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  1. Plato and Levinas on Violence and the Other.Deborah Achtenberg - 2011 - Symposium: Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy/Revue canadienne de philosophie continentale 15 (1):170-190.
    In this essay, I shall describe both Plato and Levinas as philosophers of the other, and delineate their similarities and differences on violence. In doing so, I will open up for broader reflection two importantly contrasting ways in which the self is essentially responsive to—as well as vulnerable to violence from—the other. I will also suggest a new way of situating Levinas in the history of philosophy, not, as he himself suggests, as one of the few in the history of (...)
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  2. Plato: Moral and Political Ideals.Adela Marion Adam - 1913 - Exclusively Distributed by Light Impressions.
    Originally published during the early part of the twentieth century, the Cambridge Manuals of Science and Literature were designed to provide concise introductions to a broad range of topics. They were written by experts for the general reader and combined a comprehensive approach to knowledge with an emphasis on accessibility. Plato: Moral and Political Ideals by Adela Marion Adam, first printed in 1913, deals with the main substance of Plato's philosophy of ethics and politics, set within the context of his (...)
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  3. Book Review:Morality and the Inner Life: A Study in Plato's "Gorgias." Ilham Dilman. [REVIEW]A. W. H. Adkins - 1983 - Ethics 93 (2):406-.
  4. Plato's Moral Philosophy John Wild: Plato's Modern Enemies and the Theory of Natural Law. Pp. Xi+259. Chicago: University of Chicago Press: (London: Cambridge University Press), 1953. Cloth, 41s. 6d. Net. [REVIEW]D. J. Allan - 1955 - The Classical Review 5 (01):53-56.
  5. Plato's Moral Philosophy.D. J. Allan - 1955 - The Classical Review 5 (01):53-.
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  6. Law and Justice in Plato's Crito.R. E. Allen - 1972 - Journal of Philosophy 69 (18):557.
  7. Tanja Staehler, Plato and Levinas: The Ambigous Out-Side of Ethics. [REVIEW]Sarah Allen - 2010 - Symposium: Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy/Revue canadienne de philosophie continentale 14 (2):202-206.
  8. Plato and Levinas: The Ambiguous Out-Side of Ethics. [REVIEW]Sarah Allen - 2010 - Symposium: Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy/Revue canadienne de philosophie continentale 14 (2):202-206.
  9. A Tale Of Two Drinking Parties: PLATO'S LAWS IN CONTEXT.W. Altman - 2010 - Polis 27 (2):240-264.
    In accordance with Leo Strauss's ingenious suggestion, the Athenian Stranger of Plato's Laws is best understood as an alternative 'Socrates', fleeing from the hemlock to Crete. Situated between Crito and Phaedo, Laws effectively tests the reader's loyalty to the real Socrates who obeys Athenian law and dies cheerfully in Athens. Having separated Plato from the Stranger, a nuanced defence of Karl Popper's suspicions about Laws confronts the apologetic readings of both Strauss and Christopher Bobonich. As hinted by his preference for (...)
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  10. Language, Ethics, and the Other Between Athens and Jerusalem: A Comparative Study of Plato and Rosenzweig.L. Anckaert - 1995 - Philosophy East and West 45 (4):545-567.
    A comparative study of Plato's "Republic" and Rozenzweig's "Stern der Eriösung" proposed that the way of speaking determines which reality can be spoken and what types of relationality are possible. Rhetorical analysis shows that Plato's philosophy of language, in contrast to Rozenzweig's, undervalues the relational possibilities of time, alterity, and language. This is revealed through a study of the place and significance of the genera of arts for thinking and society.
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  11. Before Theory and Practice: Implication of Desire and Knowledge in Plato's Dialogues.Colin Alexander Anderson - 2002 - Dissertation, Loyola University of Chicago
    In this dissertation, I re-examine the relationship between knowledge and virtue in Plato's dialogues. I argue that "knowledge" in the dialogues is not defined in opposition to "desire" but rather involves "desire" as a constitutive component and that "knowledge" has affective and "erotic" aspects. As a point of reference, I examine Aristotle's brief arguments against the Socratic identification of episteme and arete . I argue that they rest on epistemological and psychological assumptions that Socrates need not accept: viz., a differentiation (...)
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  12. Platonic Ethics, Old and New.Julia Annas - 1999 - Cornell University Press.
    Offers a fundamental reexamination of Plato's ethical thought, highlighting the differences between ancient & modern assumptions & stressing the need to be ...
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  13. An Introduction to Plato's Republic.Julia Annas - 1981 - Oxford University Press.
    This interpretive introduction provides unique insight into Plato's Republic. Stressing Plato's desire to stimulate philosophical thinking in his readers, Julia Annas here demonstrates the coherence of his main moral argument on the nature of justice, and expounds related concepts of education, human motivation, knowledge and understanding. In a clear systematic fashion, this book shows that modern moral philosophy still has much to learn from Plato's attempt to move the focus from questions of what acts the just person ought to perform (...)
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  14. Plato and Aristotle on Friendship and Altruism.Julia Annas - 1977 - Mind 86 (344):532-554.
  15. Culbert Gerow rutember, "the doctrine of the imitation of God in Plato". [REVIEW]M. T. Antonelli - 1948 - Epistemologia 3 (5):539.
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  16. Platōn: Ontologia, Gnōsiotheōria, Ēthikē, Politikē Philosophia, Philosophia Tēs Glōssas, Aisthētikē.G. Arampatzēs & A. Marinopoulou (eds.) - 9999 - Ekdoseis Papadēma.
  17. Cook's Metaphysical Basis of Plato's Ethics The Metaphysical Basis of Plato's Ethics. By A. B. Cook, Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge. Deighton, Bell and Co. Crown 8vo. Pp. Xvi. + 160. 6s. [REVIEW]R. D. Archer-Hind - 1896 - The Classical Review 10 (05):246-249.
  18. Plato's Moral Theory.Gavin Ardley - 1980 - Philosophical Studies 27:329-331.
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  19. The Long March to Plato's Statesman Continued.F. Arends - 2001 - Polis 18 (1-2):125-152.
    Melissa S. Lane, Method and Politics in Plato's Statesman , xiii + 229 pp., ?40, ISBN 0 521 58229 6.
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  20. Impure Intellectual Pleasure and the Phaedrus.Kelly E. Arenson - 2016 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (1):21-45.
    This paper considers how Plato can account for the fact that pain features prominently in the intellectual pleasures of philosophers, given that in his view pleasures mixed with pain are ontologically deficient and inferior to ‘pure,’ painless pleasures. After ruling out the view that Plato does not believe intellectual pleasures are actually painful, I argue that he provides a coherent and overlooked account of pleasure in the Phaedrus, where purity does not factor into the philosopher’s judgment of pleasures at all; (...)
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  21. Rational Pleasures. Review of James Warren, The Pleasures of Reason in Plato, Aristotle, and the Hellenistic Hedonists. [REVIEW]Kelly E. Arenson - 2016 - The Classical Review 66 (1):1-3.
  22. Review of Frisbee C. C. Sheffield, Plato’s Symposium: The Ethics of Desire (Oxford University Press, 2006). [REVIEW]John M. Armstrong - 2009 - Ancient Philosophy 29 (1):208–212.
    The purpose of Sheffield’s careful study is to increase scholarly appreciation of the Symposium as a ‘substantive work in Platonic ethics’ (3). Among the book’s highlights are a persuasive response to Vlastos’ criticism of Plato on love for individuals, an eminently reasonable assessment of the evidence for and against the presence of tripartite psychology in the Symposium, and a delightful interpretation of Alcibiades’ speech at the dialogue’s end—one that reveals elements of satyr play and corroborates rather than undermines Diotima’s account (...)
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  23. Hume's Damage Control.Annette C. Baier - 2012 - The Philosophers' Magazine 56 (56):87-89.
    We want to know about philosophers’ lives in part to see how they applied their philosophy to their own lives. Plato’s account of Socrates’ life, trial, and death sets a great example here, perhaps never equalled, just as few philosophers equal Socrates in integrity and courage.
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  24. Death and the Limits of Truth in the Phaedo.Nicholas Baima - 2015 - Apeiron 48 (3):263-284.
    This paper raises a new interpretive puzzle concerning Socrates’ attitude towards truth in the Phaedo. At one point Socrates seems to advocate that he is justified in trying to convince himself that the soul is immortal and destined for a better place regardless of whether or not these claims are true, but that Cebes and Simmias should relentlessly pursue the truth about the very same matter. This raises the question: Why might Socrates believe that he will benefit from believing things (...)
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  25. Plato's Movement From an Ethics of the Individual to a Science of Particulars.Edward G. Ballard - 1957 - Tulane Studies in Philosophy 6:5-41.
  26. Review of Ilham Dilman, Philosophy and the Philosophic Life: A Study in Plato's Phaedo. [REVIEW]Dirk Baltzly - 1992 - Review of Metaphysics 46 (2):399-401.
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  27. Platonism, Moral Nostalgia and the City of Pigs.Rachel Barney - 2001 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 17 (1):207-27.
    Plato’s depiction of the first city in the Republic (Book II), the so-called ‘city of pigs’, is often read as expressing nostalgia for an earlier, simpler era in which moral norms were secure. This goes naturally with readings of other Platonic texts (including Republic I and the Gorgias) as expressing a sense of moral decline or crisis in Plato’s own time. This image of Plato as a spokesman for ‘moral nostalgia’ is here traced in various nineteenth- and twentieth-century interpretations, and (...)
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  28. Plato on Conventionalism.Rachel Barney - 1997 - Phronesis 42 (2):143 - 162.
    A new reading of Plato's account of conventionalism about names in the Cratylus. It argues that Hermogenes' position, according to which a name is whatever anybody 'sets down' as one, does not have the counterintuitive consequences usually claimed. At the same time, Plato's treatment of conventionalism needs to be related to his treatment of formally similar positions in ethics and politics. Plato is committed to standards of objective natural correctness in all such areas, despite the problematic consequences which, as he (...)
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  29. Plato and the Divided Self.Rachel Barney, Tad Brennan & Charles Brittain (eds.) - 2012 - Cambridge University Press.
    Plato's account of the tripartite soul is a memorable feature of dialogues like the Republic, Phaedrus and Timaeus: it is one of his most famous and influential yet least understood theories. It presents human nature as both essentially multiple and diverse - and yet somehow also one - divided into a fully human 'rational' part, a lion-like 'spirited part' and an 'appetitive' part likened to a many-headed beast. How these parts interact, how exactly each shapes our agency and how they (...)
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  30. Plato, Utilitarianism and Education.Robin Barrow - 1975 - Routledge and Kegan Paul.
    Introduction I i Plato's critics The view that I shall put forward is that utilitarianism is the only acceptable ethical theory and that this was recognised ...
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  31. ¿Demuestra Sócrates la independencia de la moral en el Eutifrón?Pierre Baumann - 2012 - STOA 3 (6):31-41.
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  32. Wine and Catharsis of the Emotions in Plato's Laws.Elizabeth Belfiore - 1986 - Classical Quarterly 36 (02):421-.
    Plato's views on tragedy depend in large part on his views about the ethical consequences of emotional arousal. In the Republic, Plato treats the desires we feel in everyday life to weep and feel pity as appetites exactly like those for food or sex, whose satisfactions are ‘replenishments’. Physical desire is not reprehensible in itself, but is simply non-rational, not identical with reason but capable of being brought into agreement with it. Some desires, like that for simple and wholesome food, (...)
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  33. Love Discourse: Rosenzweig Vs. Plato.Hanoch Ben-Pazi - 2012 - In Yossi Turner, Y. Amir & M. Brasser (eds.), Faith, Truth and Reason - The Philosophy of Franz Rosenzweig. K. Alber. pp. 105 - 124.
    My aim in this study is to unfold the profound relationship thatnonetheless exists between the world of Rosenzweig and that of Plato. Plato’s presence in The Star of Redemption is greater than onemight think by relying solely on the references found in the index. Inaccordance with this suggested relationship, one might propose areligious interpretation of that youthful pronouncement made byRosenzweig, to which, indeed, the expression of „faith“ is appropri-ate: „Ich glaube an Πλάτων [Plato]“. Notwithstanding the need to undertake a broad (...)
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  34. The Rhetoric of Morality and Philosophy: Plato's Gorgias and Phaedrus.Seth Benardete - 1991 - University of Chicago Press.
    Benardete here interprets and, for the first time, pairs two important Platonic dialogues, the Gorgias and the Phaedrus . In linking these dialogues, he places Socrates' notion of rhetoric in a new light and illuminates the way in which Plato gives morality and eros a place in the human soul.
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  35. Theoria, Praxis, and the Contemplative Life After Plato and Aristotle.Thomas Bénatouïl & Mauro Bonazzi (eds.) - 2012 - Brill.
    This volume deals with the appropriations, criticism and transformation of Plato’s and Aristotle’s positions about theory, practice and the contemplative life, including their epistemological and metaphysical foundations, from ...
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  36. James Rachels, The Legacy of Socrates: Essays in Moral Philosophy:The Legacy of Socrates: Essays in Moral Philosophy.Jeremy Bendik‐Keymer - 2007 - Ethics 117 (4):780-784.
  37. Deliberation and Moral Expertise in Plato's "Crito".Eugenio Benitez - 1996 - Apeiron 29 (4):21 - 47.
    Deliberation is the intellectual activity of rational agents in their capacity as rational agents, and good deliberation is the mark of those who have practical wisdom. That is Aristotle's general view,2 one we may safely attribute to Plato as well. Some philosophers, however, have tried to specifiy Plato's view in ways that accentuate the differences between him and Aristotle. They align Plato's views about deliberation and virtue closely with views the fifth-century sophists, and suppose that Plato borrows from the sophists (...)
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  38. Plato's Ethics. [REVIEW]Eugenio Benitez - 1996 - Review of Metaphysics 50 (1):159-161.
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  39. The Wisdom of Love or Negotiating Mythos and Logos with Plato and Levinas.Silvia Benso - 2005 - Dialogue and Universalism 15 (3-4):117-128.
    Inverting the sequence of the traditional terms, in Otherwise than Being or Beyond Essence Levinas redefines philosophy as the “wisdom of love”. Through an intertwining of Platonic motifs and Levinasian inspirations, the essay argues for a mutually regulated interplay of mythos and logos as a way to regain a sense of wisdom that remains respectful of the elements of otherness in reality-in particular, respectful of the otherness of the Third who, for Levinas, constitutes the ground for politics. That is, the (...)
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  40. A Note on Socratic Self-Knowledge in the Charmides.Hugh H. Benson - 2003 - Ancient Philosophy 23 (1):31-47.
  41. Socratic Dynamic Theory: A Sketch.Hugh H. Benson - 1997 - Apeiron 30 (4):79 - 93.
  42. On Plato's Phaedrus: Politics Beyond the City Walls.Russell Bentley - 2005 - Polis 22 (2):230-249.
    This paper presents a political reading of the Phaedrus. It is argued that the dialogue's speeches on love describe types of political leadership and that, using the Socratic account of the statesman as someone who promotes moral improvement, political relations are not bound by institutions. Political relations become those in which one person affects the moral development of another and, thus, political 'space' is between people, not in specific locations. As a result, this new kind of forum must affect the (...)
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  43. Plato on Virtue and the Law.Sandrine Berges - 2009 - Continuum.
    This important monograph examines Plato's contribution to virtue ethics and shows how his dialogues contain interesting and plausible insights into current philosophical concerns.
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  44. Wisdom and the Laws: The Parent Analogy in Plato’s Crito.Sandrine Berges - 2004 - Yeditepe'de Felsefe (Philosophy at Yeditepe) 3.
    One noticeable omission in the otherwise ever flourishing literature on Plato's Crito (and one might say on the early Platonic dialogues in general) is the recognition that Plato is presenting a problem from a virtue ethical angle. This is no doubt due to the fact that Aristotle, rather than Plato is regarded as the originator of Virtue Ethics as a branch of philosophy.1 Plato's own contribution to the discipline is more often than not bypassed.2 This has unfortunate consequences not only (...)
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  45. Plato on Tyranny, Philosophy, and Pleasure.Martin A. Bertman - 1985 - Apeiron 19 (2):152 - 160.
  46. Plato's Semantics and Plato's Cave.Thomas Wheaton Bestor - 1996 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 14:33-82.
  47. Gabriela Roxana Carone.Plato’s Cosmology and Its Ethical Dimensions. X + 320 Pp., Bibl., Index. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2005. $70. [REVIEW]Gábor Betegh - 2007 - Isis 98 (3):619-620.
  48. Cosmological Ethics in the Timaeus and Early Stoicism.Gabor Betegh - 2003 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 24:273-302.
  49. The Interpersonal Aspect of Eros in Plato's "Symposium.".Donald N. Blakeley - 1978 - Dissertation, University of Hawai'i
  50. The Play of Character in Plato's Dialogues.Ruby Blondell - 2002 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book attempts to bridge the gulf that still exists between 'literary' and 'philosophical' interpreters of Plato by looking at his use of characterization. Characterization is intrinsic to dramatic form and a concern with human character in an ethical sense pervades the dialogues on the discursive level. Form and content are further reciprocally related through Plato's discursive preoccupation with literary characterization. Two opening chapters examine the methodological issues involved in reading Plato 'as drama' and a set of questions surrounding Greek (...)
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1 — 50 / 352