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  1. Platos' Conception of Unhappiness in the Gorgias.Y. Kurihara - unknown - Skepsis: A Journal for Philosophy and Interdisciplinary Research 13.
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  2. Commentary on "A Man of No Substance: The Philosopher in Plato's Gorgias," by S. Montgomery Ewegen.Joseph M. Forte - forthcoming - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy.
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  3. Socrates’s Great Speech: The Defense of Philosophy in Plato’s Gorgias.Tushar Irani - forthcoming - Journal of the History of Philosophy.
    This paper focuses on a neglected portion of Plato’s Gorgias from 506c to 513d during Socrates’s discussion with Callicles. I claim that Callicles adopts the view that virtue lies in self-preservation in this part of the dialogue. Such a position allows him to assert the value of rhetoric in civic life by appealing not to the goodness of acting unjustly with impunity, but to the badness of suffering unjustly without remedy. On this view, the benefits of the life of rhetoric (...)
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  4. Psychological Dimensions of Elenchus in the Gorgias.Richard D. Parry - forthcoming - Archai: Revista de Estudos Sobre as Origens Do Pensamento Ocidental.
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  5. The Common Origins of Philosophical and Political Power in Plato's Gorgias.Lydia Winn - 2021 - Plato Journal 21:7-19.
    Plato’s Gorgias concerns the tension between political and philosophical power. In it, Socrates and Gorgias discuss rhetoric’s power, which Gorgias claims is universal, containing all powers, enabling the rhetorician to rule over others politically. Polus and Callicles develop Gorgias’s understanding of rhetoric’s universal power. Scholars addressing power’s central focus rightly distinguish Socrates’ notion of philosophical power from Gorgias’s. However, these authors make this distinction too severe, overlooking the kinship between philosophy and politics. This paper argues that Socrates’ notion of power (...)
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  6. Between Rhetoric and Sophistry: The Puzzling Case of Plato’s Gorgias.Jacqueline Tusi - 2020 - Apeiron 53 (1):59-80.
    The case of Gorgias’ profession has been an object of ongoing dispute among scholars. This is mainly because in some dialogues Plato calls Gorgias a rhetorician, in others a sophist. The purpose of this article is to show that a solution only emerges in the Gorgias, where Plato presents Gorgias’ goals as a rhetorician and its associated arts. On this basis, Plato introduces a systematic division between genuine arts and fake arts, including rhetoric and sophistry, thereby identifying their conceptual differences (...)
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  7. Plato on the Value of Philosophy: The Art of Argument in the Gorgias and Phaedrus.Tushar Irani - 2017 - Cambridge University Press.
    Plato was the first philosopher in the Western tradition to reflect systematically on rhetoric. In this book, Tushar Irani presents a comprehensive and innovative reading of the Gorgias and the Phaedrus, the only two Platonic dialogues to focus on what an art of argument should look like, treating each of the texts individually, yet ultimately demonstrating how each can best be understood in light of the other. For Plato, the way in which we approach argument typically reveals something about our (...)
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  8. Can a Daoist Sage Have Close Relationships with Other Human Beings?Joanna Iwanowska - 2017 - Diametros 52:23-46.
    This paper explores the compatibility between the Daoist art of emptying one’s heart-mind and the art of creating close relationships. The fact that a Daoist sage is characterized by an empty heart-mind makes him somewhat different from an average human being: since a full heart-mind is characteristic of the human condition, the sage transcends what makes us human. This could alienate him from others and make him incapable of developing close relationships. The research goal of this paper is to investigate (...)
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  9. The Refutation of Polus in Plato’s Gorgias Revisited.Georgia Sermamoglou-Soulmaidi - 2017 - Apeiron 50 (3):277-310.
    Journal Name: Apeiron Issue: Ahead of print.
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  10. Seeming and Being in the "Cosmetics" of Sophistry: The Infamous Analogy of Plato's Gorgias. Reames - 2016 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 49 (1):74-97.
    Only all the effete latecomers, with their overly clever wit, believe that they can be done with the historical power of seeming by explaining it as “subjective,” where the essence of this “subjectivity” is something extremely dubious.The Gorgias dialogue is widely recognized as the source of Plato’s harshest condemnation of rhetoric. In it, he ultimately concludes that rhetoric is not “a technē but a knack, because it can give no rational explanation of the thing it is catering for, nor of (...)
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  11. Shame in the Gorgias. C.H. Tarnopolsky Prudes, Perverts, and Tyrants. Plato's Gorgias and the Politics of Shame. Pp. XVI + 218. Princeton and Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2010. Paper, £16.95, Us$24.95 . Isbn: 978-0-691-16342-0. [REVIEW]Olivier Renaut - 2016 - The Classical Review 66 (1):55-57.
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  12. Who Is Plato’s Callicles and What Does He Teach?Francisco Bravo - 2015 - In Gabriele Cornelli (ed.), Plato's Styles and Characters: Between Literature and Philosophy. De Gruyter. pp. 317-334.
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  13. Platón: Gorgias.Javier Echenique - 2015 - Santiago, Región Metropolitana, Chile: Editorial Universitaria.
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  14. Psychological Dimensions of Elenchus in the Gorgias.Richard D. Parry - 2015 - Archai: Revista de Estudos Sobre as Origens Do Pensamento Ocidental 14:65-76.
    In this article, I argue that, in showing inconsistency of beliefs, Socratic elenchus is showing incompatibility of the desires those beliefs express. This thesis explains Socrates’ claim that, in refuting Callicles, he is also restraining his desires. The beliefs in question are about the best kind of life to lead; such beliefs express the second order desire to lead a life in which certain sorts of first order desires are satisfied. Socrates’ elenchus shows that Callicles is caught between two incompatible (...)
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  15. A Textual Note to Plato, Gorgias 465a4.Marco Romani Mistretta - 2015 - Classical Quarterly 65 (2):882-884.
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  16. Boethius’s Consolatio and Plato’s Gorgias.John Magee - 2014 - In Andreas Kirchner, Thomas Jürgasch & Thomas Böhm (eds.), Boethius as a Paradigm of Late Ancient Thought. De Gruyter. pp. 13-30.
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  17. The Image of the Jars in Plato’s Gorgias.Brooks Sommerville - 2014 - Ancient Philosophy 34 (2):235-254.
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  18. Corpses, Self-Defense, and Immortality: Callicles’ Fear of Death in the Gorgias.Emily A. Austin - 2013 - Ancient Philosophy 33 (1):33-52.
  19. Rhetoric at the Heart of Socratic Cross-Examination: The Game of Emotions in Gorgias.Catherine Collobert - 2013 - Phronesis-a Journal for Ancient Philosophy 58 (2):107 - 138.
  20. 5 Gadamer and the Game of Dialectic in Plato's Gorgias.Barry Dixon - 2013 - In Emily Ryall (ed.), The Philosophy of Play. Routledge. pp. 64.
  21. Peri Ti?: Interrogating Rhetoric's Domain.Megan Foley - 2013 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 46 (2):241-246.
    You, who call yourself a rhetorician, what is your art? With what particular thing is your skill concerned? Weaving is concerned with fabricating fabrics, music with making melodies; rhetorician, with what is your know-how concerned? This is the question that Socrates poses to Gorgias in Plato's notorious refutation of rhetoric: "Peri tēs rhētorikēs, peri ti tōn ontōn estin epistēmē?" (1925, 268). Socrates' question frames rhetoric in the genitive case—which, in this case, specifies the source or origin of one thing from (...)
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  22. Socrates Vs. Callicles: Examination & Ridicule in Plato’s Gorgias.David Levy - 2013 - Plato Journal 13:27-36.
    The Callicles colloquy of Plato’s Gorgias features both examination and ridicule. Insofar as Socrates’ examination of Callicles proceeds via the elenchus, the presence of ridicule requires explanation. This essay seeks to provide that explanation by placing the effort to ridicule within the effort to examine; that is, the judgment/pronouncement that something/ someone is worthy of ridicule is a proper part of the elenchic examination. Standard accounts of the Socratic elenchus do not include this component. Hence, the argument of this essay (...)
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  23. Amusing Gorgias: Why Does the Encomium of Helen End as It Does?Stephen Makin - 2013 - Ancient Philosophy 33 (2):291-305.
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  24. Prudes, Perverts, and Tyrants. Plato’s Gorgias and the Politics of Shame. By Christina H. Tarnopolsky. [REVIEW]Christopher Moore - 2013 - Ancient Philosophy 33 (1):202-209.
  25. Whip Scars on the Naked Soul: Myth and Elenchos in Plato's Gorgias.Radcliffe G. Edmonds - 2012 - In Catherine Collobert, Pierre Destrée & Francisco J. Gonzalez (eds.), Plato and Myth: Studies on the Use and Status of Platonic Myths. Brill.
  26. Il Vero Nel Mito: Teoria Esegetica Nel Commento di Olimpiodoro Alessandrino Al "Gorgia".Elena Gritti - 2012 - Aracne.
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  27. Christina H. Tarnopolsky , Prudes, Perverts, and Tyrants: Plato's Gorgias and the Politics of Shame . Reviewed By.Wendy C. Hamblet - 2012 - Philosophy in Review 32 (2):145-148.
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  28. Colloquium 5: Attempting the Political Art.Christopher Long - 2012 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 27 (1):153-182.
    The main thesis of this essay is that the practice of Socratic political speaking and the practice of Platonic political writing are intimately interconnected but distinct. The essay focuses on the famous passage from the Gorgias in which Socrates claims to be one of the few Athenians who attempt the political art truly and goes on to articulate the nature of his political practice as a way of speaking toward the best (521d6-e2). It then traces the ways Socrates attempts to (...)
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  29. Tragic Pathos: Pity and Fear in Greek Philosophy and Tragedy.Dana LaCourse Munteanu - 2012 - Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction; Part I. Theoretical Views about Pity and Fear as Aesthetic Emotions: 1. Drama and the emotions: an Indo-European connection? 2. Gorgias: a strange trio, the poetic emotions; 3. Plato: from reality to tragedy and back; 4. Aristotle: the first 'theorist' of the aesthetic emotions; Part II. Pity and Fear within Tragedies: 5. An introduction; 6. Aeschylus: Persians; 7. Prometheus Bound; 8. Sophocles: Ajax; 9. Euripides: Orestes; Appendix: catharsis and the emotions in the definition of tragedy (...)
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  30. Sappho and Socrates: The Nature of Rhetoric.Rachel Parish - 2012 - Kairos: A Journal of Rhetoric, Technology, and Pedagogy 17 (1):n1.
  31. Friendship and War: True Political Art as the Alliance of Philosophy and Rhetoric in Plato’s Gorgias.Nicolás Parra - 2012 - Ideas Y Valores 61 (149):59-83.
    The paper explores the relation between philosophy and rhetoric from a new perspective by highlighting the dramatic nature of the dialogue and paying attention not only to what is said about philosophy and rhetoric but also to what is shown, especially through Gorgias' intervention throughout the dialogue in order to save a community of dialogue that inquires into the good and the just. This re-conception of the relation between philosophy and rhetoric implies a re-conception of the practice of politics itself, (...)
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  32. The Status of the Myth of the Gorgias, Or: Taking Plato Seriously.Christopher Rowe - 2012 - In Catherine Collobert, Pierre Destrée & Francisco J. Gonzalez (eds.), Plato and Myth: Studies on the Use and Status of Platonic Myths. Brill.
  33. Challenging the Established Order: Socrates’ Perversion of Callicles’ Position in Plato’s Gorgias.Eric C. Sanday - 2012 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 16 (2):197-216.
    In this article I argue that Socrates sees one important truth in the position Callicles represents in the Gorgias: it is necessary in the case of extreme philosophical provocation to be able to overthrow completely the received order and to maintain oneself in the face of unimagined possibility. Without this faith in the power of wisdom to overturn and destroy received wisdom, philosophy would not be able to shepherd the good into the world in Socratic fashion. Interpreters are generally correct (...)
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  34. Distinguindo Persuasão E Retórica No Górgias de Platão.Claudiano dos Santos - 2012 - Hypnos. Revista Do Centro de Estudos da Antiguidade 28:165-169.
    A filosofia se desenvolveu durante uma época na qual a habilidade de persuadir era considerada fundamental para quem quisesse ter sucesso na pólis - daí o prestígio da Retórica entre os atenienses. Platão, porém, no diálogo Górgias critica essa atividade. Mas ao criticá-la não condena a persuasão, elemento fundamental para o ensino.
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  35. Zur Funktion des Personenwechsels im Gorgias.Erwin Sonderegger - 2012 - Museum Helveticum 69 (2):129-139.
    Discussions about the content of Plato’s Gorgias mostly follow the structure of this dialogue given by the change of the interlocutors. As plain as this change is, as little does it correspond with the development of the subject. This becomes obvious if we compare the division of the dialogue by the interlocutors with the division of the leading questions. New themes do not start with a new person, but only in the course of the conversation with Gorgias, Polos, and Callicles (...)
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  36. Plato's Political Philosophy. By Mark Blitz. Pp. Vii, 326, The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2010, $60.00/24.95; £31.50/13.00. Prudes, Perverts, and Tyrants: Plato's Gorgias and the Politics of Shame. By Christina H. Tarnopolsky. Pp. Xiii, 218, Princeto. [REVIEW]Robin Waterfield - 2012 - Heythrop Journal 53 (3):510-511.
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  37. A Catholic Reading of the Gorgias of Plato.J. V. Schall - 2011 - Télos 2011 (157):6-19.
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  38. Gorgias Ioli Gorgia di Leontini. Su Ciò Che Non È. Pp. 205. Hildesheim, Zurich and New York: Georg Olms, 2010. Paper, €37.80. ISBN: 978-3-487-14308-8. [REVIEW]Edward Schiappa & Matthew Briel - 2011 - The Classical Review 61 (1):44-46.
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  39. Encomium Gorgiae Ou Górgias Versus Parmênides.Peter Simpson - 2011 - Hypnos. Revista Do Centro de Estudos da Antiguidade 26:1-12.
    O tratado de Górgias sobre o nada é dividido por meio da prova de três teses diferentes: 1) que o nada é ou existe; 2) que mesmo que haja algo, não pode ser conhecido; 3) que mesmo que pudesse ser conhecido, não poderia ser comunicado a outrem. Estas teses são tão opostas a Parmênides quanto qualquer tese poderia sê-lo. O tratado de Górgias é uma proeza da polêmica antiparmenidiana. Sua dialética também é uma façanha ao reduzir algo ao absurdo, porque (...)
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  40. Gorgias' Defense: Plato and His Opponents on Rhetoric and the Good.Rachel Barney - 2010 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 48 (1):95-121.
    This paper explores in detail Gorgias' defense of rhetoric in Plato 's Gorgias, noting its connections to earlier and later texts such as Aristophanes' Clouds, Gorgias' Helen, Isocrates' Nicocles and Antidosis, and Aristotle's Rhetoric. The defense as Plato presents it is transparently inadequate; it reveals a deep inconsistency in Gorgias' conception of rhetoric and functions as a satirical precursor to his refutation by Socrates. Yet Gorgias' defense is appropriated, in a streamlined form, by later defenders of rhetoric such as Isocrates (...)
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  41. Gorgias en el Banquete de Platón: ecos del Encomio de Helena en el discurso de Agatón.Esteban Enrique Bieda - 2010 - Elenchos: Rivista di Studi Sul Pensiero Antico 31 (2):213-241.
    After Agathon’s speech in Plato’s Symposium, Socrates takes a little time to make some comments about it. One of these comments is that the speech brought Gorgias to his memory . In this article we intend to track down in three complementary levels the diverse reasons why this recollection took place: regarding the form of the speech, we will try to show that there is an equivalence in how both Gorgias in his Encomium to Helen and the character of Agathon (...)
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  42. Weakening or Strengthening?: A Case of Enantiosemy in Plato's Gorgias$.Claudia Caffi - 2010 - In Gunther Kaltenböck, Wiltrud Mihatsch & Stefan Schneider (eds.), New Approaches to Hedging. Emerald. pp. 9--181.
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  43. Socrates and Gorgias.James Doyle - 2010 - Phronesis 55 (1):1-25.
    In this paper I try to solve some problems concerning the interpretation of Socrates' conversation with Gorgias about the nature of rhetoric in Plato's Gorgias (448e6-461b2). I begin by clarifying what, ethically, is at stake in the conversation (section 2). In the main body of the paper (sections 3-6) I address the question of what we are to understand Gorgias as believing about the nature of rhetoric: I criticise accounts given by Charles Kahn and John Cooper, and suggest an alternative (...)
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  44. “Diagnostic Hedonism” and the Role of Incommensurability in Plato’s Protagoras.Tea Logar - 2010 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 10 (3):241-257.
    The dispute over Socrates’ apparent endorsement of hedonism in the Protagoras has persisted for ages among scholars and students of Plato’s work. The solution to the query concerning the seriousness and sincerity of Socrates’ argument from hedonism established in the dialogue is of considerable importance for the interpretation of Plato’s overall moral theory, considering how blatantly irreconcilable the defense of this doctrine is with Plato’s other early dialogues. In his earlier works, Socrates puts supreme importance on virtue and perfection of (...)
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  45. Chapter One. Shame and Rhetoric in Plato’s Gorgias.Christina H. Tarnopolsky - 2010 - In Prudes, Perverts, and Tyrants: Plato's Gorgias and the Politics of Shame. Princeton University Press. pp. 29-55.
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  46. Chapter Two. Shaming Gorgias, Polus, and Callicles.Christina H. Tarnopolsky - 2010 - In Prudes, Perverts, and Tyrants: Plato's Gorgias and the Politics of Shame. Princeton University Press. pp. 56-88.
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  47. Starosť O seba V platónovom dialógu gorgias.Ulrich Wollner - 2010 - Filozofia 65 (3).
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  48. The Care of the Self in Plato's Gorgias.Ulrich Wollner - 2010 - Filozofia 65 (3):227-238.
    The paper offers an analysis of Plato’s conception of the care of the self in his Gorgias. There are two components of the self-care: self-knowledge and self-control. The first part deals with self-knowledge. The second part asks the question, wether there can be a fixed model of the individual soul’s order. The third part of the paper deals with Plato’s conception of self-control. The last part is concerned with the problem of a self-control training.
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  49. Socrates and the Fat Rabbis.Daniel Boyarin - 2009 - University of Chicago Press.
    What kind of literature is the Talmud? To answer this question, Daniel Boyarin looks to an unlikely source: the dialogues of Plato. In these ancient texts he finds similarities, both in their combination of various genres and topics and in their dialogic structure. But Boyarin goes beyond these structural similarities, arguing also for a cultural relationship. In _Socrates and the Fat Rabbis_, Boyarin suggests that both the Platonic and the talmudic dialogues are not dialogic at all. Using Michael Bakhtin’s notion (...)
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  50. Shame as a Tool for Persuasion in Plato's Gorgias: Plato.Gorgias.D. B. Futter - 2009 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (3):451-461.
    In gorgias, socrates stands accused of argumentative "foul play" involving manipulation by shame. Polus says that Socrates wins the fight with Gorgias by shaming him into the admission that "a rhetorician knows what is right . . . and would teach this to his pupils" . And later, when Polus himself has been "tied up" and "muzzled" , Callicles says that he was refuted only because he was ashamed to reveal his true convictions . These allegations, if justified, directly undermine (...)
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