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  1. added 2019-03-11
    Platonic Epogoge and the “Purification” of the Method of Collection in Advance.Holly G. Moore - forthcoming - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy.
    Despite Aristotle’s claim in Topics I that all dialectical argument is either syllogism or epagōgē, modern scholars have largely neglected to assess the role of epagōgē in Platonic dialectic. Though epagōgē has no technical use in Plato, I argue that the method of collection (which, along with division (diairēsis), is central to many of the dialogues’ accounts of dialectic) functions as the Platonic predecessor to Aristotelian epagōgē. An analysis of passages from the Sophist and Statesman suggests that collection is a (...)
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  2. added 2019-03-11
    Animal Sacrifice in Plato's Later Methodology.Holly Moore - 2015 - In Jeremy Bell, Michael Naas & Thomas Patrick Oates (eds.), Plato's Animals: Gadflies, Horses, Swans, and Other Philosophical Beasts. Indianapolis, IN, USA: pp. 179-192.
    In both the Phaedrus and Statesman dialogues, the dialectician's method of division is likened to the butchery of sacrificial animals. Interpreting the significance of this metaphor by analyzing ancient Greek sacrificial practice, this essay argues that, despite the ubiquity of the method of division in these later dialogues, Plato is there stressing the logical priority of the method of collection, division's dialectical twin. Although Plato prioritizes the method of collection, the author further argues that, through a kind of 'domestication' of (...)
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  3. added 2018-07-28
    Division as a Method in Plato.Hallvard Fossheim - 2012 - In Jakob Fink (ed.), The Development of Dialectic from Plato to Aristotle. Cambridge University Press.
  4. added 2018-06-19
    The Science of Philosophy: Discourse and Deception in Plato’s Sophist.Pettersson Olof - 2018 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 22 (2):221-237.
    At 252e1 to 253c9 in Plato’s Sophist, the Eleatic Visitor explains why philosophy is a science. Like the art of grammar, philosophical knowledge corresponds to a generic structure of discrete kinds and is acquired by systematic analysis of how these kinds intermingle. In the literature, the Visitor’s science is either understood as an expression of a mature and authentic platonic metaphysics, or as a sophisticated illusion staged to illustrate the seductive lure of sophistic deception. By showing how the Visitor’s account (...)
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  5. added 2018-06-04
    The Philosopher in Plato's Statesman. [REVIEW]Kenneth Seeskin - 1984 - Ancient Philosophy 4 (2):234-237.
  6. added 2018-05-18
    Platons Sophistes: Ein Kritischer Kommentar.Gustav Adolf Seeck - 2011 - Munchen: C.H. Beck.
  7. added 2017-11-09
    Plato's Analytic Method.Kenneth M. Sayre - 1969 - University of Chicago Press.
  8. added 2017-09-29
    A Sharp Eye for Kinds: Collection and Division in Plato's Late Dialogues.Devin Henry - 2011 - In Michael Frede, James V. Allen, Eyjólfur Kjalar Emilsson, Wolfgang-Rainer Mann & Benjamin Morison (eds.), Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy. Oxford University Press. pp. 229-55.
    This paper focuses on two methodological questions that arise from Plato’s account of collection and division. First, what place does the method of collection and division occupy in Plato’s account of philosophical inquiry? Second, do collection and division in fact constitute a formal “method” (as most scholars assume) or are they simply informal techniques that the philosopher has in her toolkit for accomplishing different philosophical tasks? I argue that Plato sees collection and division as useful tools for achieving two distinct (...)
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  9. added 2017-01-29
    On the Division of History Into Epochs.Philip S. Miller - 1932 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 26:167-168.
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  10. added 2016-12-12
    Metaphysics and Method in Plato's Statesman.Kenneth M. Sayre - 2006 - Cambridge University Press.
    At the beginning of his Metaphysics, Aristotle attributed several strange-sounding theses to Plato. Generations of Plato scholars have assumed that these could not be found in the dialogues. In heated arguments, they have debated the significance of these claims, some arguing that they constituted an 'unwritten teaching' and others maintaining that Aristotle was mistaken in attributing them to Plato. In a prior book-length study on Plato's late ontology, Kenneth M. Sayre demonstrated that, despite differences in terminology, these claims correspond to (...)
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  11. added 2015-04-28
    Dialectic as Inter-Personal Activity: Self-Refutation and Dialectic in Plato and Aristotle / Luca Castagnoli ; The Role of the Respondent in Plato and Aristotle / Marja-Liisa Kakkuri-Knuuttila ; Division as a Method in Plato.Hallvard Fossheim - 2012 - In Jakob L. Fink (ed.), The Development of Dialectic From Plato to Aristotle. Cambridge University Press.
  12. added 2015-04-28
    Plato’s Definition of Sophistry.Samuel C. Rickless - 2010 - Ancient Philosophy 30 (2):289-298.
  13. added 2015-04-28
    Plato and Aristotle on Universals and Definition by Division.Laura Castelli - 2007 - Documenti E Studi Sulla Tradizione Filosofica Medievale 18:21-35.
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  14. added 2015-04-28
    « Paradigm And Diairesis: A Response To M.L. Gill’s ‘Models In Plato’s Sophist And Statesman ».Dimitri El Murr - 2006 - Plato: The Internet Journal of the International Plato Society 6.
  15. added 2015-04-28
    Plato's Stranger Harvey Ronald Scodel: Diaeresis and Myth in Plato's Statesman. (Hypomnemata, 85.) Pp. 172. Göttingen and Zörich: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 1987. Paper, DM 44. [REVIEW]Christopher Gill - 1988 - The Classical Review 38 (02):225-226.
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  16. added 2015-04-28
    Diaeresis and Myth in Plato's Statesman.Harvey Ronald Scodel - 1987
  17. added 2015-04-28
    The Method of Collection and Division in Plato's Later Dialogues: "Phaedrus", "Sophist", "Statesman".Catherine Marie Culver - 1986 - Dissertation, The Florida State University
    This is part one of an examination of Plato's Method of Collection and Division, a method which Plato describes in the later dialogues as the method of dialectic. Included are chapters on the Phaedrus, Sophist and Statesman as well as a separate survey of the passages in those dialogues in which the method is mentioned. Questions concerning the requirements for making a collection or a division and the connection between collections and division are addressed. Also included is discussion of the (...)
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  18. added 2015-04-28
    Plato and Diaeresis.Joseph T. Clark - 1952 - Philosophical Studies of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 3:4-6.
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  19. added 2015-03-14
    Plato and Aristotle on Division and Definition.Marguerite Deslauriers - 1990 - Ancient Philosophy 10 (2):203-219.
  20. added 2015-02-22
    Forms and First Principles.Julia Annas - 1974 - Phronesis 19 (3):257-283.
  21. added 2014-12-02
    « Topos » en question dans l'introduction du Sophiste (216a1-217a1).Nathalie Nercam - 2013 - Plato: The Internet Journal of the International Plato Society (Plato 12 (2012)).
    Au début du Sophiste, Socrate demande au visiteur éléate ce qu’ont pensé des genres philosophe, sophiste et politique, « ceux » qui sont de ce lieu-là ». L’article a pour but d’éclairer cette dernière expression et en particulier son mot clef « topos ». Il est montré que les significations de ce terme, dans son contexte, sont multiples et que cette diversité, loin d’apporter la confusion, permet au contraire et précisément d’ouvrir les diverses perspectives du dialogue. At the beginning of (...)
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  22. added 2014-03-29
    Collecting the Letters.Stephen Menn - 1998 - Phronesis 43 (4):291 - 305.
    In this paper I reexamine Plato's method of collection and division, and specifically of collection. If collection and division are simply methods for mapping out genus-species trees, then it is hard to understand why Plato is so excited about them. But a close study of Plato's examples shows that these methods are something broader, and shows why Plato would regard collection as an important tool for coming to know "elements" in any domain of inquiry. In the first section I focus (...)
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  23. added 2014-03-12
    Method and Metaphysics in Plato's Sophist and Statesman.Mary Louise Gill - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    The Sophist and Statesman are late Platonic dialogues, whose relative dates are established by their stylistic similarity to the Laws, a work that was apparently still “on the wax” at the time of Plato's death (Diogenes Laertius III.37). These dialogues are important in exhibiting Plato'sviews on method and metaphysics after he criticized his own most famous contribution to the history of philosophy, the theory of separate, immaterial forms, in the Parmenides. The Statesman also offers a transitional statement of Plato's political (...)
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  24. added 2014-03-12
    The Method of Division and the Division of the Phaedrus.Kenneth Dorter - 2006 - Ancient Philosophy 26 (2):259-273.
  25. added 2014-03-12
    Plato on Kinds of Animals.David B. Kitts - 1987 - Biology and Philosophy 2 (3):315-328.
    Some biologists and philosophers of biology have seen in Plato an especially objectionable version of essentialism or topology. Although kinds of animals are mentioned in almost all of Plato's dialogues, in none of them is there an explicity stated doctrine of animal kinds. An examination of the dialogues has, moreover, failed to reveal some implicit but consistent and unambiguous view of kinds that Plato might have held.
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  26. added 2014-03-12
    Plato's Method of Division.S. Marc Cohen - 1973 - In J. M. E. Moravcsik (ed.), Patterns in Plato's Thought. Reidel. pp. 181--191.
    Critical discussion of J.M.E. Moravcsik's paper on Plato's method of division.
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  27. added 2014-03-12
    The Anatomy of Plato's Divisions.J. M. E. Moravcsik - 1973 - In Richard Rorty, Alexander P. D. Mourelatos & Edward N. Lee (eds.), Exegesis and argument. Studies in Greek philosophy presented to Gregory Vlastos. Phronesis. Assen, van Gorcum. pp. 324-348.
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  28. added 2014-03-12
    Plato’s Analytic Method . By Kenneth M. Sayre . (Chicago and London : University of Chicago Press. 1969. Pp. Xi + 250. Price £4.40). [REVIEW]R. C. Cross - 1971 - Philosophical Quarterly 21 (84):261-262.
  29. added 2014-03-12
    Division and its Relation to Dialectic and Ontology in Plato.J. R. Trevaskis - 1967 - Phronesis 12 (1):118-129.
  30. added 2014-03-12
    Plato's Description of Division.A. C. Lloyd - 1952 - Classical Quarterly 2 (1-2):105-.
    There are many passages in Plato which look as if they alluded to well-worn practices, discussions, or lessons in the Academy. As is natural with allusions, they are often marked by a puzzling brevity or oddity of expression. One need not assume that they are always conscious allusions; for every writer has moments of obscurity which are due not so much to his conclusions as to his reaching them along lines that have long been familiar to Mm. To appreciate his (...)
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  31. added 2014-03-11
    The Eleatic Visitor's Method of Division.Laura Grams - 2012 - Apeiron 45 (2):130-156.