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  1. added 2020-04-18
    ""Philosophical Training Grounds: Socratic Sophistry and Platonic Perfection in" Symposium" and" Gorgias".Joshua Landy - 2007 - Arion 15 (1):63-122.
    Plato’s character Socrates is clearly a sophisticated logician. Why then does he fall, at times, into the most elementary fallacies? It is, I propose, because the end goal for Plato is not the mere acquisition of superior understanding but instead a well-lived life, a life lived in harmony with oneself. For such an end, accurate opinions are necessary but not sufficient: what we crucially need is a method, a procedure for ridding ourselves of those opinions that are false. Now learning (...)
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  2. added 2019-10-13
    T. Irwin, Plato: Gorgias. [REVIEW]Christopher Rowe - 1982 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 102:249.
    The Gorgias is a vivid introduction to the central problems of moral and political philosophy. In the notes to his translation, Professor Irwin discusses the historical and social context of the dialogue, expounds and criticises the arguments, and tries above all to suggest the questions a modern reader ought to raise about Plato's doctrines. No knowledge of Greek is necessary.
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  3. added 2019-06-06
    Challenging the Established Order: Socrates’ Perversion of Callicles’ Position in Plato’s Gorgias.Eric C. Sanday - 2012 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 16 (2):197-216.
    In this article I argue that Socrates sees one important truth in the position Callicles represents in the Gorgias: it is necessary in the case of extreme philosophical provocation to be able to overthrow completely the received order and to maintain oneself in the face of unimagined possibility. Without this faith in the power of wisdom to overturn and destroy received wisdom, philosophy would not be able to shepherd the good into the world in Socratic fashion. Interpreters are generally correct (...)
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  4. added 2019-06-06
    Shame as a Tool for Persuasion in Plato's Gorgias: Plato.Gorgias.D. B. Futter - 2009 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (3):451-461.
    In gorgias, socrates stands accused of argumentative "foul play" involving manipulation by shame. Polus says that Socrates wins the fight with Gorgias by shaming him into the admission that "a rhetorician knows what is right . . . and would teach this to his pupils" . And later, when Polus himself has been "tied up" and "muzzled" , Callicles says that he was refuted only because he was ashamed to reveal his true convictions . These allegations, if justified, directly undermine (...)
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  5. added 2019-06-06
    Socratic Rhetoric in the Gorgias.Gabriela Roxana Carone - 2005 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 35 (2):221-241.
    Given that it seems uncontroversial that Socrates displays considerable contempt towards rhetoric in the Gorgias, the title of this paper might strike one as an oxymoron. Indeed, a reading of the text has more than once encouraged scholars to posit an opposition between the elenctic procedures championed by Socrates and the rhetorical procedures of his interlocutors. At least three features have been highlighted that seem to indicate this contrast.
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  6. added 2019-06-06
    Further Questioning Irrational Desires in Plato’s Gorglas.Noel Boyle - 2004 - Southwest Philosophy Review 20 (2):139-145.
  7. added 2019-06-06
    Olympiodorus. Commentary on Plato’s Gorgias. [REVIEW]H. S. Schibli - 2001 - Ancient Philosophy 21 (2):514-517.
  8. added 2019-06-06
    Questioning Irrational Desires in Plato’s Gorglas.James Butler - 1998 - Southwest Philosophy Review 14 (1):169-178.
  9. added 2019-06-06
    Callicles’ Examples of Ϙὄπρζ Σ Ζ Ιὔωηθζ in Plato’s Gorgias.Alessandra Fussi - 1996 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 19 (1):119-149.
    The Gorgias has been delivered to us in medieval manuscripts with the subtitle ἢ περὶ ‘ρητορικῆσ. As a matter of fact, the starting point of the dialogue is the question concerning the nature of rhetoric. In the course of the dialogue, however, this question gives rise to a more fundamental inquiry: how should one live? By the time Callicles starts his long speech the theme of εὐδαιμονία has already been introduced by Polus. Callicles takes a radical stand by reducing εὐδαιμονία (...)
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  10. added 2019-06-06
    How Polus Was Refuted: Reconsidering Plato’s Gorgias 474c-475c.Scott Berman - 1991 - Ancient Philosophy 11 (2):265-284.
  11. added 2019-06-06
    Plato on Knowledge, Persuasion and the Art of Rhetoric: Gorgias 452e-455a.James S. Murray - 1988 - Ancient Philosophy 8 (1):1-10.
  12. added 2019-06-06
    Plato's Letters and Gorgias. [REVIEW]L. Coventry - 1988 - The Classical Review 38 (2):227-229.
  13. added 2019-06-06
    A Pyrrhic Victory: Gorgias 474b-477a.Mary Mackenzie - 1982 - Classical Quarterly 32 (1):84-88.
    Crime pays, says Polus at Gorgias 473. Socrates, on the other hand, maintains two propositions in the face of universal opinion.
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  14. added 2019-06-06
    Dialectic and Health in Plato’s Gorgias: Presuppositions and Implications.John P. Anton - 1980 - Ancient Philosophy 1 (1):49-60.
  15. added 2019-06-06
    La Notion de Liberté Dans le ‘Gorgias’ de Platon. [REVIEW]G. B. Kerferd - 1959 - The Classical Review 9 (1):75-75.
  16. added 2019-06-06
    The Political Mission of Gorgias to Athens in 427 B.C.1.B. H. Garnons Williams - 1931 - Classical Quarterly 25 (1):52-56.
    The history of Athenian relations with Sicily in the fifth century is beset with difficulties; and no part of it, perhaps, is more obscure than the story of what is commonly known as the First Sicilian Expedition, which set sail from Athens in the late summer of 427 under Laches, and was reinforced under Pythodorus, Sophocles and Eurymedon in the winter of 426.
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  17. added 2019-06-05
    Shame in the Gorgias. C.H. Tarnopolsky Prudes, Perverts, and Tyrants. Plato's Gorgias and the Politics of Shame. Pp. XVI + 218. Princeton and Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2010. Paper, £16.95, Us$24.95 . Isbn: 978-0-691-16342-0. [REVIEW]Olivier Renaut - 2016 - The Classical Review 66 (1):55-57.
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  18. added 2019-06-05
    Plato's Political Philosophy. By Mark Blitz. Pp. Vii, 326, The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2010, $60.00/24.95; £31.50/13.00. Prudes, Perverts, and Tyrants: Plato's Gorgias and the Politics of Shame. By Christina H. Tarnopolsky. Pp. Xiii, 218, Princeto. [REVIEW]Robin Waterfield - 2012 - Heythrop Journal 53 (3):510-511.
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  19. added 2019-06-05
    Once Again the Opening of Plato's Gorgias.David Sansone - 2009 - Classical Quarterly 59 (2):631.
  20. added 2019-05-30
    Plato, Gorgias - Terence Irwin: Plato, Gorgias. Pp. Ix+ 268. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1980. £10.50.D. S. Hutchinson - 1981 - The Classical Review 31 (1):56-58.
  21. added 2019-05-13
    The Birth of Rhetoric: Gorgias, Plato and Their SuccessorsRobert Wardy Issues in Ancient Philosophy New York: Routledge, 1996, Viii + 197 Pp., $76.95. [REVIEW]Eugenio Benitez - 1999 - Dialogue 38 (4):901-904.
  22. added 2019-01-08
    Can a Daoist Sage Have Close Relationships with Other Human Beings?Joanna Iwanowska - 2017 - Diametros 52:23-46.
    This paper explores the compatibility between the Daoist art of emptying one’s heart-mind and the art of creating close relationships. The fact that a Daoist sage is characterized by an empty heart-mind makes him somewhat different from an average human being: since a full heart-mind is characteristic of the human condition, the sage transcends what makes us human. This could alienate him from others and make him incapable of developing close relationships. The research goal of this paper is to investigate (...)
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  23. added 2018-02-26
    Olympiodorus on Pleasure and the Good in Plato’s Gorgias.Kimon Lycos - 1994 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 12:183-205.
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  24. added 2018-02-18
    Socrates and the Fat Rabbis.Daniel Boyarin - 2009 - University of Chicago Press.
    What kind of literature is the Talmud? To answer this question, Daniel Boyarin looks to an unlikely source: the dialogues of Plato. In these ancient texts he finds similarities, both in their combination of various genres and topics and in their dialogic structure. But Boyarin goes beyond these structural similarities, arguing also for a cultural relationship. In _Socrates and the Fat Rabbis_, Boyarin suggests that both the Platonic and the talmudic dialogues are not dialogic at all. Using Michael Bakhtin’s notion (...)
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  25. added 2018-02-18
    The Doctor and the Pastry Chef.Jessica Moss - 2007 - Ancient Philosophy 27 (2):229 - 249.
  26. added 2018-02-17
    Why Is the Gorgias so Bitter?Alessandra Fussi - 2000 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 33 (1):39 - 58.
  27. added 2017-11-12
    Philosophy and Moral Commitment.W. Thomas Schmid - 1982 - Ancient Philosophy 2 (2):134-141.
  28. added 2017-10-25
    Commentary on "A Man of No Substance: The Philosopher in Plato's Gorgias," by S. Montgomery Ewegen.Joseph M. Forte - forthcoming - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy.
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  29. added 2017-10-12
    Man in His Pride: A Study in the Political Philosophy of Thucydides and Plato. By Grene David. Pp. Xiv + 231. Chicago: University of Chicago Press (London: Cambridge University Press), 1950. 30s. [REVIEW]D. A. Russell - 1953 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 73:155-155.
  30. added 2017-10-10
    Callicles' Hedonism.George Rudebusch - 1992 - Ancient Philosophy 12 (1):53-71.
  31. added 2017-10-06
    Contemplation and Virtue in Plato.F. Rosen - 1980 - Religious Studies 16 (1):85 - 95.
    This paper has been prompted by the conviction that a number of ethical and political doctrines in Plato remain obscure and somewhat unintelligible unless related to the contemplative experience of the Platonic philosopher. 1 I shall concentrate here on one such doctrine, the distinction between philosophic and popular virtue, especially as it appears in the Phaedo and the Gorgias . But in order first to clarify our conception of the relationship between contemplation and virtue, I shall examine the fourteenth-century English (...)
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  32. added 2017-09-23
    "Platone. Gorgia", by Stefania Nonvel Pieri. [REVIEW]D. L. Blank - 1995 - Ancient Philosophy 15 (2):608.
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  33. added 2017-09-22
    Platon: Gorgias.Dirk Cürsgen - 2005 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 10:261-263.
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  34. added 2017-09-19
    Amusing Gorgias: Why Does the Encomium of Helen End as It Does?Stephen Makin - 2013 - Ancient Philosophy 33 (2):291-305.
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  35. added 2017-09-19
    Corpses, Self-Defense, and Immortality: Callicles’ Fear of Death in the Gorgias.Emily A. Austin - 2013 - Ancient Philosophy 33 (1):33-52.
  36. added 2017-09-19
    Prudes, Perverts, and Tyrants. Plato’s Gorgias and the Politics of Shame. By Christina H. Tarnopolsky. [REVIEW]Christopher Moore - 2013 - Ancient Philosophy 33 (1):202-209.
  37. added 2017-03-01
    Plato on the Value of Philosophy: The Art of Argument in the Gorgias and Phaedrus.Tushar Irani - 2017 - Cambridge University Press.
    Plato was the first philosopher in the Western tradition to reflect systematically on rhetoric. In this book, Tushar Irani presents a comprehensive and innovative reading of the Gorgias and the Phaedrus, the only two Platonic dialogues to focus on what an art of argument should look like, treating each of the texts individually, yet ultimately demonstrating how each can best be understood in light of the other. For Plato, the way in which we approach argument typically reveals something about our (...)
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  38. added 2017-02-15
    L'argumentation Éthique Dans le Gorgias de Platon.M. Prze Ecki - 1988 - Studia Filozoficzne 266:3-12.
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  39. added 2017-02-15
    Plato: True and Sophistic Rhetoric.Keith V. Erickson (ed.) - 1979 - Rodopi.
  40. added 2017-02-14
    Olympiodorus: Commentary on Platos Gorgias : Introduction by Harold Tarrant.Harold Tarrant (ed.) - 1998 - Brill.
    This is a modern, annotated translation of antiquity's only extant commentary on Plato's moral and political dialogue Gorgias , in which the author defends ancient Greek philosophy and culture at a time when Christianity has almost replaced it. The first translation into any modern language of a central work in Platonic studies is accompanied by annotations which guide the reader in understanding the obscurities of the text, an introduction to the main issues raised by it, and a bibliography of the (...)
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  41. added 2017-02-14
    Some Philosophic Strands in Popular Rhetoric.Harold Zyskind - 1970 - In Howard Evans Kiefer & Milton Karl Munitz (eds.), Perspectives in Education, Religion, and the Arts. Albany, State University of New York Press. pp. 373--395.
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  42. added 2017-02-14
    Recensão A: Plato, Gorgias. A Revised Text with Introduction and Commentary by ER Dodds.Maria Helena Rocha Pereira - 1964 - Humanitas 15.
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  43. added 2017-02-13
    Gorgias Ioli Gorgia di Leontini. Su Ciò Che Non È. Pp. 205. Hildesheim, Zurich and New York: Georg Olms, 2010. Paper, €37.80. ISBN: 978-3-487-14308-8. [REVIEW]Edward Schiappa & Matthew Briel - 2011 - The Classical Review 61 (1):44-46.
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  44. added 2017-02-13
    Retórica, Ética y Política En Gorgias y Fedro.José Antonio Sánchez Tarifa - 1997 - Contrastes: Revista Internacional de Filosofía 2:291-313.
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  45. added 2017-02-13
    Timoleon and His Relations with Tyrants.W. H. Porter & H. D. Westlake - 1954 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 74:213-214.
  46. added 2017-02-11
    Sappho and Socrates: The Nature of Rhetoric.Rachel Parish - 2012 - Kairos: A Journal of Rhetoric, Technology, and Pedagogy 17 (1):n1.
  47. added 2017-02-11
    Sur la Tête de Gorgias. Le “Parler Beau” Et le “Dire Vrai” Dans Le Banquet de Platon.Henri Joly - 1990 - Argumentation 4 (1):5-33.
    Rhetoric is at present the object of a rehabilitation on a grand scale, all the more as it overlaps the fields of literature, linguistics, and philosophy. Actually, if philosophy rejects and removes rhetoric, it is nevertheless, as a method of word, wholly impregnated with it. To investigate the complex relationship of mutual implication in which rhetoric and philosophy are involved is part and parcel of this plan of re-evaluation of rhetoric as “discourse art” with a view to a re-definition of (...)
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  48. added 2017-02-09
    "If We Link the Essence of Rhetoric with Deception": Vincenzo on Socrates and Rhetoric.Livio Rossetti - 1993 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 26 (4):311 - 321.
  49. added 2017-02-07
    Plato, Gorgias. A Revised Text with Introduction and Commentary. By E. R. Dodds. Clarendon Press: Oxford University Press, 1959. Pp. Vi + 406. 45s. (In U.K. Only). [REVIEW]J. B. Skemp - 1961 - Philosophy 36 (138):379-.
  50. added 2017-01-29
    The Quarrel Between Rhetoric and Philosophy: Ethos and the Ethics of Rhetoric.Kenneth Stewart Casey - 1992 - Dissertation, Vanderbilt University
    This dissertation examines the quarrel between rhetoric and philosophy in fifth century Athens. Focusing upon the ethical dimensions of the struggle, it discusses how the formation of the souls of students as part of rhetorical pedagogy was disputed among rhetoricians and philosophers. It looks at works of Gorgias, Lysias, and Isocrates, for their contributions to the growing art of rhetoric and for their development of the technique of ethos, which raises numerous ethical questions. ;Through a reading of Plato's Gorgias and (...)
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1 — 50 / 258