This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories

183 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 183
  1. Erotic themes in Plato. Brisson, Renaut érotique et politique chez Platon. Erôs, genre et sexualité dans la cité Platonicienne. Pp. 274. Sankt Augustin: Academia verlag, 2017. Paper, €29.50. Isbn: 978-3-89665-725-1. [REVIEW]Ken Moore - forthcoming - The Classical Review:1-3.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Philosophy’s Workmate: Erōs and the Erōtica in Plato’s Symposium.Edith Gwendolyn Nally - forthcoming - Apeiron.
  3. Eros, Kosmos.Ken Wilber - forthcoming - Logos. Anales Del Seminario de Metafísica [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, España].
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. On Socrates' Project of Philosophical Conversion.Jacob Stump - 2020 - Philosophers' Imprint 20 (32):1-19.
    There is a wide consensus among scholars that Plato’s Socrates is wrong to trust in reason and argument as capable of converting people to the life of philosophy. In this paper, I argue for the opposite. I show that Socrates employs a more sophisticated strategy than is typically supposed. Its key component is the use of philosophical argument not to lead an interlocutor to rationally conclude that he must change his way of life but rather to cause a certain affective (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Two Passions in Plato’s Symposium: Diotima’s To Kalon as a Reorientation of Imperialistic Erōs.Mateo Duque - 2019 - In Heather L. Reid & Tony Leyh (eds.), Looking at Beauty to Kalon in Western Greece: Selected Essays from the 2018 Symposium on the Heritage of Western Greece. Sioux City, IA, USA: Parnassos Press – Fonte Aretusa. pp. 95-110.
    In this essay, I propose a reading of two contrasting passions, two kinds of erōs, in the "Symposium." On the one hand, there is the imperialistic desire for conquering and possessing that Alcibiades represents; and on the other hand, there is the productive love of immortal wisdom that Diotima represents. It’s not just what Alcibiades says in the Symposium, but also what he symbolizes. Alcibiades gives a speech in honor of Socrates and of his unrequited love for him, but even (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Philosophical Eroticism, or How Socrates Made Me a Man.Vincent M. Tafolla - 2018 - Ancient Philosophy 38 (3):289-304.
    Dialogue, Philosophical Eroticism, Plato, Socrates, Power Dynamics, Episteme, Self-Knowledge, Eros.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Aristophanic Tragedy.Suzanne Obdrzalek - 2017 - In Z. Giannopoulou & P. Destrée (eds.), The Cambridge Critical Guide to Plato’s Symposium. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. pp. 70-87.
    In this paper, I offer a new interpretation of Aristophanes’ speech in Plato’s Symposium. Though Plato deliberately draws attention to the significance of Aristophanes’ speech in relation to Diotima’s (205d-206a, 211d), it has received relatively little philosophical attention. Critics who discuss it typically treat it as a comic fable, of little philosophical merit (e.g. Guthrie 1975, Rowe 1998), or uncover in it an appealing and even romantic treatment of love that emphasizes the significance of human individuals as love-objects to be (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  8. Plato's Erotic Citizens. L. Prauscello Performing Citizenship in Plato's Laws. Pp. X + 272. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2014. Cased, £60, Us$95. Isbn: 978-1-107-07288-6. [REVIEW]Robert Mayhew - 2016 - The Classical Review 66 (1):57-59.
  9. Bad Luck to Take a Woman Aboard.Debra Nails - 2015 - In Debra Nails & Harold Tarrant (eds.), Second Sailing: Alternative Perspectives on Plato. Helsinki, Finland: Societas Scientiarum Fennica. pp. 73-90.
    Despite Diotima’s irresistible virtues and attractiveness across the millennia, she spells trouble for philosophy. It is not her fault that she has been misunderstood, nor is it Plato’s. Rather, I suspect, each era has made of Diotima what it desired her to be. Her malleability is related to the assumption that Plato invented her, that she is a mere literary fiction, licensing the imagination to do what it will. In the first part of my paper, I argue against three contemporary (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. Climbing the Ladder of Love.Brendan Shea - 2015 - In Adam Barkman & Robert Arp (eds.), Downton Abbey and Philosophy: Thinking in the Manor. Open Court. pp. 249-259.
    Downton Abbey is, at its most basic, a story driven by intimate, romantic relationships: Mary and Matthew, Bates and Anna, Sybil and Branson, Lord and Lady Grantham, and many others. As viewers, we root for (or against) these characters as they fall in love, quarrel, break up, reconcile, have children, and deal with separation and death. But what do we get out of this? Is it merely an emotional “rush,” or is it something more meaningful? In this essay, I’ll attempt (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. The Gravity of Eros in the Contemporary: Introduction to the Special Section.Agnes Horvath & Arpad Szakolczai - 2013 - History of the Human Sciences 26 (5):69-78.
    The study of eros as passionate devotion leads back to the classical foundations of social and political analysis, in particular Plato’s philosophical anthropology, focusing on imitation and not rationality as the moving force of social life.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. Socrates on Love.Suzanne Obdrzalek - 2013 - In John Bussanich & Nicholas D. Smith (eds.), The Bloomsbury Companion to Socrates. Continuum. pp. 210-32.
    In this chapter, I offer an overview of current scholarly debates on Plato's Lysis. I also argue for my own interpretation of the dialogue. In the Lysis, Socrates argues that all love is motivated by the desire for one’s own good. This conclusion has struck many interpreters as unattractive, so much so that some attempt to reinterpret the dialogue, such that it either does not offer an account of interpersonal love, or that it offers an account on which love is, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. Erôs in Ancient Greece.Ed Sanders, Chiara Thumiger, Christopher Carey & Nick Lowe (eds.) - 2013 - Oxford University Press.
    This volume brings together eighteen articles which examine erôs as an emotion in ancient Greek culture. Taking into account all important thinking about the nature of erôs from the eighth century BCE to the third century CE, it covers a very broad range of sources and theoretical approaches, both in the chronological and the generic sense.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. Plato and the Divided Self.Rachel Barney, Tad Brennan & Charles Brittain (eds.) - 2012 - Cambridge University Press.
    Plato's account of the tripartite soul is a memorable feature of dialogues like the Republic, Phaedrus and Timaeus: it is one of his most famous and influential yet least understood theories. It presents human nature as both essentially multiple and diverse - and yet somehow also one - divided into a fully human 'rational' part, a lion-like 'spirited part' and an 'appetitive' part likened to a many-headed beast. How these parts interact, how exactly each shapes our agency and how they (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  15. Socrates' Daimonic Art: Love for Wisdom in Four Platonic Dialogues.Elizabeth S. Belfiore - 2012 - Cambridge University Press.
    Despite increasing interest in the figure of Socrates and in love in ancient Greece, no recent monograph studies these topics in all four of Plato's dialogues on love and friendship. This book provides important new insights into these subjects by examining Plato's characterization of Socrates in Symposium, Phaedrus, Lysis and the often neglected Alcibiades I. It focuses on the specific ways in which the philosopher searches for wisdom together with his young interlocutors, using an art that is 'erotic', not in (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  16. Reply to Rowe.Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith - 2012 - The Journal of Ethics 16 (3):325-338.
    In our reply to Rowe, we explain why most of what he criticizes is actually the product of his misunderstanding our argument. We begin by showing that nearly all of his Part 1 misconceives our project by defending a position we never attacked. We then question why Rowe thinks the distinction we make between motivational and virtue intellectualism is unimportant before developing a defense of the consistency of our views about different desires. Next we turn to Rowe’s criticisms of our (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  17. The Philosopher as a Lover: Renaissance Debates on Platonic Eros.Sabrina Ebbersmeyer - 2012 - In Martin Pickavé & Lisa Shapiro (eds.), Emotion and Cognitive Life in Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy. Oxford University Press. pp. 133.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  18. Eros at the World’s End.Craig E. Mattson & Virginia LaGrand - 2012 - Renascence 64 (3):275-293.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. Contemplation and Self-Mastery in Plato's Phaedrus.Suzanne Obdrzalek - 2012 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 42:77-107.
    This chapter examines Plato's moral psychology in the Phaedrus. It argues against interpreters such as Burnyeat and Nussbaum that Plato's treatment of the soul is increasingly pessimistic: reason's desire to contemplate is at odds with its obligation to rule the soul, and psychic harmony can only be secured by violently suppressing the lower parts of the soul.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  20. Erōs Tyrannos: Philosophical Passion and Psychic Ordering in the Republic.Suzanne Obdrzalek - 2012 - In Noburo Notomi & Luc Brisson (eds.), Dialogues on Plato's Politeia (Republic): Selected Papers from the IX Symposium Platonicum. pp. 188-193.
    In this paper, I explore parallels between philosophical and tyrannical eros in Plato's Republic. I argue that in arguing that reason experiences eros for the forms, Plato introduces significant tensions into his moral psychology.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. La riscoperta della via regia. Freud lettore di Platone.Marco Solinas - 2012 - Psicoterapia E Scienze Umane (4):539-568.
    Starting with the reference to “Plato’s dictum” that Freud added in the second last page of the first edition of The Interpretation of Dreams, the author explains the convergences between the conception of dreams expounded by Plato in the Republic and Freud’s fundamental insights. The analysis of bibliographic sources used by Freud, and of his interests, allow than to suppose not only that Freud omitted to acknowledge the Plato’s theoretical genealogy of “the Via Regia to the unconscious”, but also the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. Via Platonica zum Unbewussten. Platon und Freud (pdf: Inhaltszerzeichnis, Vegetti Vorwort, Einleitung).Marco Solinas - 2012 - Turia + Kant.
    Solinas’ Studie untersucht den Einfluss von Platons Anschauungen von Traum, Wunsch und Wahn auf den jungen Freud. Anhand der Untersuchung einiger zeitgenössischer kulturwissenschaftlicher Arbeiten, die bereits in die ersten Ausgabe der Traumdeutung Eingang fanden, wird Freuds nachhaltige Vertrautheit mit den platonischen Lehren erläutert und seine damit einhergehende direkte Textkenntnis der thematisch relevanten Stellen aus Platons Staat aufgezeigt. Die strukturelle Analogie von Freud’schem und platonischem Seelenbegriff wird inhaltlich am Traum als »Königsweg zum Unbewussten«, in dem von Freud selbst angesprochenen Verhältnis von (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  23. Gaita and Plato : Goodness, Love, and Beauty.Christopher Cordner - 2011 - In Christopher Cordner & Raimond Gaita (eds.), Philosophy, Ethics, and a Common Humanity: Essays in Honour of Raimond Gaita. Routledge.
  24. Two Conceptions of Love in Philosophical Thought.Christopher Cordner - 2011 - Sophia 50 (3):315-329.
    I distinguish, describe and explore two different conceptions of love that inform our lives. One conception found its classic philosophical articulation in Plato, the other its richest expressions in Christian thought. The latter has not had the same secure place in our philosophical traditon as the former. By trying to bring out what is distinctive in this second conception of love, centrally including its significance in revealing the fundamental value of human beings, I aim to show the importance of extending (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  25. Eros In Plato.Alfred Geier - 2011 - Philosophy Now 85:17-17.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26. The Unwritten Teachings in Plato’s Symposium: Socrates’ Initiation Into the Ἀριϴμός of Ἔρως.Burt C. Hopkins - 2011 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (2):279-298.
    The paper argues that the ontology of Self behind Descartes’s paradigmatic modern account of passion is an obstacle to interpreting properly the account Socrates gives in the Symposium of the truth of Eros’s origin, nature, and gift to the philosophical initiate into his truth. The key to interpreting this account is located in the relation between Eros and the arithmos-structure of the community of kinds, which is disclosed in terms of the Symposium’s dramatic mimesis of the two Platonic sources of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27. Eros and the Intoxications of Enlightenment: On Plato's Symposium.Steven Berg - 2010 - State University of New York Press.
    Author Steven Berg offers an interpretation of this dialogue wherein all the speakers at the banquetwith the exception of Socratesnot only offer their views on ...
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28. Love as a Problem of Knowledge in Kierkegaard's Either/Or and Plato's Symposium.Ulrika Carlsson - 2010 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 53 (1):41-67.
    At the end of the essay “Silhouettes” in Either/Or , Kierkegaard writes, “only the person who has been bitten by snakes knows what one who has been bitten by snakes must suffer.” I interpret this as an allusion to Alcibiades' speech in Plato's Symposium. Kierkegaard invites the reader to compare Socrates to Don Giovanni, and Alcibiades to the seduced women. Socrates' philosophical method, in this light, is a deceptive seduction: just as Don Giovanni's seduction leads his conquests to unhappy love—what (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  29. Erotic Desire and Courage in Plato’s Parmenides.Jill Gordon - 2010 - Ancient Philosophy 30 (2):261-287.
  30. Moral Transformation and the Love of Beauty in Plato's Symposium.Suzanne Obdrzalek - 2010 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 48:415-44.
    This paper offers an intellectualist interpretation of Diotima’s speech in Plato’s Symposium. Diotima’s purpose, in discussing the lower lovers, is to critique their erōs as aimed at a goal it can never secure, immortality, and as focused on an inferior object, themselves. By contrast, in loving beauty, the philosopher gains a mortal sort of completion; in turning outside of himself, he also ceases to be preoccupied by his own incompleteness.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  31. Moral Transformation and the Love of Beauty in Plato's Symposium.Suzanne Obdrzalek - 2010 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 48 (4):415-444.
    This paper defends an intellectualist interpretation of Diotima’s speech in Plato’s Symposium. I argue that Diotima’s purpose, in discussing the lower lovers, is to critique their erōs as aimed at a goal it can never secure, immortality, and as focused on an inferior object, themselves. By contrast, in loving the form of beauty, the philosopher gains a mortal sort of completion; in turning outside of himself, he also ceases to be preoccupied by his own incompleteness.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  32. Why is Socrates Absurd Question Absurd? (Plato, Symposium 199 C 6-D 7).Denis O’Brien - 2010 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 4 (1):4-26.
    The form of beauty is the ultimate correlate of love in Socrates' account of Diotima's teaching in the Symposium . To arrive at this insight, Socrates aims to show the `absurdity' of adopting any more specific correlate as a definition of the very nature of love. Were love defined as love `for a father or a mother', we could never love anyone who was not our father or our mother. An obvious absurdity.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33. Plato and Sex.Stella Sandford - 2010 - Polity.
    What does the study of Plato’s dialogues tell us about the modern meaning of ‘sex’? How can recent developments in the philosophy of sex and gender help us read these ancient texts anew? _Plato and Sex _addresses these questions for the first time. Each chapter demonstrates how the modern reception of Plato’s works Ð in both mainstream and feminist philosophy and psychoanalytical theory Ð has presupposed a ‘natural-biological’ conception of what sex might mean. Through a critical comparison between our current (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  34. Review of Frisbee C. C. Sheffield, Plato’s Symposium: The Ethics of Desire (Oxford University Press, 2006). [REVIEW]John M. Armstrong - 2009 - Ancient Philosophy 29 (1):208–212.
    The purpose of Sheffield’s careful study is to increase scholarly appreciation of the Symposium as a ‘substantive work in Platonic ethics’ (3). Among the book’s highlights are a persuasive response to Vlastos’ criticism of Plato on love for individuals, an eminently reasonable assessment of the evidence for and against the presence of tripartite psychology in the Symposium, and a delightful interpretation of Alcibiades’ speech at the dialogue’s end—one that reveals elements of satyr play and corroborates rather than undermines Diotima’s account (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35. Function, Ability and Desire in Plato's Republic.Antonis Coumoundouros & Ronald Polansky - 2009 - Philosophical Inquiry 31 (1-2):175-190.
  36. Law and Love: Legal Terminology in Roman Elegy.Caitlynn Cummings - 2009 - Constellations (University of Alberta Student Journal) 1 (1).
    This paper analyses the use of legal terminology in Roman love elegy of the 1st century BCE. Catullus, Tibullus, and Ovid all employ this seemingly strange vocabulary in their love poetry for different ends, while also sharing some specific similarities. This legal vocabulary does not make these love poems stilted, dry, nor unemotional, but is used deftly and rather indicates an interesting layer of Roman concern and preoccupation.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37. Love of the Good, Love of the Whole.Alessandra Fussi - 2009 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 13 (2):267-290.
    Diotima criticizes, but does not refute, Aristophanes’ thesis that love is desire for completeness. Her argument incorporates that thesis within a more complextheory: eros is desire for the permanent possession of the good, and hence also desire for immortality. Aristophanes cannot account for the aspirations entailed in the desire for fame or in the desire for knowledge. Such aspirations can be understood only with reference to the good. However, the paper shows how time plays a fundamental role in the original (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38. Ancient EROS and Medieval AGAPE: The Concept of Love in Plato and Maximus the Confessor.Filip Ivanovic - 2009 - In Konstantinos Boudouris & Maria Adam (eds.), Greek Philosophy and the Issues of Our Age II. Athens, Greece: Ionia Publications. pp. 93-114.
  39. Eros, Psyche and Mania: The Sources of Philosophical Inspiration According to Plato.[Spanish].M. Pájaro & Carlos Julio - 2009 - Eidos: Revista de Filosofía de la Universidad Del Norte 9:134-164.
  40. Plato and Shakespeare on Love.Bérnard Quincy - 2009 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 26 (2):103 - 120.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41. Plato: White and Non-White Love.Amo Sulaiman - 2009 - Kritike 3 (1):78-93.
    Plato’s dialogues, the Symposium, and Phaedrus, provide a reasonable explanation of love. G. Vlastos and M. Nussbaum do not share such an opinion. The former contends that Plato’s view of love is about loving only a person’s beauty, but not the entire person; thus, it falls short of an appropriate explanation of love. The latter holds that a theory of love should be complete, and that Plato’s one is incomplete on the grounds that it does not account for personal love. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42. Eros and Necessity in the Ascent From the Cave.Rachel Barney - 2008 - Ancient Philosophy 28 (2):357-72.
    A generally ignored feature of Plato’s celebrated image of the cave in Republic VII is that the ascent from the cave is, in its initial stages, said to be brought about by force. What kind of ‘force’ is this, and why is it necessary? This paper considers three possible interpretations, and argues that each may have a role to play.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  43. Review: Hendrik Lorenz: The Brute Within: Appetitive Desire in Plato and Aristotle. [REVIEW]J. Beere - 2008 - Mind 117 (468):1097-1102.
  44. The Brute Within: Appetitive Desire in Plato and Aristotle. [REVIEW]Catherine Jack Deavel - 2008 - International Philosophical Quarterly 48 (1):116-118.
  45. Plato's Symposium: The Ethics of Desire.Alessandra Fussi - 2008 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 2 (2):209-211.
  46. The Desire for Recognition in Plato’s Symposium.Alessandra Fussi - 2008 - Arethusa 41: 237–262.
    The paper argues that thumos, which is never explicitly mentioned as a part of the soul in the Symposium, plays a major role in the dialogue. In light of the Republic’s characterization of thumos as the source of emotions such as of love of honor, love of victory, admiration for courage, shame, anger, and the propensity to become indignant at real or imaginary wrongs, the paper argues that both Phaedrus’ speech and the speech of Alcibiades are shaped by thumoeidetic motivations. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47. Sheffield (F.C.C.) Plato's Symposium: The Ethics of Desire. Pp. X + 252. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2006. Cased, £50. ISBN: 978-0-19-928677-. [REVIEW]Suzanne Obdrzalek - 2008 - The Classical Review 58 (1):62-64.
  48. Plato on Friendship and Eros.C. D. C. Reeve - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  49. Erotic Wisdom: Philosophy and Intermediacy in Plato's Symposium.Gary Alan Scott & William Welton - 2008 - Albany, New York: State University of New York Press.
    Erotic Wisdom provides a careful reading of one of Plato's most beloved dialogues, the Symposium, which explores the nature and scope of human desire (erôs). Gary Alan Scott and William A. Welton engage all of the dialogue's major themes, devoting special attention to illuminating Plato's conception of philosophy. In the Symposium, Plato situates philosophy in an intermediate (metaxu) position--between need and resource, ignorance and knowledge--showing how the very lack of what one desires can become a guiding form of contact with (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  50. Psiche: Platone e Freud. Desiderio, Sogno, Mania, Eros (pdf: indice, prefazione Vegetti, introduzione, capitolo I).Marco Solinas - 2008 - Firenze University Press.
    Psiche sets up a close-knit comparison between the psychology of Plato's Republic and Freud's psychoanalysis. Convergences and divergences are discussed in relation both to the Platonic conception of the oneiric emergence of repressed desires that prefigures the main path of Freud's subconscious, to the analysis of the psychopathologies related to these theoretical formulations and to the two diagnostic and therapeutic approaches adopted. Another crucial theme is the Platonic eros - the examination of which is also extended to the Symposium and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 183