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  1. The Analogical Methodology of Augustine's De Trinitate and Plato's Republic.Douglas A. Shepardson - 2017 - Studia Patristica 75:109-119.
    This article argues that the analogical argument employed by Augustine in De Trinitate (the soul-God analogy) is formally identical to the analogical argument employed by Plato in the Republic (the city-soul analogy). The similarities between these two analogies, however, have received insufficient attention in the secondary literature. My goal is to fill this lacuna. I first provide a summary of the analogical methodology of these two works, and I then proceed to translate these two analogies into one analogical argument form, (...)
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  2. “H. Benson, Clitophon's Challenge: Dialectic in Plato's Meno, Phaedo, and Republic.”. [REVIEW]Edith Gwendolyn Nally - 2016 - Religious Studies Review 42:205-6.
  3. What Socrates Says, and Does Not Say.George Klosko - 2020 - Classical Quarterly 70 (2):577-591.
    For several decades, scholars of Plato's dialogues have focussed their efforts on understanding Socrates’ philosophy by unravelling the arguments used to establish it. On this view, Socrates’ philosophy is presented in his arguments, and, as Gregory Vlastos says, ‘Almost everything Socrates says is wiry argument; that is the beauty of his talk for a philosopher.’ In this paper I raise questions about what can be learned about Socrates’ philosophy through analysis of his arguments. One critic of what he views as (...)
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  4. Censuring Oneself.Travis Mulroy - 2021 - Ancient Philosophy 41 (1):37-61.
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  5. Replenishment and Maintenance of the Human Body.Lea Aurelia Schroeder - 2021 - Apeiron 54 (3):317-346.
    Scholarship on Plato's Timaeus has paid relatively little attention to Tim. 77a–81, a seemingly disjointed passage on topics including plants, respiration, blood circulation, and musical sounds. Despite this comparative neglect, commentators both ancient and modern have levelled a number of serious charges against Timaeus' remarks in the passage, questioning the coherence and explanatory power of what they take to be a theory of respiration. In this paper, I argue that the project of 77a–81e is not to sketch theories of respiration, (...)
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  6. On Socrates' Project of Philosophical Conversion.Jacob Stump - 2020 - Philosophers' Imprint 20 (32):1-19.
    There is a wide consensus among scholars that Plato’s Socrates is wrong to trust in reason and argument as capable of converting people to the life of philosophy. In this paper, I argue for the opposite. I show that Socrates employs a more sophisticated strategy than is typically supposed. Its key component is the use of philosophical argument not to lead an interlocutor to rationally conclude that he must change his way of life but rather to cause a certain affective (...)
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  7. Eine vorplatonische Deutung des sokratischen eros. Der Dialog Aspasia des sokratikers Aischines.Harry Neumann & Barbara Ehlers - 1968 - American Journal of Philology 89 (3):383.
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  8. Selected Papers.Gregory Vlastos, Harold Cherniss & Leonardo Taran - 1978 - American Journal of Philology 99 (4):537.
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  9. Socrates, Philosophy, and Friendship in the 'Phaedo'.Doug Reed - 2020 - In Wisdom, Love, and Friendship in Ancient Greek Philosophy: Essays in Honor of Daniel Devereux. Berlin, Germany: De Gruyter. pp. 175–190.
    In this paper I investigate Socrates as a friend in Plato's 'Phaedo'. I begin by setting out his friends' request for reassurance of how they will fare after Socrates dies. I argue that by structuring the discussion as he does, Socrates provides one final opportunity for his friends to prepare themselves for life without him, thus offering them the best kind of reassurance they could ask for.
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  10. Plato's Gymnastic Dialogues.Heather Reid - 2020 - In Mark Ralkowski Heather Reid (ed.), Athletics, Gymnastics, and Agon in Plato. Sioux City, IA, USA: pp. 15-30.
    It is not mere coincidence that several of Plato’s dialogues are set in gymnasia and palaistrai (wrestling schools), employ the gymnastic language of stripping, wrestling, tripping, even helping opponents to their feet, and imitate in argumentative form the athletic contests (agōnes) commonly associated with that place. The main explanation for this is, of course, historical. Sophists, orators, and intellectuals of all stripes, including the historical Socrates, really did frequent Athens’ gymnasia and palaistrai in search of ready audiences and potential students. (...)
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  11. Wrestling with the Eleatics in Plato's Parmenides.Heather Reid & Lidia Palumbo - 2020 - In Athletics, Gymnastics, and Agon in Plato. Sioux City, IA, USA: pp. 185-198.
    This paper interprets the Parmenides agonistically as a constructive contest between Plato’s Socrates and the Eleatics of Western Greece. Not only is the dialogue set in the agonistic context of the Panathenaic Games, it features agonistic language, employs an agonistic method, and may even present an agonistic model for participation in the forms. The inspiration for this agonistic motif may be that Parmenides and his student Zeno represent Western Greece, which was a key rival for the mainland at the Olympics (...)
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  12. Athletics, Gymnastics, and Agon in Plato.Heather Reid, Mark Ralkowski & Coleen P. Zoller (eds.) - 2020 - Sioux City, IA, USA: Parnassos Press.
    In the Panathenaic Games, there was a torch race for teams of ephebes that started from the altars of Eros and Prometheus at Plato’s Academy and finished on the Acropolis at the altar of Athena, goddess of wisdom. It was competitive, yes, but it was also sacred, aimed at a noble goal. To win, you needed to cooperate with your teammates and keep the delicate flame alive as you ran up the hill. Likewise, Plato’s philosophy combines competition and cooperation in (...)
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  13. Herdsmen and Stargazers: The Science of Philosophy in Plato’s Statesman.Olof Pettersson - 2020 - Polis 37 (3):534-549.
    Together with the Sophist, Plato’s Statesman is often taken to introduce and develop a new scientific form of theoretical inquiry, represented by the Eleatic visitor. This paper draws on recent scholarship on the Sophist and evaluates the reliability of this scientific approach when applied to political matters in the Statesman. It analyzes how the Eleatic visitor identifies and tries to mend two central mistakes in his own initial definition of the statesman and argues that the visitor’s treatment of three related (...)
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  14. Suggestions On How To Combine The Platonic Forms To Overcome The Interpretative Difficulties Of The Parmenides Dialogue.Gerardo Óscar Matía Cubillo - 2021 - Revista de Filosofía de la Universidad de Costa Rica 60 (156):157-171.
    This paper provides an original approach to research on the logical processes that determine how certain forms participate in others. By introducing the concept of relational participation, the problems of self-referentiality of the Platonic forms can be dealt with more effectively. Applying this to the forms of likeness and unlikeness in Parmenides 132d-133a reveals a possible way to resolve different versions of the Third Man Argument. The method of generating numbers from oddness and evenness may also be of interest; relational (...)
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  15. La radicalización Del élenchos: El recurso a la verdad como condición dialéctica mínima en el teeteto de platón.Pilar Spangenberg - 2020 - Argos 1 (39):9-32.
    En la primera parte del Teeteto Sócrates refuta tres tesis que considera estrechamente vinculadas entre sí: la tesis de Teeteto que identifica conocimientoy percepción, la tesis relativista y la tesis movilista. El propósito de este trabajo es mostrar que en tres de las refutaciones ofrecidas contra estas posiciones se exhibe una misma estrategia tendiente a remitis a un prerrequisito dialéctico vinculado a la pretensión de verdad. ESta constituiría una estrategia radical, en el sentido de que pone en cuestión la misma (...)
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  16. Hippocrates at Phaedrus 270c.Elizabeth Jelinek & Nickolas Pappas - 2020 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 101 (3):409-430.
    At Plato’s Phaedrus 270c, Socrates asks whether one can know souls without knowing ‘the whole.’ Phaedrus answers that ‘according to Hippocrates’ the same demand on knowing the whole applies to bodies. What parallel is intended between soul-knowledge and body-knowledge and which medical passages illustrate the analogy have been much debated. Three dominant interpretations read ‘the whole’ as respectively (1) environment, (2) kosmos, and (3) individual soul or body; and adduce supporting Hippocratic passages. But none of these interpretations accounts for the (...)
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  17. Plato’s Method of Hypothesis in the Middle Dialogues, Written by Samuel Scolnicov.José Lourenço - 2020 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 14 (1):75-77.
  18. Knowing the Whole: Comments on Gill, “Plato’s Phaedrus and the Method of Hippocrates”.Eric Brown - 2003 - Modern Schoolman 80 (4):315-323.
    Socrates suggests that no one can know the nature of soul without knowing the nature of the whole. The whole what? Gill proposes "the whole environment" in which the soul is active. I criticize this and argue for the old-fashioned reading of "the whole world.".
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  19. Plato's Socrates and His Conception of Philosophy.Eric Brown - forthcoming - In Richard Kraut & David Ebrey (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Plato, 2nd ed. Cambridge:
    This is a study of Plato's use of the character Socrates to model what philosophy is. The study focuses on the Apology, and finds that philosophy there is the love of wisdom, where wisdom is expertise about how to live, of the sort that only gods can fully have, and where Socrates loves wisdom in three ways, first by honoring wisdom as the gods' possession, testing human claims to it, second by pursuing wisdom, examining himself as he examines others, to (...)
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  20. Was Plato an Eristic According to Isocrates?Geneviève Lachance - 2020 - Apeiron 53 (1):81-96.
    The article examines the passages in Isocrates’ Corpus containing a description and a critique of a new type of sophistic called “eristic”. Based on the chronology of Isocrates’ discourses and the description he gave, the author shows that the majority of these passages could not have aimed at Plato as its sole or principal target. However, it should not be excluded that Isocrates’ criticism of eristics was directed against various members of the Socratic circle, a heterogeneous group in which Plato (...)
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  21. Studien zur Entwicklung der platonischen Dialektik. By Julius Stenzel. 2nd edition, enlarged. Pp. 208. Leipzig and Berlin: Teubner, 1931. 12 m. [REVIEW]T. D. - 1932 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 52 (2):319-319.
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  22. Les Mythes de Platon. By Perceval Frutiger. Pp. 295. Paris: F. Alcan, 1930. 35 Fr.T. D. - 1931 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 51 (2):311-311.
  23. La Fabulation Platonicienne. By P.-M. Schuhl. Pp. 124; Pl. 4. Paris: Presses Universitaires de France, 1947. 120 Fr.T. D. - 1946 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 66:143-143.
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  24. Plato's Method of Dialectic. By Julius Stenzel. Trans, and Ed. D.J. Allan. Pp. Xliii + 170. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1940. 10s. 6d. [REVIEW]T. D. - 1942 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 62:95-95.
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  25. Kahn Plato and the Socratic Dialogue. The Philosophical Use of a Literary Form. Cambridge UP, 1996. Pp Xx + 431. 0521433258. [REVIEW]Tania L. Gergel - 1999 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 119:190-191.
  26. Gill and McCabe Eds.Form and Argument in Late Plato. Oxford UP, 1996. Pp. Xii + 345. £35. 0198240120.C. C. W. Taylor - 1998 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 118:227-228.
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  27. Miller Plato's Parmenides: The Conversion of the Soul. Princeton: University Press. 1986. Pp. Xiii + 299. £20.10.Malcolm Schofield - 1988 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 108:229-230.
  28. Annas An Introduction to Plato's Republic. Oxford: Clarendon Press. 1981. Pp. Viii + 362. £15-00.Mary Margaret Mackenzie - 1983 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 103:170-171.
  29. Le Dialogue Platonicien de la Maturit.J. B. Skemp - 1981 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 101:154.
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  30. Findlay Plato: The Written and Unwritten Doctrines. London and New York: Routledge & Kegan Paul and Humanities Press. 1974. Pp. Xiv + 484. £7·75. [REVIEW]H. D. Rankin - 1976 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 96:183-184.
  31. Thesleff Studies in the Styles of Plato. Helsinki: Societas Philosophica Fennica. 1967. Pp. 192. FM 20.L. Brandwood - 1968 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 88:160-161.
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  32. Presses Universitaires de France.D. Tarrant - 1947 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 67 (22):145.
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  33. Paideia: The Ideals of Greek Culture, Vol. II. By Werner Jaeger, Translated by Gilbert Highet. Pp. Xv + 442. Oxford: Blackwell, 1944. 22s. 6d. [REVIEW]R. E. F. - 1944 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 64:115-115.
  34. George A. Bozonis: Δομὴ Καὶ Μορφὴ Το Πλατωνικο Διαλόγου. Pp. 93. Athens: Privately Printed, 1970. Paper.Pamela M. Huby - 1972 - The Classical Review 22 (3):408-408.
  35. Hermann Gundert: Dialog und Dialektik: zur Struktur des platonischen Dialogs. Pp. viii+166. Amsterdam: B. R. Grüner, 1971. Cloth, fl.35. [REVIEW]Pamela Huby - 1975 - The Classical Review 25 (1):144-144.
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  36. Gottfried Bloch: Platons Charmides: die Erscheinung des Seins im Gespräch. Pp. 163. Privately printed, 1973. . Paper.Pamela Huby - 1976 - The Classical Review 26 (2):279-279.
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  37. Dietrich Roloff: Platonische Ironie–Das Beispiel: Theaitetos. Pp. Vi + 422. Heidelberg: Carl Winter, 1975. Cloth, DM.85. [REVIEW]Jonathan Barnes - 1977 - The Classical Review 27 (2):289-289.
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  38. Hanns-Dieter Voigtländer: Der Philosoph unddie Vielen. Pp. xiv + 698. Wiesbaden: Franz Steiner, 1980. Paper, DM. 178.C. J. Rowe - 1983 - The Classical Review 33 (1):140-140.
  39. Plato and the Written Word - Wolfgang Wieland: Platon Und Die Formen des Wissens. Pp. 339. Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 1982. DM. 72. [REVIEW]C. C. W. Taylor - 1983 - The Classical Review 33 (1):58-60.
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  40. Il teatro platonico della virtù, edited by Fulvia De Luise.Filippo Forcignano - 2018 - Polis 35 (2):607-611.
  41. Platonic Inquiry.Ravi Sharma - 2017 - Polis 34 (1):147-155.
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  42. Platonic Dialogue - Charles L. Griswold : Platonic Writings, Platonic Readings. Pp. Xi + 321. New York and London: Routledge, 1988. £25. [REVIEW]Christopher Gill - 1989 - The Classical Review 39 (2):252-253.
  43. Giovanni Cerri: Platone sociologo della communicazione. (La Cultura.) Pp. xvii +156. Milan: Arnoldo Mondadori, II Saggiatore, 1991. Paper, L. 38,000. [REVIEW]G. B. Kerferd - 1993 - The Classical Review 43 (2):440-440.
  44. Michelini Plato as Author. The Rhetoric of Philosophy. Pp. Viii + 359. Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2003. Cased, €40, US$47. ISBN: 90-04-12878-6. [REVIEW]Kathryn A. Morgan - 2006 - The Classical Review 56 (2):296-298.
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  45. The Psychagogic Work of Examples in Plato's Statesman. Moore - 2016 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 49 (3):300-322.
    This paper concerns the role of examples (paradeigmata) as propaedeutic to philosophical inquiry, in light of the methodological digression of Plato’s Statesman. Consistent with scholarship on Aristotle’s view of example, scholars of Plato’s work have privileged the logic of example over their rhetorical appeal to the soul of the learner. Following a small but significant trend in recent rhetorical scholarship that emphasizes the affective nature of examples, this essay assesses the psychagogic potential of paradeigmata, following the discussion of example in (...)
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  46. Plato's Analogical Thought.Holly Moore - 2009 - Dissertation, DePaul University
    The philosophical concept of analogy is fundamental to the theory of imaging that characterizes Plato’s metaphysics, cosmology, and methodology. While Plato never explicitly conceptualizes the philosophical role of analogy, his dialogues are rife with analogies and images that are often pivotal to the thought expressed there. An analysis of celebrated analogies such as the sun and the good in the Republic, the “second sailing” in the Phaedo, the “receptacle” (chōra) in the Timaeus, and the example of weaving in the Statesman (...)
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  47. By What is the Soul Nourished? - On the Art of the Physician of Souls in Plato’s Protagoras.Jens Kristian Larsen - 2017 - In Olof Pettersson & Vigdis Songe-Møller (eds.), Plato’s Protagoras: Essays on the Confrontation of Philosophy and Sophistry. Springer. pp. 79-97.
    This article explores the motif of psychic nourishment in Plato’s Protagoras. It does so by analyzing what consequences Socrates’ claim that only a physician of souls will be able adequately to assess the quality of such nourishment has for the argument of the dialogue. To this purpose, the first section of the article offers a detailed analysis of Socrates’ initial conversation with Hippocrates, highlighting and interpreting the various uses of medical metaphors. Building on this, this section argues that the warning (...)
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  48. “F. Trabattoni, Essays on Plato’s Epistemology.”. [REVIEW]Edith Gwendolyn Nally - 2017 - The Classical Review 67 (2):351-352.
  49. The Atlantis Story in Plato. C. Gill Plato's Atlantis Story. Text, Translation and Commentary. Pp. X + 222, Ills. Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, 2017. Paper, £19.95 . Isbn: 978-1-78694-015-5. [REVIEW]Lloyd P. Gerson - 2018 - The Classical Review 68 (1):37-38.
  50. The Groundwork for Dialectic in Statesman 277a-287b.Colin C. Smith - 2018 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 12 (2):132-150.
    In Plato’s Statesman, the Eleatic Stranger leads Socrates the Younger and their audience through an analysis of the statesman in the service of the interlocutors’ becoming “more capable in dialectic regarding all things”. In this way, the dialectical exercise in the text is both intrinsically and instrumentally valuable, as it yields a philosophically rigorous account of statesmanship and exhibits a method of dialectical inquiry. After the series of bifurcatory divisions in the Sophist and early Statesman, the Stranger changes to a (...)
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