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  1. ‘Pushing Through’ in Plato’s Sophist: A New Reading of the Parity Assumption.Evan Rodriguez - 2020 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 102 (2):159-188.
    At a crucial juncture in Plato’s Sophist, when the interlocutors have reached their deepest confusion about being and not-being, the Eleatic Visitor proclaims that there is yet hope. Insofar as they clarify one, he maintains, they will equally clarify the other. But what justifies the Visitor’s seemingly oracular prediction? A new interpretation explains how the Visitor’s hope is in fact warranted by the peculiar aporia they find themselves in. The passage describes a broader pattern of ‘exploring both sides’ that lends (...)
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  2. Aristotle's Platonic Response to the Problem of First Principles.Evan Rodriguez - 2020 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 58 (3):449-469.
    how does one inquire into the truth of first principles? Where does one begin when deciding where to begin? Aristotle recognizes a series of difficulties when it comes to understanding the starting points of a scientific or philosophical system, and contemporary scholars have encountered their own difficulties in understanding his response. I will argue that Aristotle was aware of a Platonic solution that can help us uncover his own attitude toward the problem.Aristotle's central problem with first principles arises from the (...)
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  3. Plato: Hippias Major.Lucas Angioni - 2019 - Archai: Revista de Estudos Sobre as Origens Do Pensamento Ocidental 26:1-51.
    Trata-se de tradução do Hípias Maior de Platão para o Português, com algumas notas de elucidação e justificação das opções.
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  4. Sugerencias sobre el modo de combinar las formas platónicas para superar las dificultades interpretativas del diálogo Parménides. La distinción entre la participación inmediata y la participación relacional.Gerardo Óscar Matía Cubillo - 2019 - Endoxa 43:41-66.
    Este trabajo pretende ser una referencia útil para los estudiosos de la filosofía de Platón. Aporta un enfoque original a la investigación de los procesos lógicos que condicionan que unas formas participen de otras. Con la introducción del concepto de participación relacional, abre una posible vía de solución a las distintas versiones del argumento del «tercer hombre». Puede resultar de interés asimismo el método de generación de los números a partir de lo par y lo impar, propuesto en la interpretación (...)
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  5. More Than a Reductio: Plato's Method in the Parmenides and Lysis.Evan Rodriguez - 2019 - Études Platoniciennes 15.
    Plato’s Parmenides and Lysis have a surprising amount in common from a methodological standpoint. Both systematically employ a method that I call ‘exploring both sides’, a philosophical method for encouraging further inquiry and comprehensively understanding the truth. Both have also been held in suspicion by interpreters for containing what looks uncomfortably similar to sophistic methodology. I argue that the methodological connections across these and other dialogues relieve those suspicions and push back against a standard developmentalist story about Plato’s method. This (...)
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  6. Plato and the Role of Argument - Irani Plato on the Value of Philosophy. The Art of Argument in the Gorgias and Phaedrus. Pp. XIV + 217. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2017. Cased, £64.99, Us$99.99. Isbn: 978-1-107-18198-4. [REVIEW]Andrew Beer - 2018 - The Classical Review 68 (2):359-361.
  7. Minimal Sartre: Diagonalization and Pure Reflection.John Bova - 2018 - Open Philosophy 1:360-379.
    These remarks take up the reflexive problematics of Being and Nothingness and related texts from a metalogical perspective. A mutually illuminating translation is posited between, on the one hand, Sartre’s theory of pure reflection, the linchpin of the works of Sartre’s early period and the site of their greatest difficulties, and, on the other hand, the quasi-formalism of diagonalization, the engine of the classical theorems of Cantor, Godel, Tarski, Turing, etc. Surprisingly, the dialectic of mathematical logic from its inception through (...)
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  8. Euporia: On the Limits Horizons and Possibilities of Critical Theory (Or: On Reconstruction).Raymond Aaron Younis - 2017 - In Harry F. Dahms & Eric Lybeck (eds.), Reconstructing social theory history and practice. Bingley: Emerald. pp. 89-108.
  9. A Eironeía de Sócrates e a Ironia de Platão nos primeiros diálogos.Antônio José Vieira de Queirós Campos - 2016 - Dissertation, Puc-Rio, Brazil
  10. A Study of Dialectic in Plato’s Parmenides.Darren Gardner - 2015 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 36 (2):485-488.
  11. Animal Sacrifice in Plato's Later Methodology.Holly Moore - 2015 - In Jeremy Bell, Michael Naas & Thomas Patrick Oates (eds.), Plato's Animals: Gadflies, Horses, Swans, and Other Philosophical Beasts. Indianapolis, IN, USA: pp. 179-192.
    In both the Phaedrus and Statesman dialogues, the dialectician's method of division is likened to the butchery of sacrificial animals. Interpreting the significance of this metaphor by analyzing ancient Greek sacrificial practice, this essay argues that, despite the ubiquity of the method of division in these later dialogues, Plato is there stressing the logical priority of the method of collection, division's dialectical twin. Although Plato prioritizes the method of collection, the author further argues that, through a kind of 'domestication' of (...)
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  12. Is Plato a Coherentist? The Theory of Knowledge in Republic V–VII.Edith Gwendolyn Nally - 2015 - Apeiron 48 (2):149-175.
  13. White, David A. 2007. Myth, Metaphysics and Dialectic in Plato’s Statesman. Hampshire: Ashgate (282 Pages, ISBN 978-0-7546-5779-8; $ 124.95, £ 23.75, 72,99 (Hardback)). [REVIEW]Audrey L. Anton - 2013 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 16 (1):375-380.
  14. The Development of Dialectic From Plato to Aristotle.Jakob Leth Fink (ed.) - 2012 - Cambridge University Press.
    The period from Plato's birth to Aristotle's death (427-322 BC) is one of the most influential and formative in the history of Western philosophy. The developments of logic, metaphysics, epistemology, ethics and science in this period have been investigated, controversies have arisen and many new theories have been produced. But this is the first book to give detailed scholarly attention to the development of dialectic during this decisive period. It includes chapters on topics such as: dialectic as interpersonal debate between (...)
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  15. Acerca del problema de lo individual y lo universal en Platón y Aristóteles (transl. to Spanish by Hardy Neumann Soto).Max Gottschlich - 2012 - Philosophica 41 (Semestres I-II):133-154.
    Philosophica. Revista del Instituto de Filosofía de la Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Chile.
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  16. The Supremacy of Dialectic in Plato’s Philebus.George Harvey - 2012 - Ancient Philosophy 32 (2):279-301.
  17. What Do the Arguments in the Protagoras Amount To?Vasilis Politis - 2012 - Phronesis 57 (3):209-239.
    Abstract The main thesis of the paper is that, in the coda to the Protagoras (360e-end), Plato tells us why and with what justification he demands a definition of virtue: namely, in order to resolve a particular aporia . According to Plato's assessment of the outcome of the arguments of the dialogue, the principal question, whether or not virtue can be taught , has, by the end of the dialogue, emerged as articulating an aporia , in that both protagonists, Socrates (...)
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  18. Myth, Metaphysics and Dialectic in Plato’s Statesman. [REVIEW]David Ambuel - 2011 - Ancient Philosophy 31 (1):208-213.
  19. Humor, Dialectic, and Human Nature in Plato.Edward C. Halper - 2011 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (2):319-330.
    Drawing principally on the Symposium, this paper argues that humor in Plato’s dialogues serves two serious purposes. First, Plato uses puns and other devices to disarm the reader’s defenses and thereby allow her to consider philosophical ideas that she would otherwise dismiss. Second, insofar as human beings can only be understood through unchanging forms that we fail to attain, our lives are discontinuous and only partly intelligible. Since, though, the discontinuity between expectation and actual occurrence is the basis for humor, (...)
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  20. Who May Live the Examined Life? Plato's Rejection of Socratic Practices in Republic VII.Sarah Lublink - 2011 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (1):3-18.
    In Republic VII Plato has Socrates make a curious argument: dialectic as currently practiced causes lawlessness, and thus the practice of dialectic should be restricted to those of a certain age who have been properly trained and selected (537e-539e). I argue that the warning in Republic VII points to a disagreement between the views expressed by the character `Socrates' in the Republic, and the views expressed by the character `Socrates' in the Apology. I do so by showing that Republic's description (...)
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  21. Dialectical Method and the Structure of Reality in the Timaeus.Cristina Ionescu - 2010 - Ancient Philosophy 30 (2):299-318.
  22. Dialectic and Disagreement in the Hippias Major. Lee - 2010 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 38:1-35.
    There are two different approaches to the Hippias Major. The first emphasises its conformity to a pattern, with the aim of uncovering a single argumentative structure common to several ‘Socratic’ dialogues. The second approach emphasises elements specific to the Hippias Major, including dramatic features such as character, with the aim of finding the best reading of the dialogue taken individually. I make use of the second approach to show that a careful reading of the dialogue by itself does not support (...)
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  23. Dialectic and Dialogue.Dmitri Nikulin - 2010 - Stanford University Press.
    This book considers the emergence of dialectic out of the spirit of dialogue and traces the relation between the two. It moves from Plato, for whom dialectic is necessary to destroy incorrect theses and attain thinkable being, to Cusanus, to modern philosophers—Descartes, Kant, Hegel, Schleiermacher and Gadamer, for whom dialectic becomes the driving force behind the constitution of a rational philosophical system. Conceived as a logical enterprise, dialectic strives to liberate itself from dialogue, which it views as merely accidental and (...)
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  24. The Divine Logos.Ammon Allred - 2009 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 14 (1):1-18.
    In this paper, I address the way in which Plato’s Sophist rethinks his lifelong dialogue with Heraclitus. Plato uses a concept of logos in this dialogue that is much more Heraclitean than his earlier concept of the logos. I argue that he employs this concept in order to resolve those problems with his earlier theory of ideas that he had brought to light in the Parmenides. I argue that the concept of the dialectic that the Stranger develops rejects, rather than (...)
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  25. Review of John Holbo, Reason and Persuasion: Three Dialogues by Plato: Euthyphro, Meno, Republic Book I[REVIEW]Paul Carelli - 2009 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (12).
  26. Philosophy (D.A.) White Myth, Metaphysics and Dialectic in Plato's Statesman. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2007. Pp. 272. £60. 9780754657798. [REVIEW]Miguel Ley-Pineda - 2009 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 129:234-.
  27. Plato's Dialogic Technique (D.) Wolfsdorf Trials of Reason. Plato and the Crafting of Philosophy. Pp. X + 285. New York: Oxford University Press, 2008. Cased, US$74. ISBN: 978-0-19-532732-. [REVIEW]Ann Michelini - 2009 - The Classical Review 59 (2):377-.
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  28. Plato on the Rhetoric of Philosophers and Sophists (Review).Richard D. Parry - 2009 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (1):pp. 131-132.
    Marina McCoy defends three interrelated claims about the topic mentioned in her title. First, the distinction between philosophy and rhetoric in the dialogues is not as clear as some commentators seem to think. Second, since philosophy as practiced by Socrates includes important rhetorical dimensions, there is no important methodological distinction between philosophy and rhetoric. Third, it is his virtues—and not any particular method—that differentiate Socrates the philosopher from sophists and rhetoricians. McCoy pursues different aspects of her theses through the Apology, (...)
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  29. Discourse, Dialectic, and the Art of Weaving.James Risser - 2009 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 13 (2):291-298.
    This paper explores the way in which the art of weaving, as it is initially presented in Plato’s Statesman, serves to configure both the fundamental character ofdiscourse and the limit experience of discourse for Plato. The problem that arises in relation to this configuration pertains to the possible unity of discourse (and with it the acquisition of knowledge). In relation to the hermeneutics of Hans-Georg Gadamer and his reading of Plato, it is argued that the unity of discourse follows “the (...)
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  30. Christopher Rowe's Plato and the Art of Philosophical Writing.George Rudebusch - 2009 - Philosophical Books 50 (1):55-62.
    The review argues that Plato makes a valid distinction between inferior hypothetical and superior unhypothetical methods. Given the distinction, the book confuses the hypothetical for unhypothetical dialectic.
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  31. The Paradox of Refuting Socrates' Paradox.Thomas Giourgas - 2008 - Dissertation, Edinburgh
    What is paradoxical about the Socratic paradoxes is that they are not paradoxical at all. Socrates famously argued that knowledge is sufficient for virtue and that no one errs willingly. Both doctrines are discussed in the Protagoras between Socrates and the Abderian sophist, however the argumentative line that Socrates chooses to follow in order to refute ‘the many’ has raised a serious degree of controversy among scholars. Is Socrates upholding the hedonistic view? Or, is he only trying to show the (...)
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  32. A (Platonic) Doctrine of Truth. Goals, Implications and Targets of the" Parmenide" Dialectic Exercise.Pierpaolo Bordini - 2007 - Giornale Critico Della Filosofia Italiana 3 (3):479-507.
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  33. Dialectic and Plato's Method of Hypothesis.Miriam Newton Byrd - 2007 - Apeiron 40 (2):141 - 158.
  34. Dialogue and Dialectic.David Evans - 2007 - The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 10:61-65.
    Plato wrote dialogues, and he praised dialectic, or conversation, as a suitable style for fruitful philosophical investigation. His works are great literature; and nodoubt this quality derives much from their form as dialogues. They also have definite philosophical content; and an important part of this content is their dialecticalepistemology. Dialectic is part of the content of Plato's philosophy. Can we reconcile this content with his literary style? I shall examine and sharpen the sense of this problem by referring to four (...)
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  35. The Sounds of Silence: Rhetoric and Dialectic in the Refutation of Callicles in Plato's Gorgias.Rod Jenks - 2007 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 40 (2):201-215.
  36. Plato on the Rhetoric of Philosophers and Sophists.Marina McCoy - 2007 - Cambridge University Press.
    Marina McCoy explores Plato's treatment of the rhetoric of philosophers and sophists through a thematic treatment of six different Platonic dialogues, including Apology, Protagoras, Gorgias, Republic, Sophist, and Phaedras. She argues that Plato presents the philosopher and the sophist as difficult to distinguish, insofar as both use rhetoric as part of their arguments. Plato does not present philosophy as rhetoric-free, but rather shows that rhetoric is an integral part of philosophy. However, the philosopher and the sophist are distinguished by the (...)
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  37. Plato’s Dialectic at Play. [REVIEW]Mitchell Miller - 2007 - Review of Metaphysics 60 (4):858-860.
  38. Diagrams, Dialectic, and Mathematical Foundations in Plato.Richard Patterson - 2007 - Apeiron 40 (1):1 - 33.
  39. Diagram, Dialectic, and Mathematical Foundations in Plato.Richard Patterson - 2007 - Apeiron 40 (1):1-34.
  40. Argumentative Norms in Republic I.Mark Anderson - 2006 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 13 (2):18-23.
    We argue that there are three norms of critical discussion in stark relief in Republic I. The first we see in the exchange with Cephalus---that we interpret each other and contribute to discussions in a maximally argumentative fashion. The second we seein the exchange with Polemarchus---that in order to cooperate in dialectic, interlocutors must maintain a distance between themselves and the theses they espouse. This way they can subject the views to serious scrutiny without the risk of personal loss. Third, (...)
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  41. Types of Definition in the Meno.Charles David - 2006 - In Lindsay Judson & Vassilis Karasmanis (eds.), Remembering Socrates: Philosophical Essays. Oxford University Press. pp. 110.
  42. Corrigan (K.), Glazov-Corrigan (E.) Plato's Dialectic at Play. Argument, Structure, and Myth in the Symposium. Pp. Xii + 266. University Park, PA: The Pennsylvania State University Press, 2004. Cased. ISBN: 0-271-02462-. [REVIEW]Alex Long - 2006 - The Classical Review 56 (02):298-.
  43. Is Dialectic as Dialectic Does? The Virtue of Philosophical Conversation.Mary Margaret McCabe - 2006 - In Burkhard Reis & Stella Haffmans (eds.), The Virtuous Life in Greek Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
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  44. Dialectic and Insight.Nenad Miščević - 2006 - Rhizai. A Journal for Ancient Philosophy and Science 1:119-128.
    A Critical notice of Gail Fine, Plato on Knowledge and Forms.
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  45. In Dialogue with the Greeks (Vol. I: The Presocratics and Reality; Vol. II: Plato and Dialectic) – Rush Rhees, Edited by D. Z. Phillips. [REVIEW]Heidi Northwood - 2006 - Philosophical Investigations 29 (4):369–382.
  46. The Wisdom of Love or Negotiating Mythos and Logos with Plato and Levinas.Silvia Benso - 2005 - Dialogue and Universalism 15 (3-4):117-128.
    Inverting the sequence of the traditional terms, in Otherwise than Being or Beyond Essence Levinas redefines philosophy as the “wisdom of love”. Through an intertwining of Platonic motifs and Levinasian inspirations, the essay argues for a mutually regulated interplay of mythos and logos as a way to regain a sense of wisdom that remains respectful of the elements of otherness in reality-in particular, respectful of the otherness of the Third who, for Levinas, constitutes the ground for politics. That is, the (...)
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  47. Opponents Vs. Adversaries in Plato's "Phaedo".Charles Blattberg - 2005 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 22 (2):109-127.
  48. Plato's Republic Revis(It)Ed D. Roochnik: Beautiful City. The Dialectical Character of Plato's Republic . Pp. Xii + 159. Ithaca and London: Cornell University Press, 2003. Cased, US$35, £21.95. ISBN: 0-8014-4087-. [REVIEW]Luca Castagnoli - 2005 - The Classical Review 55 (01):55-.
  49. Franz Ungler: Zur antiken und neuzeitlichen Dialektik.Michael Höfler & Michael Wladika (eds.) - 2005 - Peter Lang.
  50. Reason and Dialectic in the Argument Against Protagoras in the Theaetetus.Marina Berzins McCoy - 2005 - International Philosophical Quarterly 45 (1):21-39.
    This paper examines Socrates’ refutation of Protagoras’s view of knowledge in the Theaetetus (151e–186e). I show that the argument against Protagoras is not intended to be a purely abstract one about inconsistent premises. Instead, Socrates’ success in argumentagainst Protagoras depends upon Theaetetus’s character and his beliefs about knowledge and expertise. I also explore how understanding that section of the dialogue in this way better exhibits Socrates’ description of himself as akin to a midwife. Plato affirms a notion of the “rational” (...)
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