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  1. Arystotelesowskie Ujęcie Homonimii.Mikołaj Domaradzki - 2016 - Diametros 50:1-24.
    The purpose of the paper is to discuss Aristotle’s account of homonymy. The major thesis advocated here is that Aristotle considers both entities and words to be homonymous, depending on the object of his criticism. Thus, when he takes issue with Plato, he tends to view homonymy more ontologically, upon which it is entities that become homonymous. When, on the other hand, he gainsays the exegetes or the sophists, he is inclined to perceive homonymy more semantically, upon which it is (...)
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  2. Names and Nature in Plato's Cratylus.Robert Nozick (ed.) - 2016 - Routledge.
    This study offers a ckomprehensive new interpretation of one of Plato's dialogues, the _Cratylus_. Throughout, the book combines analysis of Plato's arguments with attentiveness to his philosophical method.
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  3. On Rational Philosophy of Language – The Programme in Plato’s Cratylus Reconsidered.Jürgen Mittelstraß - 2014 - In Die Griechische Denkform: Von der Entstehung der Philosophie Aus Dem Geiste der Geometrie. De Gruyter. pp. 230-246.
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  4. Plato's Cratylus: The Comedy of Language.S. Montgomery Ewegen - 2013 - Indiana University Press.
    Plato’s dialogue Cratylus focuses on being and human dependence on words, or the essential truths about the human condition. Arguing that comedy is an essential part of Plato's concept of language, S. Montgomery Ewegen asserts that understanding the comedic is key to an understanding of Plato's deeper philosophical intentions. Ewegen shows how Plato’s view of language is bound to comedy through words and how, for Plato, philosophy has much in common with playfulness and the ridiculous. By tying words, language, and (...)
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  5. Comedy as Self-Forgetting: Implications for Sallis's Reading of Plato's Cratylus.Sonja Tanner - 2013 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 27 (2):188-198.
    I know of nothing that has caused me to dream more on Plato’s secrecy and his sphinx nature than the happily preserved petit fait that under the pillow of his deathbed there was found no “Bible,” nothing Egyptian, Pythagorean, or Platonic—but a volume of Aristophanes. How could even a Plato have endured life—a Greek life to which he said No—without an Aristophanes? Diogenes Laertius reports that Plato was reputed to have been so “well regulated”(kosmiois) as never once to have been (...)
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  6. The Cratylus of Plato: A Commentary. By Francesco Ademollo. [REVIEW]Geoffrey Bagwell - 2012 - Ancient Philosophy 32 (1):190-193.
  7. Francesco Ademollo, Plato's Cratylus: A Commentary. [REVIEW]Shawn Loht - 2012 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 50 (3):450-51.
  8. Plato's Cratylus: A Commentary. [REVIEW]Shawn Loht - 2012 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 50 (3):450-451.
  9. Meaning and Cognition in Plato’s Cratylus and Theaetetus.Deborah K. W. Modrak - 2012 - Topoi 31 (2):167-174.
    For Plato, the crucial function of human cognition is to grasp truths. Explaining how we are able to do this is fundamental to understanding our cognitive powers. Plato addresses this topic from several different angles. In the Cratylus and Theaetetus, he attempts to identify the elemental cognitions that are the foundations of language and knowledge. He considers several candidates for this role, most notably, perception and simple meaning-bearing concepts. In the first section, we will look at Plato’s worries about semantic (...)
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  10. Etymology and the Power of Names in Plato’s Cratylus.Franco V. Trivigno - 2012 - Ancient Philosophy 32 (1):35-75.
  11. The Cratylus of Plato: A Commentary.Francesco Ademollo - 2011 - Cambridge University Press.
    The first full-scale commentary on the Cratylus, one of Plato's most difficult and intriguing dialogues.
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  12. I Fondamenti Della Riflessione di Platone Sul Linguaggio: Il Cratilo.Francesco Aronadio - 2011 - Edizioni di Storia E Letteratura.
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  13. Does Plato Argue Fallaciously at Cratylus 385b–C?Geoffrey Bagwell - 2011 - Apeiron 44 (1):13-21.
    At Cratylus 385b–c, Plato appears to argue that names have truth-value. Critics have almost universally condemned the argument as fallacious. Their case has proven so compelling that it has driven editors to recommend moving or removing the argument from its received position in the manuscripts. I argue that a close reading of the argument reveals it commits no fallacy, and its purpose in the dialogue justifies its original position. I wish to vindicate the manuscript tradition, showing that the argument establishes (...)
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  14. Plato on the Norms of Speech and Thought.Matthew Evans - 2011 - Phronesis 56 (4):322-349.
    Near the beginning of the Cratylus (385e-387d) Plato's Socrates argues, against his friend Hermogenes, that the standards of correctness for our use of names in speech are in no way up to us. Yet this conclusion should strike us, at least initially, as bizarre. After all, how could it not be up to us whether to call our children by the names of our parents, or whether to call dogs “dogs“? My aim in this paper will be to show that, (...)
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  15. Review: RM van den Berg. Proclus' Commentary on the Cratylus in Context. Ancient Theories of Language and Naming. [REVIEW]Pieter D'Hoine - 2010 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 72 (1):151-153.
  16. The Theory of Names in Plato’s Cratylus.Nicholas Bunnin - 2009 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 36 (4):531-540.
  17. Living by the Cratylus Hermeneutics and Philosophic Names in the Roman Empire.Harold Tarrant - 2009 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 3 (1):1-25.
    This paper is about an aspect of philosophic life, showing, in the case of one Platonic dialogue in particular, that the texts that later Platonists employed in a quasi-scriptural capacity could influence their lives in important ways. The Cratylus was seen as addressing the question of how names could be regarded as 'correct', raising the role of the name-giver to the level of the law-giver. It begins with the question of how a personal name could be correct. The ancient text (...)
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  18. NINE. Cratylus’ Theory of Names and Its Refutation.BernardHG Williams - 2009 - In The Sense of the Past: Essays in the History of Philosophy. Princeton University Press. pp. 138-147.
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  19. Plato's Philosophy of Language.Paolo Crivelli - 2008 - In Gail Fine (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Plato. Oxford University Press. pp. 217-242.
    Ideas in and problems of the philosophy of language surface frequently in Plato's dialogues. This forms the basis of the present article. Some passages briefly formulate, or presuppose, views about names, signification, truth, or falsehood; others are extended discussions of important themes of the philosophy of language. Basic predicative expressions are an integral part of Plato's philosophy of language. The article further emphasizes on the importance of forms as missing standards. Plato does say that perceptible particulars derive their names from (...)
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  20. Plato's "Cratylus".David Sedley - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  21. False Names, Demonstratives and the Refutation of Linguistic Naturalism in Plato's "Cratylus" 427 D1-431c3.Imogen Smith - 2008 - Phronesis 53 (2):125-151.
    This paper offers an interpretation of Plato's Cratylus 427d1-431c3 that supports a reading of the dialogue as a whole as concluding in favour of a conventionalist account of naming. While many previous interpretations note the value of this passage as evidence for Platonic investigations of false propositions, this paper argues that its demonstration that there can be false (or incorrect) naming in turn refutes the naturalist account of naming; that is, it shows that a natural relation between name and nominatum (...)
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  22. Inquiry Without Names in Plato's Cratylus.Christine J. Thomas - 2008 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (3):pp. 341-364.
    The interlocutors of Plato’s Cratylus agree that “it is far better to learn and to inquire from the things themselves than from their names”. Although surprisingly little attention has been paid to these remarks, at least some commentators view Plato as articulating a preference for direct, nonlinguistic cognitive access to the objects of inquiry. Another commentator takes Plato simply to recommend first-hand, yet linguistic, experience in addition to instruction from experts. This paper defends, in contrast to both interpretations, the view (...)
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  23. Proclus' Commentary on the Cratylus in Context: Ancient Theories of Language and Naming.Robbert Maarten van den Berg - 2007 - Brill.
    This book explores the various views on language and its relation to philosophy in the Platonic tradition by examening the reception of Plato’s Cratylus in antiquity in general, and the commentary of the Neoplatonist Proclus in particular.
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  24. Proclus' Commentary on the Cratylus in Context: Ancient Theories of Language and Naming.Robbert Maarten van den Berg - 2007 - Brill Academic.
    This book explores the various views on language and its relation to philosophy in the Platonic tradition by examening the reception of Plato's Cratylus in antiquity in general, and the commentary of the Neoplatonist Proclus in particular.
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  25. Heraclitean Flux and Unity of Opposites in Plato's Theaetetus and Cratylus.Matthew Colvin - 2007 - Classical Quarterly 57 (2):759-769.
    Heraclitean flux plays a large role in Plato 's « Theaetetus » and « Cratylus ». Yet Heraclitus himself did not hold the same conception of flux. The question of how the two thinkers differ, and why Plato treats Heraclitus as he does, is significant because the notion of flux has figured in subsequent philosophical conceptions of the persistence of identity through change. Comparison of Heraclitus, frr. B 12 and B 125 DK reveals that flux is not motion simply, but (...)
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  26. Logos as the Message From the Gods: On the Etymology of Hermes in Plato's Cratylus.Sean D. Kirkland - 2007 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 12 (1):1 - 14.
    In the Cratylus, Socrates seems to present the Logos essentially as an always already present yoke binding us to our world. However, this prior and necessary bond does not entail that the world is revealed perfectly and completely in the terms and structures of our human language. Rather, within this bond, the Logos opens up a distance between being and appearance, insofar as it points to »what is« as the withdrawn possibility condition for the appearances ordered, gathered and separated according (...)
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  27. On Plato's "Cratylus". Proclus - 2007 - Cornell University Press.
  28. The Case of the Etymologies in Plato's Cratylus.Christine J. Thomas - 2007 - Philosophy Compass 2 (2):218–226.
  29. Names and “Cutting Being at the Joints” in the Cratylus.Adam Wood - 2007 - Dionysius 25.
  30. Plato’s Cratylus, by David Sedley. [REVIEW]A. D. Carpenter - 2006 - Ancient Philosophy 26 (2):404-408.
  31. Del Vero E Del Falso Nel Sofista di Platone: Con Un Saggio Sul Cratilo.Alfonso De Petris - 2005 - L. S. Olschki.
  32. Stoic Linguistics, Plato's Cratylus, and Augustine's De Dialectica.A. A. Long - 2005 - In Dorothea Frede & Brad Inwood (eds.), Language and Learning: Philosophy of Language in the Hellenistic Age. Cambridge University Press. pp. 36.
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  33. Language, Communication, and the Paradox of Analysis: Some Philosophical Remarks on Plato's Cratylus.Marc Moffett - 2005 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 8.
    On the face of it, Plato’s dialogue the Cratylus has a clear and narrowly linguistic subject matter, specifically, the debate between conventionalism and naturalism in the theory of meaning. But why should this topic be of sufficient interest to Plato to warrant an entire dialogue? What philosophically was at stake for him in these seemingly recherché questions about language? I argue that at least one major motivation is a defense of Platonistic epistemology and, in particular, Plato’s Theory of Recollection. Specifically, (...)
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  34. Cratylus D. Sedley: Plato's Cratylus. Pp. Xii + 190. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003. Cased, £40, US$60. ISBN: 0-521-58492-. [REVIEW]Philomen Probert - 2005 - The Classical Review 55 (02):428-.
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  35. Plato's Cratylus: Argument, Form, and Structure.Michael W. Riley (ed.) - 2005 - Rodopi.
    This book explains how the Cratylus, Plato’s apparently meandering and comical dialogue on the correctness of names, makes serious philosophical progress by its notorious etymological digressions. While still a wild ride through a Heraclitean flood of etymologies which threatens to swamp language altogether, the Cratylus emerges as an astonishingly organized evaluation of the power of words.
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  36. Plato's `Cratylus'. [REVIEW]F. Aronadio - 2004 - Elenchos 25 (2).
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  37. (D.) Sedley Plato's Cratylus. Cambridge UP, 2001. Pp. Xi + 189. £40. 0521584922. [REVIEW]Andrea Capra - 2004 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 124:216-217.
  38. Review of David Sedley, Plato's Cratylus[REVIEW]Victor Caston - 2004 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2004 (7).
  39. David Sedley, Plato's Cratylus. [REVIEW]Patrick Mooney - 2004 - Philosophy in Review 24 (6):440-442.
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  40. Plato's Cratylus (Review).Rosamond Kent Sprague - 2004 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 42 (4):490-491.
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  41. Recensione di R. BARNEY, Names and Nature in Plato's 'Cratylus'. [REVIEW]F. Aronadio - 2003 - Elenchos 24 (2):422-430.
  42. The Nomothetês in Plato’s Cratylus.David Sedley - 2003 - The Studia Philonica Annual 15:5-16.
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  43. Plato's Cratylus.David Sedley - 2003 - Cambridge University Press.
    Plato's Cratylus is a brilliant but enigmatic dialogue. It bears on a topic, the relation of language to knowledge, which has never ceased to be of central philosophical importance, but tackles it in ways which at times look alien to us. In this reappraisal of the dialogue, Professor Sedley argues that the etymologies which take up well over half of it are not an embarrassing lapse or semi-private joke on Plato's part. On the contrary, if taken seriously as they should (...)
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  44. City, Soul, and Speech in Plato's "Cratylus": The Rhetoric of Socratic Philosophy.Andrew Scott Hertzoff - 2002 - Dissertation, University of Notre Dame
    In this dissertation, I offer a narrative reading of the Cratylus , which separates it from debates about language, and instead, by focusing on the dynamics of the interactions of the characters, discovers in it a portrait of Socrates' interaction with two men with very different reactions to the new and radical teachings of the philosophers and sophists. Socrates appeals to Hermogenes, who is immersed in the conventional aristocratic life, with a fantastic promise of an impossible art of names, and (...)
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  45. Names and Nature in Plato's Cratylus.Rachel Barney - 2001 - Routledge.
    This study offers a ckomprehensive new interpretation of one of Plato's dialogues, the _Cratylus_. Throughout, the book combines analysis of Plato's arguments with attentiveness to his philosophical method.
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  46. Teratology and Truth: Socrates' Investigation of Poetic Names in the "Cratylus".Ashley Elliott Pryor - 2001 - Dissertation, The Pennsylvania State University
    This dissertation explores the emergence of the textual discipline of etymology in order to demonstrate its difference from earlier investigations of names---particularly those of Socrates in Plato's Cratylus , and to suggest the implications that this difference has for thinking about truth. My project is motivated by a two-fold observation: the historical fact that etymology was not established until several centuries after Plato wrote the Cratylus and that it emerges from within a political and social context that is dominated by (...)
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  47. "The Natural Rightness of Names in Plato's" Cratylus".B. Svandova - 2001 - Filosoficky Casopis 49 (3):471-485.
  48. Přirozená Správnost Jmen V Dialogu „Kratylos“.Blažena ŠvandovÁ - 2001 - Filosoficky Casopis 49:471-485.
    [The natural correctness of names in the dialogue “Cratylus“].
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  49. Limiting the Arbitrary Linguistic Naturalism and its Opposites in Plato's Cratylus and the Modern Theories of Language.John Earl Joseph - 2000
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  50. An Interpretation of Plato's Cratylus.Simon Keller - 2000 - Phronesis 45 (4):284-305.
    Plato's main concern in the "Cratylus," I claim, is to argue against the idea that we can learn about things by examining their names, and in favour of the claim that philosophers should, so far as possible, look to the things themselves. Other philosophical questions, such as that of whether we should accept a naturalist or a conventionalist theory of namng, arise in the dialogue, but are subordinate. This reading of the "Cratylus," I say, explains certain puzzling facts about the (...)
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