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  1. Kent F. Moors: Glaucon and Adeimantus on Justice: The Structure of Argument in Book 2 of Plato's Republic. Pp. X + 145. Washington, DC.: University Press of America, 1981. $20. [REVIEW]Julia Annas - 1982 - The Classical Review 32 (2):283-284.
  2. Socrates on Why We Should Inquire.David Ebrey - 2017 - Ancient Philosophy 37 (1):1-17.
    This paper examines whether Socrates provides his interlocutors with good reasons to seek knowledge of what virtue is, reasons that they are in a position to appreciate. I argue that in the Laches he does provide such reasons, but they are not the reasons that are most commonly identified as Socratic. Socrates thinks his interlocutors should be motivated not by the idea that virtue is knowledge nor by the idea that knowledge is good for its own sake, but rather by (...)
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  3. Walter T. Schmid, "On Manly Courage: A Study of Plato's "Laches"". [REVIEW]David Roochnik - 1994 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 32 (1):128.
  4. On Manly Courage: A Study of Plato’s Laches. [REVIEW]Hugh H. Benson - 1994 - Ancient Philosophy 14 (2):383.
  5. Goodness and Justice: Plato, Aristotle and the Moderns.R. F. Stalley - 2003 - Mind 112 (446):382-385.
  6. Nature, Knowledge and Virtue. [REVIEW]Pamela M. Huby - 1992 - The Classical Review 42 (1):84-85.
  7. Protagoras’ Defense of the Teachableness of Virtue: Protagoras 320c-328d.Tom Morris - 1991 - Southwest Philosophy Review 7 (2):47-65.
  8. Virtue as the Only Unconditional — But Not Intrinsic — Good: Plato’s Euthydemus 278e3-281e5.Naomi Reshotko - 2001 - Ancient Philosophy 21 (2):325-334.
  9. Socrates’ Human Wisdom and Sophrosune in Charmides 164c Ff.Gabriela Roxana Carone - 1998 - Ancient Philosophy 18 (2):267-286.
  10. Prudence and the Fear of Death in Plato’s Apology.Emily A. Austin - 2010 - Ancient Philosophy 30 (1):39-55.
  11. The Unity of Knowledge and Love in Socrates’ Conception of Virtue.Emile de Strycker - 1966 - International Philosophical Quarterly 6 (3):428-444.
  12. Euthyphro, Foucault, and Baseball: Teaching the Euthyphro.Harry Brod - 2007 - Teaching Philosophy 30 (3):249-258.
    The central question of the Euthyphro is “Is the pious loved by the gods because it is pious, or pious because it is loved?” A baseball analogy explains this to students: “Does the umpire say ‘Out’ because the runner is out, or is the runner out because the umpire says ‘Out’?” The former makes the relevant knowledge public, making Socrates the appropriate secular moral authority, while the latter makes it religious, invoking Euthyphro’s expertise. Foucault’s aphorism that power is knowledge illuminates (...)
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  13. Comments on Sarah Broadie, “Virtue and Beyond in Plato and Aristotle”.Rachel Barney - 2005 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 43 (Supplement):115-125.
  14. Plato, Aristotle and Professor MacIntyre.Arthur Madigan - 1983 - Ancient Philosophy 3 (2):171-183.
  15. On the Ancient Idea That Music Shapes Character.James Harold - 2016 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 15 (3):341-354.
    Ancient Chinese and Greek thinkers alike were preoccupied with the moral value of music; they distinguished between good and bad music by looking at the music’s effect on moral character. The idea can be understood in terms of two closely related questions. Does music have the power to affect the ethical character of either listener or performer? If it does, is it better as music for doing so? I argue that an affirmative answers to both questions are more plausible than (...)
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  16. Thrasymachus’ Sophistic Account of Justice in Republic I.Merrick E. Anderson - 2016 - Ancient Philosophy 36 (1):151-172.
    In this paper, I oppose the now-dominant view that Thrasymachus offers a definition of justice in Book I of the Republic. This way of interpretation Thrasymachus does not pay sufficient attention to the methodological assumptions he makes during his disagreement with Socrates. To better understand Socrates’ antagonist, it is crucial to remember that he was, in fact, a sophist. I argue that what the character Thrasymachus is doing in Book I is importantly akin to a certain genre of sophistic arguments (...)
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  17. “Wolf’s Justice”: The Iliadic Doloneia and the Semiotics of Wolves.D. Steiner - 2015 - Classical Antiquity 34 (2):335-369.
    This article treats representations of the wolf in the Greek archaic and early classical literary and visual sources. Using a close reading of the Iliadic Doloneia as a point of departure, it argues that wolves in myth, fable, and other modes of discourse, as well as in the early artistic tradition, regularly serve as a means of signaling the loss of distinctions that occurs when friend turns into foe and an erstwhile philos or “second self” betrays one of his kind. (...)
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  18. Thrasymachus's Justice.Shmuel Harlap - 1979 - Political Theory 7 (3):347-370.
  19. Plato's 'Laws': A Critical Guide.Christopher Bobonich (ed.) - 2010 - Cambridge University Press.
    Long understudied, Plato's Laws has been the object of renewed attention in the past decade and is now considered to be his major work of political philosophy besides the Republic. In his last dialogue, Plato returns to the project of describing the foundation of a just city and sketches in considerable detail its constitution, laws and other social institutions. Written by leading Platonists, the essays in this volume cover a wide range of topics central for understanding the Laws, such as (...)
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  20. The Virtuous Life in Greek Ethics.Burkhard Reis & Stella Haffmans (eds.) - 2006 - Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    There is now a renewed concern for moral psychology among moral philosophers. Moreover, contemporary philosophers interested in virtue, moral responsibility and moral progress regularly refer to Plato and Aristotle, the two founding fathers of ancient ethics. The book contains eleven chapters by distinguished scholars which showcase current research in Greek ethics. Four deal with Plato, focusing on the Protagoras, Euthydemus, Symposium and Republic, and discussing matters of literary presentation alongside the philosophical content. The four chapters on Aristotle address problems such (...)
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  21. Evaluating the Goodness of Actions on Plato's Ethical Theory.Elizabeth Jelinek - 2015 - Philosophical Inquiry 39 (3-4):56-72.
  22. Plato or Justice.Edward Calvin Golumbic - 1961
  23. Die Entwicklungsstufen in Platos Tugendlehre.Maximilian Gerhard Michaelis - 1893
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  24. Before Theory and Practice: Implication of Desire and Knowledge in Plato's Dialogues.Colin Alexander Anderson - 2002 - Dissertation, Loyola University of Chicago
    In this dissertation, I re-examine the relationship between knowledge and virtue in Plato's dialogues. I argue that "knowledge" in the dialogues is not defined in opposition to "desire" but rather involves "desire" as a constitutive component and that "knowledge" has affective and "erotic" aspects. As a point of reference, I examine Aristotle's brief arguments against the Socratic identification of episteme and arete . I argue that they rest on epistemological and psychological assumptions that Socrates need not accept: viz., a differentiation (...)
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  25. Glaucon and Adeimantus on Justice the Structure of Argument in Book 2 of Plato's Republic.Kent F. Moors - 1981
  26. The Double Life of Justice and Injustice in Thrasymachus' Account.R. Arp - 1999 - Polis 16 (1-2):17-29.
  27. Of Firemen, Sophists, and Hunter-Philosophers: Citizenship and Courage in Plato's Laches.Richard Avramenko - 2007 - Polis 24 (2):203-230.
    The violence of the attacks on New York and Washington and the subsequent war in Iraq have brought to the fore the issue of citizenship virtue. This paper challenges nearly a generation of citizenship theorists who, by privileging discourse over other virtues, have impaired the capacity for a balanced political response to this event. It is argued that the removal of the virtue of courage from the model of good citizenship has resulted in a politics that either cannot suffer violence (...)
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  28. Justice in Plato's Republic. [REVIEW]F. D. J. - 1958 - Review of Metaphysics 11 (3):514-514.
    A desultory caricature, ostensibly socialist in tenor, of a well-known theory of justice.--J. F. D.
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  29. Kamtekar Virtue and Happiness. Essays in Honour of Julia Annas. Pp. X + 351. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012. Paper, £22.50 . ISBN: 978-0-19-964605-0. [REVIEW]Vanessa de Harven - 2014 - The Classical Review 64 (1):71-73.
    Contains essays on topics in moral philosophy from Plato, Aristotle, Stoicism and Plotinus. See the review at NDPR for detailed descriptions http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/virtue-and-happiness-essays-in-honour-of-julia-annas/.
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  30. Comic Cure for Delusional Democracy: Plato's Republic.Gene Fendt - 2014 - Lexington Books.
    In this book, author Gene Fendt shows how Plato's Republic provides a liturgical purification for the political and psychic delusions of democratic readers, even as Socrates provides the same for his interlocutors at the festival of Bendis. Each of the several characters is analyzed in accord with Book Eight's 6 geometrically possible kinds of character showing how their answers and failures in the dialogue exhibit the particular kind of movement and blindness predictable for the type.
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  31. Terry Penner and Richard Kraut, Eds., Nature, Knowledge and Virtue: Essays in Memory of Joan Kung Reviewed By.Marguerite Deslauriers - 1991 - Philosophy in Review 11 (5):353-355.
  32. Knowledge, Stability, and Virtue in the Meno.Casey Perin - 2012 - Ancient Philosophy 32 (1):15-34.
  33. Sovereign Virtue.C. C. W. Taylor - 1995 - Ancient Philosophy 15 (1):228 - 232.
  34. Piety as a Virtue in the Euthyphro.Russell E. Jones - 2006 - Ancient Philosophy 26 (2):385 - 390.
  35. Plato's Anti-Hedonism and the "Protagoras".J. Clerk Shaw - 2015 - Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.
    Plato often rejects hedonism, but in the "Protagoras", Plato's Socrates seems to endorse hedonism. In this book, J. Clerk Shaw removes this apparent tension by arguing that the "Protagoras" as a whole actually reflects Plato's anti-hedonism. He shows that Plato places hedonism at the core of a complex of popular mistakes about value and especially about virtue: that injustice can be prudent, that wisdom is weak, that courage is the capacity to persevere through fear, and that virtue cannot be taught. (...)
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  36. Contemplation and Self-Mastery in Plato's Phaedrus.Suzanne Obdrzalek - 2012 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 42:77-107.
    This chapter examines Plato's moral psychology in the Phaedrus. It argues against interpreters such as Burnyeat and Nussbaum that Plato's treatment of the soul is increasingly pessimistic: reason's desire to contemplate is at odds with its obligation to rule the soul, and psychic harmony can only be secured by violently suppressing the lower parts of the soul.
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  37. Lust Und Arete Bei Platon.Lynn Huestegge - 2004 - G. Olms.
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  38. La Colère Selon Platon.Magali Paillier - 2007 - Harmattan.
    Pourquoi la colère selon Platon ? S'évader d'une perspective classique qui présente tout excès comme étant mauvais, telle est la tentative de cette étude de la colère selon Platon.
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  39. Virtue and Democracy in Plato's Late Dialogues.Athanasios Samaras - 1995 - Dissertation, University of Warwick
    Both Plato's theory of virtue and his attitude towards democracy -the two being correspondent- change significantly as we move from the middle to the late dialogues. The Republic is a substantially authoritarian work which expresses an unmitigated rejection of democracy. Its authoritarianism is deeply rooted in the fact that its ethical and political assertions are justified on a metaphysical basis. Plato suggests that virtue and metaphysical knowledge legitimize political power, but both virtue and knowledge are so defined as to be (...)
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  40. The Good and the Just in Plato's Gorgias.Christopher Rowe - 2008 - Philosophical Inquiry 30 (3-4):55-75.
  41. Plato's Concept of the Philosophic Life.Raymond V. Schoder - 1941 - Modern Schoolman 19 (1):2-7.
  42. Plato and Education.Thomas C. Brickhouse - 1978 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 16 (3):344-344.
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  43. What Do the Arguments in the Protagoras Amount To?Vasilis Politis - 2012 - Phronesis 57 (3):209-239.
    Abstract The main thesis of the paper is that, in the coda to the Protagoras (360e-end), Plato tells us why and with what justification he demands a definition of virtue: namely, in order to resolve a particular aporia . According to Plato's assessment of the outcome of the arguments of the dialogue, the principal question, whether or not virtue can be taught , has, by the end of the dialogue, emerged as articulating an aporia , in that both protagonists, Socrates (...)
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  44. Virtue and Reason in Plato and Aristotle.A. W. Price - 2011 - Oxford University Press.
    A.W. Price explores the views of Plato and Aristotle on how virtue of character and practical reasoning enable agents to achieve eudaimonia--the state of living or acting well. He provides a full philosophical analysis and argues that the perennial question of action within human life is central to the reflections of these ancient philosophers.
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  45. Hobbs, Angela. Plato and the Hero: Courage, Manliness and the Impersonal Good.Jerrold R. Caplan - 2001 - Review of Metaphysics 55 (2):397-398.
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  46. Paideia.W. S. A. - 1979 - Review of Metaphysics 32 (4):756-758.
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  47. Filial Piety in the Euthyphro.Doug Al-Maini - 2011 - Ancient Philosophy 31 (1):1-24.
  48. Plato on the Sovereignty of Law.Zena Hitz - 2009 - In Ryan Balot (ed.), The Blackwell Companion to Greek and Roman Political Thought. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 367-381.
    This paper is in part an introduction to Plato's late political philosophy. In the central sections, I look at Plato's Laws and Statesman and ask the question of how law can produce authentic virtue. If law is merely coercive or habituating, but virtue requires rational understanding, there will be a gap between what law can do and what it is supposed to do. I examine the solution to this difficulty proposed in the Laws, the persuasive preludes attached to the laws, (...)
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  49. Socrates at Work on Virtue and Knowledge in Plato's "Laches".Gerasimos Santas - 1969 - Review of Metaphysics 22 (3):433 - 460.
  50. Knowledge and Virtue: Paradox in Plato's "Meno".Rosemary Desjardins - 1985 - Review of Metaphysics 39 (2):261 - 281.
    THE POINT of studying ethics, so Aristotle reminds us, is to become, ourselves, actually good. But surely we must wonder--as did the Greeks--whether it is in fact through studying ethics that we become good, or whether we ought perhaps look rather to the subtler influences of role models, both public and private, and the practical context of home and school environment. The question is as persistent today as it was in classical Greece: How is it that human beings come to (...)
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