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  1. Autoengaño, ambición y arrogancia en el Alcibíades de Platón.Daniel Vázquez - 2016 - In J. M. Roqueñi (ed.), Afectividad y confianza en el conocimiento personal. Mexico City, CDMX, Mexico: pp. 13-30.
  2. Theory of Forms: The Construction of Plato and Aristotle’s Criticism.Abduljaleel Alwali - 2002 - Amman, Jordan: Dar Al-Warraq.
    The book "Theory of Forms: The Construction of Plato and Aristotle’s Criticism" focuses on two main aspects, construction and criticism. The constriction of Forms theory is the basis on which Plato built all of his philosophy and which influenced all forms of ideas philosophy that emerged after Plato. The research topic was completed by adding Aristotle's critique of the theory of Forms in order to put a clear picture in front of the reader, which was presented by Plato himself and (...)
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  3. Socratic Ignorance and Platonic Knowledge in the Dialogues of Plato. By Sara Ahbel-Rappe.Mark Ralkowski - 2021 - Ancient Philosophy 41 (1):207-215.
  4. Plato’s Tough Guys and Their Attachment to Justice, Written by Peter J. Hansen.Paul Diduch - 2021 - Polis 38 (1):153-156.
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  5. Austere Versus Normative Dualism in Plato and the Flourishing of Individuals and Societies.Jana Schultz - 2020 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 14 (2):177-187.
  6. Was Polus Refuted?Gregory Vlastos - 1967 - American Journal of Philology 88 (4):454.
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  7. Why Socrates’ Legs Didn’T Run Off to Megara.Ellisif Wasmuth - 2020 - Phronesis 65 (4):380-413.
    I argue that the arguments presented in Socrates’ dialogue with the personified Laws of the Crito are arguments Socrates endorses and relies upon when deciding to remain in prison. They do not, however, entail blind obedience to every court verdict, nor do they provide necessary and sufficient conditions for resolving every dilemma of civil disobedience. Indeed, lacking definitional knowledge of justice, we should not expect Socrates to be able to offer such conditions. Instead, the Laws present an argument that is (...)
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  8. State Typohumanism and its Role in the Rise of Völkisch-Racism: Paideía and Humanitas at Issue in Jaeger’s and Krieck’s ‘Political Plato’.Facundo Norberto Bey - 2020 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 2020:1-11.
    The aim of this article is to provide a philosophical conceptual framework to understand the theoretical roots and political implications of the interpretations of Plato’s work in Jaeger’s Third Humanism and Krieck’s völkisch-racist pedagogy and anthropology. This article will seek to characterize, as figures of localitas, their conceptions of the individual, community, corporeality, identity, and the State that both authors developed departing from Platonic political philosophy. My main hypothesis is that Jaeger’s and Krieck’s interpretations of Platonic paideía shared several core-elements (...)
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  9. Kritik über Schriefl (2013): Platons Kritik an Geld und Reichtum.Thomas Zimmer - 2014 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 17 (1):268-269.
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  10. Review of Quarch (1998): Sein und Seele: Platons Ideenphilosophie als Metaphysik der Lebendig-keit. Interpretationen zu und. [REVIEW]Arne Malmsheimer - 1999 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 4 (1):251-257.
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  11. Review of Horn, Müller & Söder (2009): Platon-Handbuch. Leben – Werk – Wirkung. [REVIEW]Stefan Düfel - 2011 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 14 (1):308-312.
  12. Justice of the Singular: Socrates' Apology and Deconstruction.Mathieu-Pierre Buchler - 2020 - L'Atelier 1 (12):68-89.
    The question of justice in Western philosophy finds its humble beginnings in the interplay of life and death. I am referring here to Plato’s Apology. The Apology is not only a text tracing the fate of the great philosopher Socrates by recounting his final speech before the judges of Athens, but it is also a text that, on a more subtle level, announces the advent of a promising justice that is birthed from death, or, to be more precise, from a (...)
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  13. Plato, Epistemology and Ethics - (M.) Bonazzi, (F.) Forcignanò, (A.) Ulacco (Edd.) Thinking, Knowing, Acting: Epistemology and Ethics in Plato and Ancient Platonism. (Brill's Plato Studies 3.) Pp. VIII + 332. Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2019. Cased, €154, Us$185. Isbn: 978-90-04-39898-6. [REVIEW]Manuel Knoll - 2020 - The Classical Review 70 (2):342-344.
  14. Plato’s Trial of Athens, by Mark A. Ralkowski.William J. Prior - 2020 - Ancient Philosophy 40 (2):481-485.
  15. Emotions in Plato.Laura Candiotto & Olivier Renaut (eds.) - 2020 - Brill.
    Emotions ( pathè) such as anger, fear, shame, and envy, but also pity, wonder, love and friendship have long been underestimated in Plato’s philosophy. The aim of Emotions in Plato is to provide a consistent account of the role of emotions in Plato’s psychology, epistemology, ethics and political theory. The volume focuses on three main issues: taxonomy of emotions, their epistemic status, and their relevance for the ethical and political theory and practice. This volume, which is the first edited volume (...)
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  16. Becoming Socrates: Political Philosophy in Plato’s Parmenides, Written by Alex Priou. [REVIEW]Darren Gardner - 2020 - Polis 37 (2):364-367.
  17. Love, Friendship, Beauty, and the Good. Plato, Aristotle, and the Later Tradition, Written by Corrigan, K.Øyvind Rabbås - 2020 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 14 (1):93-96.
  18. Thick Concepts and Moral Revisionism in Plato’s Gorgias: Arguing About Something There Can Be No Argument About.Philipp Brüllmann - 2019 - Phronesis 65 (2):153-178.
    David Furley has suggested that we think of Callicles’ immoralism as attacking a thick concept. I take up this suggestion and apply it to the argument of Plato’s Gorgias more generally. I show that the discussion between Socrates, Gorgias and Polus, which prepares the ground for Callicles, is precisely addressing the thickness of the concept of justice: it reveals that this concept is both descriptive and evaluative and that formulating a revisionist position about justice is therefore extremely difficult. Callicles’ strategy (...)
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  19. The Guise of the Beautiful: Symposium 204d Ff.Jonathan Fine - 2019 - Phronesis 65 (2):129-152.
    A crux of Plato’s Symposium is how beauty relates to the good. Diotima distinguishes beauty from the good, I show, to explain how erotic pursuits are characteristically ambivalent and opaque. Human beings pursue beauty without knowing why or thinking it good; yet they are rational, if aiming at happiness. Central to this reconstruction is a passage widely taken to show that beauty either coincides with the good or demands disinterested admiration. It shows rather that what one loves as beautiful does (...)
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  20. A Wolf in the City: Tyranny and the Tyrant in Plato's Republic. [REVIEW]Jason W. Carter - 2020 - Philosophical Quarterly 70 (279):419-421.
    In this dense, intelligent, but often frustrating work, Cinzia Arruzza argues that Plato's depiction of tyranny and the character of the tyrant in the Republic is best interpreted as, ‘an intervention in a debate concerning the transformed relation between political leaders and demos in Athenian democracy’ (p. 9) in the last decades of the fifth century BCE. Her central claim is that Plato's critique of tyranny in the Republic was aimed at showing that this particular historical form of Athenian democracy, (...)
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  21. Plato on the Enslavement of Reason.Mark A. Johnstone - 2020 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 50 (3):382-394.
    In Republic 8–9, Socrates describes four main kinds of vicious people, all of whose souls are “ruled” by an element other than reason, and in some of whom reason is said to be “enslaved.” What role does reason play in such souls? In this paper, I argue, based on Republic 8–9 and related passages, and in contrast to some common alternative views, that for Plato the “enslavement” of reason consists in this: instead of determining for itself what is good, reason (...)
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  22. The Emerging Good in Plato’s Philebus. By John V. Garner. [REVIEW]David F. Hoinski - 2020 - Ancient Philosophy 40 (1):211-216.
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  23. The Cosmic Purpose of Natural Disasters in Plato’s Laws.George Harvey - 2020 - Ancient Philosophy 40 (1):157-177.
  24. Plato and Inherited Punishment.Anthony Natoli - 2020 - Ancient Philosophy 40 (1):135-156.
  25. The Discipline of Virtue.Allison Piñeros Glasscock - 2020 - Ancient Philosophy 40 (1):41-65.
  26. Plato’s Pragmatic Project: A Reading of Plato’s Laws, Written by Myrthe L. Bartels.Richard Stalley - 2019 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 13 (2):193-196.
  27. Alcibiades’ Akrasia: Reason for Wrongdoing?Colm Shanahan - 2019 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 13 (2):131-152.
    I will argue that, due to the level of attention given to comparing and contrasting Socratic Intellectualism with the Republic, the question of the possibility of akrasia in Plato’s thought has not yet been adequately formulated. I will instead be focusing on Plato’s Symposium, situating Alcibiades at its epicentre and suggesting that his case should be read as highlighting some of Plato’s concerns with Socratic Intellectualism. These concerns arise from the following position of Socratic Intellectualism: knowing the greater good will (...)
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  28. The Quarrel Between Sophistry and Philosophy.Jens Kristian Larsen - 2011 - Dissertation, University of Copenhagen
    This study presents a full-length interpretation of two Platonic dialogues, the Theaetetus and the Sophist. The reading pursues a dramatic motif which I believe runs through these dialogues, namely the confrontation of Socratic philosophy, as it is understood by Plato, with the practise of sophistry. I shall argue that a major point for Plato in these two dialogues is to examine and defend his own Socratic or dialectical understanding of philosophy against the sophistic claim that false opinions and statements are (...)
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  29. What Are the Wages of Justice? Rethinking the Republic’s Division of Goods.Merrick Anderson - forthcoming - Phronesis:1-26.
    A growing number of scholars have seen that the Republic’s division of goods includes goods which possess value δι᾽ αὑτό in virtue of some of their causal effects. Building on this, I argue that goods, including justice, which are valuable διὰ τὰ γιγνόµενα ἀπ’ αὐτοῦ are so in virtue of a limited class of beneficial effects: those that depend on the recognition of other agents. This way of dividing goods explains why Socrates legitimately invokes some effects of justice in his (...)
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  30. Plato and the Dangerous Pleasures of Poikilia.Jonathan Fine - forthcoming - Classical Quarterly:1-18.
    A significant strand of the ethical psychology, aesthetics and politics of Plato's Republic revolves around the concept of poikilia, ‘fascinating variety’. Plato uses the concept to caution against harmful appetitive pleasures purveyed by democracy and such artistic or cultural practices as mimetic poetry. His aim, this article shows, is to contest a prominent conceptual connection between poikilia and beauty (kallos, to kalon). Exploiting tensions in the archaic and classical Greek concept, Plato associates poikilia with dangerous pleasures to redirect admiration toward (...)
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  31. What Are the Wages of Justice? Rethinking Plato's Division of Goods.Merrick Anderson - 2020 - Phronesis 65 (1):1-26.
    Against the standard view that the Republic’s division of goods distinguishes between intrinsic and instrumental value, a growing number of scholars have correctly argued that goods possess value δι᾽ αὑτό in virtue of some of their causal effects. However, these scholars have not yet given a convincing and principled account of what it means to be valuable διὰ τὰ γιγνόμενα ἀπ’ αὐτοῦ such that some effects can contribute to the value a good has δι᾽ αὑτό. In this paper I offer (...)
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  32. Plato on the Incompatibility of Wealth and Justice: The Property Arrangements in the Republic.Anna Schriefl - 2018 - History of Political Thought 39 (2):193-215.
    The property arrangements of the Republic are often linked to Plato's biographical and historical background, especially to his alleged aristocratic prejudices against moneymaking. Contrary to this, I argue that they are based on one of his central philosophical theories, i.e. on his conception of justice. According to Plato, justice involves the control of appetitive desires. Among these appetitive desires, the desire for money stands out for the following reasons given in the text: it is part of human appetite 'by nature', (...)
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  33. Neutral, Natural and Hedonic State in Plato.Wei Cheng - 2019 - Mnemosyne 4 (72):525-549.
    This paper aims to clarify Plato’s notions of the natural and the neutral state in relation to hedonic properties. Contra two extreme trends among scholars—people either conflate one state with the other, or keep them apart as to establish an unsurmount- able gap between both states, I argue that neither view accurately reflects Plato’s position because the natural state is real and can coincide with the neutral state in part, whereas the latter, as an umbrella term, can also be realized (...)
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  34. Attitudinal Pleasure in Plato’s Philebus.Brooks A. Sommerville - 2019 - Phronesis 64 (3):247-276.
    This paper addresses two interpretive puzzles in Plato’s Philebus. The first concerns the claim, endorsed by both interlocutors, that the most godlike of lives is a pleasureless life of pure thinking. This appears to run afoul of the verdict of the earlier so-called ‘Choice of Lives’ argument that a mixed life is superior to either of its ‘pure’ rivals. A second concerns Socrates’ discussion of false pleasure, in which he appears to be guilty of rank equivocation. I argue that we (...)
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  35. Friendship, Knowledge and Reciprocity in Lysis.José Antonio Giménez - 2020 - Apeiron 53 (4):315-337.
    Plato’s characterization of philia in Lysis, on one hand, as one-sided belonging to the ultimate object of our desire and, on the other, as interpersonal reciprocal belonging appears problematic. Yonesawa has recently claimed that one can make sense of both uses of “belonging” if we assume that one is the other’s friend when each one coincides in being the ultimate object of the other’s desire. This paper proposes instead that Lysis’ ‘reciprocity’ of friendship results from friends’ right wanting, which presupposes (...)
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  36. Platonism. By Paul Elmer More. Second Edition, Revised. Pp. Xiv + 317. Princeton University Press, 1926. 13s. 6d.H. S. J. - 1928 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 48 (1):110-111.
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  37. Die Phronesis in der Philosophie Platons vor dem Staate. By Johannes Hirschberger. Pp. vi + 200. Leipzig: Dieterich, 1932. 12.80 m. [REVIEW]T. D. - 1933 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 53 (1):149-149.
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  38. Huby Plato and Modern Morality. London: Macmillan. 1972. Pp. Ix + 80. £1·95.Trevor J. Saunders - 1974 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 94:220-220.
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  39. Philosophical Genesis: The Three Waves and the City-Soul Analogy in Republic V.Charlotte C. S. Thomas & Kevin S. Honeycutt - 2018 - Polis: The Journal for Ancient Greek Political Thought 35 (1):164-185.
  40. Luciano Montoneri: Il problema del male nella filosofia di Platone. Pp. 474. Padua: Cedam, 1968. Paper, L.3,000.W. E. Charlton - 1971 - The Classical Review 21 (1):128-128.
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  41. Torsten J. Andersson: Polis and Psyche: A Motif in Plato's Republic. Pp. 263. Stockholm: Almqvist & Wiksell, 1971. Paper. [REVIEW]H. J. Easterling - 1975 - The Classical Review 25 (2):313-313.
  42. Christopher Rowe: An Introduction to Greek Ethics. Pp. 143. London: Hutchinson, 1976. Paper, £2·50.W. Charlton - 1978 - The Classical Review 28 (1):166-166.
  43. Rosamond Kent Sprague: Plato's Philosopher-King: A Study of the Theoretical Background. Pp. Xviii + 132. Columbia, S.C.: University of South Carolina Press, 1976. Hard Covers. [REVIEW]Pamela Huby - 1979 - The Classical Review 29 (1):162-162.
  44. Plato's Moral Theory - Terence Irwin: Plato's Moral Theory. The Early and Middle Dialogues. Pp. Xvii + 376. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1977. £9·50. [REVIEW]Malcolm Schofield - 1979 - The Classical Review 29 (2):246-249.
  45. The City-State of the Soul: Constituting the Self in Plato’s Republic, Written by Kevin M. Crotty.Rebecca Lemoine - 2018 - Polis 35 (1):324-327.
  46. Who’s Happy in Plato’s Republic?Jonathan Culp - 2014 - Polis 31 (2):288-312.
  47. Plato’s Rejection of the Instrumental Account of Friendship in the Lysis.Howard J. Curzer - 2014 - Polis 31 (2):352-368.
  48. The Benefits of Bullies: Sophists as Unknowing Teachers of Moderation in Plato’s Euthydemus.Rebecca LeMoine - 2015 - Polis 32 (1):32-54.
  49. Book Review: Virtue is Knowledge: The Moral Foundations of Socratic Political Philosophy, Written by Lorraine Smith Pangle. [REVIEW]Roslyn Weiss - 2015 - Polis 32 (1):235-239.
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  50. Thrasymachus and His Attachment to Justice.Peter J. Hansen - 2015 - Polis 32 (2):344-368.
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