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  1. Myth and Philosophy in Plato's Phaedrus by Daniel S. Werner (Review).Doug Al-Maini - 2014 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 52 (1):161-162.
    The Phaedrus continues to fascinate. But then, that seems to be precisely the point, and scholars are doing an ever-better job of showing how the Phaedrus accomplishes the interest it generates, both in itself and in philosophy generally. The latest commentary to unravel the propaedeutic nature of the Phaedrus is Daniel Werner’s monograph, and it is a well-written, meticulous, and insightful examination. As his title suggests, Werner limits himself to the topic of myths in the Phaedrus, but that lens gives (...)
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  2. Plato's Phaedrus. Translated with Introduction and Commentary by R. Hackforth. (Cambridge University Press. 1952. Pp. 172. Price 18s. Net.). [REVIEW]D. J. Allan - 1953 - Philosophy 28 (107):365-.
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  3. Two Commentaries on the Phaedrus: Ficino's Indebtedness to Hermias.Michael J. B. Allen - 1980 - Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 43:110-129.
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  4. Condensation and Process in the Prologue of Plato's Phaedrus (229c-230a).George Arabatzis - 2000 - Philosophical Inquiry 22 (3):65-70.
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  5. 'Words of Air' : On Breath and Inspiration.Claudia Baracchi - 2006 - In Martin McQuillan & Ika Willis (eds.), Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy. Palgrave-Macmillan. pp. 27-49.
    In Plato’s Phaedrus divine inspiration comes literally to mean “environmental inspiration.” Intimated thereby is the insufficiency of all reflection on the divine and the natural which would fail to interrogate these categories precisely in their convergence, indeed, in their being one. The theme of inspiration, in its divine or elemental character, necessarily raises further questions concerning the status of inspired utterance—that is, in this case, of philosophical discourse itself. These themes finally point to the problem of the provenance of speaking (...)
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  6. “Words of Air”: On Breath and Inspiration.Claudia Baracchi - 2006 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 11 (1):27-49.
    In Plato’s Phaedrus divine inspiration comes literally to mean “environmental inspiration.” Intimated thereby is the insufficiency of all reflection on the divine and the natural which would fail to interrogate these categories precisely in their convergence, indeed, in their being one. The theme of inspiration, in its divine or elemental character, necessarily raises further questions concerning the status of inspired utterance—that is, in this case, of philosophical discourse itself. These themes finally point to the problem of the provenance of speaking (...)
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  7. The Soul as a Self-Moving Motion: The Synthesis of Madness and Sobriety in Plato's "Phaedrus.".Beverly Jean Bardsley - 1975 - Dissertation, The University of Texas at Austin
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  8. Dancing with the Gods: The Myth of the Chariot in Plato's Phaedrus.Elizabeth S. Belfiore - 2006 - American Journal of Philology 127 (2):185-217.
  9. The Rhetoric of Morality and Philosophy: Plato's Gorgias and Phaedrus.Seth Benardete - 1991 - University of Chicago Press.
    Benardete here interprets and, for the first time, pairs two important Platonic dialogues, the Gorgias and the Phaedrus . In linking these dialogues, he places Socrates' notion of rhetoric in a new light and illuminates the way in which Plato gives morality and eros a place in the human soul.
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  10. Immortality and the Nature of the Soul in the Phaedrus.Richard Bett - 1986 - Phronesis 31 (1):1-26.
  11. Self-Knowledge in Plato's Phaedrus.Thomas C. Brickhouse - 1992 - Ancient Philosophy 12 (1):187-189.
  12. Knowing the Whole: Comments on Gill, “Plato's Phaedrus and the Method of Hippocrates”.Eric Brown - 2003 - Modern Schoolman 80 (4):315-323.
    What does Socrates mean by suggesting that no one can understand the nature of the soul "without the nature of the whole" (Phaedrus 270c)? I raise epistemological and metaphysical questions for Mary Louise Gill's proposal that he means us to consider the whole environment, and I make a case for the old-fashioned interpretation that he means us to consider the whole cosmos.
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  13. The Middle Speech of Plato's.Malcolm Brown & James Coulter - 1971 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 9 (4).
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  14. The Middle Speech of Plato's Phaedrus.Malcolm Brown & James Coulter - 1971 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 9 (4):405-423.
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  15. The Psychical Forces in Plato's Phaedrus.Eva M. Buccioni - 2002 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 10 (3):331 – 357.
  16. Eva,“The Physic Forces in Plato's Phaedrus”.M. Buccioni - 2002 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 10 (3).
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  17. Who Speaks? Who Writes? Dialogue and Authorship in the Phaedrus.Sean Burke - 1997 - History of the Human Sciences 10 (3):40-55.
    This paper argues that the concepts of writing and authorship in Plato are associated with monologism and absence rather than presence. The Phaedrus objects to writing precisely insofar as it creates that unre sponsive figure in the field of discursive which we have subsequently called the 'author'. The dialectical preference for question-and-answer is designed to resist anything resembling an author from entering the field of knowledge: the Socratic method resists monologism on epistemological and ethical grounds. However, the Platonic dialogues are (...)
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  18. Ronna Burger: Plato's Phaedrus: A Defense of a Philosophic Art of Writing. Pp. 160. Alabama: University of Alabama Press, 1980. [REVIEW]M. F. Burnyeat - 1981 - The Classical Review 31 (02):299-300.
  19. The «Phaedrus».Chung-Hwan Chen - 1972 - Studi Internazionali Di Filosofia 4:77-90.
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  20. Pears Bearing Apples: Virgil's "Georgics", Plato's "Phaedrus", Theresa Hak Kyung Cha's "Dictee".Kristina Julie Chew - 1995 - Dissertation, Yale University
    This dissertation investigates the art of writing and the means of writing art in three texts: Virgil's didactic poem, the Georgics; a Platonic dialogue, the Phaedrus; and an Asian American text, Theresa Hak Kyung Cha's Dictee. ;In chapter 1, "Eidos: The Art of Grafting," I discuss the image of grafting in book 2 of Virgil's Georgics. I will show how grafting can be interpreted to describe both the "art of farming" and the "art of writing." ;Chapter 2, "Techne: The Idea (...)
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  21. Phaedrus and Quintilian I. 9. 2. A Reply to Professor Postgate.F. H. Colson - 1919 - The Classical Review 33 (3-4):59-61.
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  22. Dialectic, Irony, and Myth in Plato's Phaedrus.Albert Cook - 1985 - American Journal of Philology 106 (4).
  23. Gardener of Souls : Philosophical Education in Plato's Phaedrus.Anne Cotton - 2010 - In Dan O'Brien (ed.), Gardening - Philosophy for Everyone: Cultivating Wisdom. Wiley-Blackwell.
  24. The Rhetorical Technique of Plato's "Phaedrus".Jane V. Curran - 1986 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 19 (1):66 - 72.
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  25. Eros, Dialektik und Rhetorik: der Mythos als funktionales Zentrum des Platonischen Dialogs. Überlegungen am Beispiel des Phaidros.Dirk Cürsgen - 2004 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 9:23-49.
    The article analyses the relation between logos and myth in Plato's philosophy using the Phaidros as a representative example; this includes the investigation of the function of the myth in this dialogue. The palinode proves to be the central unifying element of the Phaidros, and thus the dialogue s core. The second speech of Socrates mediates between the different parts of the Phaidros, its themes, motives and thoughts: for example love, rhetoric, dialectic, forms, different kinds of knowledge and speech or (...)
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  26. W. Kühn: La Fin du Phèdre de Platon. Critique de la Rhétorique et de l'Écriture . Pp. 137. Florence: Leo S. Olschki, 2000. Paper, £28. ISBN:88-222-4867-. [REVIEW]Alexandra de Forest Duer - 2002 - The Classical Review 52 (01):171-.
  27. Peri Physeos Psyches: Regarding the Nature of the Sole in Plato's Phaedrus.Maria Aparecida de Paiva Montenegro - 2010 - Kriterion: Revista de Filosofia 51 (122):441-457.
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  28. A Commentary on the Phaedrus of Plato.Gerrit Jacob de Vries - 1969 - Amsterdam: Adolf M. Hakkert.
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  29. Philostratus, Plutarch, Gorgias and the End of Plato's Phaedrus.Kristoffel Demoen & Danny Praet - 2012 - Classical Quarterly 62 (1):436-439.
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  30. Hermeias on Plato Phaedrus 238d and Synesius Dion 14.2.Matthew W. Dickie - 1993 - American Journal of Philology 114 (3):421-440.
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  31. Self-Knowledge in Plato's Phaedrus.Michael Dink - 1988 - Review of Metaphysics 41 (3):620-622.
  32. « Phaedrus, Ion, And The Lure Of Inspiration ».Barry Dixon - 2008 - Plato: The Internet Journal of the International Plato Society 8.
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  33. The Method of Division and the Division of the Phaedrus.Kenneth Dorter - 2006 - Ancient Philosophy 26 (2):259-273.
  34. Imagery and Philosophy in Plato's Phaedrus.Kenneth Dorter - 1971 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 9 (3):279-288.
  35. Alcidamas of Elaea in Plato's Phaedrus.Slobodan Dušanić - 1992 - Classical Quarterly 42 (02):347-.
    In Bk. 3 of the Institutio oratoria, Quintilian gives a list of the Greek artium scriptores of the classical epoch . It contains a controversial entry: ‘…et, quem Palameden Plato appellat, Alcidamas Elaites’ . The historicity of the rhetorician and sophist from Elaea named Alcidamas, Gorgias' pupil, is of course beyond doubt; scholars disagree only as to the ‘quem Palameden Plato appellat’.
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  36. Zeus and Philosophy in the Myth of Plato’s Phaedrus.M. Dyson - 1982 - Classical Quarterly 32 (02):307-.
    The matter which I wish to discuss is a discrepancy between two accounts of the origin of the philosopher in the myth of Plato's Phaedrus. Before their incarnation the souls of all humans are imagined as having enjoyed the vision of reality, but not all in the same company or to the same degree. For, in the first place, the souls are distributed among the companies that severally follow eleven different gods, 247 a-b, a distribution which is regarded as important (...)
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  37. Werner Myth and Philosophy in Plato's Phaedrus. Pp. Vi + 302. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2012. Cased, £65, US$99. ISBN: 978-1-107-02128-0. [REVIEW]S. Montgomery Ewegen - 2014 - The Classical Review 64 (1):58-60.
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  38. Listening to the Cicadas: A Study of Plato's Phaedrus.G. R. F. Ferrari - 1987 - Cambridge University Press.
    The focus of this account is how myth and formal argument in the dialogue Phaedrus complement and reinforce each other in Plato's philosophy. Not only is the dialogue in its formal structure a joining of myth and argument, but the philosophic life that it praises is also shaped by the limitations of argument and the importance of mythical and poetic understanding. The book is written for anyone seriously interested in Plato's thought and in the history of literary theory or of (...)
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  39. The Struggle in the Soul: Plato, Phaedrus 253c7-255a.G. R. F. Ferrari - 1985 - Ancient Philosophy 5 (1):1-10.
  40. Self-Knowledge in Plato's Phaedrus.G. R. F. Ferrari & Charles L. Griswold - 1988 - Philosophical Review 97 (3):408.
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  41. Commentaries on Plato.Marsilio Ficino - 2008 - Harvard University Press.
    This volume contains Ficino’s extended analysis and commentary on the Phaedrus, which he explicates as a meditation on “beauty in all its forms” and a ...
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  42. The Myth of the Winged Chariot in the Phaedrus: A Vehicle for Philosophical Thinking.María Angélica Fierro - 2015 - In Gabriele Cornelli (ed.), Plato's Styles and Characters: Between Literature and Philosophy. De Gruyter. pp. 47-62.
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  43. Whither and Whence We Go, Where We Stop Nobody Knows.Benjamin Frazer-Simser - 2011 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (2):299-318.
    Beginning the Phaedrus, Socrates greets Phaedrus saying, “Dear Phaedrus, whither and whence?” This essay will unfold the salutation, exposing its power to disclose the erotic phenomena portrayed in the dialogue. Moreover, the erotic soul’s incorporation of future and past, its implementation of memory and prophecy, its agency and passivity, and its relation to these ways of being reveals its ability to know itself. However, the temporality in which the soul reveals itself is neither chronological nor dialectical but ecstatic, characterized as (...)
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  44. “As the Wolf Loves the Lamb”.Alessandra Fussi - 2006 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 11 (1):51-80.
    The Phaedrus’s Palinode ascribes to the wing the double function of lifting the soul towards truth while itself being nourished by truth. The paper concentrates on the role Socrates ascribes to the wing in the structure and ‘physiology’ of the soul—mortal and divine—as well as on the role it plays in Socrates’ subsequent phenomenological description of falling in love. The experience of love described in Socrates’ first speech—an experience dominated by envy—is examined in light of Socrates’ Palinode, by reference to (...)
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  45. Amare Platone: Una Lettura Del Fedro.Livio Garzanti - 2006 - Garzanti.
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  46. The Phaedrus. J.R. Rapp Ordinary Oblivion and the Self Unmoored. Reading Plato's Phaedrus and Writing the Soul. Pp. XII + 205. New York: Fordham University Press, 2014. Cased, £36, Us$55. Isbn: 978-0-8232-5743-0. [REVIEW]Zina Giannopoulou - 2015 - The Classical Review 65 (2):378-380.
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  47. Plato's Phaedrus and the Method of Hippocrates.Mary Louise Gill - 2003 - Modern Schoolman 80 (4):295-314.
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  48. Loving and Dying: A Reading of Plato's Phaedo, Symposium, and Phaedrus.Richard Gotshalk - 2001 - University Press of America.
    Loving and Dying is a reading of three dialogues which, using the figure of Socrates conversing in three different concrete situations, in complementary fashion address death, love, and reflection, as matters central to finding and understanding life's meaning and to sharing in the kind of immortality that is open to a human being. The intent of the work is simply to bring to attention how the dialogues register as drama and how they achieve this provocation of the reader to reflection (...)
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  49. Self-Knowledge and the « Ἰδἐα » of the Soul in Plato's « Phaedrus ».Charles Griswold - 1981 - Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale 86 (4):477 - 494.
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  50. Soul, Form, and Indeterminacy in Plato's Philebus and Phaedrus.Charles Griswold - 1981 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 55:184-194.
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