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  1. Anatomia do Cômico.Felipe Ramos Gall - 2021 - Dissertation, PUC-Rio, Brazil
  2. The Carpenter as a Philosopher Artist: A Critique of Plato's Theory of Mimesis.Ilemobayo John Omogunwa - 2018 - Philosophy Pathways 222 (1).
    Plato’s theory of mimesis is expressed clearly and mainly in Plato’s Republic where he refers to his philosophy of Ideas in his definition of art, by arguing that all arts are imitative in nature. Reality according to him lies with the Idea, and the Form one confronts in this tangible world is a copy of that universal everlasting Idea. He poses that a carpenter’s chair is the result of the idea of chair in his mind, the created chair is once (...)
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  3. A Companion to Ancient Aesthetics. [REVIEW]Aiste Celkyte - 2017 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 25 (5):731-734.
    A free copy of the review can be obtained by following this link: -/- http://www.tandfonline.com/eprint/pKdJUN4BCKP7z8SneF6X/full .
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  4. On the Ancient Idea That Music Shapes Character.James Harold - 2016 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 15 (3):341-354.
    Ancient Chinese and Greek thinkers alike were preoccupied with the moral value of music; they distinguished between good and bad music by looking at the music’s effect on moral character. The idea can be understood in terms of two closely related questions. Does music have the power to affect the ethical character of either listener or performer? If it does, is it better as music for doing so? I argue that an affirmative answers to both questions are more plausible than (...)
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  5. Sun and Lightning: The Visibility of Radiance.Spuybroek Lars - 2016 - In J. Brouwer, S. van Tuinen & L. Spuybroek (eds.), The War of Appearances: Transparency, Opacity, Radiance. V2_Publishing. pp. 98-127.
    A long chapter for The War of Appearances: Transparency, Opacity, Radiance (V2_Publishing, 2016) building on the findings of “Charis and Radiance,” an essay published two years earlier. It discusses the inherent connection between visibility and radiance within the framework of Plato’s sun model as the source of reality. The argument develops a system where transcendent verticality and earthly horizontality together construct an “arena of presence” in which things flood each other with light, absorbing and returning portions of it in a (...)
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  6. Detailed Completeness and Pleasure of the Narrative. Some Remarks on the Narrative Tradition and Plato.Michael Erler - 2015 - In Gabriele Cornelli (ed.), Plato's Styles and Characters: Between Literature and Philosophy. De Gruyter. pp. 103-118.
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  7. Music and Pedagogy in the Platonic City. Bourgault - 2012 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 46 (1):59-72.
    The gods, however, took pity on the human race, born to suffer as it was, and gave it relief in the form of religious festivals to serve as periods of rest from its labors. They gave us the Muses, with Apollo their leader, and Dionysus; by having these gods to share their holidays, men were to be made whole again . . .That Plato1 regarded music as an extremely powerful means to cultivate morality and good citizenship is well-known.2 In the (...)
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  8. Compte Rendu de F. Pelosi, Plato: On Music, Soul and Body.Catherine Collobert - 2012 - Plato Journal 12 (Plato 12 (2012)).
    Cet ouvrage constitue la version révisée d'une thèse de doctorat soutenue à la Scuola Normale Superiore de Pise, et traduite en anglais. Composé de quatre chapitres, l'ouvrage se propose d'abord d'examiner le rôle que Platon attribue à la musique dans l'éducation, pour ensuite analyser la relation que la musique entretient avec l'âme et le corps. F. Pelosi étudie la conception platonicienne de la musique et envisage son importance pour comprendre non seulement la relation corps-esprit chez Platon, mais (…) - 12. (...)
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  9. Introduction.A. E. Denham - 2012 - In A. E. Denham (ed.), Plato on Art & Beauty. Palgrave MacMillan.
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  10. Combating Oblivion: The Myth of Er as Both Philosophy's Challenge and Inspiration.Francisco J. Gonzalez - 2012 - In Catherine Collobert, Pierre Destrée & Francisco J. Gonzalez (eds.), Plato and Myth: Studies on the Use and Status of Platonic Myths. Brill.
  11. Plato.Robert Stecker - 2012 - In Alessandro Giovannelli (ed.), Aesthetics: The Key Thinkers. pp. 8-20.
  12. Laughing to Learn: Irony in the Republic as Pedagogy.Jonathan Fine - 2011 - Polis 28 (2):235-49.
    Recent commentators have attended to dramatic and ironic aspects of Plato’s Republic. But a more sustained examination of the relation between irony and the exchanges of Socrates and Glaucon is required because a crucial purpose and presentation of the irony have largely gone unnoticed. I argue that Socrates employs irony in part to parody Glaucon’s extremism and that he does so to exhort Glaucon to think critically. I examine how Socrates uses the term makaria (blessedness) primarily ironically and pedagogically. A (...)
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  13. Plato and the Art of Philosophical Writing.Marina Mccoy - 2011 - Ancient Philosophy 31 (1):203-208.
  14. Reason V. Literature in Plato’s Republic: Does the Dialogue Rule Itself Out?Constance Meinwald - 2011 - Ancient Philosophy 31 (1):25-45.
  15. Tragic Pathos: Pity and Fear in Greek Philosophy and Tragedy.Dana LaCourse Munteanu - 2011 - Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction; Part I. Theoretical Views about Pity and Fear as Aesthetic Emotions: 1. Drama and the emotions: an Indo-European connection? 2. Gorgias: a strange trio, the poetic emotions; 3. Plato: from reality to tragedy and back; 4. Aristotle: the first 'theorist' of the aesthetic emotions; Part II. Pity and Fear within Tragedies: 5. An introduction; 6. Aeschylus: Persians; 7. Prometheus Bound; 8. Sophocles: Ajax; 9. Euripides: Orestes; Appendix: catharsis and the emotions in the definition of tragedy (...)
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  16. Plato's Analogy Between Law and Painting: Laws VI.769a-771a.Eugenio Benitez - 2010 - Philosophical Inquiry 32 (1-2):1-19.
  17. The Return of the Exile: The Benefits of Mimetic Literature in the Republic.Miriam Byrd - 2010 - In Robert Berchman John Finamore (ed.), Conversations Platonic and Neoplatonic. Sankt Augustin: Academia Verlag.
  18. The ‘Birth of Truth’: Alain Badiou and Plato’s Banishment of the Poets.J. Maggio - 2010 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 36 (5):607-621.
    Plato famously banishes the poets from his ideal city in book X of his Republic. Yet in this banishment Plato establishes the boundaries of reason, art and poetry — boundaries that have haunted western thinkers since antiquity. In this article I will explore those Platonic boundaries, specifically the intellectual limits of poetic writing as reflected upon by self-identified Platonist Alain Badiou. That being said, I am not attempting, strictly speaking, to look at Badiou’s interpretation of Plato’s banishment of poetry. Instead, (...)
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  19. The Lover of the Beautiful and the Good: Platonic Foundations of Aesthetic and Moral Value.John Neil Martin - 2008 - Synthese 165 (1):31-51.
    Though acknowledged by scholars, Plato’s identification of the Beautiful and the Good has generated little interest, even in aesthetics where the moral concepts are a current topic. The view is suspect because, e.g., it is easy to find examples of ugly saints and beautiful sinners. In this paper the thesis is defended using ideas from Plato’s ancient commentators, the Neoplatonists. Most interesting is Proclus, who applied to value theory a battery of linguistic tools with fixed semantic properties—comparative adjectives, associated gradable (...)
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  20. Plato’s Dionysian Music?: A Reading of the Symposium.Jacob Howland - 2007 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 12 (1):17-47.
    Like Aristophanes’ Frogs, Plato’s Symposium stages a contest between literary genres. The quarrel between Socrates and Aristophanes constitutes the primary axis of this contest, and the speech of Alcibiades echoes and extends that of Aristophanes. Alcibiades’ comparison of Socrates with a satyr, however, contains the key to understanding Socrates’ implication, at the very end of the dialogue, that philosophy alone understands the inner connectedness, and hence the proper nature, of both tragedy and comedy. I argue that Plato reflects in the (...)
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  21. Philosophy as the Practice of Musical Inheritance: Book II of Plato’s Republic.Eric C. Sanday - 2007 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 11 (2):305-317.
    Philosophy is often taken at its core to be an argumentative appeal to our own native capacity to judge the truth without bias. I claim in this paper that the very notion of unbiased truth represents a particular interest, viz., the interests of the political as such: the city. My thesis is that Socrates’ city in speech in Book II of the Republic exposes the injustice concealed at the core of demonstrative philosophy, and on this basis he goes on to (...)
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  22. Platonic Reflections on the Aesthetic Dimensions of Deliberative Democracy.Christina Tarnopolsky - 2007 - Political Theory 35 (3):288-312.
    This essay utilizes Plato's insights into the role of shame in dialogical interactions to illuminate the aesthetic dimensions of deliberative democracy. Through a close analysis of the refutation of Polus in Plato's dialogue, the "Gorgias", I show how the emotion of shame is central to the unsettling, dynamic, and transformative character of democratic engagement and political judgment identified by recent aesthetic critics of Habermas' model of communicative action and democratic deliberation. Plato's analysis of shame offers a friendly amendment to these (...)
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  23. “Words of Air”: On Breath and Inspiration.Claudia Baracchi - 2006 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 11 (1):27-49.
    In Plato’s Phaedrus divine inspiration comes literally to mean “environmental inspiration.” Intimated thereby is the insufficiency of all reflection on the divine and the natural which would fail to interrogate these categories precisely in their convergence, indeed, in their being one. The theme of inspiration, in its divine or elemental character, necessarily raises further questions concerning the status of inspired utterance—that is, in this case, of philosophical discourse itself. These themes finally point to the problem of the provenance of speaking (...)
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  24. “As the Wolf Loves the Lamb”: Need, Desire, Envy, and Generosity in Plato’s Phaedrus.Alessandra Fussi - 2006 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 11 (1):51-80.
    The Phaedrus’s Palinode ascribes to the wing the double function of lifting the soul towards truth while itself being nourished by truth. The paper concentrates on the role Socrates ascribes to the wing in the structure and ‘physiology’ of the soul—mortal and divine—as well as on the role it plays in Socrates’ subsequent phenomenological description of falling in love. The experience of love described in Socrates’ first speech—an experience dominated by envy—is examined in light of Socrates’ Palinode, by reference to (...)
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  25. Theories of Aesthesis and Mneme in Plato's Dialogues: A Critical Analysis and Re-Assessment.D. Z. Andriopoulos - 2005 - Philosophical Inquiry 27 (1/2):58-81.
  26. The Muses' speech in the republic N. blössner: Musenrede und 'geometrische zahl': Ein beispiel platonischer dialoggestaltung ('politeia' VIII, 545c8–547a7) . Pp. 194. Stuttgart: Franz Steiner verlag, 1998. Paper. Isbn: 3-515-07540-. [REVIEW]Alex Hardie - 2003 - The Classical Review 53 (01):52-.
  27. PLATO'S IMAGES E. E. Pender: Images of Persons Unseen. Plato's Metaphors for the Gods and the Soul . (International Plato Studies 11.) Pp. Xi + 278. Sankt Augustin: Akademia Verlag, 2000. Cased, DM 88. ISBN: 3-89655-006-. [REVIEW]George Karamanolis - 2003 - The Classical Review 53 (01):49-.
  28. History of Aesthetics. Plato.Christopher Janaway - 2001 - In Berys Nigel Gaut & Dominic Lopes (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Aesthetics. Routledge.
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  29. Literary Theory From Plato to Barthes: An Introductory History.Richard Harland - 1999 - St. Martin's Press.
    Richard Harland provides a lucid account of all the major movements in literary theory up to the late 1960s. In a lucid and accessible style, he unfolds a comprehensive "story" of literary theory in all its manifestations. Because contemporary literary theory depends heavily upon European thinkers, the book has an international focus, and its coverage extends from philosophers to social theorists to linguists. Harland explains the essential principles of each theoretical position, looking behind particular critical judgments and interpretations in order (...)
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  30. Platonic Errors: Plato, a Kind of Poet.Gene Fendt - 1998 - Greenwood Press.
    Poetic and dramatic readings of selected Platonic dialogues show the fallacy of the philosophical and political positions usually attributed to Plato. Dialogues dealt with include Apology, Meno, Ion, Republic, Theaetetus, Euthyphro, Laws.
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  31. The Theological Basis of Plato’s Criticism of Art with Reference to Icons.Asli Gocer - 1998 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 36 (3):353-365.
  32. Who Speaks? Who Writes?: Dialogue and Authorship in the Phaedrus.Sean Burke - 1997 - History of the Human Sciences 10 (3):40-55.
    This paper argues that the concepts of writing and authorship in Plato are associated with monologism and absence rather than presence. The Phaedrus objects to writing precisely insofar as it creates that unre sponsive figure in the field of discursive which we have subsequently called the 'author'. The dialectical preference for question-and-answer is designed to resist anything resembling an author from entering the field of knowledge: the Socratic method resists monologism on epistemological and ethical grounds. However, the Platonic dialogues are (...)
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  33. Plato’s Literary Garden.Grace M. Ledbetter - 1997 - Ancient Philosophy 17 (2):447-451.
  34. Platón y el espíritu trágico.José Biedma López - 1996 - Diálogo Filosófico 35:251-266.
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  35. The Folly of Praise: Plato's Critique of Encomiastic Discourse in the Lysis and Symposium.Andrea Wilson Nightingale - 1993 - Classical Quarterly 43 (01):112-.
    Plato targets the encomiastic genre in three separate dialogues: the Lysis, the Menexenus and the Symposium. Many studies have been devoted to Plato's handling of the funeral oration in the Menexenus. Plato's critique of the encomium in the Lysis and Symposium, however, has not been accorded the same kind of treatment. Yet both of these dialogues go beyond the Menexenus in exploring the opposition between encomiastic and philosophic discourse. In the Lysis, I will argue, Plato sets up encomiastic rhetoric as (...)
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  36. Plato and the New Rhapsody.Dirk C. Baltzly - 1992 - Ancient Philosophy 12 (1):29-52.
  37. Conceptual Truth and Aesthetic Truth.Kenneth Dorter - 1990 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 48 (1):37-51.
  38. Plato, Inquiry, and Painting.Michael L. Morgan - 1990 - Apeiron 23 (2):121 - 145.
  39. Understanding and Literary Form in Plato (with Special Reference to the Early and Middle Dialogues).Lucinda Jane Coventry - 1989
  40. Chapter Eight.Terry Penner - 1987 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 3 (1):263-325.
  41. Wine and Catharsis of the Emotions in Plato's Laws.Elizabeth Belfiore - 1986 - Classical Quarterly 36 (02):421-.
    Plato's views on tragedy depend in large part on his views about the ethical consequences of emotional arousal. In the Republic, Plato treats the desires we feel in everyday life to weep and feel pity as appetites exactly like those for food or sex, whose satisfactions are ‘replenishments’. Physical desire is not reprehensible in itself, but is simply non-rational, not identical with reason but capable of being brought into agreement with it. Some desires, like that for simple and wholesome food, (...)
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  42. The Impossibility of Perfection: Socrates' Criticism of Simonides' Poem in the Protagoras.Dorothea Frede - 1986 - Review of Metaphysics 39 (4):729 - 753.
    THE CLAIM that even Plato could not say everything at once nor could have thought or worked out everything at once is, of course, a platitude. It is generally acknowledged that there is development in Plato's thought. But what the development is, is still a much fought-over question. For in spite of all scholarly efforts this intriguing question cannot be regarded as settled in a satisfactory way. This is due not only to the fact that we all look at Plato (...)
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  43. Theories of Art.Moshe Barasch - 1985 - Routledge.
    In this volume, the third in his classic series on art theory, Moshe Barasch traces the hidden patterns and interlocking themes in the study of art, from impressionism to abstract art. Barasch details the immense social changes in the creation, presentation, and reception of art which have set the history of art theory on a vertiginous new course: the decreased relevance of workshops and art schools; the replacement of the treatise by the critical review; and the emerging interrelationship between scientific (...)
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  44. Plato on the Triviality of Literature.Julia Annas - 1982 - In J. M. E. Moravcsik & Philip Temko (eds.), Plato on Beauty, Wisdom, and the Arts. Rowman & Littlefield.
  45. Eva C. Keuls, "Plato and Greek Painting". [REVIEW]W. Joseph Cummins - 1982 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 20 (1):91.
  46. Plato on Poetry and Painting.R. A. Goodrich - 1982 - British Journal of Aesthetics 22 (2):126-137.
  47. Noetic Aspiration and Artistic Inspiration.Julius Moravcsik - 1982 - In J. M. E. Moravcsik & Philip Temko (eds.), Plato on Beauty, Wisdom, and the Arts. Rowman & Littlefield.
  48. The Fire and the Sun: Why Plato Banished the Artists.John Peter Anton - 1981 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 19 (2):239-242.
  49. Plato's Phaedrus: A Defense of a Philosophic Art of Writing. [REVIEW]M. F. Burnyeat - 1981 - The Classical Review 31 (2):299-300.
  50. Plato's Atlantis Story and the Birth of Fiction.Christopher Gill - 1979 - Philosophy and Literature 3 (1):64-78.
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