascertain. Part of the (...)
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