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1 — 50 / 92
  1. added 2018-06-25
    H. Tredennick, H. Tarrant (Trs.): Plato, The Last Days of Socrates: Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, Phaedo. Pp. Xxxi+237. Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1993 (Original Translation, 1954). Paper, £5.99. [REVIEW]Anne Sheppard - 1995 - The Classical Review 45 (01):159.
  2. added 2018-06-06
    The Value of Rule in Plato’s Dialogues: A Reply to Melissa Lane.David Ebrey - 2016 - Plato: The Internet Journal of the International Plato Society 16:75-80.
    A reply to Melissa Lane's "Antianarchia: interpreting political thought in Plato" In these comments I focus on how to think of antianarchia as an element of Plato's political thought, and in doing so raise some methodological questions about how to read Plato’s dialogues, focusing on what is involved in attributing views to Plato in general.
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  3. added 2018-05-11
    Dialectic in Action: An Examination of Plato's Crito. By Michael C. Stokes: Book Reviews. [REVIEW]Robin Waterfield - 2009 - Heythrop Journal 50 (3):510-510.
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  4. added 2018-02-17
    Plato Re-Edited - Duke E. A., Hicken W. F., Nicoll W. S. M., Robinson D. B., Strachan J. C. G. (Edd.): Platonis Opera: Vol. I: Euthyphro, Apologia Socratis, Crito, Phaedo, Cratylus, Theaetetus, Sophista, Politicus (Oxford Classical Texts). Pp. Xxxii + 572. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1995. £17.50. ISBN: 0-19-814569-1. [REVIEW]Christopher Rowe - 1997 - The Classical Review 47 (02):272-274.
  5. added 2017-10-09
    Review: Routledge Philosophy Guidebook to Plato and the Trial of Socrates. [REVIEW]G. Rudebusch - 2005 - Mind 114 (455):714-718.
  6. added 2017-10-06
    C. Emlyn-Jones: Plato: Crito. Pp. Ix + 106. Bristol: Bristol Classical Press, 1999. Paper, £12.95. ISBN: 1-85399-469-. [REVIEW]V. A. Rodgers - 2001 - The Classical Review 51 (01):161-.
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  7. added 2017-03-03
    Rethinking Plato: A Cartesian Quest for the Real Plato.Necip Fikri Alican - 2012 - New York: Brill | Rodopi.
    This book is a quest for the real Plato, forever hiding behind the veil of drama. The quest, as the subtitle indicates, is Cartesian in that it looks for Plato independently of the prevailing paradigms on where we are supposed to find him. The result of the quest is a complete pedagogical platform on Plato. This does not mean that the book leaves nothing out, covering all the dialogues and all the themes, but that it provides the full intellectual apparatus (...)
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  8. added 2017-02-15
    Platos Crito On The Nature Of Persuasion And Obedience.Eugene Garver - 2012 - Polis 29:1-20.
  9. added 2017-02-15
    Crito and the Socratic Controversy.Gabriel Danzig - 2006 - Polis 23 (1):21-45.
    Crito was written in response to popular slanders concerning Socrates' failure to escape from prison, and accompanying misgivings within the Socratic circle. Plato responds by asking his audience to disregard the slander of the mob and obey the moral expert instead. But he also responds by creating an image of Socrates and his friends widely at odds with the popular slander; by implying that Socrates' critics were themselves guilty of some of the behaviour they charged against Socrates; by pointing out (...)
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  10. added 2017-02-08
    Richard A. McNeal: Law and Rhetoric in the Crito. (Europäische Hochschulschriften, XV, 56.) Pp. Xv + 184. Frankfurt Am Main, Berne, New York and Paris: Peter Lang, 1992. Paper. [REVIEW]Christopher Rowe - 1993 - The Classical Review 43 (02):440-441.
  11. added 2017-02-07
    Socrates and Obedience.Gary Young - 1974 - Phronesis 19 (1):1-29.
  12. added 2017-02-01
    Justice and Obedience in the Crito.Joseph G. DeFilippo - 1991 - Ancient Philosophy 11 (2):249-263.
  13. added 2017-01-28
    Socrates and Paideia in Crito.Paul Neufeld - 2003 - Apeiron 36 (2):115-142.
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  14. added 2017-01-27
    Reason and the Rhetoric of Legal Obligation in Plato’s Crito.Paul J. Diduch - 2014 - Polis 31 (1):1-27.
    This paper examines Crito’s motives for wanting to help Socrates escape, and Socrates’ rhetorical strategy for handling Crito’s concerns, particularly Crito’s fear of the many. It concludes that Socrates’ admitted concern for his reputation provides the only adequate explanation for his obedience to the court, an explanation which does not rely on his explicit arguments for obligation, but which helps explain why he is concerned to come to the law’s defence. Joining others in suggesting that Socrates’ case for obligation be (...)
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  15. added 2017-01-27
    Lessons From The Crito.Kyle Scott - 2009 - Polis 26 (1):31-51.
    On the question of civil disobedience the Crito seems out of step with what Socrates says on the matter in other dialogues. This paper argues that Socrates does not abandon his earlier preference for philosophy over the law by choosing to stay and die, but rather, it is because of his preference for philosophy and the philosophic way of life that he ends up not escaping. This paper reaches its conclusion by showing that the argument of the Laws is unpersuasive (...)
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  16. added 2017-01-27
    The Roots of Socratic Philanthropy and the Rule of Law: Plato's Crito.M. Plax - 2001 - Polis 18 (1-2):59-89.
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  17. added 2017-01-27
    Crito in Plato's Euthydemus: The Lover of Family and of Money.M. Plax - 2000 - Polis 17 (1-2):35-59.
    If Platonic dialogues are dramas, then Socrates' interlocutors can be understood in their full humanity rather than foils for Socrates. This essay examines Crito, not as he appears in the dialogue named after him, but in the Euthydemus, where he reveals himself to a much greater degree. Here Crito is revealed as a successful businessman, a lover of money, who also has protective feelings about his son Critobolus. The physical frailty is a cause of concern. By understanding Crito in these (...)
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  18. added 2017-01-27
    Crito's Reasoning: Plato's Commentary on Athenian Justice.D. W. Goldberg - 2000 - Skepsis: A Journal for Philosophy and Interdisciplinary Research 11.
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  19. added 2017-01-27
    Taking Crito Seriously.M. Plax - 1999 - Polis 16 (1-2):86-92.
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  20. added 2017-01-27
    The Crito as a Mythological Mime.Thomas Payne - 1983 - Interpretation 11 (1):1-23.
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  21. added 2017-01-27
    The Crito of Plato.A. S. Plato & Owen - 1903 - Blackie & Son.
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  22. added 2017-01-25
    Crito's Failure to Deliberate Socratically.Antony Hatzistavrou - 2013 - Classical Quarterly 63 (2):580-594.
    In comparison to the speech of the Laws, the dialectic between Crito and Socrates at the beginning of the Crito has received little attention. In this paper I argue that it contains an important philosophical message. It illustrates that the many's failure to follow Socrates' principles, like his principle of non-retaliation, is due to the intrinsic fragility of true beliefs. Though the many can understand Socrates' values and may accept his principles if he argues with them long enough, they may (...)
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  23. added 2017-01-25
    " A Creature of Modern Scholarship": Disobedience and the Crito Problem.F. Rosen - 1998 - Polis 15 (1-2):1-12.
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  24. added 2017-01-23
    Plato's Crito On the Obligation to Obey the Law.Charles M. Young - 2006 - Philosophical Inquiry 28 (1-2):79-90.
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  25. added 2017-01-23
    Plato's' Apologia'and'Crito'-Reflections and Objections.M. Montuori - 1997 - Filosofia 48 (2).
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  26. added 2017-01-21
    Plato's Crito: A Question of Agreement.Jordan Howard Sobel - 1994 - Theoria 60 (1):1-26.
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  27. added 2017-01-21
    Agreement and Obligation in the Crito.Donald F. Dreisbach - 1978 - New Scholasticism 52 (2):168-186.
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  28. added 2017-01-19
    Crito.Cathal Woods & Ryan Pack - manuscript
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  29. added 2017-01-19
    Obedience to the Law in Plato's Crito.Ernest J. Weinrib - 1982 - American Journal of Jurisprudence 27 (1):85-108.
    Plato's Crito is not a treatise on obedience to the law, but a dialogue whose interpretation is not determined by its surface meaning. The initial dream is not mere ornamentation; rather it points to the range of possibilities in Socrates' situation. The speeches of the Laws, with which the dialogue closes, are not intended to be philosophically cogent, since they are inconsistent with the principles laid out in the preceding conversation between Socrates and Crito. The arguments of the Laws are (...)
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  30. added 2017-01-18
    Obligation and Friendship in Plato's Crito.Frederick Rosen - 1973 - Political Theory 1 (3):307-316.
  31. added 2017-01-15
    Reason, Law, and Authority in Plato's Crito.Mark Brouwer - unknown
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  32. added 2017-01-15
    What in Plato's Crito is Benefited by Justice and Harmed by Injustice.Dougal Blyth - 1996 - Apeiron 29 (4):1-20.
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  33. added 2017-01-15
    The Structure of Plato's Crito.Hunter Brown - 1992 - Apeiron 25 (1):67.
  34. added 2017-01-15
    Problems in the Argument of Plato's Crito.Charles H. Kahn - 1989 - Apeiron 22 (4):29.
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  35. added 2017-01-14
    Socrates Dissatisfied: An Analysis of Plato's Crito.Roslyn Weiss - 1998 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    In Socrates Dissatisfied, Weiss argues against the prevailing view that the personified Laws in the latter part of the Crito are Socrates' spokesmen. She reveals and explores many indications that Socrates and the Laws are, both in style and in substance, adversaries. Deft, provocative, and compelling, with new translations providing groundbreaking interpretations of key passages, Socrates Dissatisfied challenges the standard conception of the history of political thought.
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  36. added 2017-01-12
    Socrates on Obedience and Disobedience to the Law.Richard W. Momeyer - 1982 - Philosophy Research Archives 8:21-53.
    Considerable scholarship over the last dozen years has greatly increased our understanding of Apology and Crito. However, the knottiest problem between these dialogues--the frequently noted apparent contradiction between Apology 29c-30c and Crito 51b-c, between Socrates’ pledge to disobey a court order to give up philosophy and his argument that legal authority absolutely obligates a citizen to obedience--is far from being resolved. In the end I argue that this contradiction is unresolved, despite numerous ingenious attempts to eliminate it, because it is (...)
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  37. added 2016-12-08
    Crito. Plato - 2009 - In Steven M. Cahn (ed.), Exploring Ethics: An Introductory Anthology. Oxford University Press.
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  38. added 2016-12-08
    Routledge Philosophy Guidebook to Plato and the Trial of Socrates.Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith - 2004 - Routledge.
    Plato is the most important philosopher in the history of Western philosophy. This guidebook introduces and examines his three dialogues that deal with the death of Socrates: Euthphryo , Apology and Crito . These dialogues are widely regarded as the closest exposition of Socrates' ideas. Plato and the Trial of Socrates introduces and assesses: * Plato's life and the background to the three dialogues * The ideas and text in the three dialogues * Plato's continuing importance to philosophy Plato and (...)
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  39. added 2016-12-08
    Law and Justice in Plato's Crito.R. E. Allen - 1972 - Journal of Philosophy 69 (18):557.
  40. added 2016-12-08
    Plato on the Trial and Death of Socrates (Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, Phaedo).H. L. Brozowski - 1942 - Modern Schoolman 20 (1):60-60.
  41. added 2016-08-31
    Platonic Mimesis.Mitchell Miller - 1999 - In Thomas Falkner, Nancy Felson & David Konstan (eds.), Contextualizing Classics: Ideology, Performance, Dialogue. pp. 253-266.
    A two-fold study, on the one hand of the thought-provoking mimesis by which Plato gives his hearer an occasion for self-knowledge and self-transcendence and of the typical sequential structure, an appropriation of the trajectory of the poem of Parmenides, by which Plato orders the drama of inquiry, and on the other hand a commentary on the Crito that aims to show concretely how these elements — mimesis and Parmenidean structure — work together to give the dialogues their exceptional elicitative power.
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  42. added 2015-04-29
    Socratic Consolation: Rhetoric and Philosophy in Plato's "Crito".Kenneth Quandt - 1982 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 15 (4):238 - 256.
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  43. added 2015-04-21
    Defence of Socrates, Euthyphro, Crito. Plato - 2008 - Oxford University Press.
    These new translations of the Defence of Socrates, the Euthyphro, and the Crito present Plato's remarkable dramatizations of the momentous events surrounding the trial of Socrates in 399 BC, on charges of irreligion and corrupting the young. They form a dramatic and thematic sequence, raising fundamental questions about the basis of moral, religious, legal, and political obligation. The introduction provides a stimulating philosophical and historical analysis of these texts, complemented by useful explanatory notes and an index of names.
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  44. added 2015-04-19
    Apology, Crito, and Phaedo. Plato - unknown
  45. added 2015-04-14
    Socrates and Παιδεία in the "Crito".Paul Neufeld - 2003 - Apeiron 36 (2):115 - 141.
  46. added 2015-04-11
    Socratic Persuasion in the Crito.Christopher Moore - 2011 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (6):1021 - 1046.
    Socrates does not use the Laws' Speech in the Crito principally to persuade Crito to accept his coming execution. It is used instead to persuade Crito to examine and work on his inadequate view of justice. Crito's view of justice fails to coordinate one's duties to friends and those to the law. The Laws' Speech accomplishes this persuasive goal by accompanying Crito?s earlier speech. Both start from the same view of justice, one that Crito accepts, but reach opposing conclusions. Crito (...)
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  47. added 2015-04-09
    “The Arguments I Seem To Hear”: Argument and Irony in the Crito.Mitchell Miller - 1996 - Phronesis 41 (2):121-137.
    A close reading of the Crito, with a focus on irony in Socrates' speech by the Laws and on the way this allows Socrates to chart a mean course between Crito's self-destructive resistance to the rule of Athenian law and Socrates' own philosophical reservations about its ethical limitations.
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  48. added 2015-04-08
    The Elenctic Speech of the Laws in Plato's Crito.Robert Metcalf - 2004 - Ancient Philosophy 24 (1):37-65.
  49. added 2015-04-08
    Socrates, Crito, and Their Debt to Asclepius.Mark L. McPherran - 2003 - Ancient Philosophy 23 (1):71-92.
  50. added 2015-04-08
    Socrates Dissatisfied: An Analysis of Plato's Crito.Mark L. McPherran - 1998 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 36 (4):620-621.
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