Plato: Menexenus

Edited by Mark Zelcer (Queensborough Community College (CUNY))
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  1. added 2019-06-06
    Dancing Naked with Socrates: Pericles, Aspasia, and Socrates at Play with Politics, Rhetoric, and Philosophy.Christopher P. Long - 2003 - Ancient Philosophy 23 (1):49-69.
  2. added 2019-06-06
    More of the Budé Plato. [REVIEW]W. L. Lorimer - 1934 - The Classical Review 48 (1):19-21.
  3. added 2019-05-28
    Politics and Philosophy in Plato’s Menexenus: Education and Rhetoric, Myth and History, Written by Nickolas Pappas and Mark Zelcer.Andreas Avgousti - 2016 - Polis 33 (1):218-223.
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  4. added 2019-05-28
    The Origin of the Olive: On the Dynamics of Plato’s Menexenus.Paul O. Mahoney - 2010 - Polis: The Journal for Ancient Greek Political Thought 27 (1):38-57.
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  5. added 2019-05-28
    Plato’s Menexenus: A Paradigm of Rhetorical Flattery.Thomas M. Kerch - 2008 - Polis: The Journal for Ancient Greek Political Thought 25 (1):94-114.
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  6. added 2018-12-24
    Speeches for the Dead: Essays on Plato's Menexenus.Harold Parker & Max Robitzsch (eds.) - 2018 - de Gruyter.
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  7. added 2018-12-17
    Reading the Menexenus Intertextually.Mark Zelcer - 2018 - In Harold Parker & Max Robitzsch (eds.), Speeches for the Dead: Essays on Plato's Menexenus. Berlin: de Gruyter. pp. 29-49.
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  8. added 2017-12-25
    Pappas and Zelcer Politics and Philosophy in Plato's Menexenus: Education and Rhetoric, Myth and History. London and New York: Routledge, 2015. Pp. Vii + 236. £90. 9781844658206. [REVIEW]Gregory A. McBrayer - 2016 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 136:283-284.
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  9. added 2017-11-24
    Review of “Platons Menexenos. Einleitung, Text Und Kommentar“ by Stavros Tsitsiridis. [REVIEW]M. Bloch - 2001 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 6:265-269.
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  10. added 2017-10-30
    Plato on International Relations.Mark Zelcer - 2017 - Philosophical Forum 48 (3):325-339.
    Plato’s political philosophy is usually seen in the context of domestic politics, justice within a polis. This essay argues that Plato had views on international relations theory as well. We show that Plato had a theory of the causes of international conflict, and that his theory can be seen as a response to Thucydides’ theory as well as theories espoused by other Greek thinkers. Plato’s theory can be generalized to a theory of causation in the social sciences. He also had (...)
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  11. added 2017-06-26
    The Dialogues of Plato, Volume 1: Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, Meno, Gorgias, Menexenus. Plato - 1989 - Yale University Press.
    This initial volume in a series of new translations of Plato’s works includes a general introduction and interpretive comments for the dialogues translated: the _Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, Meno, Gorgias, _and _Menexenus. _ _ _“Allen’s work is very impressive. The translations are readable, lucid, and highly accurate. The general introduction is succinct and extremely clear. The discussion of the dating of the dialogues is enormously useful; there has previously been no brief account of these issues to which one could refer the (...)
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  12. added 2017-03-13
    Plato’s Menexenus as a History That Falls Into Patterns.Nickolas Pappas & Mark Zelcer - 2013 - Ancient Philosophy 33 (1):19-31.
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  13. added 2017-03-13
    Virtue Ethics, Politics, and the Function of Laws: The Parent Analogy in Plato’s Menexenus.Sandrine Berges - 2007 - Dialogue 46 (2):211-230.
    ABSTRACT Can virtue ethics say anything worthwhile about laws? What would a virtue-ethical account of good laws look like? I argue that a plausible answer to that question can be found in Plato's parent analogies in the Crito and the Menexenus. I go on to show that the Menexenus gives us a philosophical argument to the effect that laws are just only if they enable citizens to flourish. I then argue that the resulting virtue-ethical account of just laws is not (...)
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  14. added 2017-03-13
    Empire and the Ends of Politics: Plato's Menexenus and Pericles' Funeral Oration. Plato & Thucydides - 1999 - Focus.
    This text brings together for the first time two complete key works from classical antiquity on the politics of Athens: Plato's Menexenus and Pericles' funeral oration.
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  15. added 2017-03-13
    The Folly of Praise: Plato's Critique of Encomiastic Discourse in the Lysis and Symposium.Andrea Wilson Nightingale - 1993 - Classical Quarterly 43 (1):112-130.
    Plato targets the encomiastic genre in three separate dialogues: the Lysis, the Menexenus and the Symposium. Many studies have been devoted to Plato's handling of the funeral oration in the Menexenus. Plato's critique of the encomium in the Lysis and Symposium, however, has not been accorded the same kind of treatment. Yet both of these dialogues go beyond the Menexenus in exploring the opposition between encomiastic and philosophic discourse. In the Lysis, I will argue, Plato sets up encomiastic rhetoric as (...)
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  16. added 2017-03-13
    The Dialogues of Plato Volume I, Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, Meno, Gorgias, Menexenus. Translated with Analysis by R. E. Allen. [REVIEW]Anthony C. Daly - 1988 - Modern Schoolman 65 (2):133-136.
  17. added 2017-03-13
    "Bury", R. G., Plato VII, Plato, Timaeus, Critias, Cleitophon, Menexenus, Epistles.John W. Knapp - 1930 - Classical Weekly 24:9-10.
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  18. added 2017-02-14
    The General Purport of Pericles' Funeral Oration and Last Speech.C. Sicking - 1995 - Hermes 123 (4):404-425.
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  19. added 2017-02-13
    ‘Their Memories Will Never Grow Old’: The Politics of Remembrance in the Athenian Funeral Orations.Julia L. Shear - 2013 - Classical Quarterly 63 (2):511-536.
    Every winter in the classical period, on a specifically chosen day, Athenians gathered together to mourn the men who had died in war. According to Thucydides, the bones of the dead killed in that year lay in state for two days before being carried in ten coffins organized by tribe to the dêmosion sêma where they were buried and then a speech was made in honour of the dead men by a man chosen by the city. As his description makes (...)
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  20. added 2016-12-08
    La terre-mère : une lecture par le genre et la rhétorique patriotique.Violaine Sebillotte Cuchet - 2005 - Kernos 18:203-218.
    Cet article discute le thème de l’autochtonie – essentiellement athénienne – en l’intégrant dans la logique du discours patriotique qui est la sienne. La prise en compte des exigences de ce type de discours tout à fait particulier, de même que la prise en compte du renouvellement du regard sur les identités sexuées qu’ont permis les études « genre », permettent aujourd’hui de proposer une interprétation différente de celle de Nicole Loraux. Celle-ci comprenait, dans sa lecture du Ménexène de Platon, (...)
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  21. added 2016-09-12
    The Dialogues of Plato. Vol. 1: Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, Meno, Gorgias, Menexenus.Donald J. Zeyl & R. E. Allen - 1988 - Philosophical Review 97 (2):244.
  22. added 2016-02-08
    Remembering Pericles.S. Sara Monoson - 1998 - Political Theory 26 (4):489-513.
  23. added 2015-05-04
    The Origin of the Olive: On the Dynamics of Plato's Menexenus.Paul Mahoney - 2010 - Polis 27 (1):38-57.
    Plato's Menexenus is a persistent puzzle for interpreters, in the main because of its obscurity of purpose and apparent lack of philosophical matter. This article argues that, while no doubt an elusive piece, it can be counted quite definitely a dialogue of philosophical import, as well as one of its author's most subtly accomplished works. The article focuses on two portions of Aspasia's oration -- the account of the earliest Athenians and the exhortation to the living in the voice of (...)
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  24. added 2015-05-04
    Plato's Menexenus: A Paradigm of Rhetorical Flattery.Thomas Kerch - 2008 - Polis 25 (1):94-114.
    The arguments advanced in this paper suggest that the Menexenus ought to be read as a pendent to the Gorgias and as an example of the way in which rhetoric that engages in flattery can harm the souls of its audience. The Menexenus was composed by Plato to illustrate precisely what sentiments ought to be avoided in public oratory, if the primary concern of speech-making is to benefit the lives of citizens. In addition to demonstrating the connections between the Menexenus (...)
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  25. added 2015-05-04
    Contemplating Athens: The Allure of Empire, Eros, and Socratic Philosophy.Dustin Gish - 2008 - Polis 25 (1):131-157.
    , Plato's Menexenus and Pericles' Funeral Oration: Empire and the Ends of Politics) , Socrates and Alcibiades) , Plato's Meno) , Plato and Xenophon: Apologies).
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  26. added 2015-05-04
    Chapter Seven. Remembering Pericles: The Political and Theoretical Import of Plato’s Menexenus.S. Sara Monoson - 2000 - In Plato's Democratic Entanglements: Athenian Politics and the Practice of Philosophy. Princeton University Press. pp. 181-205.
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  27. added 2015-05-04
    "Bury", R. G., Plato VII, Plato, Timaeus, Critias, Cleitophon, Menexenus, Epistles.John W. Knapp - 1930 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 24:9-10.
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  28. added 2015-05-04
    Die Tendenz des Platonischen Menexenus.P. Wendland - 1890 - Hermes 25 (2):171-195.
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  29. added 2015-03-25
    Review of “Platons Menexenos. Einleitung, Text und Kommentar” by Stavros Tsitsiridis. [REVIEW]Matthias M. A. Bloch - 2001 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 6 (1):265-269.
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  30. added 2015-03-06
    « Hysteron proteron » : la nature et la loi selon Antiphon et Platon.Fernanda Decleva Caizzi - 1986 - Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale 91 (3):291 - 310.
    La découverte d'un nouveau fragment du papyrus contenant la Vérité d'Antiphon renforce l'hypothèse qu'il nous faut identifier le sophiste avec le rhétoricien de Rhamnonte dont Thucydide fait l'éloge. Si l'on analyse de ce point de vue l'ensemble des témoignages, il est possible de déceler, dans le Ménexène d'un côté, dans le livre X des Lois de l'autre, des pièces à l'appui de la thèse que les idées d'Antiphon étaient une des cibles visées par la polémique platonicienne. The discovery of a (...)
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  31. added 2015-02-27
    Socrates Agonistes: The Case of the Cratylus Etymologies.Rachel Barney - 1998 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 16:63-98.
    Are the long, wildly inventive etymologies in Plato’s Cratylus just some kind of joke, or does Plato himself accept them? This standard question misses the most important feature of the etymologies: they are a competitive performance, an agôn by Socrates in which he shows that he can play the game of etymologists like Cratylus better than they can themselves. Such show-off performances are a recurrent feature of Platonic dialogue: they include Socrates’ speeches on eros in the Phaedrus, his rhetorical discourse (...)
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  32. added 2015-02-16
    Plato's Menexenus and the Distortion of History.M. M. Henderson - 1975
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  33. added 2015-02-16
    Plato's Funeral Oration the Motive of the Menexenus.Charles H. Kahn - 1963
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  34. added 2015-02-16
    Laudationem Funebrem Platonis [in the Menexenus] Et Periclis Thucydidei Contendit ... Ioannes Chr. Gottleber.Johann Christoph Gottleber - 1779
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  35. added 2015-01-28
    Platón, Aristóteles y la narrativa histórica.Javier Picón Casas - 2013 - Synthesis 20:53-70.
    Una de las cuestiones más llamativas de las obras de Platón y Aristóteles estriba en su silencio acerca de la historia. Leyeron y criticaron a físicos, filósofos, matemáticos, biólogos, poetas, retóricos, políticos, etc. Sin embargo, sus citas a propósito de los historiadores de su momento cabrían en una cuartilla. En este breve artículo tratamos de ofrecer una explicación a propósito de tal omisión. Así mismo, aprovechamos para ofrecer una razón del Menéxeno y aportar una confirmación de las razones que condujeron (...)
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  36. added 2014-11-04
    Politics and Philosophy in Plato's Menexenus: Education and Rhetoric, Myth and History.Nickolas Pappas & Mark Zelcer - 2015 - New York, USA: Routledge.
  37. added 2014-05-19
    Menexenus (Greek and English). Plato - unknown
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  38. added 2014-05-19
    Menexenus. Plato - unknown
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  39. added 2014-05-19
    The Menexenus Reconsidered.Pamela M. Huby - 1957 - Phronesis 2 (2):104-114.
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  40. added 2014-05-12
    Le Ménexène de Platon et la rhétorique de son temps Robert Clavaud Coll. d'Etudes Anciennes. Paris: Les Belles Lettres. 1980. 338 p. [REVIEW]Yvon Lafrance - 1982 - Dialogue 21 (1):156-160.
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  41. added 2014-04-02
    Menexenus—Son of Socrates.Lesley Dean-Jones - 1995 - Classical Quarterly 45 (01):51-.
    The Menexenus is also known as Plato's Epitaphios or Funeral Oration. The body of the work is a fictional funeral oration, composed as an example of what should be said at a public funeral for Athenians who have fallen in war. The oration is framed by an encounter between Socrates and a certain Menexenus, an eager young man who thinks he has reached the end of education and philosophy, but who is still rather young to take an active party in (...)
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  42. added 2014-03-28
    Gorgias, Menexenus, Protagoras. Plato - 2010 - Cambridge University Press.
    Presented in the popular Cambridge Texts format are three early Platonic dialogues in a new English translation by Tom Griffith that combines elegance, accuracy, freshness and fluency. Together they offer strikingly varied examples of Plato's critical encounter with the culture and politics of fifth and fourth century Athens. Nowhere does he engage more sharply and vigorously with the presuppositions of democracy. The Gorgias is a long and impassioned confrontation between Socrates and a succession of increasingly heated interlocutors about political rhetoric (...)
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  43. added 2014-03-12
    Autochthony in Plato's Menexenus.Nickolas Pappas - 2011 - Philosophical Inquiry 34 (1-2):66-80.
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  44. added 2014-03-12
    Review of Plato, Malcolm Schofield (Ed.), Gorgias, Menexenus, Protagoras[REVIEW]C. C. W. Taylor - 2010 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (8).
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  45. added 2014-03-12
    The Rhetoric of Parody in Plato's Menexenus.Franco V. Trivigno - 2009 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 42 (1):pp. 29-58.
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  46. added 2014-03-12
    Plato: Gorgias, Menexenus, and Protagoras. Plato - 2009 - Cambridge University Press.
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  47. added 2014-03-12
    The Dialogues, I. Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, Meno, Gorgias, Menexenus. [REVIEW]G. B. Kerferd, Plato & R. E. Allen - 1991 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 111:225-226.
  48. added 2014-03-12
    Philosophy and Rhetoric in the Menexenus.Lucinda Coventry - 1989 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 109:1-15.
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  49. added 2014-03-12
    The Menexenus Reconsidered.Pamela M. Huby - 1957 - Phronesis 2 (2):104 - 114.
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  50. added 2014-03-12
    The Loeb Plato, VII Plato, with an English Translation, VII. (Timaeus, Critias, Clitophon, Menexenus, Epistles). By R. G. Bury, Litt.D. Pp. 636; 3 Plates Illustrative of the Critias. London: William Heinemann, Ltd.; New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1929. Cloth, 10s.; Leather, 12s. 6d. [REVIEW]A. E. Taylor - 1930 - The Classical Review 44 (04):127-130.
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