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  1. Plato on the Triviality of Literature.Julia Annas - 1982 - In J. M. E. Moravcsik & Philip Temko (eds.), Plato on Beauty, Wisdom, and the Arts. Rowman & Littlefield.
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  2. Plato’s Defence of Poetry.John P. Anton - 1987 - Idealistic Studies 17 (1):89-90.
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  3. Plato as Tragedian.Gavin Ardley - 1963 - Philosophical Studies 12:7-24.
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  4. Philosophy on Poetry, Philosophy in Poetry.Robin Attfield - 2008 - In Jinfen Yan & David E. Schrader (eds.), Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy. Edwin Mellen Press. pp. 13-19.
    The relations of philosophy and poetry include but are not exhausted by Plato’s hostility to mimetic poetry in the Republic and Aristotle’s defence of it in the Poetics. For poetry has often carried a philosophical message itself, from the work of Chaucer and Milton to that of T.S. Eliot. In yet earlier generations, poetry was chosen as the medium for conveying a philosophical message by (among Greek philosophers) Xenophanes, Parmenides and Empedocles, and (at Rome) by Lucretius, who struggled both with (...)
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  5. Republic 382a-D: On the Dangers and Benefits of Falsehood.Nicholas R. Baima - 2017 - Classical Philology 112 (1):1-19.
    Socrates' attitude towards falsehood is quite puzzling in the Republic. Although Socrates is clearly committed to truth, at several points he discusses the benefits of falsehood. This occurs most notably in Book 3 with the "noble lie" (414d-415c) and most disturbingly in Book 5 with the "rigged sexual lottery" (459d-460c). This raises the question: What kinds of falsehoods does Socrates think are beneficial, and what kinds of falsehoods does he think are harmful? And more broadly: What can this tell us (...)
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  6. Plato and the New Rhapsody.Dirk C. Baltzly - 1992 - Ancient Philosophy 12 (1):29-52.
  7. Plato on True and False Poetry.M. Pabst Battin - 1977 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 36 (2):163-174.
  8. Plato and Hesiod. Edited by G.R. Boys-Stones and J.H. Haubold.E. F. Beall - 2012 - Ancient Philosophy 32 (2):420-429.
  9. Plato on Poetry: Ion. P Murray.E. Belfiore - 1998 - The Classical Review 48 (1):20-21.
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  10. Plato on Poetry P. Murray (Ed.): Plato on Poetry: Ion; Republic 376e–398b9; Republic 595–608b10 (Cambridge Greek and Latin Classics). Pp. X + 250. Cambridge, New York, and Melbourne: Cambridge University Press, 1996. £37.50/$59.95 (Paper, £13.95/$21.95). ISBN: 0-521-34182-5 (0-521-34981-8 Pbk). [REVIEW]Elizabeth Belfiore - 1998 - The Classical Review 48 (01):20-21.
  11. Plato and Aristotle on Poetry.Elizabeth Belfiore - 1990 - Ancient Philosophy 10 (1):138-140.
  12. A Queer Feeling for Plato.Emanuela Bianchi - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (2):139-162.
    This paper takes Plato's metaphor of poetic transmission as magnetic charge in the Ion as a central trope for thinking through the various relationships between philosophy and literature; between poetry, interpretation, and truth; and between erotic affects and the material, corporeal, queer dimensions of reception. The affective dimensions of the Platonic text in the Ion, Republic, Symposium, and Phaedrus are examined at length, and the explicit accounts of ascent to philosophical truth are shown to be complicated by the persistence of (...)
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  13. Plato and Hesiod.G. R. Boys-Stones & J. H. Haubold (eds.) - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
    A collection of essays exploring the relationship between Plato and the poet Hesiod. The volume covers a wide variety of thematic angles, brings new and sometimes surprising light to a large range of Platonic dialogues, and represents a major contribution to the study of the reception of archaic poetry in Athens.
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  14. Plato's Defense of Poetry.Thomas C. Brickhouse - 1987 - New Scholasticism 61 (1):108-111.
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  15. Exiling the Poets: The Production of Censorship in Plato's Republic, by Ramona Naddaff.Sara Brill - 2004 - Ancient Philosophy 24 (1):215-219.
  16. A Retracted Exile?: Poetry and Republic 614b.Robert S. Brumbaugh - 1992 - Ancient Philosophy 12 (1):172-173.
  17. Plato's Defence of Poetry.John Bussanich - 1986 - Ancient Philosophy 6:210-213.
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  18. In Quest of Harmony: Plato and Confucius on Poetry.Zong-qi Cai - 1999 - Philosophy East and West 49 (3):317-345.
    How Plato and Confucius formulate their views on poetry in light of their overriding concerns with harmony is examined here. Both acknowledge the educational value of poetry in similar terms and set up similar moral-aesthetic standards. Both rank poetry lower than other objects of learning because they find poetic harmony to be less significant than intellectual or moral harmonies. But both take note of the transforming aesthetic experience afforded by poetry in certain circumstances, and identify this experience of the attainment (...)
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  19. The Poetics of Plato's.Dorrit Cohn - 2000 - Philosophy and Literature 24 (1).
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  20. The Poetics of Plato's Republic : A Modern Perspective.Dorrit Cohn - 2000 - Philosophy and Literature 24 (1):34-48.
  21. Hartmut Westermann: Die Intention des Dichters und die Zwecke der Interpreten. Zu Theorie und Praxis der Dichterauslegung in den platonischen Dialogen. [REVIEW]Cürsgen Dirk - 2005 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 10:274-278.
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  22. The Quarrel Between Philosophy and Poetry.Kenneth Dorter - 1989 - Review of Metaphysics 42 (4):848-850.
  23. Poiesis and Cosmos.Shannon Dubose - 1970 - Tulane Studies in Philosophy 19:21-26.
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  24. Poetry and Truth in Plato.Irwin Edman - 1936 - Journal of Philosophy 33 (22):605-609.
  25. Literature Against Philosophy, Plato to Derrida: A Defence of Poetry.Mark Edmundson - 1995 - Cambridge University Press.
    This timely book argues that the institutionalisation of literary theory, particularly within American and British academic circles, has led to a sterility of thought which ignores the special character of literary art. Mark Edmundson traces the origins of this tendency to the ancient quarrel between philosophy and poetry, in which Plato took the side of philosophy; and he shows how the work of modern theorists - Foucault, Derrida, de Man and Bloom - exhibits similar drives to subsume poetic art into (...)
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  26. Philosophie und Wissenschaften im Dialog bei Platon.Eva-Maria Engelen - 2005 - In Gereon Wolters & Martin Carrier (eds.), Homo Sapiens Und Homo Faber. De Gruyter. pp. 39.
    Nach Platon „vermittelt“ die Philosophie als Kunst der Dialektik durch Dialog zwischen Begriffen und Disziplinen. Um dies zu zeigen, wird hier eine Lektüre von Platons Symposion vorgestellt, in der das Verhältnis der Disziplinen mit Wissens- und Erziehungsanspruch in Platons Zeit beleuchtet wird. Jede Rede des Symposions ist wie eine Stellungnahme in einem Dialog zu verstehen, so dass das Gesamtwerk als sieben Reden zu lesen sind, die dialogisch aufeinander verweisen. Die Grundannahme dieser Lektüre besagt, dass den einzelnen Reden verschiedene Wissenschaften oder (...)
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  27. ION: Plato's Defense of Poetry.Gene Fendt - 1997 - International Studies in Philosophy 29 (4):23-50.
    Reads Ion, Plato's only dialogue on poetry as such, poetically—noting what it does as much as what it says. Doing so allows explanation of several historical anomalies and factual inconsistencies in it, and proves that the dilemma (techne/mania) of the dialogue is false; that the dilemma is intimately related to a view of language as names; that the flaw which the dialogue exhibits in the rhapsode is both moral and intellectual; that those flaws are not transferable simpliciter to the poem (...)
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  28. Ion: Plato’s Defense of Poetry.Gene Fendt - 1997 - International Studies in Philosophy 29 (4):23-50.
    This reading of Plato's Ion shows that the philosophic action mimed and engendered by the dialogue thoroughly reverses its (and Plato's) often supposed philosophical point, revealing that poetry is just as defensible as philosophy, and only in the same way. It is by Plato's indirections we find true directions out: the war between philosophy and poetry is a hoax on Plato's part, and a mistake on the part of his literalist readers. The dilemma around which the dialogue moves is false, (...)
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  29. Listening to the Cicadas: A Study of Plato's Phaedrus.G. R. F. Ferrari - 1987 - Cambridge University Press.
    The focus of this account is how myth and formal argument in the dialogue Phaedrus complement and reinforce each other in Plato's philosophy. Not only is the dialogue in its formal structure a joining of myth and argument, but the philosophic life that it praises is also shaped by the limitations of argument and the importance of mythical and poetic understanding. The book is written for anyone seriously interested in Plato's thought and in the history of literary theory or of (...)
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  30. Image and Word.Günter Figal - 2003 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 7 (2):251-259.
    The Symposium is one of Plato’s most literary and poetic dialogues. How might one reconcile this evidence of Plato’s predilection for poetry in light of his severe critique of poetry in the Republic? Though his critique is modified and refined in other dialogues, the power of his critique is nowhere significantly undermined. I argue in this paper that Plato’s poetic writing is not inconsistent with his critique, and that in fact there is an affinity between his practice of poetry and (...)
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  31. Poetics Before Plato: Interpretation and Authority in Early Greek Theories of Poetry.P. Gallagher - 2006 - British Journal of Aesthetics 46 (2):216-217.
  32. Poetic Theory Before Plato.A. F. Garvie - 1967 - The Classical Review 17 (01):68-.
  33. Platão e a cidade justa: poetas ilusionistas e potências da alma.Rachel Gazolla - 2007 - Kriterion: Journal of Philosophy 48 (116):399-415.
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  34. The Role and Treatment of Poetry in Plato's "Republic.".Roddy Francis Gerraughty - 1974 - Dissertation, The Pennsylvania State University
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  35. Platone E la Poesia: Teoria Della Composizione E Prassi Della Ricezione.Fabio Massimo Giuliano - 2005 - Academia Verlag.
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  36. The Ancient Quarrel Between Philosophy and Poetry Revisited.Asli Gocer - 2002 - Ancient Philosophy 22 (1):185-188.
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  37. Plato on Poetry and Painting.R. A. Goodrich - 1982 - British Journal of Aesthetics 22 (2):126-137.
  38. Plato on Rhetoric and Poetry.Charles Griswold - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  39. The Ideas and the Criticism of Poetry in Plato's.Charles L. Griswold - 1981 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 19 (2):135-150.
  40. The Subjection of Muthos to Logos: Plato's Citations of the Poets.S. Halliwell - 2000 - Classical Quarterly 50 (01):94-.
    According to Aristotle, Metaphysics 2.3, 995a7–8, there are people who will take seriously the arguments of a speaker only if a poet can be cited as a ‘witness’ in support of them. Aristotle's passing observation sharply reminds us that Greek philosophy had developed within, and was surrounded by, a culture which extensively valued the authority of the poetic word and the poet's ‘voice’ from which it emanated. The currency of ideas, values, and images disseminated through familiarity with poetry had always (...)
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  41. On the Ancient Idea That Music Shapes Character.James Harold - 2016 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 15 (3):341-354.
    Ancient Chinese and Greek thinkers alike were preoccupied with the moral value of music; they distinguished between good and bad music by looking at the music’s effect on moral character. The idea can be understood in terms of two closely related questions. Does music have the power to affect the ethical character of either listener or performer? If it does, is it better as music for doing so? I argue that an affirmative answers to both questions are more plausible than (...)
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  42. Plato as Poet: A Critical Interpretation. Part II.John Hartland-Swann - 1951 - Philosophy 26 (97):131 - 141.
  43. Plato as Poet: A Critical Interpretation.John Hartland-Swann - 1951 - Philosophy 26 (96):3 - 18.
  44. Writing Knowledge in the Soul: Orality, Literacy, and Plato's Critique of Poetry.Lawrence J. Hatab - 2007 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 11 (2):319-332.
    In this essay I take up Plato’s critique of poetry, which has little to do with epistemology and representational imitation, but rather the powerful effects that poeticperformances can have on audiences, enthralling them with vivid image-worlds and blocking the powers of critical reflection. By focusing on the perceived psychological dangers of poetry in performance and reception, I want to suggest that Plato’s critique was caught up in the larger story of momentous shifts in the Greek world, turning on the rise (...)
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  45. Writing Knowledge in the Soul: Orality, Literacy, and Plato’s Critique of Poetry.Lawrence J. Hatab - 2007 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 11 (2):319-332.
    In this essay I take up Plato’s critique of poetry, which has little to do with epistemology and representational imitation, but rather the powerful effects that poeticperformances can have on audiences, enthralling them with vivid image-worlds and blocking the powers of critical reflection. By focusing on the perceived psychological dangers of poetry in performance and reception, I want to suggest that Plato’s critique was caught up in the larger story of momentous shifts in the Greek world, turning on the rise (...)
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  46. Ancient Philosophical Poetics.Malcolm Heath - 2012 - Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: 1. Poetry: the roots of a problem; 2. A radical solution: Plato's Republic; 3. The natural history of poetry: Aristotle; 4. Ways to find truth in falsehood; 5. The marriage of Homer and Plato.
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  47. Early Greek Poetics G. M. Ledbetter: Poetics Before Plato. Interpretation and Authority in Early Greek Theories of Poetry . Pp. XIV + 128. Princeton and Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2003. Cased, £19.95. Isbn: 0-691-09609-. [REVIEW]Malcolm Heath - 2004 - The Classical Review 54 (1):66.
  48. Book Review: Literature Against Philosophy, Plato to Derrida: A Defense of Poetry. [REVIEW]Paul M. Hedeen - 1996 - Philosophy and Literature 20 (2):538-540.
  49. Some Remarks on “of Two Minds”.Blake E. Hestir - 2002 - Southwest Philosophy Review 18 (2):141-145.
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  50. Plato and the Poets.Geo Ainslie Hight - 1922 - Mind 31 (122):195-199.
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