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  1. added 2020-02-14
    After the Ascent: Plato on Becoming Like God.John M. Armstrong - 2004 - In David Sedley (ed.), Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy Xxvi: Summer 2004. Oxford University Press. pp. 171–183.
    Plato is associated with the idea that the body holds us back from knowing ultimate reality and so we should try to distance ourselves from its influence. This sentiment appears is several of his dialogues including Theaetetus where the flight from the physical world is compared to becoming like God. In some major dialogues of Plato's later career such as Philebus and Laws, however, the idea of becoming like God takes a different turn. God is an intelligent force that tries (...)
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  2. added 2019-12-02
    Complex Wisdom in the Euthydemus.Joshua I. Fox - forthcoming - Apeiron.
    In the Euthydemus, Socrates is presented as an eager student of seemingly trivial arts, earning derision both for desiring to master the peculiar art of Euthydemus and Dionysodorus and for studying the harp in his old age. I explain Socrates’ interest in these apparently trivial arts by way of a novel reading of the first protreptic argument, suggesting that the wisdom Socrates praises is complex in nature, securing the happiness of its possessor only insofar as it is composed of both (...)
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  3. added 2019-11-20
    The Quarrel Between Sophistry and Philosophy.Jens Kristian Larsen - 2011 - Dissertation, University of Copenhagen
    This study presents a full-length interpretation of two Platonic dialogues, the Theaetetus and the Sophist. The reading pursues a dramatic motif which I believe runs through these dialogues, namely the confrontation of Socratic philosophy, as it is understood by Plato, with the practise of sophistry. I shall argue that a major point for Plato in these two dialogues is to examine and defend his own Socratic or dialectical understanding of philosophy against the sophistic claim that false opinions and statements are (...)
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  4. added 2019-09-03
    Sheffield (F.C.C.) Plato's Symposium: The Ethics of Desire. Pp. X + 252. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2006. Cased, £50. ISBN: 978-0-19-928677-. [REVIEW]Suzanne Obdrzalek - 2008 - The Classical Review 58 (1):62-64.
  5. added 2019-08-26
    Fleeing the Divine: Plato's Rejection of the Ahedonic Ideal in the Philebus.Suzanne Obdrzalek - 2010 - In John Dillon & Brisson Luc (eds.), Plato's Philebus: Selected Papers From the Eighth Symposium Platonicum. pp. 209-214.
    Note: "Next to Godliness" (Apeiron) is an expanded version of this paper. -/- According to Plato's successors, assimilation to god (homoiosis theoi) was the end (telos) of the Platonic system. There is ample evidence to support this claim in dialogues ranging from the Symposium through the Timaeus. However, the Philebus poses a puzzle for this conception of the Platonic telos. On the one hand, Plato states that the gods are beings beyond pleasure while, on the other hand, he argues that (...)
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  6. added 2019-08-23
    Aristophanic Tragedy.Suzanne Obdrzalek - 2017 - In Z. Giannopoulou & P. Destrée (eds.), The Cambridge Critical Guide to Plato’s Symposium. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. pp. 70-87.
    In this paper, I offer a new interpretation of Aristophanes’ speech in Plato’s Symposium. Though Plato deliberately draws attention to the significance of Aristophanes’ speech in relation to Diotima’s (205d-206a, 211d), it has received relatively little philosophical attention. Critics who discuss it typically treat it as a comic fable, of little philosophical merit (e.g. Guthrie 1975, Rowe 1998), or uncover in it an appealing and even romantic treatment of love that emphasizes the significance of human individuals as love-objects to be (...)
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  7. added 2019-08-22
    Moral Transformation and the Love of Beauty in Plato's Symposium.Suzanne Obdrzalek - 2010 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 48:415-44.
    This paper offers an intellectualist interpretation of Diotima’s speech in Plato’s Symposium. Diotima’s purpose, in discussing the lower lovers, is to critique their erōs as aimed at a goal it can never secure, immortality, and as focused on an inferior object, themselves. By contrast, in loving beauty, the philosopher gains a mortal sort of completion; in turning outside of himself, he also ceases to be preoccupied by his own incompleteness.
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  8. added 2019-08-20
    Moral Transformation and the Love of Beauty in Plato's Symposium.Suzanne Obdrzalek - 2010 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 48 (4):415-444.
    This paper defends an intellectualist interpretation of Diotima’s speech in Plato’s Symposium. I argue that Diotima’s purpose, in discussing the lower lovers, is to critique their erōs as aimed at a goal it can never secure, immortality, and as focused on an inferior object, themselves. By contrast, in loving the form of beauty, the philosopher gains a mortal sort of completion; in turning outside of himself, he also ceases to be preoccupied by his own incompleteness.
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  9. added 2019-08-19
    Contemplation and Self-Mastery in Plato's Phaedrus.Suzanne Obdrzalek - 2012 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 42:77-107.
    This chapter examines Plato's moral psychology in the Phaedrus. It argues against interpreters such as Burnyeat and Nussbaum that Plato's treatment of the soul is increasingly pessimistic: reason's desire to contemplate is at odds with its obligation to rule the soul, and psychic harmony can only be secured by violently suppressing the lower parts of the soul.
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  10. added 2019-07-31
    Health and Hedonism in Plato and Epicurus.Kelly E. Arenson - 2019 - London: Bloomsbury.
    This book links Plato and Epicurus, two of the most prominent ethicists in the history of philosophy, exploring how Platonic material lays the conceptual groundwork for Epicurean hedonism. It argues that, despite their significant philosophical differences, Plato and Epicurus both conceptualise pleasure in terms of the health and harmony of the human body and soul. It turns to two crucial but underexplored sources for understanding Epicurean pleasure: Plato's treatment of psychological health and pleasure in the Republic, and his physiological account (...)
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  11. added 2019-06-06
    Measuring Humans Against Gods: On the Digression of Plato’s Theaetetus.Jens Kristian Larsen - 2019 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 101 (1):1-29.
  12. added 2019-06-06
    Plato’s Protagoras: Essays on the Confrontation of Philosophy and Sophistry.Pettersson Olof (ed.) - 2017 - Springer.
    This book presents a thorough study and an up to date anthology of Plato’s Protagoras. International authors' papers contribute to the task of understanding how Plato introduced and negotiated a new type of intellectual practice – called philosophy – and the strategies that this involved. They explore Plato’s dialogue, looking at questions of how philosophy and sophistry relate, both on a methodological and on a thematic level. While many of the contributing authors argue for a sharp distinction between sophistry and (...)
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  13. added 2019-06-06
    Plato on the Ideal of Justice and Human Happiness: Return to the Cave.Yuji Kurihara - 2008 - Philosophical Inquiry 30 (3-4):77-86.
  14. added 2019-06-06
    The Unity of the Philebus: Metaphysical Assumptions of the Good Human Life.Cristina Ionescu - 2007 - Ancient Philosophy 27 (1):55-75.
  15. added 2019-06-06
    The Happiness of the City and the Happiness of the Individual in Plato’s Republic.Donald Morrison - 2001 - Ancient Philosophy 21 (1):1-24.
  16. added 2018-06-26
    Loyalty and the Art of Wise Living: The Influence of Plato on the Moral Philosophy of Josiah Royce.Melissa Shew & Mathew A. Foust - 2010 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 48 (4):353-370.
    This essay investigates Josiah Royce's sustained interest in the Platonic dialogues by focusing not only on Royce's explicit commentary on Socrates and Plato but also on significant philosophical connections between Royce and these figures. In section 1, we explain the nature of loyalty according to Royce and how Socratic loyalty exemplifies Royce's ideas in both evident and surprising ways. In section 2, we claim that Royce's treatment of “lost causes” (particularly truth as a lost cause) relates to Socrates' dedication to (...)
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  17. added 2018-06-15
    Plato's Symposium: The Ethics of Desire.Frisbee Sheffield - 2006 - Oxford University Press.
    Frisbee Sheffield argues that the Symposium has been unduly marginalized by philosophers. Although the topic, eros, and the setting at a symposium have seemed anomalous, she demonstrates that both are intimately related to Plato's preoccupation with the nature of the good life, with virtue, and how it is acquired and transmitted. For Plato, analyzing our desires is a way of reflecting on the kind of people we will turn out to be and on our chances of leading a worthwhile and (...)
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  18. added 2018-06-15
    Plato's Symposium: The Ethics of Desire.Frisbee Sheffield - 2006 - Oxford University Press.
    Frisbee Sheffield argues that the Symposium has been unduly marginalized by philosophers. Although the topic - eros - and the setting at a symposium have seemed anomalous, she demonstrates that both are intimately related to Plato's preoccupation with the nature of the good life, with virtue, and how it is acquired and transmitted.
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  19. added 2018-06-14
    The Symposium and Platonic Ethics: Plato, Vlastos, and a Misguided Debate.Frisbee Sheffield - 2012 - Phronesis 57 (2):117-141.
    Abstract Scholarship on the Symposium is dominated by a debate on interpersonal love started by Gregory Vlastos in his article, `The Individual as an Object of Love in Plato.' This paper argues that this debate is a misguided one, because it is not reflective of the central concerns of this text. Attention needs to be turned to the broader ethical questions posed about the ends of life, the nature of human happiness, and contemplation. Failure to do so will mean that (...)
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  20. added 2018-06-12
    Socratic Philosophy, Rationalism, and "Obedience": Decision Making Without Divine Intervention.Scott J. Senn - 2012 - Plato: The Internet Journal of the International Plato Society 12.
    The main aim of this paper is to explain why Plato's Socrates devotes himself to philosophy. In so doing, I hope also to show that he does not sincerely believe that any of his decisions, about philosophy or anything, involve any kind of divine intervention. As my conclusions are contrary to a good bit of first-rate, recent scholarship on the subject, and also contrary to part of what Socrates himself says in Plato's Apology of Socrates, I think it is especially (...)
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  21. added 2018-06-06
    Plato on Well-Being.Eric Brown - 2016 - In Guy Fletcher (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Well-Being. London, UK: pp. 9-19.
    Plato's dialogues use several terms for the concept of well-being, which concept plays a central ethical role as the ultimate goal for action and a central political role as the proper aim for states. But the dialogues also reveal sharp debate about what human well-being is. I argue that they endorse a Socratic conception of well-being as virtuous activity, by considering and rejecting several alternatives, including an ordinary conception that lists a variety of goods, a Protagorean conception that identifies one's (...)
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  22. added 2017-11-22
    Kátharsis e Psyché: A Purificação como Salvação da Alma no Fédon de Platão.André Miranda Decotelli da Silva - 2014 - Dissertation, UFF, Brazil
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  23. added 2017-10-28
    Fallacy and Political Radicalism in Plato's "Republic".Rolf Sartorius - 1974 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 3 (3):349 - 363.
    The order in which Plato’s thoughts follow upon one another in the Republic is logical, but the dramatic or the picturesque medium through which he is constantly presenting his ideas disguises the logical structure of the work.
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  24. added 2016-12-08
    Theories of Happiness: An Anthology.Jennifer Wilson Mulnix & M. J. Mulnix (eds.) - 2015 - Broadview Press.
    _Theories of Happiness: An Anthology_ introduces readers to many difficult philosophical questions surrounding the concept of happiness. With historical and contemporary readings in philosophy, psychology, and the social sciences, the anthology reflects a dialogue between ideas, providing for a rich conversation that brings out the key insights and strengths of several competing views. Each of the included readings is contextualized by the editors and situated to speak to the larger issues, including the value of happiness and its connection to well-being, (...)
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  25. added 2016-12-05
    Gorgias. Plato - 1979 - Oxford University Press.
    The struggle which Plato has Socrates recommend to his interlocutors in Gorgias - and to his readers - is the struggle to overcome the temptations of worldly success and to concentrate on genuine morality. Ostensibly an enquiry into the value of rhetoric, the dialogue soon becomes an investigation into the value of these two contrasting ways of life. In a series of dazzling and bold arguments, Plato attempts to establish that only morality can bring a person true happiness, and to (...)
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  26. added 2016-09-19
    Virtue and Knowledge: An Introduction to Ancient Greek Ethics.William J. Prior - 1991 - Routledge.
    Originally published in 1991, this book focuses on the concept of virtue, and in particular on the virtue of wisdom or knowledge, as it is found in the epic poems of Homer, some tragedies of Sophocles, selected writings of Plato, Aristotle, and the Stoic and Epicurean philosophers. The key questions discussed are the nature of the virtues, their relation to each other, and the relation between the virtues and happiness or well-being. This book provides the background and interpretative framework to (...)
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  27. added 2016-09-15
    The Unexamined Life Is Worth Living.Mark Maller - 2013 - Linguistic and Philosophical Investigations 12:67-83.
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  28. added 2016-08-08
    Love Discourse: Rosenzweig Vs. Plato.Hanoch Ben-Pazi - 2012 - In Yossi Turner, Y. Amir & M. Brasser (eds.), Faith, Truth and Reason - The Philosophy of Franz Rosenzweig. K. Alber. pp. 105 - 124.
    My aim in this study is to unfold the profound relationship thatnonetheless exists between the world of Rosenzweig and that of Plato. Plato’s presence in The Star of Redemption is greater than onemight think by relying solely on the references found in the index. Inaccordance with this suggested relationship, one might propose areligious interpretation of that youthful pronouncement made byRosenzweig, to which, indeed, the expression of „faith“ is appropri-ate: „Ich glaube an Πλάτων [Plato]“. Notwithstanding the need to undertake a broad (...)
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  29. added 2016-04-22
    Philosopher Rulers and False Beliefs.Nicholas Baima - 2017 - Ancient Philosophy 37 (1):19-37.
    Many scholars have viewed the noble lie as fundamentally a device for educating the non-philosophers in the Kallipolis. On this reading, the elite and sophisticated philosopher rulers lie to the non-philosophers, who are unable to fully grasp the truth; such lies help motivate the non-philosophers towards virtuous activity and the promotion of the common good. Hence, according to many scholars, the falsehoods of the noble lie play no role in motivating fully accomplished adult philosophers towards virtue. The motivation for this (...)
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  30. added 2015-08-25
    The Coherence of Thrasymachus.Ralph Wedgwood - 2017 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 53:33-63.
    In Book I of the Republic, or so I shall argue, Plato gives us a glimpse of sheer horror. In the character, beliefs, and desires of Thrasymachus, Plato aims to personify some of the most diabolical dangers that lurk in human nature. In this way, the role that Thrasymachus plays for Plato is akin to the role that for Hobbes is played by the bellum omnium contra omnes, the war of all against all, which would allegedly be the inevitable result (...)
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  31. added 2015-08-25
    The Attractions and Delights of Goodness.By Jyl Gentzler - 2004 - Philosophical Quarterly 54 (216):353–367.
    What makes something good for me? Most contemporary philosophers argue that something cannot count as good for me unless I am in some way attracted to it, or take delight in it. However, subjectivist theories of prudential value face difficulties, and there is no consensus about how these difficulties should be resolved. Whether one opts for a hedonist or a desire-satisfaction account of..
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  32. added 2015-08-24
    O Hedonismo De Cálicles.George Rudebusch - 1999 - O Que Nos Faz Pensar:155-180.
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  33. added 2015-07-11
    The Pleasures of Reason in Plato, Aristotle, and the Hellenistic Hedonists.James Warren - 2014 - Cambridge University Press.
    Human lives are full of pleasures and pains. And humans are creatures that are able to think: to learn, understand, remember and recall, plan and anticipate. Ancient philosophers were interested in both of these facts and, what is more, were interested in how these two facts are related to one another. There appear to be, after all, pleasures and pains associated with learning and inquiring, recollecting and anticipating. We enjoy finding something out. We are pained to discover that a belief (...)
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  34. added 2015-04-17
    Daniel Russell, Plato on Pleasure and the Good Life. [REVIEW]Nickolas Pappas - 2008 - Ancient Philosophy 28 (1):227-232.
  35. added 2015-04-17
    Plato on Pleasure and the Good Life.Richard D. Parry - 2007 - Review of Metaphysics 60 (3):688-689.
  36. added 2015-04-08
    “Standing Apart in the Shelter of the City Wall”: The Contemplative Ideal Vs. The Politically Engaged Philosopher in Plato's Political Theory.Catherine McKeen - 2010 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 48 (2):197-216.
    Natural philosophers seem to have good reasons to prefer that the kallipolis, the maximally just community of the Republic, is never realized. If such a community is realized, philosophers are under the obligation of a just demand that they govern. However, a life that contains governance as a significant part is not the happiest life a philosopher can live. The happiest life for a philosopher is one consisting entirely or largely in philosophical contemplation. I confront this puzzle by arguing that (...)
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  37. added 2015-04-07
    The Argument of the Philebus.Joe McCoy - 2007 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 12 (1):1-16.
    This essay explores Socrates’ argumentative strategy in the Philebus, which is a response to the view that pleasure is the good. Socrates leads his interlocutorsthrough a series of steps in order to demonstrate to them the “conditions and dispositions of soul” upon which hedonism rests. Socrates’ aim is not to refute the claim that pleasure is a good, but rather to show the dependence of the experience of pleasure on intellect and the other elements of the life of mind. In (...)
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  38. added 2015-04-06
    Beyond Pleasure: Plato and the Good.Nicholas Maki - unknown
    In Republic IX, Plato claims that the philosopher would live the most pleasant life, learning being the greatest pleasure. However, Plato is not explicit as to what the life of an accomplished philosopher would be like. Some have posited that the philosopher, once he has acquired knowledge of the good, continually relearns it, experiencing residual pleasure in this. While this approach works for ordinary pieces of knowledge, Plato's description of the nature of the good puts it in another class. Looking (...)
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  39. added 2015-04-06
    Plato and Aristotle on Human Happiness.Jeff Mason & Claude Pearson - 1998 - The Philosophers' Magazine 2 (2):25-26.
  40. added 2015-04-03
    The Harmony of Plato and Aristotle.Matthew S. Linck - 2006 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 13 (2):38-44.
    The pervasive tendency to characterize Plato and Aristotle as philosophers who are fundamentally in opposition blocks an adequate contemporary reception of their writings. This tendency results in superficial presentations of the philosophical concerns of both thinkers and obscures the historical affinity between their global projects. This article provides an example of a reading that respects the accord between Plato and Aristotle on one crucial issue: the foundation of a good life. With respect to Plato’s Republic, I demonstrate that the harmonization (...)
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  41. added 2015-03-31
    How Plato and Pythagoras Can Save Your Life: The Ancient Greek Prescription for Health and Happiness.Nicholas Kardaras - 2011 - Red Wheel/Weiser.
    My personal odyssey -- Tripping the night fantastic. Who-and what-am I? -- The journey home. Take me to the river-- -- The being human -- White crows : mystics, savants, and other harbingers of human potential. Mystic mind (or how to crack open the cranium) -- Wake up! Greek philosophy breaks the trance -- The ultimate cage match : philosophy, science, and religion (or togas, Bibles, and microscopes : why can't we all just get along?) -- Homo anxious : I (...)
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  42. added 2015-03-31
    Social Justice and Happiness in the Republic: Plato's Two Principles.Rachana Kamtekar - 2001 - History of Political Thought 22 (2):189-220.
    rally best suited’. One would ordinarily suppose social justice to concern not only the allocation of duties but also the distribution of benefits. I argue that this expectation is fulfilled not by Plato’s conception of social justice, but by the normative basis for it, Plato’s requirement of aiming at the happiness of all the citizens. I argue that Plato treats social justice as a necessary but not sufficient means to happiness that guarantees only the production of the greatest goods; ensuring (...)
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  43. added 2015-03-26
    Seeking the Truth and Taking Care for Common Goods – Plato on Expertise and Recognizing Experts.Jörg Hardy - 2010 - Episteme 7 (1):7-22.
    In this paper I discuss Plato's conception of expertise as a part of the Platonic theory of a good, successful life (eudaimonia). In various Platonic dialogues, Socrates argues that the good life requires a certain kind of knowledge that guides all our good, beneficial actions: the “knowledge of the good and bad”, which is to be acquired by “questioning ourselves and examining our and others’ beliefs”. This knowledge encompasses the particular knowledge of how to recognize experts in a given technical (...)
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  44. added 2015-03-17
    Plato's Rejection of Thoughtless and Pleasureless Lives.Matthew Evans - 2007 - Phronesis 52 (4):337 - 363.
    In the Philebus Plato argues that every rational human being, given the choice, will prefer a life that is moderately thoughtful and moderately pleasant to a life that is utterly thoughtless or utterly pleasureless. This is true, he thinks, even if the thoughtless life at issue is intensely pleasant and the pleasureless life at issue is intensely thoughtful. Evidently Plato wants this argument to show that neither pleasure nor thought, taken by itself, is sufficient to make a life choiceworthy for (...)
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  45. added 2015-03-15
    Free Will, Luck, and Happiness in the Myth of Er.Kenneth Dorter - 2003 - Journal of Philosophical Research 28:129-142.
    According to the Myth of Er we are responsible for our character because we chose it before birth. But any choice is determined by our present character, sothere is an indefinite regress and we cannot be entirely responsible for our character. The Myth of Er can be seen as the first formulation of the problem of free will, which Aristotle demythologizes in Nicomachean Ethics III.5. Plato's solution is that freedom is compatible with causal determinism because it does not mean indeterminism (...)
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  46. added 2015-03-14
    Happiness in the Euthydemus.Panos Dimas - 2002 - Phronesis 47 (1):1-27.
    Departing on a demonstration which aims to show to young Cleinias how one ought to care about wisdom and virtue, Socrates asks at 278e2 whether people want to do well (εὐ πράττειν). Εὐ πράττειν is ambiguous. It can mean being happy and prospering, or doing what is right and doing it well. Socrates will later exploit this ambiguity, but at this point he uses this expression merely to announce his conviction that every human being (pathological cases aside, perhaps) desires to (...)
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  47. added 2015-03-10
    Dying as Supreme Opportunity: A Comparison of Plato's "Phaedo" and "the Tibetan Book of the Dead".Maurice Cohen - 1976 - Philosophy East and West 26 (3):317-327.
  48. added 2015-03-06
    Pleasure, Virtue, Externals, and Happiness in Plato's "Laws".Gabriela Roxana Carone - 2002 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 19 (4):327 - 344.
  49. added 2015-02-25
    “Justice is Happiness”?—An Analysis of Plato's Strategies in Response to Challenges From the Sophists.Limin Bao - 2011 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 6 (2):258-272.
    The challenge from the sophists with whom Plato is confronted is: Who can prove that the just man without power is happy whereas the unjust man with power is not? This challenge concerns the basic issue of politics: the relationship between justice and happiness. Will the unjust man gain the exceptional happiness of the strong by abusing his power and by injustice? The gist of Plato’s reply is to speak not of justice but of intrinsic justice, i.e., the strength of (...)
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  50. added 2015-02-24
    The Classical Ideals of Friendship.Dirk Baltzly & Nick Eliopoulos - 2009 - In Barabara Caine (ed.), Friendship: a history,. Equinox.
    Surveys the ideals of friendship in ancient Greco-Roman philosophy. The notion of the best friendship inevitably reflects the various conceptions of a good life.
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