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  1. Emotions in Plato.Laura Candiotto & Olivier Renaut (eds.) - 2020 - Brill.
    Emotions ( pathè) such as anger, fear, shame, and envy, but also pity, wonder, love and friendship have long been underestimated in Plato’s philosophy. The aim of Emotions in Plato is to provide a consistent account of the role of emotions in Plato’s psychology, epistemology, ethics and political theory. The volume focuses on three main issues: taxonomy of emotions, their epistemic status, and their relevance for the ethical and political theory and practice. This volume, which is the first edited volume (...)
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  2. Becoming Socrates: Political Philosophy in Plato’s Parmenides, Written by Alex Priou. [REVIEW]Darren Gardner - 2020 - Polis 37 (2):364-367.
  3. Love, Friendship, Beauty, and the Good. Plato, Aristotle, and the Later Tradition, Written by Corrigan, K.Øyvind Rabbås - 2020 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 14 (1):93-96.
  4. Thick Concepts and Moral Revisionism in Plato’s Gorgias: Arguing About Something There Can Be No Argument About.Philipp Brüllmann - 2019 - Phronesis 65 (2):153-178.
    David Furley has suggested that we think of Callicles’ immoralism as attacking a thick concept. I take up this suggestion and apply it to the argument of Plato’s Gorgias more generally. I show that the discussion between Socrates, Gorgias and Polus, which prepares the ground for Callicles, is precisely addressing the thickness of the concept of justice: it reveals that this concept is both descriptive and evaluative and that formulating a revisionist position about justice is therefore extremely difficult. Callicles’ strategy (...)
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  5. The Guise of the Beautiful: Symposium 204d Ff.Jonathan Fine - 2019 - Phronesis 65 (2):129-152.
    A crux of Plato’s Symposium is how beauty relates to the good. Diotima distinguishes beauty from the good, I show, to explain how erotic pursuits are characteristically ambivalent and opaque. Human beings pursue beauty without knowing why or thinking it good; yet they are rational, if aiming at happiness. Central to this reconstruction is a passage widely taken to show that beauty either coincides with the good or demands disinterested admiration. It shows rather that what one loves as beautiful does (...)
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  6. A Wolf in the City: Tyranny and the Tyrant in Plato's Republic. [REVIEW]Jason W. Carter - 2020 - Philosophical Quarterly 70 (279):419-421.
    In this dense, intelligent, but often frustrating work, Cinzia Arruzza argues that Plato's depiction of tyranny and the character of the tyrant in the Republic is best interpreted as, ‘an intervention in a debate concerning the transformed relation between political leaders and demos in Athenian democracy’ (p. 9) in the last decades of the fifth century BCE. Her central claim is that Plato's critique of tyranny in the Republic was aimed at showing that this particular historical form of Athenian democracy, (...)
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  7. The Quarrel Between Sophistry and Philosophy.Jens Kristian Larsen - 2011 - Dissertation, University of Copenhagen
    This study presents a full-length interpretation of two Platonic dialogues, the Theaetetus and the Sophist. The reading pursues a dramatic motif which I believe runs through these dialogues, namely the confrontation of Socratic philosophy, as it is understood by Plato, with the practise of sophistry. I shall argue that a major point for Plato in these two dialogues is to examine and defend his own Socratic or dialectical understanding of philosophy against the sophistic claim that false opinions and statements are (...)
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  8. Plato and the Dangerous Pleasures of Poikilia.Jonathan Fine - forthcoming - Classical Quarterly.
    This paper shows how, in the Republic, Plato contests a prominent conception of beauty as ‘fascinating variety’ (poikilia). Drawing on tensions in the concept, Plato associates poikilia with harmful sensory pleasure to redirect admiration toward the non-sensible nature of beauty. This is to put the aesthetics of poikilia in its place, in service of a distinctly philosophical pursuit of beauty. Yet Plato does not deny the beauty of poikilia, not even in imitative poetry. Rather, his critique lays bare a problem (...)
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  9. Neutral, Natural and Hedonic State in Plato.Wei Cheng - 2019 - Mnemosyne 4 (72):525-549.
    This paper aims to clarify Plato’s notions of the natural and the neutral state in relation to hedonic properties. Contra two extreme trends among scholars—people either conflate one state with the other, or keep them apart as to establish an unsurmount- able gap between both states, I argue that neither view accurately reflects Plato’s position because the natural state is real and can coincide with the neutral state in part, whereas the latter, as an umbrella term, can also be realized (...)
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  10. Plato's Moral Theory - Terence Irwin: Plato's Moral Theory. The Early and Middle Dialogues. Pp. Xvii + 376. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1977. £9·50. [REVIEW]Malcolm Schofield - 1979 - The Classical Review 29 (2):246-249.
  11. Self-Knowledge in Plato’s Symposium.Eric Sanday - 2018 - In James M. Ambury & Andy German (eds.), Knowledge and Ignorance of Self in Platonic Philosophy. Cambridge University Press. pp. 186-205.
    I use Plato’s Symposium to examine a tension that I believe to be key to self-knowledge. On the one hand, knowledge proper refers to noetic insight into the ultimate explanatory principles and causes, which “objects” are often referred to in the dialogues as forms. On the other hand, self-knowledge refers to basic modes of self-awareness and self-understanding that are at once embodied and interpersonal, and which are not explicitly related to the study of form. I believe these two basic commitments, (...)
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  12. Plato and Ethics - J.M. Rist Plato's Moral Realism. The Discovery of the Presuppositions of Ethics. Pp. X + 286. Washington, D.C.: The Catholic University of America Press, 2012. Paper, Us$29.95 . Isbn: 978-0-8132-1980-6. [REVIEW]Benjamin Rider - 2013 - The Classical Review 63 (2):362-364.
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  13. Dialectic of Eros and Myth of the Soul in Plato's Phaedrus.Jens Kristian Larsen - 2010 - Symbolae Osloenses 84 (84):73-90.
    In this paper, I question a widespread reading of a passage in the last part of the Phaedrus dealing with the science of dialectic. According to this reading, the passage announces a new method peculiar to the later Plato aiming at defining natural kinds. I show that the Phaedrus itself does not support such a reading. As an alternative reading, I suggest that the science of dialectic, as discussed in the passage, must be seen as dealing primarily with philosophical rhetoric (...)
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  14. The Virtue of Power – The Gigantomachia in Plato’s Sophist 245e6-249d5 Revisited.Jens Kristian Larsen - 2014 - New Yearbook for Phenomenology and Phenomenological Philosophy 13:306-317.
    The “battle” between corporealists and idealists described in Plato’s Sophist 245e6–249d5 is of significance for understanding the philosophical function of the dramatic exchange between the Eleatic guest and Theaetetus, the dialogue's main interlocutors. Various features of this exchange indicate that the Eleatic guest introduces and discusses the dispute between corporealists and idealists in order to educate Theaetetus in ontological matters. By reading the discussion between Theaetetus and the Eleatic guest in the light of these features, one comes to see that (...)
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  15. By What is the Soul Nourished? - On the Art of the Physician of Souls in Plato’s Protagoras.Jens Kristian Larsen - 2017 - In Olof Pettersson & Vigdis Songe-Møller (eds.), Plato’s Protagoras: Essays on the Confrontation of Philosophy and Sophistry. Springer. pp. 79-97.
    This article explores the motif of psychic nourishment in Plato’s Protagoras. It does so by analyzing what consequences Socrates’ claim that only a physician of souls will be able adequately to assess the quality of such nourishment has for the argument of the dialogue. To this purpose, the first section of the article offers a detailed analysis of Socrates’ initial conversation with Hippocrates, highlighting and interpreting the various uses of medical metaphors. Building on this, this section argues that the warning (...)
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  16. Fenomenología de la pólis y torsión del Dasein: dialéctica y hermenéutica en la temprana interpretación gadameriana de la ética platónica.Facundo Bey - forthcoming - Daimon: Revista Internacional de Filosofía.
    English title: Phenomenology of the pólis and torsion of Dasein: dialectic and hermeneutics in the early Gadamerian interpretation of Plato's ethics. Abstract: The aim of this paper is to present and analyse the main hypotheses of Hans-Georg Gadamer in his 1931 book Platos dialektische Ethik. Phänomenologische Interpretationen zum Philebos regarding the notions of pólis, aretḗ, tó agathṓn y Dasein. Then, it will be attempted to show that in this early book of Gadamer is his first relevant philosophical-political work, expressed in (...)
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  17. On Poietic Remembering and Forgetting: Hermeneutic Recollection and Diotima’s Historico-Hermeneutic Leanings.Cynthia R. Nielsen - 2018 - Symposium 22 (2):107-134.
    Like human existence itself, our enduring legacies—whether poetic, ethical, political, or philosophical—continually unfold and require recurrent communal engagement and (re)enactment. In other words, an ongoing performance of significant works must occur, and this task requires the collective human activity of re-membering or gathering-together-again. In the Symposium, Diotima provides an account of human pursuits of immortality through the creation of artifacts, including laws, poems, and philosophical discourses that resonates with Gadamer’s account of our engagement with artworks and texts. This essay explores (...)
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  18. Socrates and the Benefits of Puzzlement.Jan Szaif - 2018 - In George Karamanolis & Vasilis Politis (eds.), The Aporetic Tradition in Ancient Philosophy. Cambridge, UK: pp. 29-47.
    This essay addresses the role of aporetic thinking and aporetic dialogue in the early “Socratic” dialogues of Plato. It aims to provide a new angle on why and how puzzlement induced by Socrates should benefit his interlocutors but often fails to do so. After discussing criteria for what is to count as an aporetic dialogue, the essay explains how and why Socrates’ aporia-inducing conversations point to a conception of virtue as grounded in a form of self-transparent wisdom. In combination with (...)
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  19. Thrasymachus and the Relational Conception of Authority.Roderick Long - 2009 - In Patricia Hanna (ed.), An Anthology of Philosophical Studies, Vol. 3. Athens, Greece: pp. 27-36.
  20. The Unity of the Soul in Plato's Republic.Eric Brown - 2012 - In Rachel Barney, Tad Brennan & Charles Brittain (eds.), Plato and the Divided Self. Cambridge, UK: pp. 53-73.
    This essay argues that Plato in the Republic needs an account of why and how the three distinct parts of the soul are parts of one soul, and it draws on the Phaedrus and Gorgias to develop an account of compositional unity that fits what is said in the Republic.
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  21. False Idles: The Politics of the "Quiet Life".Eric Brown - 2008 - In Ryan Balot (ed.), A Companion to Greek and Roman Political Thought. Oxford, UK: pp. 485-500.
    The dominant Greek and Roman ideology held that the best human life required engaging in politics, on the grounds that the human good is shared, not private, and that the activities central to this shared good are those of traditional politics. This chapter surveys three ways in which philosophers challenged this ideology, defended a withdrawal from or transformation of traditional politics, and thus rethought what politics could be. Plato and Aristotle accept the ideology's two central commitments but insist that a (...)
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  22. How Smart is the Appetitive Part of the Soul?Mehmet M. Erginel - 2013 - In Noburu Notomi & Luc Brisson (eds.), The Selected Papers of the Ninth Symposium Platonicum. 53757 Sankt Augustin, Germany: Academia Verlag. pp. 204-208.
    In recent years there has been a surge of interest among Plato scholars in the tripartition of the soul in the Republic. Particular attention has been devoted to the nature of the soul-parts, and whether or not each part is agent-like. A key element in this debate has been the question whether or not the non-rational parts have access to significant cognitive and conceptual resources. That this is the case, and that appetite cannot be entirely unreasoning, is the widely accepted (...)
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  23. Plato on the Pangs of Love.Mehmet M. Erginel - 2016 - In Mauro Tulli & Michael Erler (eds.), The Selected Papers of the Tenth Symposium Platonicum. 53757 Sankt Augustin, Germany: pp. 231-236.
    At the heart of Plato’s theory of erōs is the ‘ascent’ of love for an individual body, through several stages, to love of Beauty itself (Symposium 210a-212b). I argue that our understanding of the psychology of this transformation would benefit especially from bringing in Plato’s views on pain from the Republic. For erōs is presented in the Symposium as including sexual desire (207b) as well as love of wisdom (210d), but the Republic takes the former to be a painful desire, (...)
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  24. God in Jesus, a Daemonion in Socrates and Their Respective Divine Communication.Yip-Mei Loh - 2018 - International Journal of Humanities and Social Science 12 (2):321-326.
    Jesus and Socrates shared a remarkable gift; a channel of inner spiritual communication, to afford them truthful guidance in their respective religious discourse. Jesus is part of the Trinity; he is the Son, the Son of God. In mortal life he is the son of a carpenter. He called on all peoples to repent of their sins but fell foul of the authorities and was crucified. Socrates was an ancient Greek philosopher and the son of an artisan. His mission is (...)
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  25. An Examination of Plato's Doctrine. Volume I, Plato on Man and Society. By I. M. Crombie.Peter Diamadopoulos & I. M. Crombie - 1964 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 25 (2):273.
  26. The Love of the Beloved (On Eros and Philotimia in Plato's *Symposium*).Jens Kristian Larsen - 2013 - Norsk Filosofisk Tidsskrift 48 (1):74-85.
    In this paper I investigate the understanding of eros expressed in the speeches of Phaedrus and Agathon in Plato’s Symposium, two speeches often neglected in the literature. I argue that they contain crucial insights about the nature of eros that reappear in Diotima’s speech. Finally, I consider the relation of Socrates and Alcibiades in light of these insights, arguing that the figure of Alcibiades should be seen as a negative illustration of the notion of erotic education described by Diotima.
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  27. Dynamik und Stabilität der Tugend in Platons Nomoi.Jakub Jinek - 2016 - Aithér 8:66-89.
    Plato’s theory of virtue in the Laws could be striking for someone who is more familiar with Aristotle’s ethics for conceptual complementarity between the two positions (contrary emotions, the ordering element of reason, virtue as a mean which lies between two forms of vice, typically linked to excessive actions, etc.). Plato’s theory, however, still differs from that of Aristotle in two crutial points. First, the source of emotional dynamism is, according to Plato, supraindividual as far as the psyche is a (...)
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  28. Love and Friendship in the Lysis and the Symposium: Human and Divine.Jakub Jinek - 2008 - Rhizai. A Journal for Ancient Philosophy and Science 5 (2008):109-126.
    The paper claims that we cannot understand properly Platonic conception of love and friendship unless we read the Lysis in the light of the Symposium and vice verse. Dealing with the crucial question of what made Plato write two different dialogues on the same topic, it advocates an alternative intertextual reading that does not deny progress of Plato’s thinking. Though the Symposium offers, in comparison to the Lysis, a more developed philosophical theory of love, Plato still has good reasons to (...)
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  29. The Emerging Good in Plato's 'Philebus'.John Garner - 2017 - Evanston, IL, USA: Northwestern University Press.
    This study examines Plato's dialogue on the good life and argues, most centrally, that the "pleasures of learning" exemplify, for Socrates, the possibility of good becoming or change.
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  30. The Socratic Dimension of Kierkegaard's Imitation.Wojciech T. Kaftański - 2016 - Heythrop Journal 57 (4):599-611.
    This article reevaluates the origins of Kierkegaard’s concept of imitation. It challenges the general approach to the genealogy of the phenomenon in question, which privileges the influence of various religious traditions on the thinker and ignores his exposure to the non-Christian literature. I contend that a close reading of the Apology, the Sophist, the Republic, and the Phaedo alongside Kierkegaard’s texts from the so-called second authorship reveals in the dialogues of Plato the three crucial aspects of Kierkegaard’s concept of imitation, (...)
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  31. Plato and Aristotle’s Ethics. [REVIEW]Thornton C. Lockwood Jr - 2005 - Ancient Philosophy 25 (1):197-202.
  32. Justice and Compulsion for Plato’s Philosopher–Rulers.Eric Brown - 2000 - Ancient Philosophy 20 (1):1-17.
    By considering carefully Socrates' invocations of 'compulsion' in Plato's Republic, I seek to explain how both justice and compulsion are crucial to the philosophers' decision to rule in Kallipolis, so that this decision does not contradict Socrates' central thesis that it is always in one's interests to act justly. On my account, the compulsion is provided by a law, made by the city's lawgivers, that requires people raised to be philosophers take turns ruling. Justice by itself does not require the (...)
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  33. How Polus Was Refuted: Reconsidering Plato’s Gorgias 474c-475c.Scott Berman - 1991 - Ancient Philosophy 11 (2):265-284.
  34. Unpublished Review of Plato on Man and Society, by I.M. Crombie.Henry Roper Roper & Arthur Davis - 2005 - In Henry Roper Roper & Arthur Davis (eds.), Collected Works of George Grant: Volume 3. University of Toronto Press. pp. 215-220.
  35. Love of the Good as the Cure for Spiritedness in Plato’s Republic.Thomas W. Smith - 2016 - Review of Metaphysics 70 (1):33-58.
    Plato’s teaching about the Good is sometimes blamed for denigrating particular goods. By contrast, this article argues that for Plato pleonexia is at the heart of disordered relationships to particular goods. In turn, the psychic root of pleonexia is spiritedness, the aspect of the soul that enables it to love what is “one’s own.” Plato employs Kallipolis as a heuristic device to diagnose these psychic roots of our attraction to pleonexia. Kallipolis’ reforms are ascetic practices that seek to transform his (...)
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  36. The Pleasures of Reason in Plato, Aristotle, and the Hellenistic Hedonists by James Warren.Giulia Bonasio - 2016 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 109 (4):556-557.
  37. Boy! What Boy?Rick Benitez - 2016 - Ancient Philosophy 36 (1):107-114.
    This paper corrects the common misconception that Meno's slave (in Plato's dialogue of that name) is a boy. The first part of the paper shows how long-standing and widespread that misconception is. The description of Meno's slave as a "slave-boy" goes back at least to Benjamin Jowett, and the phrase is still commonly seen today in books and journal articles in philosophy and classics generally, even in presses and journals with the highest reputation. The paper then shows that the Greek (...)
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  38. Deliberation and Moral Expertise in Plato's Crito.Eugenio Benitez - 1996 - Apeiron 29 (4):21-48.
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  39. Plato and the Individual.H. C. Baldry - 1963 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 85:205.
  40. Aristotle's Definition of Moral Virtue, and Plato's Account of Justice in the Soul.H. W. B. Joseph - 1934 - Philosophy 9 (34):168.
    Nicolai Hartmann, in an interesting discussion of Aristotle’s account of moral virtue, has called attention to the difference between the contrariety of opposed vices and the contrast of certain virtues. The äκρa or extremes, somewhere between which Aristotle thought that any morally virtuous disposition must lie, are not conciliable. The same man cannot combine or reconcile, in the same action, cowardice and bravery, intemperance and insensibility, stinginess and thriftlessness, passion and lack of spirit. These are pairs of contraries, between which (...)
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  41. Plato’s Critique of Antisthenes on Pleasure and the Good Life.Sean McConnell - 2015 - Ancient Philosophy 35 (2):329-349.
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  42. Aiming at Virtue in Plato.Iakovos Vasiliou - 2008 - Cambridge University Press.
    This study of Plato's ethics focuses on the concept of virtue. Based on detailed readings of the most prominent Platonic dialogues on virtue, it argues that there is a central yet previously unnoticed conceptual distinction in Plato between the idea of virtue as the supreme aim of one's actions and the determination of which action-tokens or -types are virtuous. Appreciating the 'aiming/determining distinction' provides detailed and mutually consistent readings of the most well-known Platonic dialogues on virtue as well as original (...)
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  43. Rozwój pojęcia woli w pogańskiej filozofii starożytnej - Sokrates, Platon, Arystoteles.Martyna Koszkało - 2015 - Roczniki Filozoficzne 63 (2):157-186.
    Celem artykułu jest przedstawienie i analiza kształtowania się pojęcia woli w starożytnej filozofii pogańskiej. W kontekście poglądów Sokratesa, Platona i Arystotelesa autor przedstawia wiele greckich intuicji dotyczących psychologii aktów moralnych i ludzkiego działania. Po pierwsze artykuł przedstawia doktrynę intelektualizmu etycznego, przypisywaną Sokratesowi, według której kognitywne elementy są głównym motywem naszych działań. Z tego powodu trudno znaleźć pojęcie wolnej woli w sokratejskiej antropologii. Po drugie artykuł prezentuje interpretację platońskiej antropologii, według której sferę thymos można nazwać proto-wolą. Ostatecznie autor ukazuje, jak trudno (...)
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  44. Socrates.George Rudebusch - 2009 - Oxford, UK: Wiley-Blackwell.
    _Socrates_ presents a compelling case for some life-changing conclusions that follow from a close reading of Socrates' arguments. Offers a highly original study of Socrates and his thought, accessible to contemporary readers Argues that through studying Socrates we can learn practical wisdom to apply to our lives Lovingly crafted with humour, thought-experiments and literary references, and with close reading sof key Socratic arguments Aids readers with diagrams to make clear complex arguments.
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  45. Plato. By Hall Frye. [REVIEW]M. D. - 1938 - Journal of Philosophy 35 (14):387-387.
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  46. H.-G. Gadamer, Idea dobra w dyskusji między Platonem a Arystotelesem, przełożył Zbigniew Nerczuk, Wydawnictwo Antyk, Kęty 2002, s. 143 (H.-G. Gadamer, Die Idee des guten zwischen Platon und Aristoteles).Zbigniew Nerczuk (ed.) - 2002 - Kęty: Wydawnictwo Antyk.
    Jest to wybór z pracy Gadamera "Idea dobra..." Zawiera Przedmowę, Zakres problemu, Rozdział I (Sokratejska wiedza i niewiedza) oraz Posłowie tłumacza. This is the opening part of the Polish translation of Gadamers' The idea of the good... with the Translator's afterword.
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  47. Mowa Gorgiasza w Platońskim dialogu „Gorgiasz” (456A1-457C3) (Gorgias' speech in Plato's dialogue "Gorgias" (456A1-457C3)).Zbigniew Nerczuk - 2014 - Studia Antyczne I Mediewistyczne 2014 12 (2014):3-12.
    This is the translation and interpretation of the Gorgias' speech from Plato's dialogue Gorgias (456A1-457C3). In the commentary it is argued that the Gorgias' speech in the dialogue is based on the philosophical and rhetorical motives which can be found both in Gorgias' epideictic speeches ("Helen" and "Palamedes") and doxographical accounts.
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  48. 13. Plato’s Comparison of Just and Unjust Lives.Richard Kraut - 2011 - In Otfried Höffe (ed.), Platon: Politeia. Akademie Verlag. pp. 209-224.
  49. Plato or Justice.Edward Calvin Golumbic - 1961
  50. The Aesthetic Element in Morality. [REVIEW]Rudolf Eucken - 1892 - Ancient Philosophy (Misc) 3:650.
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