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  1. Plato on the Role of Anger in Our Intellectual and Moral Development.Marta Jimenez - 2020 - In Laura Candiotto & Olivier Renaut (eds.), Emotions in Plato. Brill. pp. 285–307.
    In this paper I examine some of the positive epistemic and moral dimensions of anger in Plato’s dialogues. My aim is to show that while Plato is clearly aware that retaliatory anger has negative effects on people’s behavior, the strategy we find in his dialogues is not to eliminate anger altogether; instead, Plato aims to transform or rechannel destructive retaliatory anger into a different, more productive, reformative anger. I argue that this new form of anger plays a crucial positive role (...)
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  2. Differentiating Philosopher From Statesman According to Work and Worth.Jens Kristian Larsen - 2020 - Polis 37 (3):550-566.
    Plato’s Sophist and Statesman stand out from many other Platonic dialogues by at least two features. First, they do not raise a ti esti question about a single virtue or feature of something, but raise the questions what sophist, statesman, and philosopher are, how they differ from each other, and what worth each should be accorded. Second, a visitor from Elea, rather than Socrates, seeks to addressed these questions and does so by employing what is commonly referred to as the (...)
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  3. On Socrates' Project of Philosophical Conversion.Jacob Stump - 2020 - Philosophers' Imprint 20 (32):1-19.
    There is a wide consensus among scholars that Plato’s Socrates is wrong to trust in reason and argument as capable of converting people to the life of philosophy. In this paper, I argue for the opposite. I show that Socrates employs a more sophisticated strategy than is typically supposed. Its key component is the use of philosophical argument not to lead an interlocutor to rationally conclude that he must change his way of life but rather to cause a certain affective (...)
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  4. Plato’s Conception of Justice and the Question of Human Dignity.Marek Piechowiak - 2019 - Berlin, Niemcy: Peter Lang Academic Publishers.
    This book is the first comprehensive study of Plato’s conception of justice. The universality of human rights and the universality of human dignity, which is recognised as their source, are among the crucial philosophical problems in modern-day legal orders and in contemporary culture in general. If dignity is genuinely universal, then human beings also possessed it in ancient times. Plato not only perceived human dignity, but a recognition of dignity is also visible in his conception of justice, which forms the (...)
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  5. Playing with Intoxication: On the Cultivation of Shame and Virtue in Plato’s Laws.Nicholas R. Baima - 2018 - Apeiron 51 (3):345-370.
    This paper examines Plato’s conception of shame and the role intoxication plays in cultivating it in the Laws. Ultimately, this paper argues that there are two accounts of shame in the Laws. There is a public sense of shame that is more closely tied to the rational faculties and a private sense of shame that is more closely tied to the non-rational faculties. Understanding this division between public and private shame not only informs our understanding of Plato’s moral psychology, but (...)
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  6. Philosopher Rulers and False Beliefs.Nicholas Baima - 2017 - Ancient Philosophy 37 (1):19-37.
    Many scholars have viewed the noble lie as fundamentally a device for educating the non-philosophers in the Kallipolis. On this reading, the elite and sophisticated philosopher rulers lie to the non-philosophers, who are unable to fully grasp the truth; such lies help motivate the non-philosophers towards virtuous activity and the promotion of the common good. Hence, according to many scholars, the falsehoods of the noble lie play no role in motivating fully accomplished adult philosophers towards virtue. The motivation for this (...)
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  7. Republic 382a-D: On the Dangers and Benefits of Falsehood.Nicholas R. Baima - 2017 - Classical Philology 112 (1):1-19.
    Socrates' attitude towards falsehood is quite puzzling in the Republic. Although Socrates is clearly committed to truth, at several points he discusses the benefits of falsehood. This occurs most notably in Book 3 with the "noble lie" (414d-415c) and most disturbingly in Book 5 with the "rigged sexual lottery" (459d-460c). This raises the question: What kinds of falsehoods does Socrates think are beneficial, and what kinds of falsehoods does he think are harmful? And more broadly: What can this tell us (...)
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  8. What’s Next in Plato’s Clitophon?Brian Marrin - 2017 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (2):307-319.
    The Clitophon has posed a riddle to its readers: Why does Socrates not respond to the criticisms levelled against him? A careful reading of the dialogue shows that Clitophon’s criticism of Socrates already contains its own rebuttal. It is not, as many have suggested, certain beliefs of Clitophon’s that make a Socratic response impossible. Rather, Socrates’s silence is itself the response, intended to force Clitophon to turn back to what has already been said. It is Clitophon’ lack of self-knowledge, or (...)
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  9. Introduction.Pettersson Olof - 2017 - In Olof Pettersson & Vigdis Songe-Møller (eds.), Plato’s Protagoras: Essays on the Confrontation of Philosophy and Sophistry. Springer. pp. 1-8.
    Guided by the bold ambition to reexamine the nature of philosophy, questions about the foundations and origins of Plato’s dialogues have in recent years gained a new and important momentum. In the wake of the seminal work of Andrea Nightingale and especially her book Genres in Dialogue from 1995, Plato’s texts have come to be reconsidered in terms of their compositional and intergeneric fabric. Supplementing important research on the argumentative structures of the dialogues, it has been argued that Plato’s philosophizing (...)
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  10. Plato’s Protagoras: Essays on the Confrontation of Philosophy and Sophistry.Pettersson Olof (ed.) - 2017 - Springer.
    This book presents a thorough study and an up to date anthology of Plato’s Protagoras. International authors' papers contribute to the task of understanding how Plato introduced and negotiated a new type of intellectual practice – called philosophy – and the strategies that this involved. They explore Plato’s dialogue, looking at questions of how philosophy and sophistry relate, both on a methodological and on a thematic level. While many of the contributing authors argue for a sharp distinction between sophistry and (...)
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  11. Dangerous Voices: On Written and Spoken Discourse in Plato’s Protagoras.Pettersson Olof - 2017 - In Olof Pettersson & Vigdis Vigdis Songe-Møller (eds.), Plato’s Protagoras: Essays on the Confrontation of Philosophy and Sophistry. Springer. pp. 177-198.
    Plato’s Protagoras contains, among other things, three short but puzzling remarks on the media of philosophy. First, at 328e5–329b1, Plato makes Socrates worry that long speeches, just like books, are deceptive, because they operate in a discursive mode void of questions and answers. Second, at 347c3–348a2, Socrates argues that discussion of poetry is a presumptuous affair, because, the poems’ message, just like the message of any written text, cannot be properly examined if the author is not present. Third, at 360e6–361d6, (...)
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  12. The Political Significance of Plato’s Allegory of the Cave.Gabriel Zamosc - 2017 - Ideas Y Valores 66 (165):237-265.
    Abstract: In this paper I claim that Plato’s Cave is fundamentally a political, not an epistemological image, and that only by treating it as such can we appreciate correctly its relation to the images of the Sun and the Line. On the basis of textual evidence, I question the two main assumptions that support (in my view, mistakenly) the effort to find an epistemological parallel between the Cave and the Line: first, that the prisoners represent humankind in general, and, second, (...)
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  13. Persuasion, Falsehood, and Motivating Reason in Plato’s Laws.Nicholas R. Baima - 2016 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 33 (2).
    In Plato’s Laws, the Athenian Stranger maintains that law should consist of both persuasion (πειθώ) and compulsion (βία) (IV.711c, IV.718b-d, and IV.722b). Persuasion can be achieved by prefacing the laws with preludes (προοίμια), which make the citizens more eager to obey the laws. Although scholars disagree on how to interpret the preludes’ persuasion, they agree that the preludes instill true beliefs and give citizens good reasons for obeying the laws. In this paper I refine this account of the preludes by (...)
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  14. Death and the Limits of Truth in the Phaedo.Nicholas Baima - 2015 - Apeiron 48 (3):263-284.
    This paper raises a new interpretive puzzle concerning Socrates’ attitude towards truth in the Phaedo. At one point Socrates seems to advocate that he is justified in trying to convince himself that the soul is immortal and destined for a better place regardless of whether or not these claims are true, but that Cebes and Simmias should relentlessly pursue the truth about the very same matter. This raises the question: Why might Socrates believe that he will benefit from believing things (...)
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  15. Early Education in Plato's Republic.Michelle Jenkins - 2015 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 23 (5):843-863.
    In this paper, I reconsider the commonly held position that the early moral education of the Republic is arational since the youths of the Kallipolis do not yet have the capacity for reason. I argue that, because they receive an extensive mathematical education alongside their moral education, the youths not only have a capacity for reason but that capacity is being developed in their early education. If this is so, though, then we must rethink why the early moral education is (...)
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  16. Plato, Forms, and Moral Motivation.Iakovos Vasiliou - 2015 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 49:37-70.
  17. The Problem of Alcibiades: Plato on Moral Education and the Many.Joshua Wilburn - 2015 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 49:1-36.
    Socrates’ admirers and successors in the fourth century and beyond often felt the need to explain Socrates’ reputed relationship with Alcibiades, and to defend Socrates against the charge that he was a corrupting influence on Alcibiades. In this paper I examine Plato’s response to this problem and have two main aims. First, I will argue in Section 2 that (...)
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  18. Plato's Critical Theory.Sara Brill - 2013 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 17 (2):233-248.
    This paper argues that the creation of Kallipolis and the educational pro­gamme designed therein should be read in the context of one branch of Plato’s critique of Athenian democracy; namely, its employment of the Laconizing trope prominent in Politeia literature in order to identify and radicalize the desires innervated by an idealized vision of Spartan unity. In particular, it aims to show that the discussion of sexual difference in the famous first wave of Book 5, as well as the peculiar (...)
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  19. Plato and Socrates: From an Educator of Childhood to a Childlike Educator?Walter Omar Kohan - 2013 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 32 (3):313-325.
    This paper deals with two forms of education—Platonic and Socratic. The former educates childhood to transform it into what it ought to be. The latter does not form childhood, but makes education childlike. To unfold the philosophical and pedagogical dimensions of this opposition, the first part of the paper highlights the way in which philosophy is presented indirectly in some of Plato’s dialogues, beginning with a characterisation that Socrates makes of himself in the dialogue Phaedrus. The second part details Plato’s (...)
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  20. Socrates Vs. Callicles: Examination & Ridicule in Plato’s Gorgias.David Levy - 2013 - Plato Journal 13:27-36.
    The Callicles colloquy of Plato’s Gorgias features both examination and ridicule. Insofar as Socrates’ examination of Callicles proceeds via the elenchus, the presence of ridicule requires explanation. This essay seeks to provide that explanation by placing the effort to ridicule within the effort to examine; that is, the judgment/pronouncement that something/ someone is worthy of ridicule is a proper part of the elenchic examination. Standard accounts of the Socratic elenchus do not include this component. Hence, the argument of this essay (...)
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  21. Bildung und Bildmetaphysik: Eine Heideggersche Kritik des Bildungsbegriffes.Jussi Backman - 2012 - In Hanna-Barbara Gerl-Falkovitz, René Kaufmann & Hans Rainer Sepp (eds.), Die Bildung Europas: Eine Topographie des Möglichen im Horizont der Freiheit. Thelem. pp. 175-191.
    Dieser Aufsatz erörtert Heideggers Auffassung vom ‚metaphysischen‘ Charakter des abendländischen Humanismus mittels einer Hervorhebung einiger Grundzüge der Geschichte des philosophischen Bildungsbegriffes. Nach Heidegger sind die Bildungsideale der europäischen Humanismen von den metaphysischen Grundauffassungen vom idealen Sein des Seienden bestimmt. Außerdem ist für Heidegger der Bildungsbegriff mit der Tradition der Bildmetaphysik – sowohl mit der platonisch-christlichen Vorstellung des Menschen als Abbild eines göttlichen Vorbilds als auch mit der neuzeitlich-subjektivistischen ‚Eroberung der Welt als Bild‘ – verbunden. Schließlich wird die Möglichkeit eines Heideggerschen (...)
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  22. Music and Pedagogy in the Platonic City. Bourgault - 2012 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 46 (1):59-72.
    The gods, however, took pity on the human race, born to suffer as it was, and gave it relief in the form of religious festivals to serve as periods of rest from its labors. They gave us the Muses, with Apollo their leader, and Dionysus; by having these gods to share their holidays, men were to be made whole again . . .That Plato1 regarded music as an extremely powerful means to cultivate morality and good citizenship is well-known.2 In the (...)
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  23. Reply to Rowe.Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith - 2012 - The Journal of Ethics 16 (3):325-338.
    In our reply to Rowe, we explain why most of what he criticizes is actually the product of his misunderstanding our argument. We begin by showing that nearly all of his Part 1 misconceives our project by defending a position we never attacked. We then question why Rowe thinks the distinction we make between motivational and virtue intellectualism is unimportant before developing a defense of the consistency of our views about different desires. Next we turn to Rowe’s criticisms of our (...)
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  24. Compte Rendu de F. Pelosi, Plato: On Music, Soul and Body.Catherine Collobert - 2012 - Plato Journal 12 (Plato 12 (2012)).
    Cet ouvrage constitue la version révisée d'une thèse de doctorat soutenue à la Scuola Normale Superiore de Pise, et traduite en anglais. Composé de quatre chapitres, l'ouvrage se propose d'abord d'examiner le rôle que Platon attribue à la musique dans l'éducation, pour ensuite analyser la relation que la musique entretient avec l'âme et le corps. F. Pelosi étudie la conception platonicienne de la musique et envisage son importance pour comprendre non seulement la relation corps-esprit chez Platon, mais (…) - 12. (...)
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  25. Laughing to Learn: Irony in the Republic as Pedagogy.Jonathan Fine - 2011 - Polis 28 (2):235-49.
    Recent commentators have attended to dramatic and ironic aspects of Plato’s Republic. But a more sustained examination of the relation between irony and the exchanges of Socrates and Glaucon is required because a crucial purpose and presentation of the irony have largely gone unnoticed. I argue that Socrates employs irony in part to parody Glaucon’s extremism and that he does so to exhort Glaucon to think critically. I examine how Socrates uses the term makaria (blessedness) primarily ironically and pedagogically. A (...)
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  26. Crisis of Community.Christopher P. Long - 2011 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (2):361-377.
    In Plato’s Protagoras Alcibiades plays the role of Hermes, the ‘ambassador god,’ who helps lead Socrates’ conversation with Protagoras through a crisis of dialogue that threatens to destroy the community of education established by the dialogue itself. By tracing the moments when Alcibiades intervenes in the conversation, we are led to an understanding of Socratic politics as always concerned with the course of the life of an individual and the proper time in which it might be turned toward the question (...)
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  27. Gardener of Souls : Philosophical Education in Plato's Phaedrus.Anne Cotton - 2010 - In Dan O'Brien (ed.), Gardening - Philosophy for Everyone: Cultivating Wisdom. Wiley-Blackwell.
  28. Plato – by Robin Barrow.Jim Mackenzie - 2010 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 42 (4):501-503.
  29. Plato on Education and Art.Rachana Kamtekar - 2008 - In Gail Fine (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Plato. Oxford University Press. pp. 336--359.
    The article resonates Plato's ideas on education and art. In the Apology, Socrates describes his life's mission of practicing philosophy as aimed at getting the Athenians to care for virtue; in the Gorgias, Plato claims that happiness depends entirely on education and justice; in the Protagoras and the Meno, he puzzles about whether virtue is teachable or how else it might be acquired; in the Phaedrus, he explains that teaching and persuading require knowledge of the soul and its powers, which (...)
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  30. Plato’s Myth of the Noble Lie and the Predicaments of American Civic Education.Kerry Burch - 2007 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 26 (2):111-125.
  31. Turning the Psyche. Plato - 2007 - In Randall R. Curren (ed.), Philosophy of Education: An Anthology. Blackwell.
  32. Philosophy as the Practice of Musical Inheritance: Book II of Plato’s Republic.Eric C. Sanday - 2007 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 11 (2):305-317.
    Philosophy is often taken at its core to be an argumentative appeal to our own native capacity to judge the truth without bias. I claim in this paper that the very notion of unbiased truth represents a particular interest, viz., the interests of the political as such: the city. My thesis is that Socrates’ city in speech in Book II of the Republic exposes the injustice concealed at the core of demonstrative philosophy, and on this basis he goes on to (...)
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  33. The Injustice of Callicles and the Limits of Socrates’s Ability to Educate a Young Politician.Eric Buzzetti - 2005 - Ancient Philosophy 25 (1):25-48.
  34. La paternità dell’eros: il “Simposio” e Freud.Marco Solinas - 2005 - In Gherardo Ugolini (ed.), Die Kraft der Vergangenheit – La forza del passato. Georg Olms Verlag. pp. 231-241.
  35. Minding the Gap in Plato's Republic.Eric Brown - 2004 - Philosophical Studies 117 (1-2):275-302.
    At least since Sachs' well-known essay, readers of Plato's Republic have worried that there is a gap between the challenge posed to Socrates--to show that it is always in one's interest to act justly--and his response--to show that it is always in one's interest to have a just soul. The most popular response has been that Socrates fills this gap in Books Five through Seven by supposing that knowledge of the Forms motivates those with just souls to act justly. I (...)
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  36. Plato's Child and the Limit-Points of Educational Theories.Bernadette Baker - 2003 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 22 (6):439-474.
    This paper analyzes how the figure of the childhas been used to authorize a series ofboundaries that have constituted thelimit-points of educational theories orphilosophies. Limit-points are the conceptualboundaries that educational theories produce,move within, respond to, and make use ofbecause the perception is that they cannot beargued away or around at the time. A method ofcomparative historico-philosophy is used tocontrast limit-points in Platonic figurationsof the child and education with childcenteredand eugenic theories of the late nineteenth andtwentieth century West. The figuration of (...)
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  37. Plato's Philosophy of Education in the Laws.D. N. Lambrellis - 2003 - Philosophical Inquiry 25 (3-4):127-133.
  38. Socrates and Παιδεία in the "Crito".Paul Neufeld - 2003 - Apeiron 36 (2):115 - 141.
  39. Plato’s Socrates as Educator. [REVIEW]Heather L. Reid - 2003 - Teaching Philosophy 26 (2):188-192.
  40. Plato’s Socrates as Educator. [REVIEW]Rebecca Benson - 2002 - Southwest Philosophy Review 18 (2):163-167.
  41. Dialectical Refutation as a Paradigm of Socratic Punishment.Michael J. Cholbi - 2002 - Journal of Philosophical Research 27:371-379.
    Evidence from the Apology, Crito, Protagoras, and Gorgias is mustered in defense of the claim that for Socrates, dialectic typifies just punishment: Dialectic benefits the punished by making her more just, since it disabuses her of the false beliefs that stand in the way of her acquiring knowledge of justice. Though painful and disorienting to the interlocutor, having one’s opinions refuted by Socrates—who is wiser than his interlocutors due to his awareness of the vastness of his ignorance —is in fact (...)
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  42. Plato’s Socrates as Educator. [REVIEW]Jacob Howland - 2002 - Ancient Philosophy 22 (1):180-184.
  43. Zum Begriff der Liebe in Platons Symposion Oder.Eva-Maria Engelen - 2001 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 6 (1):1-20.
    The feminine component which can be identified with creativity is, according to Plato, crucial for education and knowledge. This essay examines how Plato in the Symposium expresses his conception of educational and cognitive relationships in analogy to amorous relationships. This analogy makes it evident why Diotima is a woman. The essay shows in addition how Eros leads to knowledge and immortality, as well as how Socrates incarnates Eros in this Platonic conception. The question is also considered whether Plato subscribed to (...)
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  44. Zum Begriff der Liebe in Platons Symposion oder: Warum ist Diotima eine Frau?Eva-Maria Engelen - 2001 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 6:1-20.
    The feminine component which can be identified with creativity is, according to Plato, crucial for education and knowledge. This essay examines how Plato in the Symposium expresses his conception of educational and cognitive relationships in analogy to amorous relationships. This analogy makes it evident why Diotima is a woman. The essay shows in addition how Eros leads to knowledge and immortality, as well as how Socrates incarnates Eros in this Platonic conception. The question is also considered whether Plato subscribed to (...)
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  45. Plato and Friere on Knowledge, Education and Justice.P. Quinn - 2001 - Skepsis: A Journal for Philosophy and Interdisciplinary Research 12.
  46. Plato's Code: Philosophical Foundations of Knowledge in Education.Twyla Gail Gibson - 2000 - Dissertation, University of Toronto (Canada)
    This thesis examines the philosophy of education presented in Plato's dialogues. It dates the composition of these writings to the time of the transition of Greek culture and education from orality to literacy following the adoption of the phonetic alphabet. It shows that an awareness of this revolution in the technology for storing and retrieving communication has not been incorporated into our paradigm for interpreting Plato's philosophy. ;The study takes Homer as an example of a literature with roots in an (...)
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  47. Friendship in Education and the Desire for the Good: An Interpretation of Plato's Phaedrus.D. P. E. Muir - 2000 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 32 (2):233–247.
  48. The Moral and Intellectual Development of the Philosopher in Plato’s Republic.Elizabeth F. Cooke - 1999 - Ancient Philosophy 19 (1):37-44.
    Many commentators of the "Republic" see the conformity to authority, emphasized in the early education, as a hindrance to the development of the critical skills necessary for the philosopher. Furthermore, they see the theoretical training of the philosopher as detached from morality. I argue that Plato does not view philosophical training as separate from morality. Rather Plato views intellectual training as integral to the philosopher's overall pursuit of the Good. Philosophical knowledge is moral because the objects of such knowledge are (...)
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  49. Socrates’ Education to Virtue: Learning the Love of the Noble.Asli Gocer - 1999 - Review of Metaphysics 52 (3):703-704.
    With this new book the gap between Straussian and analytic approaches to Plato’s dialogues begins to look like it is unbridgeable. While the analytic side has been furiously fussing over the critical minutia regarding the dating and authenticity of the Platonic dialogues in order to determine what we can know of Socrates through Plato, Lutz without so much as a nod toward that project simply takes any Platonic dialogue to be a reliable guide to “Socrates” and his thought. This will (...)
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  50. Plato's Counsel on Education.Amélie Oksenberg Rorty - 1998 - Philosophy 73 (2):157-178.
    Plato's dialogues can be read as a carefully staged exhibition and investigation of paideia, education in the broadest sense, including all that affects the formation of character and mind. The twentieth century textbook Plato — the Plato of the Myth of the Cave and the Divided Line, the ascent to the Good through Forms and Ideas — is but one of his elusive multiple authorial personae, each taking a different perspective on his investigations. As its focused problems differ, each Platonic (...)
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