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  1. Cratylus 393b–C and the Prehistory of Plato's Text.Francesco Ademollo - 2013 - Classical Quarterly 63 (2):595-602.
    We start from a passage in Plato's Cratylus, 393b7–c7. For reasons which will become clear in due course, I give Burnet's text , which differs from that of the more recent OCT edition on an important detail.
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  2. Recensione di R. BARNEY, Names and Nature in Plato's 'Cratylus'. [REVIEW]F. Aronadio - 2003 - Elenchos 24 (2):422-430.
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  3. A Reading of Plato's "Cratylus".Rachel Barney - 1996 - Dissertation, Princeton University
    The Cratylus is Plato's principal discussion of language, and has generated immense interpretive controversy. This thesis offers a new interpretation of the Cratylus, starting from the idea that it is essentially a normative enquiry, to be interpreted alongside Plato's ethical and political works. Just as the Statesman attempts to determine the nature of the statesman, so too the basic project of the Cratylus is to discover what constitutes a true, correct name. But this aim is doomed in the case of (...)
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  4. Plato's Semantics and Plato's Cave.Thomas Wheaton Bestor - 1996 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 14:33-82.
  5. Legionary Soldiers and Their Names, The.Brady Brady - 1952 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 46:217.
  6. The History of the Names Hellas, Hellenes.J. B. Bury - 1895 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 15:217-238.
  7. (D.) Sedley Plato's Cratylus. Cambridge UP, 2001. Pp. Xi + 189. £40. 0521584922. [REVIEW]Andrea Capra - 2004 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 124:216-217.
  8. Review of John Holbo, Reason and Persuasion: Three Dialogues by Plato: Euthyphro, Meno, Republic Book I[REVIEW]Paul Carelli - 2009 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (12).
  9. The Meaning of the Word ΣΩΜΑ in Plato's Cratylus 400 C.Rein Ferwerda - 1985 - Hermes 113 (3):266-279.
  10. God of Many Names: Play, Poetry, and Power in Hellenic Thought From Homer to Aristotle. [REVIEW]Robert S. Garland - 1994 - Ancient Philosophy 14 (1):200-201.
  11. Names, Nominata, the Forms and the Cratylus.David F. Wolf Ii - 1996 - Philosophical Inquiry 18 (3/4):20-35.
  12. A Lydian Gloss and Some Names.J. H. Jongkees - 1935 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 55:80.
  13. Logos as the Message From the Gods: On the Etymology of Hermes in Plato's Cratylus.Sean D. Kirkland - 2007 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 12 (1):1 - 14.
    In the Cratylus, Socrates seems to present the Logos essentially as an always already present yoke binding us to our world. However, this prior and necessary bond does not entail that the world is revealed perfectly and completely in the terms and structures of our human language. Rather, within this bond, the Logos opens up a distance between being and appearance, insofar as it points to »what is« as the withdrawn possibility condition for the appearances ordered, gathered and separated according (...)
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  14. Review: Falsehood Unmasked. [REVIEW]Christopher Kirwan - 1991 - Phronesis 36 (3):319 - 327.
  15. Le sophiste et les exemples. Sur le problème de la ressemblance dans le "Sophiste" de Platon.Felipe Ledesma - 2009 - Revue de Philosophie Ancienne 27 (1):3-38.
    In the Sophist Plato introduces a very peculiar character, the eleatic stranger who plays both for Theaetetus and for us the role of a perfect sophist. His terrific power simply comes of his refusal to understand the examples. He just requires his interlocutors that absolutely all what is to be understood by them must be explicitly said. And “all” means really all: even the most evident for everybody, all what is not necessary to say and perhaps is not possible either. (...)
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  16. M. Dondin-Payre Les Noms de Personnes Dans l'Empire Romain. Transformations, Adaptation, Évolution. Pp. 379, Ills, Maps. Bordeaux: Ausonius Éditions, 2011. Paper, €30. ISBN: 978-2-35613-051-8. [REVIEW]Katherine Mcdonald - 2013 - The Classical Review 63 (1):217-219.
  17. What's in a Name: An Interpretation of Plato's "Cratylus".Donald James Mclean - 1991 - Dissertation, University of Waterloo (Canada)
    Modern philosophic study of names and naming focuses on issues of how it is that denotation and reference are achieved. Questions as to whether names can be correct or appropriate to their referents, are thought to fall outside the domain of philosophic inquiry; thus, the assessment of, for example, the sound symbolism suggested by the phonemes of a name, is thought to belong to non-philosophic disciplines such as onomastics and literary criticism. In this thesis, I will argue that the modern (...)
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  18. Logos and Pistme: The Constitutive Role of Language in Plato's Theory of Knowledge.Burkhard Mojsisch - 1998 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 3 (1):19-28.
    This essay first differentiates the various meanings of the term as it appears in Plato's dialogues Theaetetus and The Sophist. These are: the colloquy of the soul with itself, a single sentence, a proposing aloud, the enumeration of the constitutive elements of a whole and the giving of a specific difference; further, opinion and imagination. These meanings are then related to Plato's determination of knowledge and therewith truth and falsity. One can be said to possess knowledge only when the universal (...)
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  19. The Etymologies of Apollos Name In'cratylus'by Plato.F. Montrasio - 1988 - Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia 43 (2):227-259.
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  20. The Natural Correctness of Names in Plato's "Cratylus": An Interpretative Study.Christopher Arnold Page - 1978 - Dissertation, The Johns Hopkins University
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  21. Names, Reference, and Correctness in Plato's Cratylus.Michael D. Palmer - 1989
  22. The Correctness of Names [Microform] Plato's Own Nature Thesis in the Cratylus. --.Michael D. Palmer - 1985 - University Microfilms International.
    This monograph deals with Plato's Cratylus, a dialogue which advertises itself from the outset as an inquiry into the question of the correctness of names. In the prologue, the inquiry is cast as a confrontation between two competing theses on this question. Two participants in the dialogue, Hermogenes and Cratylus, seem to differ in their accounts of correctness. Cratylus reportedly holds that correctness obtains by reason of some natural relation between the name and the thing named; Hermogenes contends that correctness (...)
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  23. The 'Cratylus': Plato's Investigation of Names.Walter Mark Pfeiffer - 1971 - Dissertation, University of Toronto (Canada)
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  24. True and False Names in the "Cratylus".Mary Richardson - 1976 - Phronesis 21 (2):135-145.
  25. The Theory of Names in Plato's Cratylus.Richard Robinson - 1955 - Revue Internationale de Philosophie 9 (2):221.
  26. Plato's Philosophy of Language in the "Cratylus" and the "Parmenides".Carol Bergman Rosenthal - 1995 - Dissertation, The University of Rochester
    The thesis proposes that there is a connection between Plato's views on language in the Cratylus and the Third Man Argument in the Parmenides. First, the thesis sets out to establish that previous analyses of the Cratylus, which concentrated mainly on the question of whether Plato adopted conventionalism or naturalism, are not completely satisfactory. Rather, it is argued that the Cratylus is concerned with discovering the conditions underlying the sign relation. As a result, Plato develops a distinctive theory of correctness, (...)
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  27. Plato on Sense and Reference.George Rudebusch - 1985 - Mind 94 (376):526-537.
    Plato's "theaetetus" (187-200) raises puzzles about false belief. Frege's explanation of how an identity statement can be informative is often seen as a solution to socrates' puzzles. The strategy of frege's solution is to explain a "mistake" as a "mismatch". But it turns out that socrates' argument, In fact, Is aware of and rejects this strategy.
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  28. Plato in the "Cratylus" on Speaking, Language, and Learning.William D. Rumsey - 1987 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 4 (4):385 - 403.
  29. Some Names in the Captivi.Seaman Seaman - 1941 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 35:197.
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  30. Plato's "Cratylus".David Sedley - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  31. Plato's Cratylus.David Sedley - 2003 - Cambridge University Press.
    Plato's Cratylus is a brilliant but enigmatic dialogue. It bears on a topic, the relation of language to knowledge, which has never ceased to be of central philosophical importance, but tackles it in ways which at times look alien to us. In this reappraisal of the dialogue, Professor Sedley argues that the etymologies which take up well over half of it are not an embarrassing lapse or semi-private joke on Plato's part. On the contrary, if taken seriously as they should (...)
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  32. The Nomothetês in Plato’s Cratylus.David Sedley - 2003 - The Studia Philonica Annual 15:5-16.
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  33. Studies in Plato's Theory of Knowledge.Allan Jay Silverman - 1985 - Dissertation, University of California, Berkeley
    In this thesis I offer a reconstruction of some of the foundations of Plato's Theory of Knowledge. This effort is based upon two Platonic theses: Thought is Language and The objects of different faculties of the soul are distinct. The thesis is an investigation of the inter-relation of these two claims. I argue that the former does not prompt Plato to abandon the latter, the so-called Two Worlds hypothesis of the Republic, but rather serves as a justification of that hypothesis. (...)
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  34. Roman Names in Macedonia (A.B.) Tataki The Roman Presence in Macedonia. Evidence From Personal Names. (Meletemata 46.) Pp. 667, Map. Athens: Research Centre for Greek and Roman Antiquity, National Hellenic Research Foundation, 2006. Paper, €88. ISBN: 978-960-7905-30-. [REVIEW]A. Spawforth - 2008 - The Classical Review 58 (2):552-.
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  35. Plato's Investigations Into Language, with Special Reference to 'Cratylus'.Michael Alexander Stewart - 1965 - Dissertation, University of Pennsylvania
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  36. "The Natural Rightness of Names in Plato's" Cratylus".B. Svandova - 2001 - Filosoficky Casopis 49 (3):471-485.
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  37. Přirozená Správnost Jmen V Dialogu „Kratylos“.Blažena ŠvandovÁ - 2001 - Filosoficky Casopis 49:471-485.
    [The natural correctness of names in the dialogue “Cratylus“].
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  38. The Case of the Etymologies in Plato's Cratylus.Christine J. Thomas - 2007 - Philosophy Compass 2 (2):218–226.
  39. Names, Nominata, the Forms and the Cratylus.Df Wolf - 1996 - Philosophical Inquiry 18 (3-4):20-35.
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  40. Names and “Cutting Being at the Joints” in the Cratylus.Adam Wood - 2007 - Dionysius 25.
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Plato: Truth
  1. The Cratylus of Plato: A Commentary. By Francesco Ademollo. [REVIEW]Geoffrey Bagwell - 2012 - Ancient Philosophy 32 (1):190-193.
  2. Does Plato Argue Fallaciously at Cratylus 385b–C?Geoffrey Bagwell - 2011 - Apeiron 44 (1):13-21.
    At Cratylus 385b–c, Plato appears to argue that names have truth-value. Critics have almost universally condemned the argument as fallacious. Their case has proven so compelling that it has driven editors to recommend moving or removing the argument from its received position in the manuscripts. I argue that a close reading of the argument reveals it commits no fallacy, and its purpose in the dialogue justifies its original position. I wish to vindicate the manuscript tradition, showing that the argument establishes (...)
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  3. Knowledge and Belief in Republic V.Dirk Baltzly - 1997 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 79 (S):239-72.
    We ought to combine the predicative and veridical readings of estin. Plato’s view involves a parallelism between truth and being: when we know, we grasp a logos which is completely true and is made true by an on which is completely (F). Opinion takes as its object a logos which is no more true than false and which concerns things which are no more (F) than not (F). This view, I argue, is intelligible in the context of the presuppositions which (...)
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  4. Names and Nature in Plato's Cratylus.Rachel Barney - 2001 - Routledge.
    This study offers a ckomprehensive new interpretation of one of Plato's dialogues, the _Cratylus_. Throughout, the book combines analysis of Plato's arguments with attentiveness to his philosophical method.
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  5. Plato on Conventionalism.Rachel Barney - 1997 - Phronesis 42 (2):143 - 162.
    A new reading of Plato's account of conventionalism about names in the Cratylus. It argues that Hermogenes' position, according to which a name is whatever anybody 'sets down' as one, does not have the counterintuitive consequences usually claimed. At the same time, Plato's treatment of conventionalism needs to be related to his treatment of formally similar positions in ethics and politics. Plato is committed to standards of objective natural correctness in all such areas, despite the problematic consequences which, as he (...)
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  6. Plato's Sophist: The Drama of Original and Image, by Stanley Rosen.Seth Benardete - 1985 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 10 (2):167-171.
  7. Jenks, Rod. The Contribution of Socratic Method and Plato's Theory of Truth to Plato Scholarship.Hugh Benson - 2003 - Review of Metaphysics 56 (3):656-658.
  8. Plato on Language and Falsehood.Thomas Wheaton Bestor - 1978 - Southwestern Journal of Philosophy 9 (3):23-37.
  9. Plato's Sophist: Falsehoods and Images.W. Bondeson - 1972 - Apeiron 6 (2):1-6.
    Possibility of falsehood arises in the early parts of plato's "sophist". I argue that the participants in the dialogue operate with two related analogies, one which considers spoken images to be fundamentally like seen images, and another analogy which considers the objects of stating or believing to be like the objects of perceiving. (the second analogy has parallels in "theaetetus" 188c-189b). These analogies lead to confusions which plato attempts to dispel in the later portions of the "sophist".
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  10. Plato's Sophist and the Significance and Truth-Value of Statements.William Bondeson - 1974 - Apeiron 8 (2):41 - 47.
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