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  1. Irrigating Blood: Plato on the Circulatory System, the Cosmos, and Elemental Motion.Douglas Campbell - forthcoming - Journal of the History of Philosophy.
    This article concerns the so-called irrigation system in the Timaeus’ biology (77a-81e), which replenishes our body’s tissues with resources from food delivered as blood. I argue that this system functions mainly by the natural like-to-like motion of the elements and that the circulation of blood is an important case study of Plato’s physics. We are forced to revise the view that the elements attract their like. Instead, similar elements merely tend to coalesce with each other in virtue of their tactile (...)
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  2. The Soul’s Tomb: Plato on the Body as the Cause of Psychic Disorders.Douglas R. Campbell - 2022 - Apeiron 55 (1):119-139.
    I argue that, according to Plato, the body is the sole cause of psychic disorders. This view is expressed at Timaeus 86b in an ambiguous sentence that has been widely misunderstood by translators and commentators. The goal of this article is to offer a new understanding of Plato’s text and view. In the first section, I argue that although the body is the result of the gods’ best efforts, their sub-optimal materials meant that the soul is constantly vulnerable to the (...)
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  3. Replenishment and Maintenance of the Human Body.Lea Aurelia Schroeder - 2021 - Apeiron 54 (3):317-346.
    Scholarship on Plato's Timaeus has paid relatively little attention to Tim. 77a–81, a seemingly disjointed passage on topics including plants, respiration, blood circulation, and musical sounds. Despite this comparative neglect, commentators both ancient and modern have levelled a number of serious charges against Timaeus' remarks in the passage, questioning the coherence and explanatory power of what they take to be a theory of respiration. In this paper, I argue that the project of 77a–81e is not to sketch theories of respiration, (...)
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  4. Hippocrates at phaedrus 270c.Elizabeth Jelinek & Nickolas Pappas - 2020 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 101 (3):409-430.
    At Plato’s Phaedrus 270c, Socrates asks whether one can know souls without knowing ‘the whole.’ Phaedrus answers that ‘according to Hippocrates’ the same demand on knowing the whole applies to bodies. What parallel is intended between soul-knowledge and body-knowledge and which medical passages illustrate the analogy have been much debated. Three dominant interpretations read ‘the whole’ as respectively (1) environment, (2) kosmos, and (3) individual soul or body; and adduce supporting Hippocratic passages. But none of these interpretations accounts for the (...)
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  5. Plato, the Medicine, and the Paraphrase on the Timaeus in the Anonymus Londiniensis Papyrus.Jordi Crespo Saumell - 2017 - Rhizomata 5 (2):148-176.
    Name der Zeitschrift: Rhizomata Jahrgang: 5 Heft: 2 Seiten: 148-176.
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  6. Plato’s cosmological medicine in the discourse of Eryximachus in the Symposium. The responsibility of a harmonic techne.Laura Candiotto - 2015 - Plato Journal 15:81-93.
    By comparing the role of harmony in Eryximachus’ discourse with other Platonic passages, especially from the Timaeus, this article aims to provide textual evidence concerning Plato’s conception of cosmological medicine as “harmonic techne”. The comparison with other dialogues will enable us to demonstrate how Eryximachus’ thesis is consistent with Plato’s cosmology — a cosmology which cannot be reduced to a physical conception of reality but represents the expression of a dialectical, and erotic cosmos, characterized by the agreement of parts. Arguably, (...)
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  7. Plato’s Rivalry with Medicine: A Struggle and Its Dissolution, written by Susan Levin.Mark McPherran - 2015 - Polis 32 (2):427-431.
  8. Plato’s Rivalry with Medicine: A Struggle and its Dissolution.Susan B. Levin - 2014 - New York: Oup Usa.
    Susan B. Levin argues that Plato's engagement with medicine is richer than previously recognized and that he views it as an important rival for authority on nature and flourishing. Levin shows further that Plato's work, particularly the Laws, holds significant promise for bioethics that has so far been nearly untapped.
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  9. Physiology in Plato's Timaeus: Irrigation, Digestion, and Respiration.Andres Pelavski - 2014 - Cambridge Classical Journal 60:61-74.
    The third part of the Timaeus, where the account is focused on the cooperation of reason and necessity, has received far less attention than the opening two sections. Particularly, the description of irrigation, digestion and respiration constitutes a challenging passage that has been conspicuously overlooked by scholarly research. Virtually the only modern explanation for the passage was devised by Cornford, and despite several inaccuracies it has been unanimously accepted by all commentators. This paper will challenge Cornford’s interpretation, and use some (...)
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  10. The Metaphysics of Bodily Health and Disease in Plato's Timaeus.Brian D. Prince - 2014 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 22 (5):908-928.
    Near the end of his speech, Timaeus outlines a theory of bodily health and disease which has seemed to many commentators loosely unified or even inconsistent . But this section is better unified than it has appeared, and gives us at least one important insight into the workings of physical causality in the Timaeus. I argue first that the apparent disorder in Timaeus’s theory of disease is likely a deliberate effect planned by the author. Second, the taxonomy of disease in (...)
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  11. Plato's Account of the Diseases of the Soul in Timaeus 86B1–87B9.Peter Lautner - 2011 - Apeiron 44 (1):22-39.
    The paper aims to show that ανoια is the general term for the diseases of the soul, and that μανία and αμαϑία are not necessarily two distinct species but two levels of the same disease: ignorance signifies the cognitive state, whereas madness indicates both a cognitive state and a specific phenomenal character. Plato's other remarks on psychic ailments can be incorporated into this account. The result can also be accommodated to the general theory of the soul–body relationship in the dialogue. (...)
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  12. Medical Theory in Plato's Timaeus.Laura Grams - 2009 - Rhizai 6:161-192.
    Plato’s Timaeus provides a significant, original account of diseases afflicting the body and soul. The causes of disease are explained according to the same physical principles that account for the motion of the four elements in the universe. As a result, medical expertise concerning the microcosm of the human body depends on cosmological expertise concerning the macrocosm of the universe. in addition, the methods of division and collection (diairesis and sunagōgē) that Plato uses in other late dialogues are employed in (...)
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  13. Eryximachus' Tale: The Symposium's Role in Plato's Critique of Medicine.Susan B. Levin - 2009 - Apeiron 42 (4):275-308.
  14. Is Medicine a Technê?Susan B. Levin - 2007 - Philosophical Inquiry 29 (5):125-153.
  15. Plato and Medical Texts: Symposium 185c–193d.E. M. Craik - 2001 - Classical Quarterly 51 (1):109-114.
  16. The Body’s Fault? Plato’s Timaeus on Psychic Illnesses.Christopher Gill - 2000 - In Reason and Necessity: Essays on Plato’s Timaeus. London: Duckworth and the Classical Press of Wales.. pp. 59-84.
  17. Herodicus, the Cratetean.Ingemar Düring - 1987 - New York: Facsimiles-Garl.
    Originally published in 1941. Herodicus was a Greek physician of the fifth century BC, and a native of Selymbria. The first use of therapeutic exercise for the treatment of disease and maintenance of health is credited to him, and he is believed to have been one of the tutors of Hippocates.
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  18. Plato's 'Fantastic'Appendix: The Procreation Model of the Timaeus.Colin M. Turbayne - 1976 - Paideia:125-140.
  19. Greek Medicine as Science and Craft.Owsei Temkin - 1953 - Isis 44:213-225.
  20. Plato's Cosmology: The Timaeus of Plato.Francis MacDonald Cornford - 1935 - Indianapolis, Ind.: Hackett Publishing Company. Edited by Francis Macdonald Cornford.