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  1. added 2020-01-20
    Plato on the Beautiful.Steven Barbone - 1993 - Lyceum 5 (2):67-80.
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  2. added 2019-12-20
    The Guise of the Beautiful: Symposium 204d Ff.Jonathan Fine - 2019 - Phronesis 65 (2):129-152.
    A crux of Plato’s Symposium is how beauty relates to the good. Diotima distinguishes beauty from the good, I show, to explain how erotic pursuits are characteristically ambivalent and opaque. Human beings pursue beauty without knowing why or thinking it good; yet they are rational, if aiming at happiness. Central to this reconstruction is a passage widely taken to show that beauty either coincides with the good or demands disinterested admiration. It shows rather that what one loves as beautiful does (...)
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  3. added 2019-08-19
    Contemplation and Self-Mastery in Plato's Phaedrus.Suzanne Obdrzalek - 2012 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 42:77-107.
    This chapter examines Plato's moral psychology in the Phaedrus. It argues against interpreters such as Burnyeat and Nussbaum that Plato's treatment of the soul is increasingly pessimistic: reason's desire to contemplate is at odds with its obligation to rule the soul, and psychic harmony can only be secured by violently suppressing the lower parts of the soul.
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  4. added 2019-07-24
    The Carpenter as a Philosopher Artist: A Critique of Plato's Theory of Mimesis.Ilemobayo John Omogunwa - 2018 - Philosophy Pathways 222 (1).
    Plato’s theory of mimesis is expressed clearly and mainly in Plato’s Republic where he refers to his philosophy of Ideas in his definition of art, by arguing that all arts are imitative in nature. Reality according to him lies with the Idea, and the Form one confronts in this tangible world is a copy of that universal everlasting Idea. He poses that a carpenter’s chair is the result of the idea of chair in his mind, the created chair is once (...)
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  5. added 2019-06-07
    Il Problema Della Bellezza—Autenticità E Significato Dell' Ippia Maggiore di Platone. [REVIEW]Pamela M. Huby - 1978 - The Classical Review 28 (1):168-169.
  6. added 2019-06-06
    Theories of Aesthesis and Mneme in Plato's Dialogues: A Critical Analysis and Re-Assessment.D. Z. Andriopoulos - 2005 - Philosophical Inquiry 27 (1/2):58-81.
  7. added 2019-06-06
    The Being of the Beautiful: Plato's Theatetus, Sophist and Statesman, by Seth Benardete. [REVIEW]Stanley Rosen - 1985 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 10 (2):163-166.
  8. added 2019-04-10
    Two Passions in Plato’s Symposium: Diotima’s To Kalon as a Reorientation of Imperialistic Erōs.Mateo Duque - 2019 - In Heather L. Reid & Tony Leyh (eds.), Looking at Beauty to Kalon in Western Greece: Selected Essays from the 2018 Symposium on the Heritage of Western Greece. Sioux City, IA, USA: Parnassos Press – Fonte Aretusa. pp. 95-110.
    In this essay, I propose a reading of two contrasting passions, two kinds of erōs, in the "Symposium." On the one hand, there is the imperialistic desire for conquering and possessing that Alcibiades represents; and on the other hand, there is the productive love of immortal wisdom that Diotima represents. It’s not just what Alcibiades says in the Symposium, but also what he symbolizes. Alcibiades gives a speech in honor of Socrates and of his unrequited love for him, but even (...)
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  9. added 2017-09-29
    Plato and the Question of Beauty. [REVIEW]Aaron James Landry - 2011 - Symposium 15 (1):212-215.
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  10. added 2016-12-09
    Sun and Lightning: The Visibility of Radiance.Spuybroek Lars - 2016 - In J. Brouwer, S. van Tuinen & L. Spuybroek (eds.), The War of Appearances: Transparency, Opacity, Radiance. V2_Publishing. pp. 98-127.
    A long chapter for The War of Appearances: Transparency, Opacity, Radiance (V2_Publishing, 2016) building on the findings of “Charis and Radiance,” an essay published two years earlier. It discusses the inherent connection between visibility and radiance within the framework of Plato’s sun model as the source of reality. The argument develops a system where transcendent verticality and earthly horizontality together construct an “arena of presence” in which things flood each other with light, absorbing and returning portions of it in a (...)
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  11. added 2016-12-08
    The Lover of the Beautiful and the Good: Platonic Foundations of Aesthetic and Moral Value.John Neil Martin - 2008 - Synthese 165 (1):31-51.
    Though acknowledged by scholars, Plato’s identification of the Beautiful and the Good has generated little interest, even in aesthetics where the moral concepts are a current topic. The view is suspect because, e.g., it is easy to find examples of ugly saints and beautiful sinners. In this paper the thesis is defended using ideas from Plato’s ancient commentators, the Neoplatonists. Most interesting is Proclus, who applied to value theory a battery of linguistic tools with fixed semantic properties—comparative adjectives, associated gradable (...)
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  12. added 2016-06-10
    The Compass of Beauty: A Search for the Middle.Lars Spuybroek - forthcoming - In Maria Voyatzaki (ed.), Architectural Materialisms: Nonhuman Creativity. Edinburgh University Press.
    This chapter is a rethinking of my earlier “The Ages of Beauty” which investigated Charles Hartshorne’s Diagram of Aesthetic Values. The argument is placed in a long history of beauty being considered as the middle between extremes. It slowly develops into a structure not merely of aesthetic experience but of existence itself, making it a competitor of Heidegger’s fourfold.
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  13. added 2015-04-26
    Plato's Sophist: Part II of The Being of the Beautiful. Plato - 1986 - University of Chicago Press.
    He was the author or translator of many books, most recently The Argument of the Action, Plato's "Laws," and Plato's "Symposium," all published by the University of Chicago Press.
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  14. added 2015-04-25
    Plato's Statesman: Part III of The Being of the Beautiful. Plato - 1986 - University Of Chicago Press.
    He was the author or translator of many books, most recently The Argument of the Action, Plato's "Laws," and Plato's "Symposium," all published by the University of Chicago Press.
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  15. added 2015-04-25
    Plato's Theaetetus: Part I of The Being of the Beautiful. Plato - 1986 - University of Chicago Press.
    He was the author or translator of many books, most recently The Argument of the Action, Plato's "Laws," and Plato's "Symposium," all published by the University of Chicago Press.
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  16. added 2015-04-17
    Plato's Poetics: The Authority of Beauty.Morriss Henry Partee - 1981 - University of Utah Press.
  17. added 2015-04-15
    Moral Transformation and the Love of Beauty in Plato's Symposium.Suzanne Obdrzalek - 2010 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 48 (4):415-444.
    This paper defends an intellectualist interpretation of Diotima’s speech in Plato’s Symposium. I argue that Diotima’s purpose, in discussing the lower lovers, is to critique their erōs as aimed at a goal it can never secure, immortality, and as focused on an inferior object, themselves. By contrast, in loving the form of beauty, the philosopher gains a mortal sort of completion; in turning outside of himself, he also ceases to be preoccupied by his own incompleteness.
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  18. added 2015-04-13
    ?Only in the Contemplation of Beauty is Human Life Worth Living? Plato, Symposium 211d.Alexander Nehamas - 2007 - European Journal of Philosophy 15 (1):1–18.
  19. added 2015-04-12
    Introduction.Julius Moravcsik & Philip Temko - 1982 - In J. M. E. Moravcsik & Philip Temko (eds.), Plato on Beauty, Wisdom, and the Arts. Rowman & Littlefield.
  20. added 2015-04-12
    Plato on Beauty, Wisdom, and the Arts.J. M. E. Moravcsik & Philip Temko (eds.) - 1982 - Rowman & Littlefield.
  21. added 2015-04-03
    Plato on Learning to Love Beauty.Gabriel Richardson Lear - 2006 - In Gerasimos Xenophon Santas (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Plato's Republic. Blackwell.
  22. added 2015-04-03
    Permanent Beauty and Becoming Happy in Plato's Symposium.Gabriel Richardson Lear - 2006 - In J. H. Lesher, Debra Nails & Frisbee C. C. Sheffield (eds.), Plato's Symposium: Issues in Interpretation and Reception. Harvard University Press. pp. 96.
    Our first encounter with Socrates in the Symposium is bizarre. Aristodemus, surprised to run into Socrates fully bathed and with his sandals on, asks him where he is going “to have made himself so beautiful (kalos)” (174a4, Rowe trans.). Socrates replies that he is on his way to see the lovely Agathon, and so that “he has beautified himself in these ways in order to go, a beauty to a beauty (kalos para kalon)” (174a7–8). Why does Socrates, who in just (...)
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  23. added 2015-04-02
    Drew Hyland, Plato and the Question of Beauty. [REVIEW]Aaron James Landry - 2011 - Symposium: Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy/Revue canadienne de philosophie continentale 15 (1):212-215.
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  24. added 2015-03-25
    Plato's Statesman: Part Iii of the Being of the Beautiful.Seth Benardete (ed.) - 1986 - University of Chicago Press.
    _Theaetetus_, the _Sophist_, and the _Statesman_ are a trilogy of Platonic dialogues that show Socrates formulating his conception of philosophy as he prepares the defense for his trial. Originally published together as _The Being of the Beautiful_, these translations can be read separately or as a trilogy. Each includes an introduction, extensive notes, and comprehensive commentary that examines the trilogy's motifs and relationships. "Seth Benardete is one of the very few contemporary classicists who combine the highest philological competence with a (...)
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  25. added 2015-03-24
    Plato's Theory of Beauty.G. M. A. Grube - 1927 - The Monist 37 (2):269-288.
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  26. added 2015-03-21
    Plato and the Question of Beauty.Zina Giannopoulou - 2011 - Ancient Philosophy 31 (2):412-416.
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  27. added 2015-03-16
    The Death of Painting (After Plato).Ryan Drake - 2011 - Research in Phenomenology 41 (1):23-44.
    Whereas the entrance of the monochrome into modern art has typically been understood in light of movements in contemporary art and aesthetic theory following in its wake, this essay seeks to understand the motivations for, and the effect of, the monochrome in the work of Aleksandr Rodchenko in 1921 in reference to Plato's analysis of pure pleasure and absolute beauty in the Philebus . I argue that Rodchenko and Plato were motivated by a shared project to contend with the aesthetic (...)
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  28. added 2015-03-14
    Plato on Art and Beauty.A. E. Denham (ed.) - 2012 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
  29. added 2015-03-11
    Gaita and Plato : Goodness, Love, and Beauty.Christopher Cordner - 2011 - In Christopher Cordner & Raimond Gaita (eds.), Philosophy, Ethics, and a Common Humanity: Essays in Honour of Raimond Gaita. Routledge.
  30. added 2015-03-11
    What Are the Topnoi in Philebus 51C?Todd Compton - 1990 - Classical Quarterly 40 (02):549-.
    In an interesting passage in the Philebus , Plato associates pure beauty with geometrical forms created by certain measuring tools used both by mathematicians and carpenters. The ‘beauty of figures’ is analysed as' something straight [εθ τι]… and round [περιφερς] and the two- and three-dimensional figures generated from these by [τρνοι] and ruler [κανσ7iota;] and set-squares [γωναι]' He continues: ‘For I maintain that these things are not beautiful in relation to something, as other things are, but they are always beautiful (...)
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  31. added 2015-03-09
    Knowledge of Beauty in Plato's Symposium.Ludwig C. H. Chen - 1983 - Classical Quarterly 33 (01):66-.
    Plato's Symposium consists of six speeches on Eros with the addition of Alcibiades' praise of Socrates. Of these speeches Socrates' speech is philosophically most important. It is true that the speech is given as a report of Diotima's view on Eros, but ‘she is a double of the Platonic Socrates’, and we take her view as the theory of Socrates in this dialogue.
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  32. added 2015-02-21
    On Some Difficulties in the Platonic Musical Modes.J. Adam - 1896 - The Classical Review 10 (08):378-379.