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  1. Rhetoric and Philosophy: The Unity of the Phaedrus.W. K. C. Guthrie - forthcoming - Paideia.
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  2. HERMIAS ON PLATO - Baltzly, Share Hermias: On Plato Phaedrus 227A–245E. Pp. Viii + 316. London and New York: Bloomsbury Academic, 2018. Cased, £85, US$114. ISBN: 978-1-350-05188-1. [REVIEW]Giannis Stamatellos - 2019 - The Classical Review 69 (1):92-94.
  3. Bessarion’s Conception of Platonic Psychology: The Immortality of the Soul in the Phaedrus (245c5-246a2).Athanasia Theodoropoulou - 2018 - Proceedings of the XXIII World Congress of Philosophy, Vol. 70: Renaissance and Modern Philosophy.
    Bessarion’s major philosophical treatise In Calumniatorem Platonis is a systematic approach to Platonic and Aristotelian philosophy written in response to George of Trebizond’s Comparatio Philosophorum Aristotelis et Platonis, which attacked Plato’s authority and proclaimed Aristotle’s superiority. A striking example of this is Bessarion’s attempt to defend Plato against George of Trebizond’s accusation that Plato did not offer sound arguments in favor of the immortality of the soul. In this article, I focus on Plato’s proof of the immortality of the soul (...)
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  4. Plato on the Value of Philosophy: The Art of Argument in the Gorgias and Phaedrus.Tushar Irani - 2017 - Cambridge University Press.
    Plato was the first philosopher in the Western tradition to reflect systematically on rhetoric. In this book, Tushar Irani presents a comprehensive and innovative reading of the Gorgias and the Phaedrus, the only two Platonic dialogues to focus on what an art of argument should look like, treating each of the texts individually, yet ultimately demonstrating how each can best be understood in light of the other. For Plato, the way in which we approach argument typically reveals something about our (...)
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  5. The Myth of the Winged Chariot in the Phaedrus: A Vehicle for Philosophical Thinking.María Angélica Fierro - 2015 - In Gabriele Cornelli (ed.), Plato's Styles and Characters: Between Literature and Philosophy. De Gruyter. pp. 47-62.
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  6. The Phaedrus. J.R. Rapp Ordinary Oblivion and the Self Unmoored. Reading Plato's Phaedrus and Writing the Soul. Pp. XII + 205. New York: Fordham University Press, 2014. Cased, £36, Us$55. Isbn: 978-0-8232-5743-0. [REVIEW]Zina Giannopoulou - 2015 - The Classical Review 65 (2):378-380.
  7. How Rude Can Socrates Be? A Note on Phaedrus 228a5-B6.Marco Zingano - 2015 - Journal of Ancient Philosophy 9 (2):67.
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  8. Myth and Philosophy in Plato's Phaedrus by Daniel S. Werner (Review).Doug Al-Maini - 2014 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 52 (1):161-162.
    The Phaedrus continues to fascinate. But then, that seems to be precisely the point, and scholars are doing an ever-better job of showing how the Phaedrus accomplishes the interest it generates, both in itself and in philosophy generally. The latest commentary to unravel the propaedeutic nature of the Phaedrus is Daniel Werner’s monograph, and it is a well-written, meticulous, and insightful examination. As his title suggests, Werner limits himself to the topic of myths in the Phaedrus, but that lens gives (...)
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  9. The Phaedrus - Werner Myth and Philosophy in Plato's Phaedrus. Pp. VI + 302. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2012. Cased, £65, Us$99. Isbn: 978-1-107-02128-0. [REVIEW]S. Montgomery Ewegen - 2014 - The Classical Review 64 (1):58-60.
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  10. The Gods’ Horses and Tripartite Souls in Plato’s Phaedrus.David Hoinski & Ronald Polansky - 2014 - Rhizomata 2 (2):139-160.
  11. Arguing for the Immortality of the Soul in the Palinode of the Phaedrus.Christopher Moore - 2014 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 47 (2):179-208.
    Socrates’ second speech in the Phaedrus includes the argument (245c6–246a2) that starts “all/every soul is immortal” (“ψυχὴ πᾶσα ἀθάνατος”).1 This argument has attracted attention for its austerity and placement in Socrates’ grand speech about chariots and love. Yet it has never been identified as a deliberately fallacious argument.2 This article argues that it is. Socrates intends to confront his interlocutor Phaedrus with a dubious sequence of reasoning. He does so to show his speech-loving friend how—rather than simply to tell him (...)
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  12. How to ‘Know Thyself’ in Plato’s Phaedrus.Christopher Moore - 2014 - Apeiron 47 (3):390-418.
  13. Pindar's Charioteer in Plato's Phaedrus.Christopher Moore - 2014 - Classical Quarterly 64 (2):525-532.
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  14. PLATO, PHAEDRUS - P. Ryan Plato's Phaedrus. A Commentary for Greek Readers. Introduction by Mary Louise Gill. [REVIEW]Edith Nally - 2013 - The Classical Review 63 (2):360-361.
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  15. A Multiform Desire.Olof Pettersson - 2013 - Dissertation, Uppsala University
    This dissertation is a study of appetite in Plato’s Timaeus, Republic and Phaedrus. In recent research is it often suggested that Plato considers appetite (i) to pertain to the essential needs of the body, (ii) to relate to a distinct set of objects, e.g. food or drink, and (iii) to cause behaviour aiming at sensory pleasure. Exploring how the notion of appetite, directly and indirectly, connects with Plato’s other purposes in these dialogues, this dissertation sets out to evaluate these ideas. (...)
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  16. Parmenides - Adluri Parmenides, Plato and Mortal Philosophy. Return From Transcendence. Pp. Xviii + 212. London and New York: Continuum, 2011. Cased, £65. ISBN: 978-0-8264-5753-0. [REVIEW]Edward Butler - 2012 - The Classical Review 62 (2):361-363.
  17. Philostratus, Plutarch, Gorgias and the End of Plato's Phaedrus.Kristoffel Demoen & Danny Praet - 2012 - Classical Quarterly 62 (1):436-439.
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  18. La alegoría del carro del alma en Platón y en la Kaṭha Upaniṣad.Paolo Magnone - 2012 - In Gerardo Rodriguez (ed.), Textos y contextos (II). Exégesis y hermenéutica de obras tardoantiguas y medievales. Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata. pp. 87-126.
    [The Soul Chariot Allegory in Plato and the Kaṭha Upaniṣad].
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  19. The Myth of Theuth in the Phaedrus.Christopher Moore - 2012 - In Catherine Collobert, Pierre Destrée & Francisco J. Gonzalez (eds.), Plato and Myth: Studies on the Use and Status of Platonic Myths. Brill.
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  20. Soul-Leading: The Unity of the Phaedrus, Again.Jessica Moss - 2012 - In Brad Inwood (ed.), Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy. Oxford University Press. pp. 43--1.
  21. Contemplation and Self-Mastery in Plato's Phaedrus.Suzanne Obdrzalek - 2012 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 42:77-107.
    This chapter examines Plato's moral psychology in the Phaedrus. It argues against interpreters such as Burnyeat and Nussbaum that Plato's treatment of the soul is increasingly pessimistic: reason's desire to contemplate is at odds with its obligation to rule the soul, and psychic harmony can only be secured by violently suppressing the lower parts of the soul.
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  22. Plato's Phaedrus: A Commentary for Greek Readers.Paul Ryan - 2012 - University of Oklahoma Press.
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  23. A Much Disputed “Whole” at Phaedrus 270.Karel Thein - 2012 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 12 (2):139-152.
    The article discusses several possible interpretations of Socrates’ suggestion that we cannot “understand the nature of soul satisfactorily without understanding the nature of the whole” (Phaedrus 270c1–2). Against those who take the “whole” implied here for the cosmic whole, it argues that nothing in the Phaedrus justifies this interpretation. In the light of both Socrates’ conception of rhetoric in this dialogue and his image of the tripartite soul in the palinode, the “whole” whose knowledge is prerequisite to knowing the soul’s (...)
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  24. Myth and Truth in Plato's Phaedrus.Franco Trabattoni - 2012 - In Catherine Collobert, Pierre Destrée & Francisco J. Gonzalez (eds.), Plato and Myth: Studies on the Use and Status of Platonic Myths. Brill. pp. 305-321.
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  25. Forgetting and the Task of Seeing: Ordinary Oblivion, Plato, and Ethics.Jennifer R. Rapp - 2011 - Journal of Religious Ethics 39 (4):680-730.
    The gaps, fissures, and lapses of attention in a life—what I call “ordinary oblivions”—are fertile fragilities that present a compelling source for ethics. Plato, not Aristotle, is the ancient philosopher specially poised to speak to this feature of human life. Drawing upon poet C. K. Williams's idea that forgetting is a “looking away” that makes possible “beginning again,” I present a Platonic approach to ethics as an alternative to Aristotelian or virtue ethics. Plato's Phaedrus is a key source text for (...)
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  26. VIII—Beyond Eros: Friendship in the "Phaedrus".Frisbee C. C. Sheffield - 2011 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 111 (2pt2):251-273.
    It is often held that Plato did not have a viable account of interpersonal love. The account of eros—roughly, desire—in the Symposium appears to fail, and, though the Lysis contains much suggestive material for an account of philia—roughly, friendship—this is an aporetic dialogue, which fails, ultimately, to provide an account of friendship. This paper argues that Plato's account of friendship is in the Phaedrus. This dialogue outlines three kinds of philia relationship, the highest of which compares favourably to the Aristotelian (...)
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  27. Gardener of Souls : Philosophical Education in Plato's Phaedrus.Anne Cotton - 2010 - In Dan O'Brien (ed.), Gardening - Philosophy for Everyone: Cultivating Wisdom. Wiley-Blackwell.
  28. Peri Physeos Psyches: Regarding the Nature of the Sole in Plato's Phaedrus.Maria Aparecida de Paiva Montenegro - 2010 - Kriterion: Journal of Philosophy 51 (122):441-457.
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  29. Whither and Whence We Go, Where We Stop Nobody Knows: Prophecy, Ἔρως, and Self-Knowledge in the Phaedrus.Benjamin Frazer-Simser - 2010 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (2):299-318.
    Beginning the Phaedrus, Socrates greets Phaedrus saying, “Dear Phaedrus, whither and whence?” This essay will unfold the salutation, exposing its power to disclose the erotic phenomena portrayed in the dialogue. Moreover, the erotic soul’s incorporation of future and past, its implementation of memory and prophecy, its agency and passivity, and its relation to these ways of being reveals its ability to know itself. However, the temporality in which the soul reveals itself is neither chronological nor dialectical but ecstatic, characterized as (...)
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  30. Nichols Socrates on Friendship and Community: Reflections on Plato's Symposium, Phaedrus and Lysis. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 2009. Pp. Viii, 229. £45/$80. 9780521899734. [REVIEW]Angela Hobbs - 2010 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 130:272-273.
  31. Review of Mary P. Nichols, Socrates on Friendship and Community: Reflections on Plato's Symposium, Phaedrus, and Lysis[REVIEW]Tushar Irani - 2009 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (9).
  32. Plato's Phaedrus: Audio Cd. Plato - 2009 - Agora Publications.
    Plato's dialogues frequently treat several topics and show their connection to each other. The Phaedrus is a model of that skill because of its seamless progression from examples of speeches about the nature of love to mythical visions of human nature and destiny to the essence of beauty and, finally, to a penetrating discussion of speaking and writing. It ends with an examination of the love of wisdom as a dialectical activity in the human mind. Phaedrus lures Socrates outside the (...)
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  33. Plato's Phaedrus. Plato - 2009 - Agora Publications.
    PHAEDRUS Characters SOCRATES, PHAEDRUS [227[ Socrates: Phaedrus, my friend, where are you going? And where are you coming from? Phaedrus: Socrates, I am coming from a long session with Lysias, the son of Cephalus.
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  34. Socrates in Drag.Ashley Pryor - 2009 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 14 (1):77-93.
    By way of the complex topography of the Phaedrus, Plato raises the question of his authorship and the consequences it has for the reader’s reception of Socrates, by likening Socrates’ changing status in the text to the complex mythological traditions surrounding the rape and abduction of Helen of Troy (amidst a grove of plane trees). As Socrates is likened to the excessive and “duplicitous” Helen and her various “eidolic” apeareances, the question of the dialogue appears to shift from “who is (...)
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  35. Phaedrus.Robin Waterfield (ed.) - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
    Phaedrus is widely recognized as one of Plato's most profound and beautiful works. It takes the form of a dialogue between Socrates and Phaedrus and its ostensible subject is love, especially homoerotic love. This new translation is accompanied by an introduction and full notes that discuss the structure of the dialogue and elucidate issues that might puzzle the modern reader.
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  36. Colloquium 7: Dialectic and the Purpose of Rhetoric in Plato’s Phaedrus.Harvey Yunis - 2009 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 24 (1):229-259.
  37. « Phaedrus, Ion, And The Lure Of Inspiration ».Barry Dixon - 2008 - Plato: The Internet Journal of the International Plato Society 8.
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  38. Commentaries on Plato.Marsilio Ficino - 2008 - Harvard University Press.
    This volume contains Ficino’s extended analysis and commentary on the Phaedrus, which he explicates as a meditation on “beauty in all its forms” and a ...
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  39. Writing Knowledge in the Soul: Orality, Literacy, and Plato's Critique of Poetry.Lawrence J. Hatab - 2007 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 11 (2):319-332.
    In this essay I take up Plato’s critique of poetry, which has little to do with epistemology and representational imitation, but rather the powerful effects that poeticperformances can have on audiences, enthralling them with vivid image-worlds and blocking the powers of critical reflection. By focusing on the perceived psychological dangers of poetry in performance and reception, I want to suggest that Plato’s critique was caught up in the larger story of momentous shifts in the Greek world, turning on the rise (...)
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  40. Phaidros: Phenomenology of “Giving Forth Upon the Beautiful”.Skirmantas Jankauskas - 2007 - Problemos 71:24-48.
    Straipsnyje mëginama rekonstruoti platoniðkosios meilës sampratos fenomenologiná aspektà. Ðiossampratos kontûrus Platonas nuþymi dar „Puotoje“, taèiau daugiausia dëmesio jai skiria benepoetiðkiausiame ir máslingiausiame savo dialoge „Faidras“. Ávadinëje dalyje teigiama, kad graikiðkasisfilosofavimas klostosi natûraliai, t. y. tematizuoja filosofavimui rûpimus turinius, tik susiklostant filosofavimui palankioms aplinkybëms. Brandà pasiekusi filosofija jau mëgina perprasti save, taigi irásisàmoninti tas natûralias prielaidas. Platonas dar „Puotoje“ nustato, kad palankiausia filosofavimuinatûrali þmogaus bûsena yra meilë. „Puotoje“ jam pavyksta iðryðkinti vertybiná meilës profilá, ofilosofavimas èia apraðomas kaip groþio vertybës uþangaþuotas „teisingasis (...)
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  41. An Ingenious Etymology In Plato, Phaedrus 266d7–9.David Sansone - 2007 - Classical Quarterly 57 (2):753-758.
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  42. Plato's Phaedrus and the Problem of Unity.Daniel Werner - 2007 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 32:91-137.
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  43. 'Words of Air' : On Breath and Inspiration.Claudia Baracchi - 2006 - In Martin McQuillan & Ika Willis (eds.), Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy. Palgrave-Macmillan. pp. 27-49.
    In Plato’s Phaedrus divine inspiration comes literally to mean “environmental inspiration.” Intimated thereby is the insufficiency of all reflection on the divine and the natural which would fail to interrogate these categories precisely in their convergence, indeed, in their being one. The theme of inspiration, in its divine or elemental character, necessarily raises further questions concerning the status of inspired utterance—that is, in this case, of philosophical discourse itself. These themes finally point to the problem of the provenance of speaking (...)
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  44. “Words of Air”: On Breath and Inspiration.Claudia Baracchi - 2006 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 11 (1):27-49.
    In Plato’s Phaedrus divine inspiration comes literally to mean “environmental inspiration.” Intimated thereby is the insufficiency of all reflection on the divine and the natural which would fail to interrogate these categories precisely in their convergence, indeed, in their being one. The theme of inspiration, in its divine or elemental character, necessarily raises further questions concerning the status of inspired utterance—that is, in this case, of philosophical discourse itself. These themes finally point to the problem of the provenance of speaking (...)
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  45. Dancing with the Gods: The Myth of the Chariot in Plato's Phaedrus.Elizabeth S. Belfiore - 2006 - American Journal of Philology 127 (2):185-217.
  46. The Method of Division and the Division of the Phaedrus.Kenneth Dorter - 2006 - Ancient Philosophy 26 (2):259-273.
  47. “As the Wolf Loves the Lamb”.Alessandra Fussi - 2006 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 11 (1):51-80.
    The Phaedrus’s Palinode ascribes to the wing the double function of lifting the soul towards truth while itself being nourished by truth. The paper concentrates on the role Socrates ascribes to the wing in the structure and ‘physiology’ of the soul—mortal and divine—as well as on the role it plays in Socrates’ subsequent phenomenological description of falling in love. The experience of love described in Socrates’ first speech—an experience dominated by envy—is examined in light of Socrates’ Palinode, by reference to (...)
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  48. Amare Platone: Una Lettura Del Fedro.Livio Garzanti - 2006 - Garzanti.
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  49. The Strangeness of the Phaedrus.David J. Schenker - 2006 - American Journal of Philology 127 (1):67-87.
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  50. Two Chariots: The Justification of the Best Life in the "Katha Upanishad" and Plato's "Phaedrus".Elizabeth Ann Schiltz - 2006 - Philosophy East and West 56 (3):451-468.
    The philosophical import of the chariot images found in the Katha Upanishad and the Phaedrus is considered here. It is claimed that the resemblance in the accounts provided in these disparate texts is not merely incidental. Rather, each chariot-image should be read as contributing to a careful answer to the same thorny philosophical problem: the identification and justification of the best life for the individual. It is argued that each serves to illuminate an internal and complex account of the self, (...)
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