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  1. added 2019-02-19
    Salvation in Plato and St. Paul: An Essay in Normative Ethics.George Nakhnikian - 1973 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 2 (3):325 - 344.
    What is a good man, and how does he become good? My aim in this paper is to unravel and to assess Plato's and St. Paul's very different answers to these questions. The pivotal texts are the Republic and Paul's Epistles.
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  2. added 2018-09-26
    Initiation, Extraction, and Transformation.Gregory Kirk - 2015 - Idealistic Studies 45 (1).
    In this paper, I provide an account of what is frequently called Socrates’s “method,” and, more specifically, of what one is being asked by Socrates when he asks “what is x?” I argue that one is being asked to change one’s life, and to orient one’s life around the pursuit of wisdom. To answer Socrates’s question is to subject oneself to a process of extracting from oneself one’s accumulated prejudices; doing so requires one to abandon, not just ideas that have (...)
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  3. added 2018-01-23
    Socrates’ Failure: Language and Lies in Plato’s Apology.Olof Pettersson - 2018 - In Haraldsen Vivil Valvik, Olof Pettersson & Tvedt Oda E. Wiese (eds.), Readings of Plato's Apology of Socrates Defending the Philosophical Life. Lexington. pp. 137-154.
    Plato’s Apology opens with a distinction. By opposing his accusers’ deceitfulness to his own blunt truthfulness, Socrates distinguishes a philosophical manner of speech from its politico-forensic counterpart. This can be said to culminate at 17d3, where Socrates claims to be a stranger (xenos) to the manner of speech—the lexis (17d3)—of the court. He asks to be allowed to talk with his own voice (phônh), in his own way (tropos, cf. 17d5–18a3) and without making fine speeches (“kekalliepêmenous ge logous,” 17b9). In (...)
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  4. added 2017-11-06
    On the Value of Drunkenness in the Laws.Nicholas Baima - 2017 - Logical Analysis and History of Philosophy 20:65-81.
    Plato's attitude towards drunkenness is surprisingly positive in the Laws, especially as compared to his negative treatment of intoxication in the Republic. In the Republic, Plato maintains that intoxication causes cowardice and intemperance, while in the Laws, Plato holds that it can produce courage and temperance. This raises the question: Did Plato change his mind, and if he did, why? Ultimately, this paper answers affirmatively and argues that his marks a substantive shift in Plato's attitude towards anti-rational desires.
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  5. added 2015-04-28
    Socratic Meditation and Emotional Self-Regulation: Human Dignity in a Technological Age.Anne-Marie Schultz & Paul Carron - 2013 - Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies 25:137-160.
    This essay proposes that Socrates practiced various spiritual exercises, including meditation, and that this Socratic practice of meditation was habitual, aimed at cultivating emotional self-control and existential preparedness. Contemporary research in neurobiology supports the view that intentional mental actions, including meditation, have a profound impact on brain activity, neuroplasticity, and help engender emotional self-control. This impact on brain activity is confirmed via technological developments, a prime example of how technology benefits humanity. Socrates attains the balanced emotional self-control that Alcibiades describes (...)
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  6. added 2015-04-12
    Manliness in Plato’s Laches.T. F. Morris - 2009 - Dialogue 48 (3):619.
    ABSTRACT: Careful analysis of the details of the text allows us to refine Socrates objections to his definition of manliness as prudent perseverance. He does not appreciate that Socrates objections merely require that he make his definition more precise. Nicias refuses to consider objections to his understanding of manliness as avoiding actions that entail risk. The two sets of objections show that manliness entails first calculating that a risk is worth taking and then subsequently not rejecting that calculation without due (...)
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  7. added 2015-04-07
    Plato's Political Philosophy: Prudence in the Republic and the Laws.Robert Mayhew - 1994 - Ancient Philosophy 14 (1):173-179.
  8. added 2015-02-18
    Nature, Knowledge, and Vertue:Essays in Memory of Professor Joan Kung.Terry Penner & Richard Kraut (eds.) - 1989 - Academic printing and publishing.
  9. added 2015-02-14
    Socrates on Virtue and Motivation.Terry Penner - 1973 - Phronesis 18:133.
  10. added 2014-02-12
    Desideri: fenomenologia degenerativa e strategie di controllo.Marco Solinas - 2005 - In Mario Vegetti (ed.), Platone. La Repubblica. Bibliopolis. pp. vol. VI, 471-498.