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  1. added 2018-12-21
    Arystotelesowskie Ujęcie Homonimii.Mikołaj Domaradzki - 2016 - Diametros 50:1-24.
    The purpose of the paper is to discuss Aristotle’s account of homonymy. The major thesis advocated here is that Aristotle considers both entities and words to be homonymous, depending on the object of his criticism. Thus, when he takes issue with Plato, he tends to view homonymy more ontologically, upon which it is entities that become homonymous. When, on the other hand, he gainsays the exegetes or the sophists, he is inclined to perceive homonymy more semantically, upon which it is (...)
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  2. added 2018-12-16
    Das Prinzip des performativen Widerspruchs. Zur epistemologischen Bedeutung der Dialogform in Platons "Euthydemos".Gregor Damschen - 1999 - Méthexis 12:89–101.
    The principle of performative contradiction. On the epistemological significance of the dialogue form in Plato's "Euthydemus". - In this study, an analysis of the section 285d-288a of Plato's "Euthydemus" shall show two things: (1) The sophistic model of a world in which there is no contradiction, in which every linguistic utterance is true and every action correct, has no semantic inconsistencies, but can only be rejected with the help of the principle of performative contradictions. (2) It is precisely these performative (...)
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  3. added 2018-09-23
    The Importance of Being Erroneous.Nils Kürbis - forthcoming - Australasian Philosophical Review 2 (3).
    This is a commentary on MM McCabe's "First Chop your logos... Socrates and the sophists on language, logic, and development". In her paper MM analyses Plato's Euthydemos, in which Plato tackles the problem of falsity in a way that takes into account the speaker and complements the Sophist's discussion of what is said. The dialogue looks as if it is merely a demonstration of the silly consequences of eristic combat. And so it is. But a main point of MM's paper (...)
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  4. added 2017-10-06
    Euthydemos. Plato - unknown
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  5. added 2017-10-06
    “Trialogical“ Duals In Plato's Euthydemus: Dramatic Influence on Plato's Illusion of the Dialogue.Wolfgang Polleichtner - 2011 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 14 (1):34-56.
  6. added 2017-10-06
    The Euthydemus of Plato. By E. H. Gifford, D.D. Oxford: Clarendon Press. 1905. Pp. Viii + 184. 3s. 6d. [REVIEW]H. Richards - 1905 - The Classical Review 19 (05):277-.
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  7. added 2017-08-01
    Platonic Know‐How and Successful Action.Tamer Nawar - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (4):944-962.
    In Plato's Euthydemus, Socrates claims that the possession of epistēmē suffices for practical success. Several recent treatments suggest that we may make sense of this claim and render it plausible by drawing a distinction between so-called “outcome-success” and “internal-success” and supposing that epistēmē only guarantees internal-success. In this paper, I raise several objections to such treatments and suggest that the relevant cognitive state should be construed along less than purely intellectual lines: as a cognitive state constituted at least in part (...)
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  8. added 2017-02-10
    Wisdom and Happiness in Euthydemus 278–282.Russell E. Jones - 2013 - Philosophers' Imprint 13.
    Plato’s Socrates is often thought to hold that wisdom or virtue is sufficient for happiness, and Euthydemus 278-282 is often taken to be the locus classicus for this sufficiency thesis in Plato’s dialogues. But this view is misguided: Not only does Socrates here fail to argue for, assert, or even implicitly assume the sufficiency thesis, but the thesis turns out to be hard to square with the argument he does give. I argue for an interpretation of the passage that explains (...)
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  9. added 2017-01-29
    Plato's "Euthydemus:" Analysis of What Is and Is Not Philosophy by Thomas H. Chance. [REVIEW]Stephen Stertz - 1995 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 88:224-224.
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  10. added 2017-01-29
    Plato's Euthydemus and Lysias.L. Arnold Post - 1926 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 20:29-31.
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  11. added 2017-01-29
    The Euthydemus.J. B. Edwards - 1917 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 11:217-221.
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  12. added 2017-01-28
    Plato's Euthydemus Analysis of What is and is Not Philosophy.Thomas H. Chance - 1992 - University of California Press.
    With _Plato's Euthydemus_, Thomas Chance solves a longstanding riddle of Platonic studies. Thought to be an early, immature work, the _Euthydemus_ has come across to scholars as lacking Plato's characteristic greatness. This apparent lack, Chance argues, is not a failure of the text but of scholarly perception. He advances a single thesis: that Plato deliberately presents _eristic_—contentious debate—as the antithesis to his own philosophical method. Once this thesis is accepted, the "hidden" purpose of the _Euthydemus_ becomes manifest: Plato has used (...)
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  13. added 2017-01-28
    Forms in Plato's 'Euthydemus'.Richard Mohr - 1984 - Hermes 112 (3):296-300.
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  14. added 2017-01-28
    On the Euthydemus.Leo Strauss - 1970 - Interpretation 1 (1):1-20.
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  15. added 2017-01-28
    Euthydemus.Rosamond Kent Plato & Sprague - 1965 - Bobbs-Merrill.
    "This is the best translation available of a lively and challenging dialogue, which sets before the reader profound questions about the use and misuse of reason." --Myles Burnyeat, University of Cambridge.
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  16. added 2017-01-27
    Silencing the Sophists: The Drama of Plato's Euthydemus'.Mary Margaret McCabe - 1998 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 14:139-68.
  17. added 2017-01-27
    Euthydemus. [REVIEW]J. W. R. - 1966 - Review of Metaphysics 20 (1):157-157.
  18. added 2017-01-26
    Plato. Euthydemus.E. H. Gifford - 1905 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 25:189.
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  19. added 2017-01-25
    ""Plato's" Euthydemus" and a Platonist Education Program.H. Tarrant - 2003 - Dionysius 21:7-22.
  20. added 2017-01-23
    Socrates' Philosophical Protreptic in Euthydemus 278c–282d.Benjamin A. Rider - 2012 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 94 (2):208-228.
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  21. added 2017-01-23
    Plato's "Euthydemus": Analysis of What Is and Is Not Philosophy.Rosamond Kent Sprague - 1994 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 32 (1):127-128.
  22. added 2017-01-20
    Euthydemus. Plato - 1965 - Kessinger Publishing.
    We contrived at last, somehow or other, to agree in a general conclusion, that he who had wisdom had no need of fortune.
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  23. added 2017-01-15
    How Do Dialecticians Use Diagrams? - Plato, Euthydemus 190b-C.R. S. W. Hawtrey - 1978 - Apeiron 12 (2):14.
  24. added 2016-12-08
    Plato: Euthydemus. Trans, with Introd. By Rosamond Kent Sprague.M. Joseph Costelloe - 1969 - Modern Schoolman 46 (2):179-180.
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  25. added 2015-04-21
    Socrates and the Sophists: Plato's Protagoras, Euthydemus, Hippias Major and Cratylus. Plato - 2010 - Focus Publishing/ R. Pullins Co..
    This is an English translation of four of Plato’s dialogue (Protagoras, Euthydemus, Hippias Major, and Cratylus) that explores the topic of sophistry and philosophy, a key concept at the source of Western thought. Includes notes and an introductory essay. Focus Philosophical Library translations are close to and are non-interpretative of the original text, with the notes and a glossary intending to provide the reader with some sense of the terms and the concepts as they were understood by Plato’s immediate audience.
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  26. added 2015-04-17
    The Craft of Ruling in Plato's Euthydemus and Republic.Richard Parry - 2003 - Phronesis 48 (1):1 - 28.
    We will investigate the relation between the notion of the craft of ruling in the "Euthydemus" and in the "Republic". In the "Euthydemus", Socrates' search for an account of wisdom leads to his identifying it as the craft of ruling in the city. In the "Republic", the craft of ruling in the city is the virtue of wisdom in the city and the analogue of wisdom in the soul. Still, the craft of ruling leads to aporia in the former dialogue (...)
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  27. added 2015-04-08
    Commentary on Plato's Euthydemus.Richard McKirahan - 1987 - Ancient Philosophy 7:229-232.
  28. added 2015-04-07
    Escaping One's Own Notice Knowing: Meno's Paradox Again.Mary Margaret McCabe - 2009 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 109 (1pt3):233 - 256.
    The complex way Meno's paradox is presented in the Meno forces reflection on both the external conditions on inquiry—its objects—and its internal conditions—the state of mind of the person who inquires. The theory of recollection does not fully account for the internal conditions—as Plato makes clear in the critique of Meno's puzzle to be found in the Euthydemus. I conclude that in the Euthydemus Plato is inviting us to reject the externalist account of knowledge urged on Socrates by the sophists (...)
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  29. added 2015-04-05
    « Developing The Good Itself By Itself: Critical Strategies In Plato’s Euthydemus ».Mary Mccabe - 2002 - Plato: The Internet Journal of the International Plato Society 2.
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  30. added 2015-04-04
    Philosophy Statesmanship, and Pragmatism in Plato's Euthydemus.Tucker Landy - 1998 - Interpretation 25 (2):181-200.
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  31. added 2015-04-04
    The Serious Play of Plato's Euthydemus.David Roochnik - 1991 - Interpretation 18 (2):211-232.
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  32. added 2015-04-04
    More of the Budé Plato Platon: Œuvres Complètes. Tome V, 1re Partie: Ion, Ménexène, Euthydème. 2e Partie: Cratyle. Texte Établi Et Traduit Par L. Méridier. Pp. 199 + 138 (but Largely Double Paging). Paris: 'Les Belles Lettres,' 1931.1 Paper, Pt. I: 30 Francs; Pt. II: 22 Francs. [REVIEW]W. L. Lorimer - 1934 - The Classical Review 48 (01):19-21.
  33. added 2015-04-01
    Thomas H. Chance: Plato's Euthydemus: Analysis of What Is and Is Not Philosophy. Pp. Xi+282. Berkeley, Los Angeles, Oxford: University of California Press, 1992. Cased, $40. [REVIEW]Christopher Kirwan - 1994 - The Classical Review 44 (02):400-.
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  34. added 2015-03-31
    Edgar Salin: Platon, Euthyphron, Laches, Charmides, Lysis, übertragen und eingeleitet. (Sammlung Klosterberg, Europäische Reihe.) Pp. 179. Basel: Schwabe, 1950. Boards, 4.75 Sw. frs. [REVIEW]G. B. Kerferd - 1952 - The Classical Review 2 (3-4):226-227.
  35. added 2015-03-29
    Sophists, Names and Democracy.Jakub Jirsa - 2012 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 12 (2):125-138.
    The article argues that the Euthydemus shows the essential connection between sophistry, right usage of language, and politics. It shows how the sophistic use of language correlates with the manners of politics which Plato associates with the sophists. First, it proceeds by showing the explicit criticism of both brothers, for they seem unable to fulfill the task given to them. Second, several times in the dialogue Socrates criticizes the sophists’ use of language, since it is totally inappropriate to fulfill the (...)
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  36. added 2015-03-29
    Socrates' Iolaos: Myth and Eristic in Plato's Euthydemus.Robin Jackson - 1990 - Classical Quarterly 40 (02):378-.
    The Euthydemus presents a brilliantly comic contrast between Socratic and sophistic argument. Socrates' encounter with the sophistic brothers Euthydemus and Dionysodorus exposes the hollowness of their claim to teach virtue, unmasking it as a predilection for verbal pugilism and the peddling of paradox. The dialogue's humour is pointed, for the brothers' fallacies are often reminiscent of substantial dilemmas explored seriously elsewhere in Plato, and the farce of their manipulation is in sharp contrast to the sobriety with which Socrates pursues his (...)
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  37. added 2015-03-27
    The Euthydemus.R. S. W. Hawtrey - 1988 - The Classical Review 38 (02):221-.
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  38. added 2015-03-27
    Commentary on Plato's Euthydemus.R. S. W. Hawtrey - 1981 - American Philosophical Society.
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  39. added 2015-03-27
    How Do Dialecticians Use Diagrams? -Plato, "Euthydemus" 290b-C.R. S. W. Hawtrey - 1978 - Apeiron 12 (2):14 - 18.
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  40. added 2015-03-15
    L'intrigue Philosophique: Essai Sur l'Euthydème de Platon.Robert F. Dobbin - 1994 - Ancient Philosophy 14 (1):162-164.
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  41. added 2015-03-14
    Happiness in the Euthydemus.Panos Dimas - 2002 - Phronesis 47 (1):1-27.
    Departing on a demonstration which aims to show to young Cleinias how one ought to care about wisdom and virtue, Socrates asks at 278e2 whether people want to do well (εὐ πράττειν). Εὐ πράττειν is ambiguous. It can mean being happy and prospering, or doing what is right and doing it well. Socrates will later exploit this ambiguity, but at this point he uses this expression merely to announce his conviction that every human being (pathological cases aside, perhaps) desires to (...)
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  42. added 2015-03-12
    Rosamond Kent Sprague: Plato: Euthydemus Translated. Pp. Xv+70. New York: Bobbs-Merrill Co., 1965. Paper, $1.25.I. M. Crombie - 1968 - The Classical Review 18 (02):236-.
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  43. added 2015-03-12
    Plato and Fallacy Rosamond Kent Sprague: Plato's Use of Fallacy. A Study of the Euthydemus and Some Other Dialogues. Pp. Xv+106. London: Routledge, 1962. Cloth, 18s. Net. [REVIEW]I. M. Crombie - 1963 - The Classical Review 13 (03):284-285.
  44. added 2015-03-05
    The Loeb Plato, IV Plato, with an English Translation, Vol. IV., Laches, Protagoras, Meno, Euthydemus. By W. R. M. Lamb. (Loeb Classical Library.) London: Heinemann; New York: Putnam, 1924. Cloth, 10s. Net. [REVIEW]John Burnet - 1925 - The Classical Review 39 (5-6):127-.
  45. added 2015-03-03
    Examining the Role and Function of Socrates' Narrative Audience in Plato's Euthydemus.Anne-Marie Bowery - 2008 - Southwest Philosophy Review 24 (1):163-172.
  46. added 2015-02-23
    Anne Marie Bowery's “Examining the Role and Function of Socrates' Narrative Audience in Plato's Euthydemus”.Randall E. Auxier - 2008 - Southwest Philosophy Review 24 (2):25-28.