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  1. Teleology, Causation and the Atlas Motif in Plato's Phaedo.Daniel Vazquez - 2020 - Schole 14 (1):82-103.
    In this paper, I propose a new reading of Phaedo 99b6-d2. My main thesis is that in 99c6-9, Socrates does not refer to the teleological αἰτία but to the αἰτία that will be provided by a stronger ‘Atlas’ (99c4-5). This means that the passage offers no evidence that Socrates abandons teleology or modifies his views about it. He acknowledges, instead, that he could not find or learn any αἰτία stronger than the teleological one. This, I suggest, allows an interpretation of (...)
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  2. Platon Et l'Objet de la Science. [REVIEW]Christopher Rowe - 1998 - The Classical Review 48 (1):211-212.
  3. Apprehension and Argument: Ancient Theories of Starting Points for Knowledge. [REVIEW]Priscilla Sakezles - 2009 - Ancient Philosophy 29 (2):419-423.
  4. Plato’s Cosmology and its Ethical Dimensions—Gabriela Roxana Carone. [REVIEW]Dana Miller - 2007 - International Philosophical Quarterly 47 (4):498-500.
  5. Knowing the Whole: Comments on Gill, “Plato’s Phaedrus and the Method of Hippocrates”.Eric Brown - 2003 - Modern Schoolman 80 (4):315-323.
    What does Socrates mean by suggesting that no one can understand the nature of the soul "without the nature of the whole" (Phaedrus 270c)? I raise epistemological and metaphysical questions for Mary Louise Gill's proposal that he means us to consider the whole environment, and I make a case for the old-fashioned interpretation that he means us to consider the whole cosmos.
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  6. Plato's Cosmology and its Ethical Dimensions.Gabriela Roxana Carone - 2005 - Cambridge University Press.
    Although a great deal has been written on Plato's ethics, his cosmology has not received so much attention in recent times and its importance for his ethical thought has remained underexplored. By offering accounts of Timaeus, Philebus, Politicus and Laws X, the book reveals a strongly symbiotic relation between the cosmic and human sphere. It is argued that in his late period Plato presents a picture of an organic universe, endowed with structure and intrinsic value, which both urges our respect (...)
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  7. The Demiurge in Ancient Thought: Secondary Gods and Divine Mediators.Carl Séan O'Brien - 2015 - Cambridge University Press.
    How was the world generated and how does matter continue to be ordered so that the world can continue functioning? Questions like these have existed as long as humanity has been capable of rational thought. In antiquity, Plato's Timaeus introduced the concept of the Demiurge, or Craftsman-god, to answer them. This lucid and wide-ranging book argues that the concept of the Demiurge was highly influential on the many discussions operating in Middle Platonist, Gnostic, Hermetic and Christian contexts in the first (...)
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  8. Le Démiurge du Timée de Platon Ou la Représentation Mythique de la Causalité Paradigmatique de la Forme du dieuThe Demiurge of Plato’s Timaeus or the Mythical Representation of the Paradigmatic Causality of the Form of God.Daniel Larose - 2016 - Methodos 16.
  9. Gabriela Roxana Carone.Plato’s Cosmology and Its Ethical Dimensions. X + 320 Pp., Bibl., Index. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2005. $70. [REVIEW]Gábor Betegh - 2007 - Isis 98 (3):619-620.
  10. Gabriela Roxana Carone, Plato's Cosmology and Its Ethical Dimensions. [REVIEW]Michael Morgan - 2007 - Philosophy in Review 27:246-247.
  11. Plato, The Timaeus and the Critias or Atlanticus: The Thomas Taylor Translation.P. O. K. - 1945 - Journal of Philosophy 42 (17):474-475.
  12. Plato: The Timaeus and The Critias or Atlanticus.Gordon H. Clark - 1945 - Philosophical Review 54 (3):285-286.
  13. Plato's Natural Philosophy: A Study of the Timaeus-Critias. [REVIEW]Daryn Lehoux - 2008 - British Journal for the History of Science 41 (1):129-130.
  14. Plato's Hesiod and the Will of Zeus: Philosophical Rhapsody in the Timaeus and the Critias.Andrea Capra - 2009 - In G. R. Boys-Stones & J. H. Haubold (eds.), Plato and Hesiod. Oxford University Press.
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  15. Plato: Timaeus and Critias (Rle: Plato).A. E. Taylor - 2012 - Routledge.
    Plato’s Timaeus was his only cosmological dialogue and for almost thirteen hundred years it provided the basis in the West for educated people’s general view of the natural world. The author provides a translation of this important work, together with the Critias – the source of the legendary tale of Atlantis. He has taken particular care to provide an accurate rendering of Plato’s words and to avoid putting his own or any other interpretation on the works.
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  16. Gabriela Roxana Carone, Plato's Cosmology and Its Ethical Dimensions Reviewed By.Michael L. Morgan - 2007 - Philosophy in Review 27 (4):246-247.
  17. An Examination of Plato's Doctrines Vol 2 : Volume 2 Plato on Knowledge and Reality.I. M. Crombie - 2012 - Routledge.
    Ian Crombie’s impressive volumes provide a comprehensive interpretation of Plato’s doctrines. Volume 2 deals with more technical philosophical topics, including the theory of knowledge, philosophy of nature, and the methodology of science and philosophy. Each volume is self-contained.
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  18. Plato's Science: His View and Ours of His.A. P. Mourelatos - 1991 - In Alan C. Bowen (ed.), Science and Philosophy in Classical Greece. Garland. pp. 11--30.
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  19. Plato's Cosmology.D. T. & F. M. Cornford - 1937 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 57 (1):276.
  20. War, Gods and Mankind in the Timaeus–Critias.Karel Thein - 2008 - Rhizai. A Journal for Ancient Philosophy and Science 5:49-107.
    Plato’s Timaeus–Critias juxtaposes a long description of our universe in the making with a discourse on human nature. The latter, confined to Critias, flanks Timaeus’ full-blown cosmogony without clearly articulating how, if at all, do the apparently so different stories fit together. By contrast to many precedent efforts at articulating their relation, the article tries to take seriously Timaeus’ distinction between the two kinds of divinities, whereby he opposes celestial bodies together with the ensouled physical universe to the traditional gods. (...)
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  21. Eidetic Questions on Plato: The Sensitive and the Demiurge, Existence and Good.Francesco Fronterotta - 2006 - Giornale Critico Della Filosofia Italiana 2 (3):412-436.
  22. Socratic Virtue: Making the Best of the Neither-Good-Nor-Bad (Review).Sara Ahbel-Rappe - 2008 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 101 (4):550-551.
  23. Rec.: T.K. Johansen, Plato's Natural Philosophy. A Stdy of the TImaeus-Critias (Cambridge 2005).Mauro Bonazzi - 2006 - Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia 61:1062-1065.
  24. Approche Mythique du Bien, du Phytourgos Et du Démiurge in Platon.J. -C. Nilles - 1986 - Revue Internationale de Philosophie 40 (156-157):115-139.
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  25. Review of Thomas Kjeller Johansen, Plato's Natural Philosophy: A Study of the Timaeus-Critias[REVIEW]Andrea Falcon - 2005 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2005 (3).
  26. Truth, Lies and History in Plato's Timaeus-Critias.Thomas Johansen - manuscript
    From antiquity on, the status of Critias' account has been the subject of intense debate. Is the Atlantis story 'real history'? The dialogue invites us to raise this question but also to reflect on its terms. In this paper I shall argue that the story should be seen as 'history' only in a special Platonic sense: it is a story which is fabricated about the past in order to reflect a general truth about how ideal citizens would behave in action.
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  27. Plato’s Universe.Gregory Vlastos - 1975 - Parmenides.
Plato: Exact Sciences
  1. Astronomy and Observation in Plato's Republic.Andrew Gregory - 1996 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 27 (4):451-471.
    Plato's comments on astronomy and the education of the guardians at Republic 528e ff have been hotly disputed, and have provoked much criticism from those who have interpreted them as a rejection or denigration of observational astronomy. Here I argue that the key to interpreting these comments lies in the relationship between the conception of enquiry that is implicit in the epistemological allegories, and the programme for the education of the guardians that Plato subsequently proposes. We have, I suggest, been (...)
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  2. Plato's Astronomy.Ivor Bulmer-Thomas - 1984 - Classical Quarterly 34 (01):107-.
    In one of the most disputed passages of Greek literature Plato in the Republic, 7. 528e–530c prescribes astronomy as the fourth study in the education of the Guardians. But what sort of astronomy? According to one school of thought it is a purely speculative study of bodies in motion having no relation to the celestial objects that we see. While this interpretation has rejoiced the hearts of Plato's detractors, who regard him as an obstacle to the progress of science, it (...)
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Plato: Teleology
  1. A Theory of Evolution as a Process of Unfolding.Agustin Ostachuk - 2020 - Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 16 (1):347-379.
    In this work I propose a theory of evolution as a process of unfolding. This theory is based on four logically concatenated principles. The principle of evolutionary order establishes that the more complex cannot be generated from the simpler. The principle of origin establishes that there must be a maximum complexity that originates the others by logical deduction. Finally, the principle of unfolding and the principle of actualization guarantee the development of the evolutionary process from the simplest to the most (...)
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  2. One Book, the Whole Universe: Plato’s Timaeus Today, Eds. Richard D. Mohr and Barbara M. Sattler. [REVIEW]Jason W. Carter - 2012 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 86 (1):170-173.
  3. Plato's Natural Philosophy: A Study of the Timaeus-Critias.Thomas Kjeller Johansen - 2004 - Cambridge University Press.
    Plato's dialogue the Timaeus-Critias presents two connected accounts, that of the story of Atlantis and its defeat by ancient Athens and that of the creation of the cosmos by a divine craftsman. This book offers a unified reading of the dialogue. It tackles a wide range of interpretative and philosophical issues. Topics discussed include the function of the famous Atlantis story, the notion of cosmology as 'myth' and as 'likely', and the role of God in Platonic cosmology. Other areas commented (...)
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  4. "Technē" and Teleology in Plato's "Gorgias".Lee Franklin - 2005 - Apeiron 38 (4):229-256.
  5. Making the World Body Whole and Complete: Plato's Timaeus, 32c5-33b1.Brad Berman - 2016 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 10 (2):168-192.
    Plato’s demiurge makes a series of questionable decisions in creating the world. Most notoriously, he endeavors to replicate, to the extent possible, some of the features that his model possesses just insofar as it is a Form. This has provoked the colorful complaint that the demiurge is as raving mad as a general contractor who constructs a house of vellum to better realize the architect’s vellum plans (Keyt 1971). The present paper considers the sanity of the demiurge’s reasoning in light (...)
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  6. The Failure of Evolution in Antiquity.Devin Henry - forthcoming - In Georgia Irby (ed.), Blackwell Companion to Ancient Science, Medicine and Technology. Wiley-Blackwell.
    The intellectual history of evolutionary theory really does not begin in earnest until the late seventeenth/early eighteenth century. Prior to that, the idea that species might have evolved over time was not a serious possibility for most naturalists and philosophers. There is certainly no substantive debate in antiquity about evolution in the modern sense. There were really only two competing explanations for how living things came to have the parts they do: design or blind chance. Ancient Greek Atomism, for example, (...)
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  7. Technique and Teleology in Plato's Rhetoric.Doug Al-Maini - 2005 - The European Legacy 10 (4):283-298.
    This paper is an investigation of the place of rhetoric in Plato's judgement that philosophers must rule. The possibility that rhetoric could facilitate the rule of philosophy raises the question of whether rhetoric could also be used to undermine the governance of philosophy. It is my thesis that Plato argues for understanding rhetoric as limited in its ability to function at cross-purposes to those of philosophy because of a basic and direct relationship between the effectiveness of rhetoric and its ability (...)
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  8. Plato’s Natural Philosophy. [REVIEW]John Dillon - 2006 - Ancient Philosophy 26 (2):408 - 411.
  9. Optimality and Teleology in Aristotle's Natural Science.Devin Henry - manuscript
    In this paper I examine the role of optimality reasoning in Aristotle’s natural science. By “optimality reasoning” I mean reasoning that appeals to some conception of “what is best” in order to explain why things are the way they are. We are first introduced to this pattern of reasoning in the famous passage at Phaedo 97b8-98a2, where (Plato’s) Socrates invokes “what is best” as a cause (aitia) of things in nature. This passage can be seen as the intellectual ancestor of (...)
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  10. Teleology and Evil in "Laws" 10.Gabriela Roxana Carone - 1994 - Review of Metaphysics 48 (2):275 - 298.
    THE TENTH BOOK OF THE LAWS, which contains Plato's last word on cosmology and theology, has often been considered as presenting Plato's views in a more exoteric way in contrast with the more esoteric style of the Timaeus. And there are good reasons to think that this view is correct. Whereas the Timaeus stresses that "to find the maker and father of this All is difficult, and, having found it, it is impossible to communicate it to the crowd", Plato is (...)
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  11. The Order Question.Richard Foley - 2010 - Ancient Philosophy 30 (1):57-72.
  12. Plato's Vision of Chaos.Jerry S. Clegg - 1976 - Classical Quarterly 26 (01):52-.
    In the creation myth of the Timaeus Plato describes God as wishing that all things should be good so far as is possible. Wherefore, finding the whole visible sphere of the world not at rest, but moving in an irregular fashion, out of disorder He brought order, thinking that this was in every way an improvement. To achieve His end He placed intelligence in soul and soul in body, reflecting that nothing unintelligent could ever be better than something intelligent . (...)
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  13. Tale, Theology, and Teleology in the Phaedo.Gabor Betegh - 2008 - In Catalin Partenie (ed.), Plato's Myths. Cambridge University Press.
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  14. Plato and the Environment.Gabriela Roxana Carone - 1998 - Environmental Ethics 20 (2):115-133.
    In this paper, I set out to refute several charges that have recently been raised against Plato’s attitude toward the environment and to present him under a new light of relevance for the contemporary environmental debate. For this purpose, I assess the meaning of Plato’s metaphysical dualism, his notion of nature and teleology, and the kind of value that he attributes to animals, plants, and the land in general. I thus show how Plato’s organicist view of the universe endows it (...)
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Plato: Natural Science
  1. A Theory of Evolution as a Process of Unfolding.Agustin Ostachuk - 2020 - Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 16 (1):347-379.
    In this work I propose a theory of evolution as a process of unfolding. This theory is based on four logically concatenated principles. The principle of evolutionary order establishes that the more complex cannot be generated from the simpler. The principle of origin establishes that there must be a maximum complexity that originates the others by logical deduction. Finally, the principle of unfolding and the principle of actualization guarantee the development of the evolutionary process from the simplest to the most (...)
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  2. Plutarch on the Geometry of the Elements.Jan2 Opsomer - 2015 - In Luc Van der Stockt & Michiel Meeusen (eds.), Aspects of Plutarch’s Natural Philosophy.
    Plutarch is committed to geometric atomism, the Platonic theory that derives the material elements from regular polyhedric shapes. An essential feature of this theory is that qualitative properties are not primitive, but supervene on more fundamental, quantitatively describable properties, such as the size, shape, mass or weight of the atoms, their solidity, position, arrangement and kinetic interactions. Plutarch recognises that the geometric account provides the causal explanation for phenomenal and other qualitative properties. He praises Plato and Democritus for their theoretical (...)
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  3. How Natural is a Unified Notion of Time? Temporal Experience in Early Greek Thought.Barbara Michaela Sattler - 2017 - In I. Philips (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Temporal Experience: Routledge Handbooks in Philosophy. Routledge.
  4. Plato's Natural Philosophy: A Study of the 'Timaeus–Critias' – Thomas Kjeller Johansen.Scott Carson - 2007 - Philosophical Quarterly 57 (226):131-133.
  5. Astronomy and Observation in Plato's Republic.Andrew Gregory - 1996 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 27 (4):451-471.
    Plato's comments on astronomy and the education of the guardians at Republic 528e ff have been hotly disputed, and have provoked much criticism from those who have interpreted them as a rejection or denigration of observational astronomy. Here I argue that the key to interpreting these comments lies in the relationship between the conception of enquiry that is implicit in the epistemological allegories, and the programme for the education of the guardians that Plato subsequently proposes. We have, I suggest, been (...)
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  6. Études Sur la Signification Et la Place de la Physique Dans la Philosophie de Platon. Par Léon Robin. One Volume. 8vo. Pp. 96. Paris: Félix Alcan, 1919. [REVIEW]R. G. Bury - 1920 - The Classical Review 34 (7-8):180-181.
  7. Aristotle's Criticism of Plato's ‘Timaeus’. [REVIEW]G. B. Kerferd - 1956 - The Classical Review 6 (1):71-71.
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