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  1. Plato's Statesman and Xenophon's Cyrus.Carol Atack - 2018 - In Gabriel Danzig, Donald Morrison & David M. Johnson (eds.), Plato and Xenophon: comparative studies. Leiden, Netherlands: pp. 510-543.
    This paper examines the relationship between the political thought of Plato and Xenophon, by positioning both as post-Socratic political theorists. It seeks to show that Xenophon and Plato examine similar themes and participate in a shared discourse in their later political thought, and in particular, that Plato is responding to Xenophon, with the Statesman exploring similar themes to Xenophon’s Cyropaedia, which itself responds to sections of Plato’s Republic. Both writers explore the themes of the shepherd king and the kairos as (...)
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  2. Why Did Socrates Refuse to Escape ?Andrew Barker - 1977 - Phronesis 22 (1):13-28.
  3. Understanding the Role of the Laws in Plato's "Statesman".Sandrine Berges - 2010 - Prolegomena 9 (1):5-23.
    In the Statesman, Plato seems to be advocating that in the absence of a true king who will rule independently of laws, the next best thing as far as just rule is concerned is to ad here rigidly to existing laws, whatever they are. The rule of the true king is given as an example of virtuous rule in the sense that virtue politics or jurisprudence holds that laws cannot always deal justly with particular cases. But Plato’s view of what (...)
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  4. Virtue Ethics, Politics, and the Function of Laws: The Parent Analogy in Plato’s Menexenus.Sandrine Berges - 2007 - Dialogue 46 (2):211-230.
    Can virtue ethics say anything worthwhile about laws? What would a virtue-ethical account of good laws look like? I argue that a plausible answer to that question can be found in Plato’s parent analogies in the Crito and the Menexenus. I go on to show that the Menexenus gives us a philosophical argument to the effect that laws are just only if they enable citizens to flourish. I then argue that the resulting virtue-ethical account ofjust laws is not viciously paternalistic. (...)
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  5. Socrates and Legal Obligation.Thomas C. Brickhouse - 1983 - New Scholasticism 57 (2):277-282.
  6. Two Ways Not to Be Martyred: Socrates and Antigone.Timothy Chappell - 2001 - Prudentia:161-170.
    Antigone’s reasons for being prepared to die make good sense within a tragic world-view; but the Crito turns out to be, in an odd way, aporetic, because Socrates’ professed reasons make no sense within the Platonist world-view that we expect him to use. On Platonist principles, Socrates should have escaped from prison, and acted unjustly in not doing so. But Socrates’ real reasons for being prepared to die are not Platonist: they are tragic. Like Antigone, he regards the narrative of (...)
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  7. The Law Most Beautiful and Best: Medical Argument and Magical Rhetoric in Plato's Laws.Randall Baldwin Clark - 2003 - Lexington Books.
    The Law Most Beautiful and Best is a thoughtful and creative examination of the role irrational rhetoric ought to play in persuading citizens to voluntarily obey laws. Author Randall Baldwin Clark explores the figure of the physician in Plato's Laws to address this question, identifying the subtle ways in which Plato uses the physician's role in healing as a metaphor for the task of governance and arguing that Plato hints that rational discourse may ultimately be inadequate as a persuasive technique.
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  8. Crito 51A-C: To What Does Socrates Owe Obedience?Darrel D. Colson - 1989 - Phronesis 34 (1):27-55.
  9. The Crito's Integrity.Matthew R. Dasti - 2007 - Apeiron 40 (2):123 - 140.
  10. The Tragedy of Law: Gyges in Herodotus and Plato.Michael Davis - 2000 - Review of Metaphysics 53 (3):635 - 655.
  11. Plato, Apology 29d3–4: A Note on the Grammar of Obedience.Joseph G. De Filippo - 1990 - Classical Quarterly 40 (02):546-.
    In 1979, A. D. Woozley proposed an interpretation of Apology 29c–d which was intended to alleviate the well-known tension between the Apology and Crito on the citizen's obligation to obey the law. According to his interpretation, the court's hypothetical offer – to release Socrates on the condition that he will be put to death if he does not give up philosophy – is not an order, but a warning as to what would happen should he accept their acquittal and yet (...)
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  12. Socrates, Obedience, and the Law: Plato's Crito.J. Dybikowski - 1974 - Dialogue 13 (3):519-535.
  13. The Structure of The Laws' Speech In Plato's Crito.M. Dyson - 1978 - Classical Quarterly 28 (02):427-.
    The argument attributed to the Laws of Athens at Crito 50 a ff. relies on three main propositions, firstly that disobedience to law harms persons, secondly that the relationship between citizen and state is analogous to that between child and parent, and thirdly that the citizen makes a tacit compact to obey the laws. The connection between these three is not entirely clear and I shall consider how the first proposition is related to the second, and then how the second (...)
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  14. The Value of Rule in Plato’s Dialogues: A Reply to Melissa Lane.David Ebrey - 2016 - Plato: The Internet Journal of the International Plato Society 16:75-80.
    A reply to Melissa Lane's "Antianarchia: interpreting political thought in Plato" In these comments I focus on how to think of antianarchia as an element of Plato's political thought, and in doing so raise some methodological questions about how to read Plato’s dialogues, focusing on what is involved in attributing views to Plato in general.
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  15. Socrates: Philosophy in Plato’s Early Dialogues . By Gerasimos X. Santas . (The Arguments of the Philosophers.) ( Routledge & Kegan Paul. 1979. Pp. Xiii + 343. Price £10.50). [REVIEW]John Ferguson - 1980 - Philosophical Quarterly 30 (118):72-74.
  16. Socrates, Injustice, and the Law.David Gallop - 1998 - Ancient Philosophy 18 (2):251-265.
  17. Platonic Punishments: A Discussion of M. M. Mackenzie, "Plato on Punishment". [REVIEW]Christopher Gill - 1983 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 1:211.
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  18. What the Laws Demand of Socrates—and of Us.Paul Gowder - 2015 - The Monist 98 (4):260-374.
    In historical and strategic context, the argument of the Laws in Plato’s Crito should be understood not as an argument for legal obedience in general, but as an argument against the public display of legal impunity (i.e., procured by bribery). Stable democratic authority requires the threat of mass collective action in support of the rule of law. But that threat is not credible without widespread trust by citizens in their fellows’ commitment to the law. Socrates’s impunity would have undermined that (...)
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  19. What the Laws Demand of Socrates—and of Us.Paul Gowder - 2015 - The Monist 98 (4):360-374.
    This paper gives a novel reading of the argument addressed by the Laws of Athens to Socrates in Plato's Crito. Many philosophers have suggested that the argument of the Laws is merely a weak 'rhetorical sop' to Crito. However, I offer an interpretation of that argument that brings out its plausibility, particularly in the context of the post-Oligarchic demos of early fourth-century Athens. For on Crito's plan, Socrates would have undermined a critical form of civic trust in Athens, not by (...)
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  20. A. D. Woozley: Law and Obedience: The Arguments of Plato's Crito. Pp. 160. London: Duckworth, 1979. £9·80.Norman Gulley - 1980 - The Classical Review 30 (02):285-286.
  21. Thrasymachus and Legalism.Demetrius J. Hadgopoulos - 1973 - Phronesis 18 (3):204-208.
  22. Socrates and Superiority.Nathan Hanna - 2007 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 45 (2):251-268.
    I propose an alternative interpretation of the Crito. The arguments that are typically taken to be Socrates’ primary arguments against escape are actually supplementary arguments that rely on what I call the Superiority Thesis, the thesis that the state and its citizens are members of a moral hierarchy where those below are tied by bonds of obligation to those above. I provide evidence that Socrates holds this thesis, demonstrate how it resolves a number of apparent difficulties and show why my (...)
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  23. Conflicting Values in Plato’s Crito.Verity Harte - 1999 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 81 (2):117-147.
    My paper has two aims. The first is to challenge the widespread assumption that the personified Laws of Athens, whom Socrates gives voice to during the second half of the _Crito express Socrates' own views. I shall argue that the principles which the Laws espouse not only differ from those which Socrates sets out in his own person within the dialogue, but are in fact in conflict with Socrates' states principles. (edited).
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  24. Law and the Moral Paradox in Plato's Apology.Ronald Hathaway - 1970 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 8 (2):127-142.
  25. Fair Play: Resolving the Crito - Apology Problem.Jonathan Hecht - 2011 - History of Political Thought 32 (4):543-564.
    Most interpretations of the Crito, such as the absolute obligation view and the civil disobedience view, are thought to be grounded largely in an obligation of gratitude. I present arguments for why these interpretations are not viable, and then propose an alternative solution; this alternative is the obligation of fair play. While the obligation of fair play has been discussed before in relation to the Crito, this is the first full account of the position. The fair play interpretation both precludes (...)
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  26. Civil Disobedience and Plato'sCrito.C. D. Herrera - 1995 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 33 (1):39-55.
  27. The Law in Plato’s Laws: A Reading of the ‘Classical Thesis’.Luke William Hunt - 2018 - Polis 35 (1):102-26.
    Plato’s Laws include what H.L.A. Hart called the ‘classical thesis’ about the nature and role of law: the law exists to see that one leads a morally good life. This paper develops Hart’s brief remarks by providing a panorama of the classical thesis in Laws. This is done by considering two themes: (1) the extent to which Laws is paternalistic, and (2) the extent to which Laws is naturalistic. These themes are significant for a number of reasons, including because they (...)
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  28. R. E. Allen: Socrates and Legal Obligation. Pp. Ix + 148. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1980. $17.50 (Paper $8.95). [REVIEW]D. S. Hutchinson - 1982 - The Classical Review 32 (01):98-99.
  29. Problems in the Argument of Plato's "Crito".Charles H. Kahn - 1989 - Apeiron 22 (4):29 - 43.
    The crito takes no stand on the question of whether violating the law is ever morally justified, despite modern attempts to derive a civil disobedience doctrine from it. The argument is largely ad hoc and ad hominem and resistant to generalization as political theory. The central claim is that socrates' escape would be unjust because escape would be an act whose maxim is incompatible with the principle of effective legality. A new construal of the crito's argument is offered and several (...)
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  30. Law and Obedience: The Arguments of Plato's Crito.Glenn Lesses - 1985 - Ancient Philosophy 5 (2):318-322.
  31. Socrates on Political Disobedience.Robert J. McLaughlin - 1976 - Phronesis 21 (3):185-197.
  32. Socrates on Obedience and Disobedience to the Law.Richard W. Momeyer - 1982 - Philosophy Research Archives 8:21-53.
    Considerable scholarship over the last dozen years has greatly increased our understanding of Apology and Crito. However, the knottiest problem between these dialogues--the frequently noted apparent contradiction between Apology 29c-30c and Crito 51b-c, between Socrates’ pledge to disobey a court order to give up philosophy and his argument that legal authority absolutely obligates a citizen to obedience--is far from being resolved. In the end I argue that this contradiction is unresolved, despite numerous ingenious attempts to eliminate it, because it is (...)
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  33. Plato's Republic in Its Athenian Context.Debra Nails - 2012 - History of Political Thought 33 (1):1-23.
    Plato's Republic critiques Athenian democracy as practised during the Peloponnesian War years. The diseased city Socrates attempts to purge mirrors Athens in crucial particulars, and his proposals should be evaluated as counter-weights to existing institutions and practices, not as absolutes to be instantiated. Plato's assessment of the Athenian polity incorporates two strategies -- one rhetorical, the other argumentative -- both of which I address. Failure to consider Athens a catalyst for Socrates' arguments has led to the misconception that Plato was (...)
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  34. Aspects of Plato's Political Thinking in the Timaeus and the 10th Book of Laws.Panagiotis Pavlos - 2013 - In Alexey V. Tsyb (ed.), ΠΛΑΤΩΝΟΠΟΛΙΣ: Philosophy of Antiquity as an interdisciplinary synthesis of philosophical, historical and philological studies. Sociological Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg's Plato Society. pp. 40-44.
    Short communication published in the Proceedings of the International Summer School for Young Researchers Platwnopolis, in St. Petersburg, Russia, 2012.
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  35. Two Notes on the Crito: The Impotence of the Many, and 'Persuade or Obey'.Terry Penner - 1997 - Classical Quarterly 47 (01):133-146.
    So far, interpreters have not made the import of this last clause clear. F. J. Church translates the last phrase ‘they act at random’. Burnet says of Adam that he seems to have been the first to point out that the meaning cannot be ‘they act at random’. Instead, ‘the phrase expresses indifference’. Adam′s idea, which Burnet here commends, is that the many are thoughtless in their treatment of the individual; and Adam compares 48C below: the many would lightly put (...)
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  36. Plato's Conception of Punitive Justice.Marek Piechowiak - 2015 - In Antonio Incampo & Wojciech Żełaniec (eds.), Universality of Punishment. Cacucci. pp. 73-96.
    The analysis demonstrates that for Plato the principal aim of punishment is not the defence of values acknowledged by the legal system nor the well being of the state, but the good of the individual – his personal development, which is, first of all, moral development. This development consists of the attainment of the greatest – situated on the level of existence – excellence of the subject, which is the virtue of justice, an inner unity based on inner regularity, order, (...)
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  37. Plato's Minos and the Euthyphro.Alex Priou - 2018 - Polis 35:145-163.
    At the start of Plato’s Minos an anonymous comrade argues that the variability of law according to time and place undermines the claim that it conveys moral truth. But by the end he has accepted Minos as the greatest of lawgivers because of his education by Zeus. How does he manage to slide so quickly from the moral laxity of conventionalism to the moral absolutism of divine revelation? Guided by this question, the author considers how the two divergent parts of (...)
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  38. Gerasimos X. Santas, Socrates: Philosophy in Plato's Early Dialogues. [REVIEW]Michael Roth - 1982 - Philosophical Inquiry 4 (2):124-127.
  39. Plato on Punishment. [REVIEW]Mary F. Rousseau - 1983 - Review of Metaphysics 36 (4):941-942.
  40. Richard A. McNeal: Law and Rhetoric in the Crito. (Europäische Hochschulschriften, XV, 56.) Pp. Xv + 184. Frankfurt Am Main, Berne, New York and Paris: Peter Lang, 1992. Paper. [REVIEW]Christopher Rowe - 1993 - The Classical Review 43 (02):440-441.
  41. Plato's Penal Code: Tradition, Controversy, and Reform in Greek Penology.J. Saunders Trevor - 1994 - Clarendon Press.
    This is a fascinating and important study of ideas of justice and punishment held by the ancient Greeks. The author traces the development of these ideas from Homer to Plato, analysing in particular the completely radical new system of punishment put forward by Plato in his dialogue the Laws. From traditional Greek ideas of cursing and pollution through to Plato's views on homicide and poisoning by doctors, this enlivening book has a wealth of insights to interest both ancient historians and (...)
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  42. Ten Tou Aristou Doxan: On the Theory and Practice of Punishment in Plato's Laws.Lewis Meek Trelawny-Cassity - 2010 - Polis: The Journal for Ancient Greek Political Thought 27 (2):222-239.
    The penal code of the Laws has attracted scholarly attention because it appears to advance a coherent theory of punishment. The Laws' suggestion that legislation follow the model of 'free doctors', as well as its discussion of the Socratic paradox, leads one to expect a theory of punishment that recommends kolasis and nouthetesis rather than timoria. In practice, however, the Laws makes use of the language of timoria and categorizes some crimes as voluntary. While the Laws provides a searching criticism (...)
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