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  1. An Onto-Epistemological Chronology of Plato’s Dialogues.Mohammad Bagher Ghomi - manuscript
    This paper aims to suggest a new arrangement of Plato’s dialogues based on a different theory of the ontological as well as epistemological development of his philosophy. In this new arrangement, which proposes essential changes in the currently agreed upon chronology of the dialogues, Parmenides must be considered as criticizing an elementary theory of Forms and not the theory of so-called middle dialogues. Dated all as later than Parmenides, the so-called middle and late dialoguesare regarded as two consecutive endeavors to (...)
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  2. The Value of Knowledge.Carter J. Adam, Pritchard Duncan & Turri John - forthcoming - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    The value of knowledge has always been a central topic within epistemology. Going all the way back to Plato’s Meno, philosophers have asked, why is knowledge more valuable than mere true belief? Interest in this question has grown in recent years, with theorists proposing a range of answers. But some reject the premise of the question and claim that the value of knowledge is ‘swamped’ by the value of true belief. And others argue that statuses other than knowledge, such as (...)
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  3. “Music to the Ears of Weaklings”: Moral Hydraulics and the Unseating of Desire.Louise R. Chapman & Constantine Sandis - forthcoming - Manuscrito: Revista Internacional de Filosofía.
    Psychological eudaimonism (PE) is the view that we are constituted by a desire to avoid the harmful. This entails that coming to see a prospective or actual object of pursuit as harmful to us will unseat our positive evaluative belief about (and coinstantiated desire for) that object (§I). There is more than one way that such an 'unseating' of desire may be caused on an intellectualist picture (§II). This paper arbitrates between two readings of Socrates' 'attack on laziness' in the (...)
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  4. The Truth in Gnosticism.Clayton Littlejohn - forthcoming - Análisis. Revista de Investigación Filosófica.
    The paper discusses some challenges to veritism, the view that the fundamental epistemic good is knowledge. It looks like the best way to meet these challenges might be to appeal to some of Sosa's ideas about the value of achievements, but I argue that the performance normativity framework only gives us part of what we want. What we need is a more radical break with the veritist approach. We need to embrace gnosticism, the view that knowledge is the fundamental epistemic (...)
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  5. Plato's Ion & Meno. Plato - forthcoming - Audio CD.
    In Plato's Ion & Meno, Socrates questions Ion, an actor who just won a major prize, about his ability to interpret the epic poetry of Homer. As the dialogue proceeds, the nature of human creativity emerges as a mysterious process and an unsolved puzzle. A similar discussion between Socrates and Meno probes the subject of ethics. Can goodness be taught? If it can, then we should be able to find teachers capable of instructing others about what is good and bad, (...)
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  6. Enquiry and the Value of Knowledge.Barnaby Walker - forthcoming - Philosophy.
    In this paper I challenge the orthodox view of the significance of Platonic value problems. According to this view, such problems are among the central questions of epistemology, and answering them is essential for justifying the status of epistemology as a major branch of philosophical enquiry. I challenge this view by identifying an assumption on which Platonic value problems are based – the value assumption – and considering how this assumption might be resisted. After articulating a line of thought that (...)
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  7. Conhecimento e Definição no Mênon de Platão.Davi Heckert César Bastos - 2020 - Kinesis 12 (31):172-185.
    Through detailed analysis of Plato’s Meno, I identify and set general argumentative rules (useful both to scientists and philosophers) concerning how to use definitions. I show how the character Socrates establishes strong requirements for knowledge in general, i.e., that the knowledge of the definition of a thing must be prior to the knowledge of properties or instances of that thing. Socrate’s requirements and the way he characterizes a definition (as coextensive to the definiendum, not circular, true and explanatorily relevant) lead (...)
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  8. The Metaphysics of Recollection in Plato’s Meno.Whitney Schwab - 2020 - Apeiron 53 (3):213-233.
    Recollection is central to the epistemology of Plato’s Meno. After all, the character Socrates claims that recollection is the process whereby embodied human souls bind down true opinions and acquire knowledge. This paper examines the exchange between Socrates and Meno’s slave to determine what steps on the path to acquiring knowledge are part of the process of recollection and what is required for a subject to count as having recollected something. I argue that the key to answering these questions is (...)
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  9. Is Plato an Innatist in the Meno?David Bronstein & Whitney Schwab - 2019 - Phronesis 64 (4):392-430.
    Plato in the Meno is standardly interpreted as committed to condition innatism: human beings are born with latent innate states of knowledge. Against this view, Gail Fine has argued for prenatalism: human souls possess knowledge in a disembodied state but lose it upon being embodied. We argue against both views and in favor of content innatism: human beings are born with innate cognitive contents that can be, but do not exist innately in the soul as, the contents of states of (...)
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  10. The Educational Interpretation of Plato’s Meno: Virtue and Recollection.Sung-Mo Chang - 2019 - Journal of Moral Education 31 (2):187-210.
  11. Meno’s Paradox is an Epistemic Regress Problem.Andrew Cling - 2019 - Logos and Episteme 10 (1):107-120.
    I give an interpretation according to which Meno’s paradox is an epistemic regress problem. The paradox is an argument for skepticism assuming that acquired knowledge about an object X requires prior knowledge about what X is and any knowledge must be acquired. is a principle about having reasons for knowledge and about the epistemic priority of knowledge about what X is. and jointly imply a regress-generating principle which implies that knowledge always requires an infinite sequence of known reasons. Plato’s response (...)
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  12. Text und übersetzung.Theodor Ebert - 2019 - In Menon. De Gruyter. pp. 25-134.
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  13. Personenregister.Theodor Ebert - 2019 - In Menon. De Gruyter. pp. 177-178.
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  14. Frontmatter.Theodor Ebert - 2019 - In Menon. De Gruyter. pp. 1-4.
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  15. Vorwort.Theodor Ebert - 2019 - In Menon. De Gruyter. pp. 5-6.
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  16. Verzeichnis der benutzten literatur.Theodor Ebert - 2019 - In Menon. De Gruyter. pp. 169-176.
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  17. Platon Menon griechisch-deutsch, herausgegeben und übersetzt.Theodor Ebert - 2019 - Berlin, Germany: de Gruyter.
    This is a shorter presentation of my commentary on the Meno of 2018. The German translation is here accompanied by a Greek text.
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  18. Inhalt.Theodor Ebert - 2019 - In Menon. De Gruyter. pp. 7-8.
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  19. Zum griechischen text dieser ausgabe.Theodor Ebert - 2019 - In Menon. De Gruyter. pp. 135-168.
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  20. Menon.Theodor Ebert (ed.) - 2019 - De Gruyter.
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  21. Einführung.Theodor Ebert - 2019 - In Menon. De Gruyter. pp. 9-24.
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  22. The Birth of Belief.Jessica Moss & Whitney Schwab - 2019 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 57 (1):1-32.
    did plato and aristotle have anything to say about belief? The answer to this question might seem blindingly obvious: of course they did. Plato distinguishes belief from knowledge in the Meno, Republic, and Theaetetus, and Aristotle does so in the Posterior Analytics. Plato distinguishes belief from perception in the Theaetetus, and Aristotle does so in the De anima. They talk about the distinction between true and false beliefs, and the ways in which belief can mislead and the ways in which (...)
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  23. Review of Samuel Scolnicov, Plato’s Method of Hypothesis in the Middle Dialogues, Edited by Harold Tarrant. [REVIEW]Evan Rodriguez - 2019 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 57 (3):549-550.
    This volume, a lightly-edited version of Professor Samuel Scolnicov’s 1974 Ph.D. thesis, is a fitting tribute to his impressive career. It will perhaps be most useful for those interested in better understanding Scolnicov’s work and his views on Plato as a whole, not least for the comprehensive list of his publications that requires a full twelve pages of print. Scholars with an interest in Plato’s method of hypothesis will also find some useful remarks on key passages in the Meno, Phaedo, (...)
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  24. Educational Implication of Meno.Hyeon-Bin Shin - 2019 - Journal of Moral Education 31 (2):21-42.
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  25. Ascent to the Good: The Reading Order of Plato’s Dialogues From Symposium to Republic.William H. F. Altman - 2018 - Lexington Books.
    This study reconsiders Plato’s “Socratic” dialogues—Charmides, Laches, Lysis, Euthydemus, Gorgias, and Meno—as parts of an integrated curriculum. By privileging reading order over order of composition, a Platonic pedagogy teaching that the Idea of the Good is a greater object of philosophical concern than what benefits the self is spotlighted.
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  26. A Reminiscência da Virtude Pelas Imagens: Platão E a Educação Moral.Daniel Figueiras Alves - 2018 - Prometeus: Filosofia em Revista 11 (26).
    O tema central deste artigo é a discussão em torno do processo de reminiscência da alma por meio das imagens. Por imagens podemos compreender uma ampla gama de elementos de caráter sensível, tais como forma, aparência, representação visual ou no imaginário. Platão confere às imagens um caráter pedagógico, qual seja: estimular na alma suas memórias. Para o filósofo, a alma é imortal e carrega em si mesma conhecimentos ou saberes apriorísticos. Trata-se, pois, de suas reminiscências, isto é, lembranças e memórias (...)
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  27. The Possibility of Inquiry: Meno's Paradox From Socrates to Sextus.Luca Castagnoli - 2018 - Philosophical Review 127 (2):225-228.
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  28. “Music to the Ears of Weaklings”: Moral Hydraulics and the Unseating of Desire.Louise Rebecca Chapman & Constantine Sandis - 2018 - Manuscrito 41 (4):71-112.
    Psychological eudaimonism is the view that we are constituted by a desire to avoid the harmful. This entails that coming to see a prospective or actual object of pursuit as harmful to us will unseat our positive evaluative belief about that object. There is more than one way that such an 'unseating' of desire may be caused on an intellectualist picture. This paper arbitrates between two readings of Socrates' 'attack on laziness' in the Meno, with the aim of constructing a (...)
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  29. Socratic Inquiry and the “What‐is‐F?” Question.Justin C. Clark - 2018 - European Journal of Philosophy 26 (4):1324-1342.
    In raising the “What-is-F?” question, commentators disagree about whether Socrates is asking a conceptual question or a causal question. I argue that the contexts surrounding Socrates' two most prominent examples of adequate answers confirm that the “What-is-F?” question is a conceptual question in both the Meno and Euthyphro, but a causal question in the Laches and Protagoras. The “What-is-F?” question is multifunctional. Plato's Socrates consistently employs two separate vocabularies in connection with these two types of questions. By outlining their vocabularies, (...)
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  30. Platon: Menon, Übersetzung und Kommentar.Theodor Ebert - 2018 - Berlin, Germany: de Gruyter.
    The book contains a German translation of the Greek text, based on Bluck’s edition, and a commentary. Special attention is paid to the question-and-answer arguments as well as to the comical situations in the dialogue. Since in Plato’s Meno we meet a Socrates very well versed in the intellectual culture of Sicily, I worked with the assumption that this dialogue was written with a Sicilian audience in mind, probably on the occasion of Plato’s first visit to Syracuse. Areté, virtue, which (...)
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  31. Epistemic Value.John Greco & Luis Pinto De Sa - 2018 - Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Epistemic value is a kind of value possessed by knowledge, and perhaps other epistemic goods such as justification and understanding. The problem of explaining the value of knowledge is perennial in philosophy, going back at least as far as Plato’s Meno. One formulation of the problem is to explain why and in what sense knowledge is valuable. Another version of the problem is to explain why and in what sense knowledge is more valuable than mere true belief or opinion. This (...)
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  32. Plato’s Recollection Argument in the Philebus.Naoya Iwata - 2018 - Rhizomata 6 (2):189-212.
    Many scholars have denied that Plato’s argument about desire at Philebus 34c10–35d7 is related to his recollection arguments in the Meno and Phaedo, because it is concerned only with postnatal experiences of pleasure. This paper argues against their denial by showing that the desire argument in question is intended to prove the soul’s possession of innate memory of pleasure. This innateness interpretation will be supported by a close analysis of the Timaeus, where Plato suggests that our inborn desires for food (...)
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  33. Knowledge and Truth in Plato: Stepping Past the Shadow of Socrates.Catherine Rowett - 2018 - Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
    Catherine Rowett presents an in depth study of Plato's Meno, Republic and Theaetetus and offers both a coherent argument that the project in which Plato was engaging has been widely misunderstood and misrepresented, and detailed new readings of particular thorny issues in the interpretation of these classic texts.
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  34. Clitophon's Challenge: Dialectic in Plato's “Meno,” “Phaedo,” and “Republic”. [REVIEW]George Rudebusch - 2018 - Philosophical Review 127 (2):229-232.
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  35. Augustine Meets Meno: The Many Faces of Temporality: Bouton, Christophe, and Huneman, Philippe : Time of Nature and the Nature of Time. Philosophical Perspectives of Time in Natural Sciences. Cham: Springer International Publishing, 2017. Xiv + 403 Pp, 124,79 € HB.Vassilis Sakellariou - 2018 - Metascience 27 (3):523-526.
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  36. Socrates and the Benefits of Puzzlement.Jan Szaif - 2018 - In George Karamanolis & Vasilis Politis (eds.), The Aporetic Tradition in Ancient Philosophy. Cambridge, UK: pp. 29-47.
    This essay addresses the role of aporetic thinking and aporetic dialogue in the early “Socratic” dialogues of Plato. It aims to provide a new angle on why and how puzzlement induced by Socrates should benefit his interlocutors but often fails to do so. After discussing criteria for what is to count as an aporetic dialogue, the essay explains how and why Socrates’ aporia-inducing conversations point to a conception of virtue as grounded in a form of self-transparent wisdom. In combination with (...)
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  37. The Possibility of Inquiry: Meno's Paradox From Socrates to Sextus. By Gail Fine. Pp. Xiv, 399, Oxford University Press, 2014, £55.00/$85.00. [REVIEW]Robin Waterfield - 2018 - Heythrop Journal 59 (4):748-749.
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  38. Plato's Theory of Knowledge.Ralph Wedgwood - 2018 - In David Brink, Susan Sauvé Meyer & Christopher Shields (eds.), Virtue, Happiness, Knowledge: Themes from the Work of Gail Fine and Terence Irwin. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 33-56.
    An account of Plato’s theory of knowledge is offered. Plato is in a sense a contextualist: at least, he recognizes that his own use of the word for “knowledge” varies – in some contexts, it stands for the fullest possible level of understanding of a truth, while in other contexts, it is broader and includes less complete levels of understanding as well. But for Plato, all knowledge, properly speaking, is a priori knowledge of necessary truths – based on recollection of (...)
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  39. Plato, Metacognition and Philosophy in Schools.Peter Worley - 2018 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 5 (1):76-91.
    In this article, I begin by saying something about what metacognition is and why it is desirable within education. I then outline how Plato anticipates this concept in his dialogue Meno. This is not just a historical point; by dividing the cognitive self into a three-in-one—a ‘learner’, a ‘teacher’ and an ‘evaluator’—Plato affords us a neat metaphorical framework for understanding metacognition that, I contend, is valuable today. In addition to aiding our understanding of this concept, Plato’s model of metacognition not (...)
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  40. Menonov »Paradoks«: Analiza Erističnega Argumenta.Lale Levin Basut - 2017 - Filozofski Vestnik 38 (1).
    Velika večina sodobnih analiz Platonovega dialoga Menon poskuša osvetliti vzpostavitev kreposti, pri čemer skušajo ugotoviti, kako lahko pridemo do nje, upoštevajoč tri momente, navedene na začetku dialoga: διδακτόν, ᾰσκητόν in ϕύσει. Članek se osredotoča na slavni eristični argument v 80e, ki je znan kot »Menonov paradoks«. Tega razgradi na elemente in skuša razkriti namenoma prikrite pomene v vsakem kosu argumenta, uporabljajoč različne grške izraze, ki označujejo »vednost« v različnih pomenih. Ta filo-loška/filozofska analiza erističnega argumenta omogoča prebiti sofistično/eristično pročelje, ki je (...)
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  41. Interactive Memory and Recollection in Plato's Meno.Rick Benitez & James Ley - 2017 - Journal of Modern Greek Studies (Australia and New Zealand) 1:1-10.
    We re-examine the geometry lesson in the Meno, focusing on the interaction between interlocutors in the practice of recollection. We appeal to an analogy with interactive memory to suggest how Plato could think that inquiry could be successful even when participants have no awareness of what would satisfy their inquiry. This exposes a feature of recollection that needs no metaphysical assumptions, and which emphasises interaction. This feature, which has escaped the notice of philosophers, is more fundamental to the Meno than (...)
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  42. Почему Парадокс Менона Более Упорен, Чем Это Предполагает Решение Аристотеля?Igor Berestov - 2017 - Schole 11 (2):505-514.
    In the present paper, we analyze Aristotle’s solution of Meno’s Paradox in his An. Post. I, 1.71a17–71b8, where he seeks to demonstrate that Plato’s assertion that it is impossible to search for an unknown object is false. We show that such an interpretation of Aristotle’s solution is very generous on his part. We demonstrate that the search in Aristotle’s solution is quite naturally treated as a search for an object that satisfies the search conditions and that this treating of the (...)
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  43. The Possibility of Inquiry: Meno’s Paradox From Socrates to Sextus, by Gail Fine.David Bronstein - 2017 - Mind 126 (502):631-634.
    The Possibility of Inquiry: Meno’s Paradox from Socrates to Sextus, by Gail Fine. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014. Pp. xiv + 399.
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  44. Everyone Desires the Good: Socrates' Protreptic Theory of Desire.Agnes Callard - 2017 - Review of Metaphysics 70 (4).
    Socrates says that everyone desires the good. Does he mean that people desire what appears to them to be good? Or does he mean that they desire what really is good? This article argues, with reference passages in the Meno and Gorgias, that these alternatives are less opposed than they seem: each identifies something Socrates takes to be a necessary but insufficient condition on desiring. If what we desire must both be and appear to us to be good, then people (...)
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  45. The Rhetoric of Plato's "Republic": Democracy and the Philosophical Problem of Persuasion by James L. Kastely.Arthur E. Walzer - 2017 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 50 (2):228-232.
    In chapters on the Gorgias and the Meno in his 1997 From Plato to Postmodernism, James Kasterly argues that an important point made in the Gorgias is that Socrates fails to persuade Callicles. Its lesson is that philosophers will never succeed in persuading nonphilosophers if they rely on dialectic, with its premises grounded in epistemology, and in the Meno, he finds a type of dialectic that functions rhetorically. In this new book, The Rhetoric of Plato's "Republic": Democracy and the Philosophical (...)
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  46. The Possibility of Inquiry: Meno's Paradox From Socrates to Sextus by Gail Fine. [REVIEW]David Ebrey - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (3):537-538.
    In the first half of this book, Gail Fine provides a renewed defense of her reading of Meno's famous paradox; in the second, she provides novel accounts of how Aristotle, the Stoics, the Epicureans, and Sextus Empiricus responded to the paradox. For reasons of space, I focus on the first half, where Fine defends the same basic account of Meno's paradox she put forward in her influential "Inquiry in the Meno". The book goes further, considering and dismissing several alternatives not (...)
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  47. Clitophon’s Challenge: Dialectic in Plato’s Meno, Phaedo, and Republic. [REVIEW]Lee Franklin - 2017 - Ancient Philosophy 37 (1):197-201.
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  48. Safety's Swamp: Against The Value of Modal Stability.Georgi Gardiner - 2017 - American Philosophical Quarterly 54 (2):119-129.
    An account of the nature of knowledge must explain the value of knowledge. I argue that modal conditions, such as safety and sensitivity, do not confer value on a belief and so any account of knowledge that posits a modal condition as a fundamental constituent cannot vindicate widely held claims about the value of knowledge. I explain the implications of this for epistemology: We must either eschew modal conditions as a fundamental constituent of knowledge, or retain the modal conditions but (...)
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  49. David Bronstein. Aristotle on Knowledge and Learning: The Posterior Analytics. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016. Pp. Xiii+272. $74.00. [REVIEW]Owen Goldin - 2017 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 7 (1):173-176.
  50. Elenchus, Recollection, and the Method of Hypothesis in the Meno.Cristina Ionescu - 2017 - Plato Journal: The Journal of the International Plato Society 17:9-29.
    The Meno is often interpreted as an illustration of Plato’s decision to replace elenchus with recollection and the method of hypothesis. My paper challenges this view and defends instead two theses: that far from replacing elenchus, the method of hypothesis incorporates and uses elenctic arguments in order to test and build its own steps; and that recollection is not a method of search on a par with elenchus and the method of hypothesis, but is rather primarily a theory that accounts (...)
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