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  1. The State of Example: Sovereignty and Bare Speech in Plato's Laws.Robert S. Leib - 2020 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 34 (3):407-423.
    In Giorgio Agamben's Homo Sacer project, he gives an archaeology of Western political power from ancient Rome up through Carl Schmitt's model of "exceptional sovereignty," where the sovereign is "he who decides on the exception."1 Agamben takes Schmitt's thesis further, arguing that, in modern biopolitics, the "sovereign is he who decides on the value or the nonvalue of life as such," and therefore, on life and death in the state.2 Although this model also appears in Foucault's work, Penelope Deutscher argues (...)
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  2. Plato’s Republic (386c5-7 & 516d4-7) : An Ambiguous (?) Attitude of Plato on Three Homeric Lines.Thanassis Gkatzaras - 2018 - In Konstantinos Boudouris (ed.), Proceedings of the XXIII World Congress of Philosophy (2013). Charlottesville, Virginia, USA: Philosophy Documentation Center. pp. 127-131.
    The subject of my paper is the explanation of Plato’s attitude in Republic on three lines taken from Odyssey (11.489-91). In one case (386c5-7) Plato rejects these lines, because they should not be heard by children or free men, while in another case (516d4-7) he repeats them as a perfect example of illustrating philosopher’s feelings. My purpose is to show that this attitude is not ambiguous; it is compatible with Plato’s doctrines and a good example of the importance that the (...)
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  3. The Carpenter as a Philosopher Artist: A Critique of Plato's Theory of Mimesis.Ilemobayo John Omogunwa - 2018 - Philosophy Pathways 222 (1).
    Plato’s theory of mimesis is expressed clearly and mainly in Plato’s Republic where he refers to his philosophy of Ideas in his definition of art, by arguing that all arts are imitative in nature. Reality according to him lies with the Idea, and the Form one confronts in this tangible world is a copy of that universal everlasting Idea. He poses that a carpenter’s chair is the result of the idea of chair in his mind, the created chair is once (...)
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  4. Republic 382a-D: On the Dangers and Benefits of Falsehood.Nicholas R. Baima - 2017 - Classical Philology 112 (1):1-19.
    Socrates' attitude towards falsehood is quite puzzling in the Republic. Although Socrates is clearly committed to truth, at several points he discusses the benefits of falsehood. This occurs most notably in Book 3 with the "noble lie" (414d-415c) and most disturbingly in Book 5 with the "rigged sexual lottery" (459d-460c). This raises the question: What kinds of falsehoods does Socrates think are beneficial, and what kinds of falsehoods does he think are harmful? And more broadly: What can this tell us (...)
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  5. Formung und Umwendung der Seele - Eine Rechtfertigung ambivalenter Darstellungen in der Literatur im Rahmen von Platons 'Politeia'.Jana Schultz - 2017 - Frankfurt am Main, Germany: Peter Lang.
  6. A Queer Feeling for Plato: Corporeal Affects, Philosophical Hermeneutics, and Queer Receptions.Emanuela Bianchi - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (2):139-162.
    This paper takes Plato's metaphor of poetic transmission as magnetic charge in the Ion as a central trope for thinking through the various relationships between philosophy and literature; between poetry, interpretation, and truth; and between erotic affects and the material, corporeal, queer dimensions of reception. The affective dimensions of the Platonic text in the Ion, Republic, Symposium, and Phaedrus are examined at length, and the explicit accounts of ascent to philosophical truth are shown to be complicated by the persistence of (...)
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  7. On the Ancient Idea That Music Shapes Character.James Harold - 2016 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 15 (3):341-354.
    Ancient Chinese and Greek thinkers alike were preoccupied with the moral value of music; they distinguished between good and bad music by looking at the music’s effect on moral character. The idea can be understood in terms of two closely related questions. Does music have the power to affect the ethical character of either listener or performer? If it does, is it better as music for doing so? I argue that an affirmative answers to both questions are more plausible than (...)
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  8. Poetry and Hedonic Error in Plato’s Republic.J. Clerk Shaw - 2016 - Phronesis 61 (4):373-396.
    This paper reads Republic 583b-608b as a single, continuous line of argument. First, Socrates distinguishes real from apparent pleasure and argues that justice is more pleasant than injustice. Next, he describes how pleasures nourish the soul. This line of argument continues into the second discussion of poetry: tragic pleasures are mixed pleasures in the soul that seem greater than they are; indulging them nourishes appetite and corrupts the soul. The paper argues that Plato has a novel account of the ‘paradox (...)
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  9. Political Technê: Plato and the Poets.Dougal Blyth - 2014 - Polis 31 (2):313-351.
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  10. Plato and Hesiod. Edited by G.R. Boys-Stones and J.H. Haubold.E. F. Beall - 2012 - Ancient Philosophy 32 (2):420-429.
  11. Ancient Philosophical Poetics.Malcolm Heath - 2012 - Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: 1. Poetry: the roots of a problem; 2. A radical solution: Plato's Republic; 3. The natural history of poetry: Aristotle; 4. Ways to find truth in falsehood; 5. The marriage of Homer and Plato.
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  12. Plato and the Poets.Veronika Konradova - 2012 - Reflexe: Filosoficky Casopis 42 (122):3-23.
    The article addresses the issue of rating Platonic poetic creation. It focuses on two aspects of this issue, namely the question transformed the concept of truth and character agonální Platonic criticism. In the first respect, the paper focuses on the relationship between truth and lies and the Platonic concept of "similar lies the truth." In the latter respect, trying to uncover the motivation and the wide range of Plato's rivalry with the older poetic tradition in the context of a widely (...)
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  13. Jeff Mitscherling, The Image of a Second Sun: Plato on Poetry, Rhetoric, and the Technē of Mimēsis. [REVIEW]Aaron Landry - 2012 - Symposium: Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy/Revue canadienne de philosophie continentale 16 (2):266-270.
  14. Tragic Pathos: Pity and Fear in Greek Philosophy and Tragedy.Dana LaCourse Munteanu - 2012 - Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction; Part I. Theoretical Views about Pity and Fear as Aesthetic Emotions: 1. Drama and the emotions: an Indo-European connection? 2. Gorgias: a strange trio, the poetic emotions; 3. Plato: from reality to tragedy and back; 4. Aristotle: the first 'theorist' of the aesthetic emotions; Part II. Pity and Fear within Tragedies: 5. An introduction; 6. Aeschylus: Persians; 7. Prometheus Bound; 8. Sophocles: Ajax; 9. Euripides: Orestes; Appendix: catharsis and the emotions in the definition of tragedy (...)
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  15. Plato on Poetry: Imitation or Inspiration?Nickolas Pappas - 2012 - Philosophy Compass 7 (10):669-678.
    A passage in Plato’s Laws offers a fresh look at Plato’s theory of poetry and art. Only here does Plato call poetry both mimêsis “imitation, representation,” and the product of enthousiasmos “inspiration, possession.” The Republic and Sophist examine poetic imitation; the Ion and Phaedrus develop a theory of artistic inspiration; but Plato does not confront the two descriptions together outside this paragraph. After all, mimêsis fuels an attack on poetry, while enthousiasmos is sometimes used to attack it, sometimes to praise (...)
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  16. Plato and the Poets (Review).Catalin Partenie - 2012 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 50 (2):291-292.
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  17. Plato.Robert Stecker - 2012 - In Alessandro Giovannelli (ed.), Aesthetics: The Key Thinkers. pp. 8-20.
  18. Reason V. Literature in Plato’s Republic.Constance Meinwald - 2011 - Ancient Philosophy 31 (1):25-45.
  19. The Image of a Second Sun: Plato on Poetry, Rhetoric, and the Technē of Mimēsis (Review).Catalin Partenie - 2011 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 49 (3):371-372.
    There are two main discussions of poetry in Plato's Republic: the first one is in Books II and III, the other in Book X. Their conclusions are not entirely coherent. In Books II and III, only some poetry is considered imitative, and certain forms of it are allowed in the ideal city. In Book X all poetry is considered imitative, and all of it is banned from the city. Jeff Mitscherling's book deals with Plato's criticism of poetry and art. It (...)
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  20. The ‘Birth of Truth’: Alain Badiou and Plato’s Banishment of the Poets.J. Maggio - 2010 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 36 (5):607-621.
    Plato famously banishes the poets from his ideal city in book X of his Republic. Yet in this banishment Plato establishes the boundaries of reason, art and poetry — boundaries that have haunted western thinkers since antiquity. In this article I will explore those Platonic boundaries, specifically the intellectual limits of poetic writing as reflected upon by self-identified Platonist Alain Badiou. That being said, I am not attempting, strictly speaking, to look at Badiou’s interpretation of Plato’s banishment of poetry. Instead, (...)
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  21. Plato and Hesiod.G. R. Boys-Stones & J. H. Haubold (eds.) - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
    A collection of essays exploring the relationship between Plato and the poet Hesiod. The volume covers a wide variety of thematic angles, brings new and sometimes surprising light to a large range of Platonic dialogues, and represents a major contribution to the study of the reception of archaic poetry in Athens.
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  22. Philosophy and Poetry- Plato's Spirit and Literary Criticism.Avi Kujman - 2009 - Create Space.
    Avi Kujman claims against the attempt of philosophy to do away with poetry. In his opinion, this neglect involves the giving-up on the spirit or the ideal of wisdom for the political, all-too-political sphere of recognition. Poetry is of great avail for philosophy in the way up and in the way down, in the way to wisdom and in the way of instilling it to others. Mr. kujman, thus, fights against the tradition in order to achieve its implicit desire in (...)
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  23. Philosophy on Poetry, Philosophy in Poetry.Robin Attfield - 2008 - In Jinfen Yan & David E. Schrader (eds.), Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy. Edwin Mellen Press. pp. 13-19.
    The relations of philosophy and poetry include but are not exhausted by Plato’s hostility to mimetic poetry in the Republic and Aristotle’s defence of it in the Poetics. For poetry has often carried a philosophical message itself, from the work of Chaucer and Milton to that of T.S. Eliot. In yet earlier generations, poetry was chosen as the medium for conveying a philosophical message by (among Greek philosophers) Xenophanes, Parmenides and Empedocles, and (at Rome) by Lucretius, who struggled both with (...)
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  24. Plato on Rhetoric and Poetry.Charles Griswold - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  25. Platão e a cidade justa: poetas ilusionistas e potências da alma.Rachel Gazolla - 2007 - Kriterion: Journal of Philosophy 48 (116):399-415.
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  26. Writing Knowledge in the Soul: Orality, Literacy, and Plato's Critique of Poetry.Lawrence J. Hatab - 2007 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 11 (2):319-332.
    In this essay I take up Plato’s critique of poetry, which has little to do with epistemology and representational imitation, but rather the powerful effects that poeticperformances can have on audiences, enthralling them with vivid image-worlds and blocking the powers of critical reflection. By focusing on the perceived psychological dangers of poetry in performance and reception, I want to suggest that Plato’s critique was caught up in the larger story of momentous shifts in the Greek world, turning on the rise (...)
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  27. Writing Knowledge in the Soul: Orality, Literacy, and Plato’s Critique of Poetry.Lawrence J. Hatab - 2007 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 11 (2):319-332.
    In this essay I take up Plato’s critique of poetry, which has little to do with epistemology and representational imitation, but rather the powerful effects that poeticperformances can have on audiences, enthralling them with vivid image-worlds and blocking the powers of critical reflection. By focusing on the perceived psychological dangers of poetry in performance and reception, I want to suggest that Plato’s critique was caught up in the larger story of momentous shifts in the Greek world, turning on the rise (...)
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  28. Justice and the Banning of the Poets: The Way of Hermeneutics in Plato's Republic.Todd S. Mei - 2007 - Review of Metaphysics 60 (4):755-778.
    Interpretations of Plato’s consideration of poetry often see his position either as a rejection or an admittance of only a certain kind. This article offers a more complex analysis: questions concerning the nature of justice and poetry should be taken as mutually illuminating inquiries. This constitutes Plato’s hermeneutics which shows how understanding poetry ideally effects a metanoia (new understanding) that requires the harmony between ethical deliberation and narrative self-understanding. The dialogue is a mimesis of this process, and the conclusion in (...)
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  29. Platons Ποίησις.Igor Mikecin - 2007 - Filozofska Istrazivanja 27 (4):885-911.
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  30. The Role of the Poet in Plato's Ideal Cities of Callipolis and Magnesia.Gerard Naddaf - 2007 - Kriterion: Journal of Philosophy 28 (116):329-349.
  31. Poetics Before Plato: Interpretation and Authority in Early Greek Theories of Poetry.P. Gallagher - 2006 - British Journal of Aesthetics 46 (2):216-217.
  32. The Image of a Second Sun: Plato on Poetry, Rhetoric, and the Techne of Mimesis.Jeff Mitscherling - 2006 - Humanity Books.
  33. Hartmut Westermann: Die Intention des Dichters und die Zwecke der Interpreten. Zu Theorie und Praxis der Dichterauslegung in den platonischen Dialogen. [REVIEW]Cürsgen Dirk - 2005 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 10:274-278.
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  34. Philosophie und Wissenschaften im Dialog bei Platon.Eva-Maria Engelen - 2005 - In Gereon Wolters & Martin Carrier (eds.), Homo Sapiens Und Homo Faber. De Gruyter. pp. 39.
    Nach Platon „vermittelt“ die Philosophie als Kunst der Dialektik durch Dialog zwischen Begriffen und Disziplinen. Um dies zu zeigen, wird hier eine Lektüre von Platons Symposion vorgestellt, in der das Verhältnis der Disziplinen mit Wissens- und Erziehungsanspruch in Platons Zeit beleuchtet wird. Jede Rede des Symposions ist wie eine Stellungnahme in einem Dialog zu verstehen, so dass das Gesamtwerk als sieben Reden zu lesen sind, die dialogisch aufeinander verweisen. Die Grundannahme dieser Lektüre besagt, dass den einzelnen Reden verschiedene Wissenschaften oder (...)
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  35. Platone E la Poesia: Teoria Della Composizione E Prassi Della Ricezione.Fabio Massimo Giuliano - 2005 - Academia Verlag.
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  36. Plato’s Misquotation of the Poets.J. Mitscherling - 2005 - Classical Quarterly 55 (1):295-298.
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  37. Exiling the Poets: The Production of Censorship in Plato’s Republic, by Ramona Naddaff. [REVIEW]Sara Brill - 2004 - Ancient Philosophy 24 (1):215-219.
  38. Early Greek Poetics G. M. Ledbetter: Poetics Before Plato. Interpretation and Authority in Early Greek Theories of Poetry . Pp. XIV + 128. Princeton and Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2003. Cased, £19.95. Isbn: 0-691-09609-. [REVIEW]Malcolm Heath - 2004 - The Classical Review 54 (1):66.
  39. Image and Word.Günter Figal - 2003 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 7 (2):251-259.
    The Symposium is one of Plato’s most literary and poetic dialogues. How might one reconcile this evidence of Plato’s predilection for poetry in light of his severe critique of poetry in the Republic? Though his critique is modified and refined in other dialogues, the power of his critique is nowhere significantly undermined. I argue in this paper that Plato’s poetic writing is not inconsistent with his critique, and that in fact there is an affinity between his practice of poetry and (...)
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  40. Republic X: What's With Being a 'Third-Remove From the Truth'?Patrick Mooney - 2003 - In Naomi Reshotko (ed.), Desire, Identity and Existence: Essays in Honor of T. M. Penner. Kelowna, BC, Canada: Academic Printing & Publishing. pp. 193-209.
  41. The Ancient Quarrel Between Philosophy and Poetry Revisited: Plato and the Greek Literary Tradition, by Susan B. Levin. [REVIEW]Asli Gocer - 2002 - Ancient Philosophy 22 (1):185-188.
  42. Some Remarks on “of Two Minds”.Blake E. Hestir - 2002 - Southwest Philosophy Review 18 (2):141-145.
  43. Mixed Pleasures, Blended Discourses: Poetry, Medicine, and the Body in Plato's Philebus 46-47c.Anastasia-Erasmia Peponi - 2002 - Classical Antiquity 21 (1):135-160.
    In Plato's Philebus the last section of the discussion on the falseness of pleasure is dedicated to those pleasures intrinsically mixed with pain. This paper focuses specifically on bodily mixed pleasures, an analysis that extends from 44d to 47c, while its focal point is 46-47c. By adopting the anti-hedonists' methodology, Socrates cunningly transforms his entire analysis of bodily mixed pleasures into a discourse on human disease, in which medical terminology prevails. Two major points are made in the reading suggested here. (...)
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  44. The Poetics of Plato's.Dorrit Cohn - 2000 - Philosophy and Literature 24 (1).
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  45. The Poetics of Plato's Republic : A Modern Perspective.Dorrit Cohn - 2000 - Philosophy and Literature 24 (1):34-48.
  46. The Subjection of Muthos to Logos: Plato's Citations of the Poets.S. Halliwell - 2000 - Classical Quarterly 50 (01):94-.
    According to Aristotle, Metaphysics 2.3, 995a7–8, there are people who will take seriously the arguments of a speaker only if a poet can be cited as a ‘witness’ in support of them. Aristotle's passing observation sharply reminds us that Greek philosophy had developed within, and was surrounded by, a culture which extensively valued the authority of the poetic word and the poet's ‘voice’ from which it emanated. The currency of ideas, values, and images disseminated through familiarity with poetry had always (...)
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  47. The Ancient Quarrel Between Philosophy and Poetry Revisited: Plato and the Greek Literary Tradition.Susan B. Levin - 2000 - Oxford University Press.
    In this study, Levin explores Plato's engagement with the Greek literary tradition in his treatment of key linguistic issues. This investigation, conjoined with a new interpretation of the Republic's familiar critique of poets, supports the view that Plato's work represents a valuable precedent for contemporary reflections on ways in which philosophy might benefit from appeals to literature.
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  48. Literacy and Poetic Performance in Plato’s Laws.Gerard Naddaf - 2000 - Ancient Philosophy 20 (2):339-350.
  49. In Quest of Harmony: Plato and Confucius on Poetry.Zong-qi Cai - 1999 - Philosophy East and West 49 (3):317-345.
    How Plato and Confucius formulate their views on poetry in light of their overriding concerns with harmony is examined here. Both acknowledge the educational value of poetry in similar terms and set up similar moral-aesthetic standards. Both rank poetry lower than other objects of learning because they find poetic harmony to be less significant than intellectual or moral harmonies. But both take note of the transforming aesthetic experience afforded by poetry in certain circumstances, and identify this experience of the attainment (...)
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  50. Plato’s Homer.R. Chandran Madhu - 1999 - Ancient Philosophy 19 (Special Issue):87-95.
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