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1 — 50 / 96
  1. added 2019-07-24
    The Carpenter as a Philosopher Artist: A Critique of Plato's Theory of Mimesis.Ilemobayo John Omogunwa - 2018 - Philosophy Pathways 222 (1).
    Plato’s theory of mimesis is expressed clearly and mainly in Plato’s Republic where he refers to his philosophy of Ideas in his definition of art, by arguing that all arts are imitative in nature. Reality according to him lies with the Idea, and the Form one confronts in this tangible world is a copy of that universal everlasting Idea. He poses that a carpenter’s chair is the result of the idea of chair in his mind, the created chair is once (...)
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  2. added 2019-06-07
    El Concepto ‘Poíesis’ En la Filosfía Griega: Heráclito—Sofistas—Platón. [REVIEW]G. B. Kerferd - 1963 - The Classical Review 13 (1):116-117.
  3. added 2019-06-06
    Plato’s Misquotation of the Poets.J. Mitscherling - 2005 - Classical Quarterly 55 (1):295-298.
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  4. added 2019-06-06
    Exiling the Poets: The Production of Censorship in Plato’s Republic, by Ramona Naddaff. [REVIEW]Sara Brill - 2004 - Ancient Philosophy 24 (1):215-219.
  5. added 2019-06-06
    The Ancient Quarrel Between Philosophy and Poetry Revisited: Plato and the Greek Literary Tradition, by Susan B. Levin. [REVIEW]Asli Gocer - 2002 - Ancient Philosophy 22 (1):185-188.
  6. added 2019-06-06
    Literacy and Poetic Performance in Plato’s Laws.Gerard Naddaf - 2000 - Ancient Philosophy 20 (2):339-350.
  7. added 2019-06-06
    "Plato and Aristotle on Poetry", by Gerald F. Else. [REVIEW]Elizabeth Belfiore - 1990 - Ancient Philosophy 10 (1):138.
  8. added 2019-06-06
    Listening to the Cicadas: A Study of Plato's Phaedrus.G. R. F. Ferrari - 1987 - Cambridge University Press.
    This full-length study of Plato's dialogue Phaedrus, now in paperback, is written in the belief that such concerted scrutiny of a single dialogue is an important part of the project of understanding Plato so far as possible 'from the inside' - of gaining a feel for the man's philosophy. The focus of this account is on how the resources both of persuasive myth and of formal argument, for all that Plato sets them in strong contrast, nevertheless complement and reinforce each (...)
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  9. added 2019-06-06
    Plato’s Defence of Poetry. [REVIEW]John P. Anton - 1987 - Idealistic Studies 17 (1):89-90.
    This brilliant study, original in certain ways, supersedes everything that has been written in recent years on Plato’s philosophy of poetry and myth in particular. Elias’s familiarity with the literature is as impressive as is his penetrating analysis of the diverse positions taken by friend or foe on Plato’s theory of poetry. In the course of the discussion Elias answers two basic questions: Do the myths form a coherent whole despite their variety, and how is this variety to be understood (...)
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  10. added 2019-06-06
    Plato’s Defence of Poetry. [REVIEW]John Bussanich - 1986 - Ancient Philosophy 6:210.
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  11. added 2019-06-06
    Plato as Poet: A Critical Interpretation: PHILOSOPHY.John Hartland-Swann - 1951 - Philosophy 26 (97):131-141.
    In my previous paper I endeavoured to illustrate the different ways in which Plato used poetry for philosophical purposes, and it now remains to attempt a final appraisal of the success or failure of Plato considered specifically as a poetic philosopher. But before I embark on what will prove a somewhat complicated task it is necessary for me to refer briefly to certain theories concerning Plato's use of myth, since they vitally affect the philosophical significance of his poetic method—and it (...)
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  12. added 2019-05-13
    Plato on Poetry - P. Murray : Plato on Poetry: Ion; Republic 376e–398b9; Republic 595–608b10 . Pp. X + 250. Cambridge, New York, and Melbourne: Cambridge University Press, 1996. £37.50/$59.95 . ISBN: 0-521-34182-5. [REVIEW]Elizabeth Belfiore - 1998 - The Classical Review 48 (1):20-21.
  13. added 2019-05-03
    Plato’s Republic (386c5-7 & 516d4-7) : An Ambiguous (?) Attitude of Plato on Three Homeric Lines.Thanassis Gkatzaras - 2018 - In Konstantinos Boudouris (ed.), Proceedings of the XXIII World Congress of Philosophy (2013). Charlottesville, Virginia, USA: Philosophy Documentation Center. pp. 127-131.
    The subject of my paper is the explanation of Plato’s attitude in Republic on three lines taken from Odyssey (11.489-91). In one case (386c5-7) Plato rejects these lines, because they should not be heard by children or free men, while in another case (516d4-7) he repeats them as a perfect example of illustrating philosopher’s feelings. My purpose is to show that this attitude is not ambiguous; it is compatible with Plato’s doctrines and a good example of the importance that the (...)
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  14. added 2019-01-30
    A Queer Feeling for Plato: Corporeal Affects, Philosophical Hermeneutics, and Queer Receptions.Emanuela Bianchi - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (2):139-162.
    This paper takes Plato's metaphor of poetic transmission as magnetic charge in the Ion as a central trope for thinking through the various relationships between philosophy and literature; between poetry, interpretation, and truth; and between erotic affects and the material, corporeal, queer dimensions of reception. The affective dimensions of the Platonic text in the Ion, Republic, Symposium, and Phaedrus are examined at length, and the explicit accounts of ascent to philosophical truth are shown to be complicated by the persistence of (...)
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  15. added 2018-06-26
    Plato, Aristotle, and the Poets.Robert R. Sherman - 1966 - Educational Theory 16 (3):250-261.
  16. added 2018-06-05
    "The Myth Was Saved": Reflections on Homer and the Mythology of Plato's Republic.Charles Segal - 1978 - Hermes 106 (2):315-336.
  17. added 2018-04-18
    Formung und Umwendung der Seele - Eine Rechtfertigung ambivalenter Darstellungen in der Literatur im Rahmen von Platons 'Politeia'.Jana Schultz - 2017 - Frankfurt am Main, Germany: Peter Lang.
  18. added 2017-11-24
    Literary Interpretation in Plato’s Protagoras.Ruth Scodel - 1986 - Ancient Philosophy 6:25-37.
  19. added 2017-11-12
    The Ancient Quarrel Between Poetry and Philosophy. [REVIEW]H. S. Schibli - 1993 - Ancient Philosophy 13 (2):450-455.
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  20. added 2017-10-20
    Plato and Poetry: A New Interpretation.Andy Sanford - unknown
    A widespread view of Plato's thought on poetry is that Plato was extremely hostile to poetry and that he wanted it banned from the state. It seems certain that Plato believed that poetry could corrupt the minds of the citizens and give them a false view of the gods. I explore what I think are three reasons for rejecting the ubiquitous view and accepting a more nuanced view of Plato's aesthetics. The use by Socrates in the REPUBLIC of a feverish (...)
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  21. added 2017-10-10
    Plato and the Poets.Darnell Rucker - 1966 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 25 (2):167-170.
  22. added 2017-10-06
    The Quarrel Between Philosophy and Poetry: Studies in Ancient Thought. [REVIEW]David Roochnik - 1990 - Ancient Philosophy 10 (2):301-304.
  23. added 2017-10-01
    Platons Ποίησις.Igor Mikecin - 2007 - Filozofska Istrazivanja 27 (4):885-911.
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  24. added 2017-09-29
    On the Ancient Idea That Music Shapes Character.James Harold - 2016 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 15 (3):341-354.
    Ancient Chinese and Greek thinkers alike were preoccupied with the moral value of music; they distinguished between good and bad music by looking at the music’s effect on moral character. The idea can be understood in terms of two closely related questions. Does music have the power to affect the ethical character of either listener or performer? If it does, is it better as music for doing so? I argue that an affirmative answers to both questions are more plausible than (...)
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  25. added 2017-09-29
    Plato and the Poets.Veronika Konradova - 2012 - Reflexe: Filosoficky Casopis 42 (122):3-23.
    The article addresses the issue of rating Platonic poetic creation. It focuses on two aspects of this issue, namely the question transformed the concept of truth and character agonální Platonic criticism. In the first respect, the paper focuses on the relationship between truth and lies and the Platonic concept of "similar lies the truth." In the latter respect, trying to uncover the motivation and the wide range of Plato's rivalry with the older poetic tradition in the context of a widely (...)
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  26. added 2017-09-29
    Some Remarks on “of Two Minds”.Blake E. Hestir - 2002 - Southwest Philosophy Review 18 (2):141-145.
  27. added 2017-09-29
    Plato-Poet and Philosopher.Joseph M. Keane - 1930 - Modern Schoolman 6 (3):54-55.
  28. added 2017-09-22
    Hartmut Westermann: Die Intention des Dichters und die Zwecke der Interpreten. Zu Theorie und Praxis der Dichterauslegung in den platonischen Dialogen. [REVIEW]Cürsgen Dirk - 2005 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 10:274-278.
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  29. added 2017-09-07
    Ion: Plato’s Defense of Poetry.Gene Fendt - 1997 - International Studies in Philosophy 29 (4):23-50.
    This reading of Plato's Ion shows that the philosophic action mimed and engendered by the dialogue thoroughly reverses its (and Plato's) often supposed philosophical point, revealing that poetry is just as defensible as philosophy, and only in the same way. It is by Plato's indirections we find true directions out: the war between philosophy and poetry is a hoax on Plato's part, and a mistake on the part of his literalist readers. The dilemma around which the dialogue moves is false, (...)
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  30. added 2017-08-23
    Plato on Poetry: Ion, Republic 376e-398b, Republic 595-608b. Plato & Penelope Murray - 1996 - Cambridge University Press.
  31. added 2017-06-15
    Republic X: What's With Being a 'Third-Remove From the Truth'?Patrick Mooney - 2003 - In Naomi Reshotko (ed.), Desire, Identity and Existence: Essays in Honor of T. M. Penner. Kelowna, BC, Canada: Academic Printing & Publishing. pp. 193-209.
  32. added 2017-03-20
    Writing Knowledge in the Soul: Orality, Literacy, and Plato’s Critique of Poetry.Lawrence J. Hatab - 2007 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 11 (2):319-332.
    In this essay I take up Plato’s critique of poetry, which has little to do with epistemology and representational imitation, but rather the powerful effects that poeticperformances can have on audiences, enthralling them with vivid image-worlds and blocking the powers of critical reflection. By focusing on the perceived psychological dangers of poetry in performance and reception, I want to suggest that Plato’s critique was caught up in the larger story of momentous shifts in the Greek world, turning on the rise (...)
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  33. added 2016-12-08
    Plato and Hesiod. Edited by G.R. Boys-Stones and J.H. Haubold.E. F. Beall - 2012 - Ancient Philosophy 32 (2):420-429.
  34. added 2016-09-22
    Poetry and Hedonic Error in Plato’s Republic.J. Clerk Shaw - 2016 - Phronesis 61 (4):373-396.
    This paper reads Republic 583b-608b as a single, continuous line of argument. First, Socrates distinguishes real from apparent pleasure and argues that justice is more pleasant than injustice. Next, he describes how pleasures nourish the soul. This line of argument continues into the second discussion of poetry: tragic pleasures are mixed pleasures in the soul that seem greater than they are; indulging them nourishes appetite and corrupts the soul. The paper argues that Plato has a novel account of the ‘paradox (...)
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  35. added 2015-11-17
    Republic 382a-D: On the Dangers and Benefits of Falsehood.Nicholas R. Baima - 2017 - Classical Philology 112 (1):1-19.
    Socrates' attitude towards falsehood is quite puzzling in the Republic. Although Socrates is clearly committed to truth, at several points he discusses the benefits of falsehood. This occurs most notably in Book 3 with the "noble lie" (414d-415c) and most disturbingly in Book 5 with the "rigged sexual lottery" (459d-460c). This raises the question: What kinds of falsehoods does Socrates think are beneficial, and what kinds of falsehoods does he think are harmful? And more broadly: What can this tell us (...)
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  36. added 2015-04-29
    Poiesis and Cosmos.Shannon Dubose - 1970 - Tulane Studies in Philosophy 19:21-26.
  37. added 2015-04-25
    The Quarrel Between Philosophy and Poetry.Kenneth Dorter - 1989 - Review of Metaphysics 42 (4):848-850.
    Stanley Rosen's latest book is a collection of essays, the first of which gives the collection its title. The essays are undated, presumably as a way of emphasizing their continuity, but are said to "have been written at various times during the past thirty years" ; some of them are published here for the first time. Although most are on Plato, two are on Aristotle, and two on contemporary continental philosophy. The collection displays Rosen's considerable skill at wide-ranging, scholarly, and (...)
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  38. added 2015-04-19
    Mixed Pleasures, Blended Discourses: Poetry, Medicine, and the Body in Plato's Philebus 46-47c.Anastasia-Erasmia Peponi - 2002 - Classical Antiquity 21 (1):135-160.
    In Plato's Philebus the last section of the discussion on the falseness of pleasure is dedicated to those pleasures intrinsically mixed with pain. This paper focuses specifically on bodily mixed pleasures, an analysis that extends from 44d to 47c, while its focal point is 46-47c. By adopting the anti-hedonists' methodology, Socrates cunningly transforms his entire analysis of bodily mixed pleasures into a discourse on human disease, in which medical terminology prevails. Two major points are made in the reading suggested here. (...)
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  39. added 2015-04-17
    Plato on Poetry: Imitation or Inspiration?Nickolas Pappas - 2012 - Philosophy Compass 7 (10):669-678.
    A passage in Plato’s Laws offers a fresh look at Plato’s theory of poetry and art. Only here does Plato call poetry both mimêsis “imitation, representation,” and the product of enthousiasmos “inspiration, possession.” The Republic and Sophist examine poetic imitation; the Ion and Phaedrus develop a theory of artistic inspiration; but Plato does not confront the two descriptions together outside this paragraph. After all, mimêsis fuels an attack on poetry, while enthousiasmos is sometimes used to attack it, sometimes to praise (...)
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  40. added 2015-04-17
    Plato and the Poets (Review).Catalin Partenie - 2012 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 50 (2):291-292.
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  41. added 2015-04-17
    The Image of a Second Sun: Plato on Poetry, Rhetoric, and the Technē of Mimēsis (Review).Catalin Partenie - 2011 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 49 (3):371-372.
    There are two main discussions of poetry in Plato's Republic: the first one is in Books II and III, the other in Book X. Their conclusions are not entirely coherent. In Books II and III, only some poetry is considered imitative, and certain forms of it are allowed in the ideal city. In Book X all poetry is considered imitative, and all of it is banned from the city. Jeff Mitscherling's book deals with Plato's criticism of poetry and art. It (...)
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  42. added 2015-04-17
    The Poetics' Argument Against Plato.Nickolas Pappas - 1992 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 30 (1):83-100.
  43. added 2015-04-17
    Socrates' Charitable Treatment of Poetry.Nickolas Pappas - 1989 - Philosophy and Literature 13 (2):248-261.
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  44. added 2015-04-17
    Plato's Poetics: The Authority of Beauty.Morriss Henry Partee - 1981 - University of Utah Press.
  45. added 2015-04-17
    Plato on the Rhetoric of Poetry.Morriss Henry Partee - 1974 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 33 (2):203-212.
  46. added 2015-04-16
    Plato: Poet: Lysis: Poem.Ginger Osborn - 1995 - Dissertation, Vanderbilt University
  47. added 2015-04-15
    "This Story Isn't True": Poetry, Goodness, and Understanding in Plato's Phaedrus.Martha Craven Nussbaum - 1982 - In J. M. E. Moravcsik & Philip Temko (eds.), Plato on Beauty, Wisdom, and the Arts. Rowman & Littlefield.
  48. added 2015-04-13
    Tragic Pathos: Pity and Fear in Greek Philosophy and Tragedy.Dana LaCourse Munteanu - 2012 - Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction; Part I. Theoretical Views about Pity and Fear as Aesthetic Emotions: 1. Drama and the emotions: an Indo-European connection? 2. Gorgias: a strange trio, the poetic emotions; 3. Plato: from reality to tragedy and back; 4. Aristotle: the first 'theorist' of the aesthetic emotions; Part II. Pity and Fear within Tragedies: 5. An introduction; 6. Aeschylus: Persians; 7. Prometheus Bound; 8. Sophocles: Ajax; 9. Euripides: Orestes; Appendix: catharsis and the emotions in the definition of tragedy (...)
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  49. added 2015-04-13
    The Role of the Poet in Plato's Ideal Cities of Callipolis and Magnesia.Gerard Naddaf - 2007 - Kriterion: Journal of Philosophy 28 (116):329-349.
  50. added 2015-04-13
    Plato on Imitation and Poetry in Republic 10.Alexander Nehamas - 1982 - In J. M. E. Moravcsik & Philip Temko (eds.), Plato on Beauty, Wisdom, and the Arts. Rowman & Littlefield.
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