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1 — 50 / 185
  1. added 2019-08-27
    Erōs Tyrannos: Philosophical Passion and Psychic Ordering in the Republic.Suzanne Obdrzalek - 2012 - In Noburo Notomi & Luc Brisson (eds.), Dialogues on Plato's Politeia (Republic): Selected Papers from the IX Symposium Platonicum. pp. 188-193.
    In this paper, I explore parallels between philosophical and tyrannical eros in Plato's Republic. I argue that in arguing that reason experiences eros for the forms, Plato introduces significant tensions into his moral psychology.
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  2. added 2019-08-23
    Aristophanic Tragedy.Suzanne Obdrzalek - 2017 - In Z. Giannopoulou & P. Destrée (eds.), The Cambridge Critical Guide to Plato’s Symposium. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. pp. 70-87.
    In this paper, I offer a new interpretation of Aristophanes’ speech in Plato’s Symposium. Though Plato deliberately draws attention to the significance of Aristophanes’ speech in relation to Diotima’s (205d-206a, 211d), it has received relatively little philosophical attention. Critics who discuss it typically treat it as a comic fable, of little philosophical merit (e.g. Guthrie 1975, Rowe 1998), or uncover in it an appealing and even romantic treatment of love that emphasizes the significance of human individuals as love-objects to be (...)
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  3. added 2019-08-22
    Moral Transformation and the Love of Beauty in Plato's Symposium.Suzanne Obdrzalek - 2010 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 48:415-44.
    This paper offers an intellectualist interpretation of Diotima’s speech in Plato’s Symposium. Diotima’s purpose, in discussing the lower lovers, is to critique their erōs as aimed at a goal it can never secure, immortality, and as focused on an inferior object, themselves. By contrast, in loving beauty, the philosopher gains a mortal sort of completion; in turning outside of himself, he also ceases to be preoccupied by his own incompleteness.
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  4. added 2019-08-19
    Contemplation and Self-Mastery in Plato's Phaedrus.Suzanne Obdrzalek - 2012 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 42:77-107.
    This chapter examines Plato's moral psychology in the Phaedrus. It argues against interpreters such as Burnyeat and Nussbaum that Plato's treatment of the soul is increasingly pessimistic: reason's desire to contemplate is at odds with its obligation to rule the soul, and psychic harmony can only be secured by violently suppressing the lower parts of the soul.
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  5. added 2019-08-13
    Socrates on Love.Suzanne Obdrzalek - 2013 - In John Bussanich & Nicholas D. Smith (eds.), The Bloomsbury Companion to Socrates. Continuum. pp. 210-32.
    In this chapter, I offer an overview of current scholarly debates on Plato's Lysis. I also argue for my own interpretation of the dialogue. In the Lysis, Socrates argues that all love is motivated by the desire for one’s own good. This conclusion has struck many interpreters as unattractive, so much so that some attempt to reinterpret the dialogue, such that it either does not offer an account of interpersonal love, or that it offers an account on which love is, (...)
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  6. added 2019-06-06
    The Unwritten Teachings in Plato’s Symposium: Socrates’ Initiation Into the Ἀριϴμός of Ἔρως.Burt C. Hopkins - 2011 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (2):279-298.
    The paper argues that the ontology of Self behind Descartes’s paradigmatic modern account of passion is an obstacle to interpreting properly the account Socrates gives in the Symposium of the truth of Eros’s origin, nature, and gift to the philosophical initiate into his truth. The key to interpreting this account is located in the relation between Eros and the arithmos-structure of the community of kinds, which is disclosed in terms of the Symposium’s dramatic mimesis of the two Platonic sources of (...)
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  7. added 2019-06-06
    Erotic Desire and Courage in Plato’s Parmenides.Jill Gordon - 2010 - Ancient Philosophy 30 (2):261-287.
  8. added 2019-06-06
    The Brute Within: Appetitive Desire in Plato and Aristotle. [REVIEW]Catherine Jack Deavel - 2008 - International Philosophical Quarterly 48 (1):116-118.
  9. added 2019-06-06
    “As the Wolf Loves the Lamb”.Alessandra Fussi - 2006 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 11 (1):51-80.
    The Phaedrus’s Palinode ascribes to the wing the double function of lifting the soul towards truth while itself being nourished by truth. The paper concentrates on the role Socrates ascribes to the wing in the structure and ‘physiology’ of the soul—mortal and divine—as well as on the role it plays in Socrates’ subsequent phenomenological description of falling in love. The experience of love described in Socrates’ first speech—an experience dominated by envy—is examined in light of Socrates’ Palinode, by reference to (...)
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  10. added 2019-06-06
    Further Questioning Irrational Desires in Plato’s Gorglas.Noel Boyle - 2004 - Southwest Philosophy Review 20 (2):139-145.
  11. added 2019-06-06
    True Love Is Requited: The Argument of Lysis 221d-222a.George Rudebusch - 2004 - Ancient Philosophy 24 (1):67-80.
    I defend the argument in Plato's Lysis that true love is requited. I state the argument, the main objections, and my replies. I begin with a synopsis of the dialogue.
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  12. added 2019-06-06
    The Forms, the Form of the Good, and the Desire for Good in Plato’s Republic.Terry Penner - 2003 - Modern Schoolman 80 (3):191-233.
  13. added 2019-06-06
    Plutarch’s Amatorius: A Commentary on Plato’s Theories of Love?John M. Rist - 2001 - Classical Quarterly 51 (2):557-575.
  14. added 2019-06-06
    Socratic Dialectic and the Art of Love: On Phaedrus 276e-277a.John Partridge - 1999 - Ancient Philosophy 19 (Special Issue):121-132.
  15. added 2019-06-06
    Questioning Irrational Desires in Plato’s Gorglas.James Butler - 1998 - Southwest Philosophy Review 14 (1):169-178.
  16. added 2019-06-06
    The Therapy of Desire: Theory and Practice in Hellenistic Ethics. [REVIEW]Rein Ferwerda - 1997 - Ancient Philosophy 17 (1):274-277.
  17. added 2019-06-06
    A. W. Price, "Love and Friendship in Plato and Aristotle". [REVIEW]John Bussanich - 1991 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 29 (4):667.
  18. added 2019-06-06
    Plato’s Theory of Love in the ‘Lysis’: A Defence.T. Brian Mooney - 1990 - Irish Philosophical Journal 7 (1/2):131-159.
  19. added 2019-06-06
    Plato, Plotinus, and Origen. [REVIEW]Norman Gulley - 1966 - The Classical Review 16 (1):84-86.
  20. added 2019-06-06
    Love and Inspiration: A Study of Plato's ‘Phaedrus’. [REVIEW]Norman Gulley - 1966 - The Classical Review 16 (2):235-236.
  21. added 2019-06-05
    Plato's Erotic Citizens. L. Prauscello Performing Citizenship in Plato's Laws. Pp. X + 272. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2014. Cased, £60, Us$95. Isbn: 978-1-107-07288-6. [REVIEW]Robert Mayhew - 2016 - The Classical Review 66 (1):57-59.
  22. added 2019-06-05
    Catullus C. 67: The Dark Side of Love and Marriage.Philip Levine - 1985 - Classical Antiquity 4 (1):62-71.
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  23. added 2019-06-04
    Eros and Psyche. Studies in Plato, Plotinus, and Origen (Phœnix Supplementary Volumes, VI. By John M. Rist. University of Toronto Press, 1964. Pp. Xi Plus 238. $6.95. [REVIEW]Philip Merlan - 1965 - Dialogue 3 (4):438-440.
  24. added 2019-05-09
    K. Sier: Die Rede der Diotima: Untersuchungen zum platonischen Symposion. . Pp. xvi + 329. Stuttgart and Leipzig: B. G. Teubner, 1997. Cased, DM 98. ISBN: 3-519-07635-7. [REVIEW]Dougal Blyth - 2000 - The Classical Review 50 (2):621-622.
  25. added 2019-04-10
    Two Passions in Plato’s Symposium: Diotima’s To Kalon as a Reorientation of Imperialistic Erōs.Mateo Duque - 2019 - In Heather L. Reid & Tony Leyh (eds.), Looking at Beauty to Kalon in Western Greece: Selected Essays from the 2018 Symposium on the Heritage of Western Greece. Sioux City, IA, USA: Parnassos Press – Fonte Aretusa. pp. 95-110.
    In this essay, I propose a reading of two contrasting passions, two kinds of erōs, in the "Symposium." On the one hand, there is the imperialistic desire for conquering and possessing that Alcibiades represents; and on the other hand, there is the productive love of immortal wisdom that Diotima represents. It’s not just what Alcibiades says in the Symposium, but also what he symbolizes. Alcibiades gives a speech in honor of Socrates and of his unrequited love for him, but even (...)
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  26. added 2018-06-26
    Love and Friendship in Plato and Aristotle. [REVIEW]Nancy Sherman - 1992 - International Studies in Philosophy 24 (1):127-128.
  27. added 2018-06-23
    The Role of the Earlier Speeches in the "Symposium": Plato's Endoxic Method?Frisbee C. C. Sheffield - 2006 - In J. H. Lesher, Debra Nails & Frisbee C. C. Sheffield (eds.), Plato's Symposium: Issues in Interpretation and Reception. Harvard University Press.
  28. added 2018-06-15
    Plato's Symposium: The Ethics of Desire.Frisbee Sheffield - 2006 - Oxford University Press.
    Frisbee Sheffield argues that the Symposium has been unduly marginalized by philosophers. Although the topic, eros, and the setting at a symposium have seemed anomalous, she demonstrates that both are intimately related to Plato's preoccupation with the nature of the good life, with virtue, and how it is acquired and transmitted. For Plato, analyzing our desires is a way of reflecting on the kind of people we will turn out to be and on our chances of leading a worthwhile and (...)
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  29. added 2018-06-15
    Plato's Symposium: The Ethics of Desire.Frisbee Sheffield - 2006 - Oxford University Press.
    Frisbee Sheffield argues that the Symposium has been unduly marginalized by philosophers. Although the topic - eros - and the setting at a symposium have seemed anomalous, she demonstrates that both are intimately related to Plato's preoccupation with the nature of the good life, with virtue, and how it is acquired and transmitted.
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  30. added 2018-03-06
    Erotic Wisdom: Philosophy and Intermediacy in Plato's Symposium.Gary Alan Scott & William Welton - 2008 - Albany, New York: State University of New York Press.
    Erotic Wisdom provides a careful reading of one of Plato's most beloved dialogues, the Symposium, which explores the nature and scope of human desire (erôs). Gary Alan Scott and William A. Welton engage all of the dialogue's major themes, devoting special attention to illuminating Plato's conception of philosophy. In the Symposium, Plato situates philosophy in an intermediate (metaxu) position--between need and resource, ignorance and knowledge--showing how the very lack of what one desires can become a guiding form of contact with (...)
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  31. added 2018-03-06
    Love and Friendship in Plato and Aristotle. [REVIEW]Roger Scruton - 1992 - Ancient Philosophy 12 (2):444-446.
  32. added 2018-02-17
    Plato's "Lysis": A Socratic Treatise on Desire and Attraction.Naomi Reshotko - 1997 - Apeiron 30 (1):1-18.
  33. added 2018-02-09
    Bad Luck to Take a Woman Aboard.Debra Nails - 2015 - In Debra Nails & Harold Tarrant (eds.), Second Sailing: Alternative Perspectives on Plato. Helsinki, Finland: Societas Scientiarum Fennica. pp. 73-90.
    Despite Diotima’s irresistible virtues and attractiveness across the millennia, she spells trouble for philosophy. It is not her fault that she has been misunderstood, nor is it Plato’s. Rather, I suspect, each era has made of Diotima what it desired her to be. Her malleability is related to the assumption that Plato invented her, that she is a mere literary fiction, licensing the imagination to do what it will. In the first part of my paper, I argue against three contemporary (...)
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  34. added 2017-11-12
    Die Rede der Diotima. [REVIEW]H. S. Schibli - 1999 - Ancient Philosophy 19 (1):159-165.
  35. added 2017-10-27
    Plato on Friendship and Familial Love in the Lysis and The Republic.Gerasimos Santas - 1984 - Philosophical Inquiry 6 (1):1-12.
  36. added 2017-10-27
    Passionate Platonic Love in the Phaedrus.Gerasimos Santas - 1982 - Ancient Philosophy 2 (2):105-114.
  37. added 2017-10-27
    Plato's Theory of Eros in the Symposisum: Abstract.Gerasimos Santas - 1979 - Noûs 13 (1):67-75.
  38. added 2017-10-20
    Plato and Sex.Stella Sandford - 2010 - Polity.
    What does the study of Plato’s dialogues tell us about the modern meaning of ‘sex’? How can recent developments in the philosophy of sex and gender help us read these ancient texts anew? _Plato and Sex _addresses these questions for the first time. Each chapter demonstrates how the modern reception of Plato’s works Ð in both mainstream and feminist philosophy and psychoanalytical theory Ð has presupposed a ‘natural-biological’ conception of what sex might mean. Through a critical comparison between our current (...)
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  39. added 2017-10-09
    Plato.C. J. Rowe - 2003 - Bristol Classical Press.
  40. added 2017-10-06
    Eros and Practical Reason in the "Symposium".Andrew Brodell Payne - 1998 - Dissertation, University of Notre Dame
    This dissertation presents Plato's distinctive approach in the Symposium to topics normally associated with Aristotelian ethics: practical reason, friendship, the theoretic life, and the ranking of the lives associated with political activity and philosophy. After an introductory chapter I focus on Diotima's speech in chapters 2 through 6. Eros appears as a species of desire, one that lacks its object, is self-interested, and can generate action. In addition to these basic characteristics common to other desires, eros is directed towards acquiring (...)
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  41. added 2017-10-06
    Another Look at Kelsen's View of Plato. Rankin - 1967 - Apeiron 2 (1):18-26.
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  42. added 2017-10-06
    The Role of Eros in Plato's "Republic".Stanley Rosen - 1965 - Review of Metaphysics 18 (3):452-475.
    The first part of my hypothesis, then, is simple enough, and would be accepted in principle by most students of Plato: the dramatic structure of the dialogues is an essential part of their philosophical meaning. With respect to the poetic and mathematical aspects of philosophy, we may distinguish three general kinds of dialogue. For example, consider the Sophist and Statesman, where Socrates is virtually silent: the principal interlocutors are mathematicians and an Eleatic Stranger, a student of Parmenides, although one who (...)
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  43. added 2017-10-05
    Eros, Hybris and Mania: Love and Desire in Plato's Laws and Beyond.Kenneth Moore - 2007 - Polis 24 (1):112-133.
    The themes of hybris, eros and mania are interconnected in Plato's final opus, the Laws, regarding his narrator's construction of sexually accepted norms for his 'second-best', utopian society. This article examines this formulation, its psychological characteristics and philosophical underpinnings. The role and function of his social programme are considered in the context of the Laws and the hypothetical polis outlined therein. However, this particular formulation is not a new development in later Platonic thought. It is, rather, a logical extension of (...)
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  44. added 2017-10-05
    The Origins of Western IdeasThe Nature of Love: Plato to Luther. [REVIEW]John C. Moore & Irving Singer - 1968 - Journal of the History of Ideas 29 (1):141.
  45. added 2017-02-15
    Eros, Kosmos.Ken Wilber - forthcoming - Logos. Anales Del Seminario de Metafísica [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, España].
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  46. added 2017-02-14
    Plotinus On Eros. [REVIEW]Lloyd P. Gerson - 2004 - The Classical Review 54 (2):347-349.
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  47. added 2017-02-14
    Eros for the Other: Retaining Truth in a Pluralistic World.Wendy Farley - 1996 - Pennsylvania State University Press.
    _Eros for the Other_ takes up the problem of how truth claims and ethical norms can survive the increasingly radical recognition of the historical, cultural, pluralistic, and often ideological character of human experience. Sharing with postmodernism a suspicion of totalizing forms of knowledge and practice, Wendy Farley parts with postmodernism in defending the possibility of truth and ethics. Arguing that reality occurs in the concrete existence of actual beings, she develops an interpretation of the nature of knowledge as an eros (...)
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  48. added 2017-02-13
    Eros, Eroti̇kli̇k Ve antEros Üzeri̇ne...‹*›.İsmail H. Demirdöven - 2006 - In Mustafa Günay & Arslan Kaynardağ (eds.), Arslan Kaynardağ'a Armağan: Türkiye'de Felsefenin Kurumsallaşması. İlya. pp. 11--228.
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  49. added 2017-02-13
    Eros and the Lesbian Pastorals of Longos.H. H. O. Chalk - 1960 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 80:32-51.
  50. added 2017-02-13
    A Flying Eros From the School of Praxiteles.P. Bienkowski - 1895 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 15:211-216.
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