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1 — 50 / 75
  1. added 2019-08-27
    Erōs Tyrannos: Philosophical Passion and Psychic Ordering in the Republic.Suzanne Obdrzalek - 2012 - In Noburo Notomi & Luc Brisson (eds.), Dialogues on Plato's Politeia (Republic): Selected Papers from the IX Symposium Platonicum. pp. 188-193.
    In this paper, I explore parallels between philosophical and tyrannical eros in Plato's Republic. I argue that in arguing that reason experiences eros for the forms, Plato introduces significant tensions into his moral psychology.
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  2. added 2019-08-26
    Fleeing the Divine: Plato's Rejection of the Ahedonic Ideal in the Philebus.Suzanne Obdrzalek - 2010 - In John Dillon & Brisson Luc (eds.), Plato's Philebus: Selected Papers From the Eighth Symposium Platonicum. pp. 209-214.
    Note: "Next to Godliness" (Apeiron) is an expanded version of this paper. -/- According to Plato's successors, assimilation to god (homoiosis theoi) was the end (telos) of the Platonic system. There is ample evidence to support this claim in dialogues ranging from the Symposium through the Timaeus. However, the Philebus poses a puzzle for this conception of the Platonic telos. On the one hand, Plato states that the gods are beings beyond pleasure while, on the other hand, he argues that (...)
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  3. added 2019-06-06
    The Place of Hedonism in Plato’s Laws.Gabriela Roxana Carone - 2003 - Ancient Philosophy 23 (2):283-300.
  4. added 2019-06-06
    A Platonic Response to Foucault’s Use of Pleasure.Benjamin Dykes - 2002 - Ancient Philosophy 22 (1):103-123.
  5. added 2019-06-06
    Irwin on Hedonism in Plato’s Protagoras.Richard A. Bidgood - 1983 - Ancient Philosophy 3 (1):30-32.
  6. added 2019-06-06
    Can Pleasures Be False? (Philebus 36C-41B).Fred D. Miller - 1971 - Southwestern Journal of Philosophy 2 (3):57-71.
    PLATO ARGUES THAT ANTICIPATORY PLEASURES MAY BE FALSE. THE STRUCTURE OF HIS ARGUMENT IS CLARIFIED. THE CRUX IS NOT THE INFERENCE FROM 'FALSE BELIEF' TO 'FALSE PICTURE' TO 'FALSE PLEASURE,' BUT THE DOCTRINE THAT THROUGH MENTAL IMAGERY PLEASURE, LIKE BELIEF, MAY TAKE AS OBJECTS UNREALIZED STATES OF AFFAIRS. ASSUMING FALSITY IS A BAD-MAKING CHARACTERISTIC, SOCRATES USES THE THESIS AGAINST HEDONISM. THE INTERPRETATIONS OF GOSLING, KENNY, AND MCLAUGHLIN ARE CRITICIZED.
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  7. added 2019-06-06
    False Anticipatory Pleasures: "Philebus" 36 a 1 a 6.Terry Penner - 1970 - Phronesis 15:166.
  8. added 2019-06-05
    Rational Pleasures. J. Warren the Pleasures of Reason in Plato, Aristotle, and the Hellenistic Hedonists. Pp. XII + 234. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2014. Cased, £60, Us$95. Isbn: 978-1-107-02544-8. [REVIEW]Kelly E. Arenson - 2016 - The Classical Review 66 (1):60-62.
  9. added 2018-06-14
    Plato's Anti-Hedonism and the "Protagoras".J. Clerk Shaw - 2015 - Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.
    Plato often rejects hedonism, but in the "Protagoras", Plato's Socrates seems to endorse hedonism. In this book, J. Clerk Shaw removes this apparent tension by arguing that the "Protagoras" as a whole actually reflects Plato's anti-hedonism. He shows that Plato places hedonism at the core of a complex of popular mistakes about value and especially about virtue: that injustice can be prudent, that wisdom is weak, that courage is the capacity to persevere through fear, and that virtue cannot be taught. (...)
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  10. added 2018-05-14
    Two Chariots: The Justification of the Best Life in the "Katha Upanishad" and Plato's "Phaedrus".Elizabeth Ann Schiltz - 2006 - Philosophy East and West 56 (3):451-468.
    The philosophical import of the chariot images found in the Katha Upanishad and the Phaedrus is considered here. It is claimed that the resemblance in the accounts provided in these disparate texts is not merely incidental. Rather, each chariot-image should be read as contributing to a careful answer to the same thorny philosophical problem: the identification and justification of the best life for the individual. It is argued that each serves to illuminate an internal and complex account of the self, (...)
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  11. added 2018-02-19
    Plato: Pleasure and the Deficiency of the Sensible World.Fernando Muniz - 2000 - Southwest Philosophy Review 16 (2):21-30.
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  12. added 2018-02-19
    Plato's Examination of Pleasure.R. Plato & Hackforth - 1945 - Liberal Arts Press.
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  13. added 2018-02-18
    The Doctor and the Pastry Chef.Jessica Moss - 2007 - Ancient Philosophy 27 (2):229 - 249.
  14. added 2018-01-11
    Review of Gosling and Taylor, The Greeks on Pleasure. [REVIEW]Didier Pralon - 1986 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 176 (4):504-506.
  15. added 2017-12-04
    On Whether Pleasure’s Esse is Percipi.James Butler - 1999 - Ancient Philosophy 19 (2):285-298.
  16. added 2017-11-27
    Pleasure and the Good in Plato. [REVIEW]Norman Gulley - 1962 - The Classical Review 12 (1):38-40.
  17. added 2017-10-12
    Plato on Pleasure and the Good Life.Daniel Russell - 2005 - Oxford University Press.
    Daniel Russell develops a fresh and original view of pleasure and its pivotal role in Plato's treatment of value, happiness, and human psychology. This is the first full-length discussion of the topic for fifty years, and Russell shows its relevance to contemporary debates in moral philosophy and philosophical psychology. Plato on Pleasure and the Good Life will make fascinating reading for ancient specialists and for a wide range of philosophers.
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  18. added 2017-10-12
    Socrates, Pleasure, and Value. [REVIEW]Daniel C. Russell - 2000 - Ancient Philosophy 20 (2):468-472.
  19. added 2017-10-12
    Protagoras and Socrates on Courage and Pleasure.Daniel C. Russell - 2000 - Ancient Philosophy 20 (2):311-338.
  20. added 2017-10-10
    Las Ambigüedades Del Placer. Ensayo Sobre El Placer En la Filosofía de Platón.George Rudebusch - 2006 - Ancient Philosophy 26 (1):192-196.
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  21. added 2017-10-10
    Callicles' Hedonism.George Rudebusch - 1992 - Ancient Philosophy 12 (1):53-71.
  22. added 2017-10-06
    Review of Cynthia Hampton, Pleasure, Knowledge, and Being: An Analysis of Plato's "Philebus". [REVIEW]David Roochnik - 1992 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 30 (1):132-134.
  23. added 2017-08-19
    A relação entre a Alma e o Cuidado de Si no Alcibíades I de Platão.Luiz Felipe da Silva Carvalho - 2015 - Dissertation, UFF, Brazil
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  24. added 2016-12-08
    Pleasure as Genesis in Plato’s Philebus.Amber D. Carpenter - 2011 - Ancient Philosophy 31 (1):73-94.
    Socrates’ claim that pleasure is a γένεσις unifies the Philebus’ conception of pleasure. Close examination of the passage reveals an emphasis on metaphysical-normative dependency in γένεσις. Seeds for such an emphasis were sown in the dialogue’s earlier discussion of μεικτά, thus linking the γένεσις claim to Philebus’ description of pleasure as ἄπειρον. False pleasures illustrate the radical dependency of pleasure on outside determinants. I end tying together the Philebus’ three descriptions of pleasure: restoration, indefinite, and γένεσις.
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  25. added 2016-12-08
    Plato on Tyranny, Philosophy, and Pleasure.Martin A. Bertman - 1985 - Apeiron 19 (2):152 - 160.
  26. added 2016-12-08
    Father Kenny on False Pleasures.J. Gosling - 1961 - Phronesis 6 (1):41-45.
  27. added 2016-09-22
    Poetry and Hedonic Error in Plato’s Republic.J. Clerk Shaw - 2016 - Phronesis 61 (4):373-396.
    This paper reads Republic 583b-608b as a single, continuous line of argument. First, Socrates distinguishes real from apparent pleasure and argues that justice is more pleasant than injustice. Next, he describes how pleasures nourish the soul. This line of argument continues into the second discussion of poetry: tragic pleasures are mixed pleasures in the soul that seem greater than they are; indulging them nourishes appetite and corrupts the soul. The paper argues that Plato has a novel account of the ‘paradox (...)
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  28. added 2016-07-08
    Pleasure, Pain, and the Unity of Soul in Plato's Protagoras.Vanessa de Harven & Wolfgang-Rainer Mann - 2018 - In William V. Harris (ed.), Pleasure and Pain in Classical Times. pp. 111-138.
  29. added 2016-03-10
    La riscoperta della via regia. Freud lettore di Platone.Marco Solinas - 2012 - Psicoterapia E Scienze Umane (4):539-568.
    Starting with the reference to “Plato’s dictum” that Freud added in the second last page of the first edition of The Interpretation of Dreams, the author explains the convergences between the conception of dreams expounded by Plato in the Republic and Freud’s fundamental insights. The analysis of bibliographic sources used by Freud, and of his interests, allow than to suppose not only that Freud omitted to acknowledge the Plato’s theoretical genealogy of “the Via Regia to the unconscious”, but also the (...)
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  30. added 2015-05-19
    Vertu Et Plaisir : Sur Lois, V, 732 D 8 -734 E 2.Klaus Schöpsdau - 2000 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 190 (1):103-115.
    Partant de l ' hypothèse que la part de plaisir et de douleur est décisive afin de choisir un mode de vie, l ' Athénien des Lois prouve qu ' il faut choisir la vie vertueuse, au motif qu ' elle comporte un excédent de plaisir. Un tel argument, qui au premier coup d ' oeil paraît hédoniste, tient compte de la nature mortelle de l ' homme. Si la plupart des hommes vivent sans tempérance, c ' est du fait (...)
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  31. added 2015-05-01
    Review: Daniel Russell: Plato on Pleasure and the Good Life. [REVIEW]N. Reshotko - 2008 - Mind 117 (465):218-223.
  32. added 2015-05-01
    False Pleasures and Plato's Philebus.David A. Reidy - 1998 - Journal of Value Inquiry 32 (3):343-356.
  33. added 2015-05-01
    Wahre und falsche Affekte im platonischen Philebus.Brandt Reinhard - 1977 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 59 (1):1-18.
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  34. added 2015-04-23
    False Pleasures in the "Philebus": A Reply to Mr. Gosling.Anthony Kenny - 1960 - Phronesis 5 (1):45 - 52.
  35. added 2015-04-19
    Mixed Pleasures, Blended Discourses: Poetry, Medicine, and the Body in Plato's Philebus 46-47c.Anastasia-Erasmia Peponi - 2002 - Classical Antiquity 21 (1):135-160.
    In Plato's Philebus the last section of the discussion on the falseness of pleasure is dedicated to those pleasures intrinsically mixed with pain. This paper focuses specifically on bodily mixed pleasures, an analysis that extends from 44d to 47c, while its focal point is 46-47c. By adopting the anti-hedonists' methodology, Socrates cunningly transforms his entire analysis of bodily mixed pleasures into a discourse on human disease, in which medical terminology prevails. Two major points are made in the reading suggested here. (...)
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  36. added 2015-04-17
    Daniel Russell, Plato on Pleasure and the Good Life. [REVIEW]Nickolas Pappas - 2008 - Ancient Philosophy 28 (1):227-232.
  37. added 2015-04-17
    Plato on Pleasure and the Good Life.Richard D. Parry - 2007 - Review of Metaphysics 60 (3):688-689.
  38. added 2015-04-16
    The Evaluation of Pleasure in Plato's Ethics.R. P. - 1957 - Review of Metaphysics 10 (3):546-546.
    A detailed study of Plato's treatment of hedonism in the Protagoras, Gorgias, Phaedo, Republic, and Philebus. The work is more noteworthy for its attention to a field hitherto out of focus in studies of this length than for its insight.--R. P.
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  39. added 2015-04-12
    Pleasure and Illusion in Plato.Jessica Moss - 2006 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 72 (3):503 - 535.
    Plato links pleasure with illusion, and this link explains his rejection of the view that all desires are rational desires for the good. The Protagoras and Gorgias show connections between pleasure and illusion; the Republic develops these into a psychological theory. One part of the soul is not only prone to illusions, but also incapable of the kind of reasoning that can dispel them. Pleasure appears good; therefore this part of the soul (the appetitive part) desires pleasures qua good but (...)
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  40. added 2015-04-12
    Virtue and Pleasure in Plato's "Laws".John Mouracade - 2005 - Apeiron 38 (1):73 - 85.
  41. added 2015-04-11
    What To Do About False Pleasures of Overestimation? "Philebus" 41a5-42c5.Norman Mooradian - 1995 - Apeiron 28 (2):91-112.
  42. added 2015-04-07
    The Argument of the Philebus.Joe McCoy - 2007 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 12 (1):1-16.
    This essay explores Socrates’ argumentative strategy in the Philebus, which is a response to the view that pleasure is the good. Socrates leads his interlocutorsthrough a series of steps in order to demonstrate to them the “conditions and dispositions of soul” upon which hedonism rests. Socrates’ aim is not to refute the claim that pleasure is a good, but rather to show the dependence of the experience of pleasure on intellect and the other elements of the life of mind. In (...)
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  43. added 2015-04-06
    Plato's Pleasures.Jeff Mason - 2003 - The Philosophers' Magazine 23:19-20.
    Jeff Mason looks at what Plato had to say about love and desire.
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  44. added 2015-04-05
    Beyond Pleasure: Plato and the Good.Nicholas Maki - unknown
    In Republic IX, Plato claims that the philosopher would live the most pleasant life, learning being the greatest pleasure. However, Plato is not explicit as to what the life of an accomplished philosopher would be like. Some have posited that the philosopher, once he has acquired knowledge of the good, continually relearns it, experiencing residual pleasure in this. While this approach works for ordinary pieces of knowledge, Plato's description of the nature of the good puts it in another class. Looking (...)
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  45. added 2015-04-04
    “Diagnostic Hedonism” and the Role of Incommensurability in Plato’s Protagoras.Tea Logar - 2010 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 10 (3):241-257.
    The dispute over Socrates’ apparent endorsement of hedonism in the Protagoras has persisted for ages among scholars and students of Plato’s work. The solution to the query concerning the seriousness and sincerity of Socrates’ argument from hedonism established in the dialogue is of considerable importance for the interpretation of Plato’s overall moral theory, considering how blatantly irreconcilable the defense of this doctrine is with Plato’s other early dialogues. In his earlier works, Socrates puts supreme importance on virtue and perfection of (...)
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  46. added 2015-04-02
    Pleasure Unlimited.John Kress - 2010 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (1):13-34.
    The Philebus is a difficult dialogue, often criticized for treating obscure ontological questions while neglecting the dramatic aspect characteristic of the Platonic dialogue. In this paper, I argue that, while subtle, the dramatic dimension is essential in understanding the ontological inquiries pursued and the dialogue as a whole. I argue that the Philebus should be read as an agon, a dramatic contest, between Socrates, the advocate of nous, and Philebus, the silent advocate of hēdonē. I show that this contest about (...)
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  47. added 2015-03-29
    Hybrid Varieties of Pleasure and the Complex Case of the Pleasures of Learning in Plato's Philebus.Cristina Ionescu - 2008 - Dialogue 47 (3-4):439-461.
    ABSTRACT: This article addresses two main concerns: first, the relation between the truth/falsehood and purity/impurity criteria as applied to pleasure, and, second, the status of our pleasures of learning. In addressing the first, I argue that Plato keeps the truth/falsehood and purity/impurity criteria distinct in his assessment of pleasures and thus leaves room for the possibility of hybrid pleasures in the form of true impure pleasures and false pure pleasures. In addressing the second issue, I show that Plato's view is (...)
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  48. added 2015-03-29
    Plato’s Understanding of Pleasure in the Philebus.Cristina Ionescu - 2008 - Journal of Philosophical Research 33:1-18.
    Plato’s definition of pleasure as perceptible replenishment of a lack has been criticized as too narrow and incapable of accounting for some of the corporeal and all the non-corporeal pleasures. Plato’s suggested reply, based on objective standards in relation to which we are to estimate the reality and degree of replenishment we experience, seems to give rise to another difficulty, concerning the legitimate diversity of our natural inclinations and tastes. I argue that Plato’sdefinition of pleasure makes perfect sense when integrated (...)
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  49. added 2015-03-28
    Pleasure, Knowledge, and Being: An Analysis of Plato's Philebus.Pamela M. Huby - 1992 - Ancient Philosophy 12 (2):431-433.
  50. added 2015-03-26
    Pleasure, Truth and Being in Plato's Philebus: A Reply to Professor Frede.Cynthia Hampton - 1987 - Phronesis 32 (1):253-262.
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