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  1. Rhetoric and Philosophy: The Unity of the Phaedrus.W. K. C. Guthrie - forthcoming - Paideia.
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  2. Why Eros?Suzanne Obdrzalek - forthcoming - In D. Ebrey and R. Kraut (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Plato.
    One of the ways in which Plato has captured the popular imagination is with the claim that the philosopher can feel erôs, passionate love, for the objects of knowledge. Why should Plato make this claim? In this chapter, I explore Plato’s treatment of philosophical erôs along three dimensions. First, I consider the source of philosophical erôs. I argue that it is grounded in our mortality and imperfection, which give rise to a desire for immortality and the immortal. Second, I turn (...)
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  3. Review of Joe Sachs's Plato's Phaedrus and Symposium. [REVIEW]Ryan M. Brown - 2024 - Bryn Mawr Classical Review 2024.
    Review of Joe Sachs's new translations of Plato's Symposium and Phaedrus.
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  4. Plato's Use of Mogis (Scarcely, With Toil) and the Accessibility of the Divine.Ryan M. Brown - 2023 - Apeiron 56 (3):519-554.
    At key moments in the Phaedrus and the Republic, Socrates qualifies our capacity to “see” the highest realities (the “place of being,” the “Good beyond being”) with the adverb “mogis” (mogis kathorosa, Phdr. 248a; mogis horisthai, Rep. 517b). Mogis can be used to indicate either the toilsome difficulty of some undertaking or the subject’s proximity to failing to accomplish the undertaking. Socrates uses mogis to qualify the nature of the human soul’s capacity to make the intellectual ascent and see the (...)
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  5. The Thematic Significance of the Scenery in Plato’s Phaedrus.Ryan M. Brown - 2023 - Ancient Philosophy 43 (2):399-423.
    In this essay, I discuss the philosophical significance of three features of the Phaedrus’s dramatic scenery: the myth of Boreas, the two trees Socrates singles out upon arriving at the grove, and the grove itself. I argue that attention to these three features of the dramatic scenery helps us better understand the Phaedrus’s account of erōs.
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  6. Conocer, hablar y nombrar según Platón: una lectura cruzada del Fedro y del Crátilo.Jonathan Lavilla deLera & Daniel Salgueiro Martín - 2023 - Alpha (Osorno) 56:142-163.
    El presente artículo contiene una lectura cruzada del Fedro y el Crátilo en la que se aclaran algunos de sus ejes temáticos centrales con el fin de sacar a relucir las constantes del pensamiento platónico que ambos diálogos comparten. La descripción de la dialéctica presente en el Fedro encaja con una definición socrática del Crátilo que explicita que el nombre es un instrumento al servicio del dialéctico. Todo ello nos lleva a concluir que la técnica dialéctica, además de constituir el (...)
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  7. The Liberation of Virtue in Plato's Phaedrus.Ryan M. Brown - 2022 - In Ryan M. Brown & Jay R. Elliott (eds.), _Arete_ in Plato and Aristotle. Sioux City: Parnassos Press. pp. 45-74.
    When thinking of Plato’s discussions of virtue, many dialogues come to mind, but, assuredly, the Phaedrus does not. The word ἀρετή is used only six times in the dialogue. Unlike other dialogues, the Phaedrus thematizes neither the general concept of virtue nor any of the particular virtues. Given the centrality of virtue to Plato’s ethics and politics, it is surprising to see little reference to virtue in a dialogue devoted to love and to rhetoric, topics that have deep ethical and (...)
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  8. The Lovers’ Formation in Plato’s Phaedrus.Ryan M. Brown - 2022 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 27 (1):19-50.
    This essay argues that the Phaedrus’s Palinode articulates an account of love (erōs) in which the experience of love can morally and intellectually transform both lover and beloved. After situating this account of love within the dialogue’s thematization of soul-leading (psuchagōgia), I show how Socrates’s account of love makes an intervention into typical Greek thought on pederasty and argue against Jessica Moss’s contention that soul-leading love suffers severe limitations in its soul-leading capacity, showing that Moss is wrong to think that (...)
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  9. Antilogy, Dialectic and Dialectic’s Objects in Plato’s Phaedrus.Jonathan Lavilla - 2022 - Méthexis 34 (1):24–41.
    Plato’s Phaedrus is a dialogue in which rhetoric is not only discussed, but also displayed. The first half of the plot depicts a rhetorical contest in which Socrates himself offers two opposite speeches on love, a kind of dissoi logoi. The current paper tries to explain that the second half of the dialogue offers the necessary keys to understand that for Plato true rhetoric is nothing but dialectic and that beyond the apparent antilogic exercise carried out by Socrates there can (...)
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  10. Soul-Leading in Plato's Phaedrus and the Iconic Character of Being.Ryan M. Brown - 2021 - Dissertation, Boston College
    Since antiquity, scholars have observed a structural tension within Plato’s Phaedrus. The dialogue demands order in every linguistic composition, yet it presents itself as a disordered composition. Accordingly, one of the key problems of the Phaedrus is determining which—if any—aspect of the dialogue can supply a unifying thread for the dialogue’s major themes (love, rhetoric, writing, myth, philosophy, etc.). My dissertation argues that “soul-leading” (psuchagōgia)—a rare and ambiguous term used to define the innate power of words—resolves the dialogue’s structural tension. (...)
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  11. Self‐Motion and Cognition: Plato's Theory of the Soul.Douglas R. Campbell - 2021 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 59 (4):523-544.
    I argue that Plato believes that the soul must be both the principle of motion and the subject of cognition because it moves things specifically by means of its thoughts. I begin by arguing that the soul moves things by means of such acts as examination and deliberation, and that this view is developed in response to Anaxagoras. I then argue that every kind of soul enjoys a kind of cognition, with even plant souls having a form of Aristotelian discrimination (...)
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  12. A complementary observation to determine Phaedrus' age in Plato's Phaedrus.Jonathan Lavilla de Lera - 2021 - Ágora. Estudos Clássicos Em Debate 23:45-62.
    This paper deals with the problem of determining Phaedrus’ age in the eponymous dialogue. The vocatives ὦ νεανία and ὦ παῖ, in Pl. Phdr. 257c8 and 267c6, could suggest that Plato depicts him as a teenager. However, most scholars believe that Phaedrus is an adult and that the vocatives point at his passive and childish character. I will first summarize the evidence given for supporting the latter thesis. Then, I offer complementary evidence, showing that those vocatives mockingly compare his passiveness (...)
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  13. La dicotomía interior/exterior en el «Fedro» de Platón.Jonathan Lavilla - 2021 - Pensamiento. Revista de Investigación E Información Filosófica 77 (293):41-63.
    En el Fedro de Platón, la dicotomía interior/exterior no sólo es empleada explícitamente por Sócrates en tres ocasiones, sino que es evocada tácitamente en numerosos pasajes. El presente artículo analiza en su contexto los diversos textos en los que se juega con dicho par conceptual, mostrando que, mediante su uso, Platón trata, entre otras cuestiones, de delimitar netamente la forma de vida filosófica, distinguiéndola de las restantes.
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  14. La broma de Sócrates inspirado Fedro 238d y Crátilo 396d.Jonathan Lavilla - 2021 - Plato Journal 22:158-175.
    El presente artículo defiende que Platón bromea cuando su Sócrates afirma estar inspirado o bajo posesión divina en Fedro 238d y Crátilo 396d. Para ello, primero se sitúan en contexto ambos pasajes; a continuación, se muestra que a lo largo de todo el corpus Platón contrapone el conocimiento y el arte (τέχνη) al falso saber y a la inspiración (ἐνθουσιασμός); en tercer y cuarto lugar respectivamente, leemos los pasajes en cuestión en función de esta contraposición, para mostrar que hay que (...)
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  15. The Political Soul: Plato on Thumos, Spirited Motivation, and the City.Josh Wilburn - 2021 - Oxford University Press.
    Josh Wilburn examines the relationship between Plato's views on psychology and his political philosophy. Focusing on his reflections on the spirited part of the tripartite soul, or thumos, and spirited motivation, he explores the social and political challenges that occupy Plato throughout his works.
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  16. Heidegger’s Reading(s) of the Phaedrus.Katherine Davies - 2020 - Studia Phaenomenologica 20:191-221.
    In the 1920s and 30s, Heidegger developed three explicit readings of Plato’s Phaedrus. These readings emphasize different dimensions of Plato’s dialogue and, at times, seem even to contradict one another. Though Heidegger pursues quite different interpretations of the dialogue, he remains steadfast in praising this Platonic dialogue above all others. I argue that these explicit readings provide fertile ground for reconsidering Heidegger’s engagement with Plato and not just with Platonism. I further develop an argument that a fourth, implicit reading of (...)
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  17. Hippocrates at phaedrus 270c.Elizabeth Jelinek & Nickolas Pappas - 2020 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 101 (3):409-430.
    At Plato’s Phaedrus 270c, Socrates asks whether one can know souls without knowing ‘the whole.’ Phaedrus answers that ‘according to Hippocrates’ the same demand on knowing the whole applies to bodies. What parallel is intended between soul-knowledge and body-knowledge and which medical passages illustrate the analogy have been much debated. Three dominant interpretations read ‘the whole’ as respectively (1) environment, (2) kosmos, and (3) individual soul or body; and adduce supporting Hippocratic passages. But none of these interpretations accounts for the (...)
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  18. Journeys in the Phaedrus: Hermias' Reading of the Walk to the Ilissus.Dirk Baltzly - 2019 - In John F. Finamore, Christina-Panagiota Manolea & Sarah Klitenic Wear (eds.), Studies in Hermias’ Commentary on Plato’s _Phaedrus_. Boston: BRILL. pp. 7-24.
    Plato’s Phaedrus is a dialogue of journeys, a tale of transitions. It begins with Socrates’ question, ‘Where to and from whence, my dear Phaedrus?’ and concludes with the Socrates’ decision, ‘Let’s go’ (sc. back into the city from whence they’ve come). In the speech that forms its centre-piece Socrates narrates another famous journey—the descent of the soul into the body and its reascent to the realm of Forms through erotic madness. It is not too implausible to suppose that Plato himself (...)
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  19. Hermias on the Unity of the Phaedrus.Quinton Gardiner & Dirk Baltzly - 2019 - In John F. Finamore, Christina-Panagiota Manolea & Sarah Klitenic Wear (eds.), Studies in Hermias’ Commentary on Plato’s _Phaedrus_. Boston: BRILL. pp. 68-83.
    In the Phaedrus, Socrates insists that every proper logos must have the unity of an organic living thing. And yet it is hard to say what imposes any such unity on the various speeches and topics that are dealt with in this very dialogue. This chapter situates the view of Hermias of Alexandria in relation to modern debates about what, if anything, unifies the Phaedrus. For the ancient Neoplatonists, the question of unity was bound up with the question of each (...)
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  20. HERMIAS ON PLATO - Baltzly, Share Hermias: On Plato Phaedrus 227A–245E. Pp. viii + 316. London and New York: Bloomsbury Academic, 2018. Cased, £85, US$114. ISBN: 978-1-350-05188-1. [REVIEW]Giannis Stamatellos - 2019 - The Classical Review 69 (1):92-94.
  21. The Prayer to Pan of Plato’s Phaedrus (279b8–c3): An Exhortation to Exercise the Philosophical Virtue.Jonathan Lavilla - 2018 - Symbolae Osloenses 92 (1):65-106.
    The current article offers a new reading of Socrates’ prayer to Pan in Plato’s Phaedrus. By means of a comprehensive approach, the paper shows that the prayer not only gathers together the most relevant topics dealt with during the conversation but it also exhorts us to engage in the way of life depicted by Socrates’ character, namely that of philosophy, which can be clearly distinguished from that of traditional rhetoric. To this extent, eros and logos, two elements closely related to (...)
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  22. The Phaedrus of Plato.W. H. Plato & Thompson - 2018 - Franklin Classics Trade Press.
    This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be (...)
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  23. On Plato : Phaedrus 227a-245e.Michael Share & Dirk Baltzly - 2018 - New York: Bloomsbury Academic. Edited by Dirk Baltzly & Michael John Share.
    This commentary records, through notes taken by Hermias, Syrianus' seminar on Plato's Phaedrus, one of the world's most influential celebrations of erotic beauty and love. It is the only Neoplatonic commentary on Plato's Phaedrus to have survived in its entirety. Further interest comes from the recorded interventions by Syrianus' pupils - including those by Proclus, his eventual successor as head of the Athenian school, who went on to teach Hermias' father, Ammonius. The second of two volumes of Hermias' commentary, the (...)
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  24. Bessarion’s Conception of Platonic Psychology: The Immortality of the Soul in the Phaedrus (245c5-246a2).Athanasia Theodoropoulou - 2018 - Proceedings of the XXIII World Congress of Philosophy, Vol. 70: Renaissance and Modern Philosophy.
    Bessarion’s major philosophical treatise In Calumniatorem Platonis is a systematic approach to Platonic and Aristotelian philosophy written in response to George of Trebizond’s Comparatio Philosophorum Aristotelis et Platonis, which attacked Plato’s authority and proclaimed Aristotle’s superiority. A striking example of this is Bessarion’s attempt to defend Plato against George of Trebizond’s accusation that Plato did not offer sound arguments in favor of the immortality of the soul. In this article, I focus on Plato’s proof of the immortality of the soul (...)
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  25. Ordinary Oblivion and the Self Unmoored: Reading Plato’s Phaedrus and Writing the Soul. [REVIEW]David F. Hoinski - 2017 - Ancient Philosophy 37 (1):205-212.
  26. Plato on the Value of Philosophy: The Art of Argument in the Gorgias and Phaedrus.Tushar Irani - 2017 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    Plato was the first philosopher in the Western tradition to reflect systematically on rhetoric. In this book, Tushar Irani presents a comprehensive and innovative reading of the Gorgias and the Phaedrus, the only two Platonic dialogues to focus on what an art of argument should look like, treating each of the texts individually, yet ultimately demonstrating how each can best be understood in light of the other. For Plato, the way in which we approach argument typically reveals something about our (...)
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  27. Hermias: On Plato's Phaedrus.Harold A. S. Tarrant & Dirk Baltzly - 2017 - In Harold Tarrant, Danielle A. Layne, Dirk Baltzly & François Renaud (eds.), Brill’s Companion to the Reception of Plato in Antiquity. Leiden: Brill.
    This article tackles the sole surviving ancient commentary on what was perhaps the second most important Platonic work, with special interest for the manner in which the ancients tackled the setting of Plato's dialogues, Socratic ignorance, Socratic eros, the central myth-like Palinode, and the question of oral as against written teaching.
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  28. Contextualising Plato. A. Capra Plato's four Muses. The phaedrus and the poetics of philosophy. Pp. XVIII + 234, ills. Washington, dc: Center for hellenic studies, 2014. Paper, £18.95, €22.50, us$24.95. Isbn: 978-0-674-41722-9. [REVIEW]I.-K. Jeng - 2016 - The Classical Review 66 (2):358-360.
  29. The Myth of the Winged Chariot in the Phaedrus: A Vehicle for Philosophical Thinking.María Angélica Fierro - 2015 - In Gabriele Cornelli (ed.), Plato's Styles and Characters: Between Literature and Philosophy. De Gruyter. pp. 47-62.
  30. The phaedrus. J.r. Rapp ordinary oblivion and the self unmoored. Reading Plato's phaedrus and writing the soul. Pp. XII + 205. New York: Fordham university press, 2014. Cased, £36, us$55. Isbn: 978-0-8232-5743-0. [REVIEW]Zina Giannopoulou - 2015 - The Classical Review 65 (2):378-380.
  31. I Have to Live in Eros.Francisco J. Gonzalez - 2015 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (2):217-240.
    Heidegger’s recently published 1932 seminar on Plato’s Phaedrus arguably represents his most successful dialogue with Plato, where such dialogue is characterized by both the deepest affinity and the most incisive opposition. The central thesis of Heidegger’s interpretation is that the Phaedrus is not simply a logos about eros, but rather an attempt to show that eros is the very essence of logos and that logos is thereby in its very essence dia-logue. Heidegger is thus here more attuned than ever before (...)
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  32. 'Philosophy' in Plato's Phaedrus.Christopher Moore - 2015 - Plato Journal 15:59-79.
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  33. How rude can Socrates be? A note on Phaedrus 228a5-b6.Marco Zingano - 2015 - Journal of Ancient Philosophy 9 (2):67.
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  34. Myth and Philosophy in Plato’s Phaedrus by Daniel S. Werner.Doug Al-Maini - 2014 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 52 (1):161-162.
    The Phaedrus continues to fascinate. But then, that seems to be precisely the point, and scholars are doing an ever-better job of showing how the Phaedrus accomplishes the interest it generates, both in itself and in philosophy generally. The latest commentary to unravel the propaedeutic nature of the Phaedrus is Daniel Werner’s monograph, and it is a well-written, meticulous, and insightful examination. As his title suggests, Werner limits himself to the topic of myths in the Phaedrus, but that lens gives (...)
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  35. The phaedrus - Werner myth and philosophy in Plato's phaedrus. Pp. VI + 302. Cambridge: Cambridge university press, 2012. Cased, £65, us$99. Isbn: 978-1-107-02128-0. [REVIEW]S. Montgomery Ewegen - 2014 - The Classical Review 64 (1):58-60.
  36. The Gods’ Horses and Tripartite Souls in Plato’s Phaedrus.David Hoinski & Ronald Polansky - 2014 - Rhizomata 2 (2):139-160.
  37. El logos y la filosofía. Una relectura del "Fedro".Jonathan Lavilla de Lera - 2014 - Dissertation, Universitat de Barcelona
    La presente tesis doctoral se suma al proyecto general del grupo de investigación “Eidos: Hermenèutica, Platonisme i Modernitat”, ofreciendo una nueva lectura e interpretación del diálogo platónico Fedro. La tesis se divide en tres apartados. El primero, que sirve de introducción, establece los objetivos principales de la tesis y el método de trabajo que hemos seguido; además, ofrece toda una serie de consideraciones generales sobre el texto, como su autenticidad, su fecha de composición, una caracterización general de sus personajes y (...)
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  38. Arguing for the Immortality of the Soul in the Palinode of the Phaedrus.Christopher Moore - 2014 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 47 (2):179-208.
    Socrates’ second speech in the Phaedrus includes the argument (245c6–246a2) that starts “all/every soul is immortal” (“ψυχὴ πᾶσα ἀθάνατος”).1 This argument has attracted attention for its austerity and placement in Socrates’ grand speech about chariots and love. Yet it has never been identified as a deliberately fallacious argument.2 This article argues that it is. Socrates intends to confront his interlocutor Phaedrus with a dubious sequence of reasoning. He does so to show his speech-loving friend how—rather than simply to tell him (...)
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  39. How to ‘Know Thyself’ in Plato’s Phaedrus.Christopher Moore - 2014 - Apeiron 47 (3):390-418.
    When Socrates says, for the only time in the Socratic literature, that he strives to “know himself” (Phdr. 229e), he does not what this “self” is, or how he is to know it. Recent scholarship is split between taking it as one’s concrete personality and as the nature of (human) souls in general. This paper turns for answers to the immediate context of Socrates’ remark about selfknowledge: his long diatribe about myth-rectification. It argues that the latter, a civic task that (...)
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  40. Pindar's Charioteer in Plato's Phaedrus(227B9–10).Christopher Moore - 2014 - Classical Quarterly 64 (2):525-532.
    In his second question of thePhaedrus, Socrates asks Phaedrus how he spent (διατριβή) his morning with Lysias. Phaedrus answers: ‘You'll learn, should you have the leisure (σχολή) to walk and listen.’ Socrates responds:What? Don't you think I would judge it, as Pindar puts it, a thing ‘surpassing even lack of leisure’ (καὶ ἀσχολίας ὑπέρτερον), to hear how you and Lysias spent your time? (227b6–10)Socrates quotes fromFirst Isthmian2. In this victory ode, Pindar celebrates, uniquely in his extant oeuvre, a charioteer winner (...)
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  41. PLATO, PHAEDRUS_- P. Ryan Plato's _Phaedrus. A Commentary for Greek Readers. Introduction by Mary Louise Gill. (Oklahoma Series in Classical Culture 47.) Pp. xxx + 344, map. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2012. Paper, US$29.95. ISBN: 978-0-8061-4259-3. [REVIEW]Edith Gwendolyn Nally - 2013 - The Classical Review 63 (2):360-361.
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  42. A Multiform Desire.Olof Pettersson - 2013 - Dissertation, Uppsala University
    This dissertation is a study of appetite in Plato’s Timaeus, Republic and Phaedrus. In recent research is it often suggested that Plato considers appetite (i) to pertain to the essential needs of the body, (ii) to relate to a distinct set of objects, e.g. food or drink, and (iii) to cause behaviour aiming at sensory pleasure. Exploring how the notion of appetite, directly and indirectly, connects with Plato’s other purposes in these dialogues, this dissertation sets out to evaluate these ideas. (...)
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  43. Parmenides - Adluri Parmenides, Plato and Mortal Philosophy. Return from Transcendence. Pp. xviii + 212. London and New York: Continuum, 2011. Cased, £65. ISBN: 978-0-8264-5753-0. [REVIEW]Edward P. Butler - 2012 - The Classical Review 62 (2):361-363.
  44. Philostratus, plutarch, gorgias and the end of Plato's phaedrus.Kristoffel Demoen & Danny Praet - 2012 - Classical Quarterly 62 (1):436-439.
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  45. La alegoría del carro del alma en Platón y en la Kaṭha Upaniṣad.Paolo Magnone - 2012 - In Gerardo Rodriguez (ed.), Textos y contextos (II). Exégesis y hermenéutica de obras tardoantiguas y medievales. Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata. pp. 87-126.
    [The Soul Chariot Allegory in Plato and the Kaṭha Upaniṣad].
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  46. The myth of Theuth in the Phaedrus.Christopher Moore - 2012 - In Catherine Collobert, Pierre Destrée & Francisco J. Gonzalez (eds.), Plato and myth: studies on the use and status of Platonic myths. Boston: Brill.
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  47. Soul-Leading: The Unity of the Phaedrus, Again.Jessica Moss - 2012 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 43:1-23.
  48. Soul-leading: The unity of the phaedrus, again.Jessica Moss - 2012 - In Brad Inwood (ed.), Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy. Oxford University Press. pp. 43--1.
  49. Contemplation and self-mastery in Plato's Phaedrus.Suzanne Obdrzalek - 2012 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 42:77-107.
    This chapter examines Plato's moral psychology in the Phaedrus. It argues against interpreters such as Burnyeat and Nussbaum that Plato's treatment of the soul is increasingly pessimistic: reason's desire to contemplate is at odds with its obligation to rule the soul, and psychic harmony can only be secured by violently suppressing the lower parts of the soul.
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  50. Plato's Phaedrus: A Commentary for Greek Readers.Paul Ryan - 2012 - Norman: University of Oklahoma Press.
    Drawing on his extensive classroom experience and linguistic expertise, Paul Ryan offers a commentary that is both rich in detail and—in contrast to earlier, more austere commentaries on the Phaedrus—fully engaging. Line by line, he explains subtle points of language, explicates difficulties of syntax, and brings out nuances of tone and meaning that students might not otherwise notice or understand.
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1 — 50 / 209