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  1. ‘Romanisation’ of Personal Names - M. Dondin-Payre Les Noms de Personnes Dans l'Empire Romain. Transformations, Adaptation, Évolution. Pp. 379, Ills, Maps. Bordeaux: Ausonius Éditions, 2011. Paper, €30. Isbn: 978-2-35613-051-8. [REVIEW]Katherine Mcdonald - 2013 - The Classical Review 63 (1):217-219.
  2. Book Review: Why Plato Wrote. [REVIEW]George Klosko - 2013 - Political Theory 41 (2):343-346.
  3. The Nomothetês in Plato’s Cratylus.David Sedley - 2003 - The Studia Philonica Annual 15:5-16.
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  4. "God of Many Names: Play, Poetry, and Power in Hellenic Thought From Homer to Aristotle", by Mihail I. Spariosu. [REVIEW]Robert S. J. Garland - 1994 - Ancient Philosophy 14 (1):200.
  5. Plato's Cratylus.David Sedley - 2003 - Cambridge University Press.
    Plato's Cratylus is a brilliant but enigmatic dialogue. It bears on a topic, the relation of language to knowledge, which has never ceased to be of central philosophical importance, but tackles it in ways which at times look alien to us. In this reappraisal of the dialogue, Professor Sedley argues that the etymologies which take up well over half of it are not an embarrassing lapse or semi-private joke on Plato's part. On the contrary, if taken seriously as they should (...)
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  6. Names, Reference, and Correctness in Plato's Cratylus.Michael D. Palmer - 1989
  7. Plato's Philosophy of Language in the "Cratylus" and the "Parmenides".Carol Bergman Rosenthal - 1995 - Dissertation, The University of Rochester
    The thesis proposes that there is a connection between Plato's views on language in the Cratylus and the Third Man Argument in the Parmenides. First, the thesis sets out to establish that previous analyses of the Cratylus, which concentrated mainly on the question of whether Plato adopted conventionalism or naturalism, are not completely satisfactory. Rather, it is argued that the Cratylus is concerned with discovering the conditions underlying the sign relation. As a result, Plato develops a distinctive theory of correctness, (...)
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  8. Studies in Plato's Theory of Knowledge.Allan Jay Silverman - 1985 - Dissertation, University of California, Berkeley
    In this thesis I offer a reconstruction of some of the foundations of Plato's Theory of Knowledge. This effort is based upon two Platonic theses: Thought is Language and The objects of different faculties of the soul are distinct. The thesis is an investigation of the inter-relation of these two claims. I argue that the former does not prompt Plato to abandon the latter, the so-called Two Worlds hypothesis of the Republic, but rather serves as a justification of that hypothesis. (...)
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  9. Some Names in the Captivi.Seaman Seaman - 1941 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 35:197.
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  10. Legionary Soldiers and Their Names, The.Brady Brady - 1952 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 46:217.
  11. The Natural Correctness of Names in Plato's "Cratylus": An Interpretative Study.Christopher Arnold Page - 1978 - Dissertation, The Johns Hopkins University
  12. Plato's Investigations Into Language, with Special Reference to 'Cratylus'.Michael Alexander Stewart - 1965 - Dissertation, University of Pennsylvania
  13. The Theory of Names in Plato's Cratylus.Richard Robinson - 1955 - Revue Internationale de Philosophie 9 (2):221.
  14. The 'Cratylus': Plato's Investigation of Names.Walter Mark Pfeiffer - 1971 - Dissertation, University of Toronto (Canada)
  15. A Reading of Plato's "Cratylus".Rachel Barney - 1996 - Dissertation, Princeton University
    The Cratylus is Plato's principal discussion of language, and has generated immense interpretive controversy. This thesis offers a new interpretation of the Cratylus, starting from the idea that it is essentially a normative enquiry, to be interpreted alongside Plato's ethical and political works. Just as the Statesman attempts to determine the nature of the statesman, so too the basic project of the Cratylus is to discover what constitutes a true, correct name. But this aim is doomed in the case of (...)
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  16. The Correctness of Names [Microform] Plato's Own Nature Thesis in the Cratylus. --.Michael D. Palmer - 1985 - University Microfilms International.
    This monograph deals with Plato's Cratylus, a dialogue which advertises itself from the outset as an inquiry into the question of the correctness of names. In the prologue, the inquiry is cast as a confrontation between two competing theses on this question. Two participants in the dialogue, Hermogenes and Cratylus, seem to differ in their accounts of correctness. Cratylus reportedly holds that correctness obtains by reason of some natural relation between the name and the thing named; Hermogenes contends that correctness (...)
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  17. Přirozená Správnost Jmen V Dialogu „Kratylos“.Blažena ŠvandovÁ - 2001 - Filosoficky Casopis 49:471-485.
    [The natural correctness of names in the dialogue “Cratylus“].
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  18. What's in a Name: An Interpretation of Plato's "Cratylus".Donald James Mclean - 1991 - Dissertation, University of Waterloo (Canada)
    Modern philosophic study of names and naming focuses on issues of how it is that denotation and reference are achieved. Questions as to whether names can be correct or appropriate to their referents, are thought to fall outside the domain of philosophic inquiry; thus, the assessment of, for example, the sound symbolism suggested by the phonemes of a name, is thought to belong to non-philosophic disciplines such as onomastics and literary criticism. In this thesis, I will argue that the modern (...)
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  19. Names, Nominata, the Forms and the Cratylus.David F. Wolf Ii - 1996 - Philosophical Inquiry 18 (3/4):20-35.
  20. The Meaning of the Word ΣΩΜΑ in Plato's Cratylus 400 C.Rein Ferwerda - 1985 - Hermes 113 (3):266-279.
  21. The Etymologies of Apollos Name In'cratylus'by Plato.F. Montrasio - 1988 - Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia 43 (2):227-259.
  22. Names, Nominata, the Forms and the Cratylus.Df Wolf - 1996 - Philosophical Inquiry 18 (3-4):20-35.
  23. A Lydian Gloss and Some Names.J. H. Jongkees - 1935 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 55 (1):80-81.
  24. The History of the Names Hellas, Hellenes.J. B. Bury - 1895 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 15:217-238.
  25. Cratylus 393b–C and the Prehistory of Plato's Text.Francesco Ademollo - 2013 - Classical Quarterly 63 (2):595-602.
    We start from a passage in Plato's Cratylus, 393b7–c7. For reasons which will become clear in due course, I give Burnet's text , which differs from that of the more recent OCT edition on an important detail.
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  26. Plato's Semantics and Plato's Cave.Thomas Wheaton Bestor - 1996 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 14:33-82.
  27. "The Natural Rightness of Names in Plato's" Cratylus".B. Svandova - 2001 - Filosoficky Casopis 49 (3):471-485.
  28. Recensione di R. BARNEY, Names and Nature in Plato's 'Cratylus'. [REVIEW]F. Aronadio - 2003 - Elenchos 24 (2):422-430.
  29. Logos and Epistêmê. The Constitutive Role of Language in Plato's Theory of Knowledge.Burkhard Mojsisch - 1998 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 3 (1):19-28.
    This essay first differentiates the various meanings of the term as it appears in Plato's dialogues Theaetetus and The Sophist. These are: the colloquy of the soul with itself, a single sentence, a proposing aloud, the enumeration of the constitutive elements of a whole and the giving of a specific difference; further, opinion and imagination. These meanings are then related to Plato's determination of knowledge and therewith truth and falsity. One can be said to possess knowledge only when the universal (...)
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  30. Names and “Cutting Being at the Joints” in the Cratylus.Adam Wood - 2007 - Dionysius 25.
  31. (D.) Sedley Plato's Cratylus. Cambridge UP, 2001. Pp. Xi + 189. £40. 0521584922. [REVIEW]Andrea Capra - 2004 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 124:216-217.
  32. Le sophiste et les exemples. Sur le problème de la ressemblance dans le "Sophiste" de Platon.Felipe Ledesma - 2009 - Revue de Philosophie Ancienne 27 (1):3-38.
    In the Sophist Plato introduces a very peculiar character, the eleatic stranger who plays both for Theaetetus and for us the role of a perfect sophist. His terrific power simply comes of his refusal to understand the examples. He just requires his interlocutors that absolutely all what is to be understood by them must be explicitly said. And “all” means really all: even the most evident for everybody, all what is not necessary to say and perhaps is not possible either. (...)
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  33. Logos as the Message From the Gods: On the Etymology of Hermes in Plato's Cratylus.Sean D. Kirkland - 2007 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 12 (1):1 - 14.
    In the Cratylus, Socrates seems to present the Logos essentially as an always already present yoke binding us to our world. However, this prior and necessary bond does not entail that the world is revealed perfectly and completely in the terms and structures of our human language. Rather, within this bond, the Logos opens up a distance between being and appearance, insofar as it points to »what is« as the withdrawn possibility condition for the appearances ordered, gathered and separated according (...)
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  34. Review: Falsehood Unmasked. [REVIEW]Christopher Kirwan - 1991 - Phronesis 36 (3):319 - 327.
  35. Plato in the "Cratylus" on Speaking, Language, and Learning.William D. Rumsey - 1987 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 4 (4):385 - 403.
  36. Roman Names in Macedonia (A.B.) Tataki The Roman Presence in Macedonia. Evidence From Personal Names. (Meletemata 46.) Pp. 667, Map. Athens: Research Centre for Greek and Roman Antiquity, National Hellenic Research Foundation, 2006. Paper, €88. ISBN: 978-960-7905-30-. [REVIEW]A. Spawforth - 2008 - The Classical Review 58 (2):552-.
  37. True and False Names in the "Cratylus".Mary Richardson - 1976 - Phronesis 21 (2):135-145.
  38. Review of John Holbo, Reason and Persuasion: Three Dialogues by Plato: Euthyphro, Meno, Republic Book I[REVIEW]Paul Carelli - 2009 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (12).
  39. Plato on Sense and Reference.George Rudebusch - 1985 - Mind 94 (376):526-537.
    Plato's "theaetetus" (187-200) raises puzzles about false belief. Frege's explanation of how an identity statement can be informative is often seen as a solution to socrates' puzzles. The strategy of frege's solution is to explain a "mistake" as a "mismatch". But it turns out that socrates' argument, In fact, Is aware of and rejects this strategy.
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  40. Plato's "Cratylus".David Sedley - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  41. The Case of the Etymologies in Plato's Cratylus.Christine J. Thomas - 2007 - Philosophy Compass 2 (2):218–226.
Plato: Truth
  1. Método dialéctico y verdad en el Parménides de Platón.Gerardo Óscar Matía Cubillo - forthcoming - Daimon: Revista Internacional de Filosofía.
    Empleando procedimientos de la lógica simbólica, el presente trabajo contribuye a una mejor comprensión del ejercicio dialéctico llevado a cabo en el Parménides. La interpretación de las formas del ser y el no ser a partir de la oposición entre el objeto de conocimiento y el pensamiento acerca del mismo, abre la puerta a una manera original de enfocar el problema de la verdad en Platón. Puede resultar interesante, asimismo, la solución que se propone a la aporía planteada en Parménides (...)
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  2. Being In Late Plato.Eric Sanday - 2018 - In A Companion to Ancient Philosophy. pp. 147-159.
    This chapter [of the edited volume, A Companion to Ancient Philosophy] examines the shift in Plato’s account of the eidē or ‘forms’ from the Republic to the Parmenides. Forms in the Republic are characterized in terms of perfection, purity, and changelessness, with the form being an ultimate explanatory principle for being-X. Participants, while being-X, are also capable of not-being-X, either through qualitative change and coming-to-be, or through external changes in perspective or opinion, by which they “appear [φανήσεται]” not-X (R. V.479a7). (...)
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  3. The Republic - Schindler Plato's Critique of Impure Reason. On Goodness and Truth in the Republic. Pp. Xiv + 358. Washington: The Catholic University of America Press, 2008. Cased, US$79.95. ISBN: 978-0-8132-1534-1. [REVIEW]Andrew Payne - 2010 - The Classical Review 60 (2):369-370.
  4. Platons Begriff der Wahrheit (2., durchgesehene Auflage. Studienausgabe).Jan Szaif - 1996 - Freiburg, Germany: Alber.
  5. The Importance of Being Erroneous.Nils Kürbis - forthcoming - Australasian Philosophical Review 2 (3).
    This is a commentary on MM McCabe's "First Chop your logos... Socrates and the sophists on language, logic, and development". In her paper MM analyses Plato's Euthydemos, in which Plato tackles the problem of falsity in a way that takes into account the speaker and complements the Sophist's discussion of what is said. The dialogue looks as if it is merely a demonstration of the silly consequences of eristic combat. And so it is. But a main point of MM's paper (...)
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  6. Knowledge and Truth in Plato: Stepping Past the Shadow of Socrates.Catherine Rowett - 2018 - Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
    Catherine Rowett presents an in depth study of Plato's Meno, Republic and Theaetetus and offers both a coherent argument that the project in which Plato was engaging has been widely misunderstood and misrepresented, and detailed new readings of particular thorny issues in the interpretation of these classic texts.
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  7. Os Problemas da Opinião Falsa e da Predicação no diálogo Sofista de Platão.Francisco de Assis Vale Cavalcante Filho - 2014 - Dissertation, UFPB, Brazil
  8. Plato on the Metaphysical Foundation of Meaning and Truth by Blake E. Hestir. [REVIEW]Fink Jakob Leth - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (1):153-154.
    This study defends the view that Plato’s account of meaning and truth does not depend on strong Platonism. Strong Platonism is based, among other things, on the assumption that basic entities are pure and cannot mix with anything. In a semantic theory, such entities provide stability of reference to single terms and so keep the danger of fluctuating meanings at bay. Unfortunately, strong Platonism pays a heavy price for this stability in that it cannot explain how terms can be combined (...)
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  9. W. G. Runciman, "Ploto's Later Epistemology". [REVIEW]J. L. Saunders - 1964 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 2 (2):255.
1 — 50 / 251