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  1. On Necessity.D. Rita Alfonso - 2012 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 16 (2):233-245.
    Since Stalbaum’s 1838 translation revived interest in Plato’s Timaeus, commentators have tended to bracket the discourse on Necessity, reading it as either mythical or mystical. This essay offers an interpretation of Necessity that is also an assertion of its importance for understanding the philosophically important conception of chora-space found therein. Beginning with throwing ourselves back into the Presocratic milieu, I examine what remains of Presocratic notions of kreon and ananke (necessity) in order to move forward a more robust interpretation of (...)
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  2. Participation and Predication in Plato's Middle Dialogues.R. E. Allen - 1960 - Philosophical Review 69 (2):147-164.
  3. The "Cratylus": Plato's Critique of Naming.Georgios Anagnostopoulos - 1994 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 32 (4):661-663.
    This detailed discussion of the Cratylus aims to explain the function of the long etymological section within the dialogue as a whole, arguing that it represents a Platonic critique of common Greek ideas about names.
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  4. Plato's "Cratylus": The Two Theories of the Correctness of Names.Georgios Anagnostopoulos - 1972 - Review of Metaphysics 25 (4):691 - 736.
  5. The Cratylus of Plato: A Commentary. By Francesco Ademollo. [REVIEW]Geoffrey Bagwell - 2012 - Ancient Philosophy 32 (1):190-193.
  6. Does Plato Argue Fallaciously at Cratylus 385b–C?Geoffrey Bagwell - 2011 - Apeiron 44 (1):13-21.
    At Cratylus 385b–c, Plato appears to argue that names have truth-value. Critics have almost universally condemned the argument as fallacious. Their case has proven so compelling that it has driven editors to recommend moving or removing the argument from its received position in the manuscripts. I argue that a close reading of the argument reveals it commits no fallacy, and its purpose in the dialogue justifies its original position. I wish to vindicate the manuscript tradition, showing that the argument establishes (...)
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  7. Names and Nature in Plato's Cratylus.Rachel Barney - 2001 - Routledge.
    This study offers a ckomprehensive new interpretation of one of Plato's dialogues, the _Cratylus_. Throughout, the book combines analysis of Plato's arguments with attentiveness to his philosophical method.
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  8. Plato on Conventionalism.Rachel Barney - 1997 - Phronesis 42 (2):143 - 162.
    A new reading of Plato's account of conventionalism about names in the Cratylus. It argues that Hermogenes' position, according to which a name is whatever anybody 'sets down' as one, does not have the counterintuitive consequences usually claimed. At the same time, Plato's treatment of conventionalism needs to be related to his treatment of formally similar positions in ethics and politics. Plato is committed to standards of objective natural correctness in all such areas, despite the problematic consequences which, as he (...)
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  9. Propositional Perception: Phantasia, Predication and Sign in Plato, Aristotle and the Stoics.Jeffrey Barnouw - 2002 - University Press of America.
    The early Greek Stoics were the first philosophers to recognize the object of normal human perception as predicative or propositional in nature. Fundamentally we do not perceive qualities or things, but situations and things happening, facts. To mark their difference from Plato and Aristotle, the Stoics adopted phantasia as their word for perception.
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  10. The Cratylus.: Plato's Critique of Naming.Timothy M. S. Baxter (ed.) - 1992 - E.J. Brill.
    This book aims to give a coherent interpretation of the whole dialogue, paying particular attention to these etymologies.The book discusses the rival theories ...
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  11. Some Problems About Being and Predication in Plato's.William B. Bondeson - 1976 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 14 (1).
  12. Some Problems About Being and Predication in Plato's Sophist 242-249.William B. Bondeson - 1976 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 14 (1):1-10.
  13. Motion and Rest as Genuinely Greatest Kinds in the Sophist.Christopher Buckels - 2015 - Ancient Philosophy 35 (2):317-327.
    The paper argues that Motion and Rest are “greatest kinds” and not just convenient examples, since they are all-pervading. Thus Motion and Rest can be jointly predicated of a single subject and can be predicated of each other, just as Sameness and Otherness can. While Sameness and Otherness are opposites, a single subject may be the same in one respect, namely, the same as itself, and other in another respect, namely, other than other things. Thus they can be predicated of (...)
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  14. Self-Predication and Linguistic Reference in Plato's Theory of the Forms.Jerry S. Clegg - 1973 - Phronesis 18 (1):26-43.
  15. Semantics, Predication, Truth and Falsehood in Plato's Sophist.Raul Corazzon - unknown
    "The Sophist seems to be concerned with two things: being and nonbeing, on the one hand, and true and false speech, on the other. If speech is either true or false speech, it seems not even plausible for being to be either being or nonbeing, since we would then be compelled to say that nonbeing is as much being as false speech is speech. If nonbeing, however, is being, then nonbeing cannot be nonbeing, for otherwise the falseness of false speech (...)
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  16. Pauline Predications in Plato.Daniel T. Devereux - 1975 - Apeiron 9 (1):1-4.
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  17. Meinwald's Pros Heauto Analysis of Plato's Apparently Self-Predicational Sentences.Michael Durrant - 1997 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 75 (3):383 – 395.
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  18. Os Problemas da Opinião Falsa e da Predicação no diálogo Sofista de Platão.Francisco de Assis Vale Cavalcante Filho - 2014 - Dissertation, UFPB, Brazil
  19. Plato on Naming.Gail Fine - 1977 - Philosophical Quarterly 27 (109):289-301.
  20. G.E.L.Owen, Plato and the Verb "To Be".Robert J. Flower - 1980 - Apeiron 14 (2):87.
  21. The Ambiguity of 'Name' in Plato's 'Cratylus'.Jeffrey B. Gold - 1978 - Philosophical Studies 34 (3):223 - 251.
    In the "cratylus", Plato presents two theories about the correctness of names, I.E., Names are correct by nature and names are correct by convention. In this paper, I argue that plato holds both views because he recognizes that the word 'name' is ambiguous as between type and token. Name tokens (individual strings of marks and noises) are conventional for plato. But name types (the role played by the tokens or the concept expressed by the tokens) are not conventional for plato.
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  22. Predication and Immortality in Plato’s Phaedo.Edwin Hartman - 1972 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 54 (3):217-228.
  23. Self-Predication in Plato's Middle Dialogues.Robert Heinaman - 1989 - Phronesis 34 (1):56-79.
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  24. Self-Predication in the Sophist.Robert Heinaman - 1981 - Phronesis 26 (1):55 - 66.
    A major problem in the interpretation of Plato's metaphysics is the question of whether he abandoned self-predication as a result of the Third Man Argument in the Parmenides. In this paper I will argue that the answer to this question must be 'no' because the self-predication assumption is still present in the Sophist.
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  25. The Cratylus: Plato's Critique of Naming.Richard J. Ketchum - 1995 - Ancient Philosophy 15 (1):211-214.
    This detailed discussion of the Cratylus aims to explain the function of the long etymological section within the dialogue as a whole, arguing that it represents a Platonic critique of common Greek ideas about names.
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  26. Participation and Predication in the Sophist 251-260.Richard J. Ketchum - 1978 - Phronesis 23 (1):42 - 62.
  27. Predicating the Good.L. A. Kosman - 1968 - Phronesis 13 (1):171-174.
  28. Plato on the Correctness of Names.Norman Kretzmann - 1971 - American Philosophical Quarterly 8 (2):126 - 138.
  29. What's in a Name?: A Reconsideration of the Cratylus' Historical Sources and Topics.Susan B. Levin - 1995 - Ancient Philosophy 15 (1):91-115.
  30. Plato On Truth And Falsity In Names.J. V. Luce - 1969 - Classical Quarterly 19 (02):222-.
    In Cratylus 385 b-c Plato argues that if statements () can be true or false, names (),2 as parts () of statements, are also capable of being true or false. From Aristotle onwards this view has often been challenged,3 and R. Robinson put the case against it trenchantly when he wrote:4 This argument is bad; for names have no truth-value, and the reason given for saying that they do is a fallacy of division. No one in the dialogue points out (...)
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  31. Semantics and Self-Predication in Plato.John Malcolm - 1981 - Phronesis 26 (3):286 - 294.
  32. Identity and Predication in Plato.Benson Mates - 1979 - Phronesis 24 (3):211 - 229.
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  33. From Plato to Frege: Paradigms of Predication in the History of Ideas. [REVIEW]Uwe Meixner - 2009 - Metaphysica 10 (2):199-214.
    One of the perennial questions of philosophy concerns the simple statements which say that an object is so and so or that such and such objects are so and so related: simple predicative statements. Do such statements have an ontological basis, and if so, what is that basis? The answer to this question determines—or in any case, is expressive of—a specific fundamental outlook on the world. In the course of the history of Western philosophy, various philosophers have given various answers (...)
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  34. For the Name's Sake.Michael Naas - 2003 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 7 (2):199-221.
    In Plato’s later dialogues, and particularly in the Sophist, there is a general reinterpretation and rehabilitation of the name (onoma) in philosophy. No longer understood rather vaguely as one of potentially dangerous and deceptive elements of everyday language or of poetic language, the word onoma is recast in the Sophist and related dialogues into one of the essential elements of a philosophical language that aims to make claims or propositions about the way thingsare. Onoma, now understood as name, is thus (...)
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  35. Participation and Predication in Plato's Later Thought.Alexander Nehamas - 1982 - Review of Metaphysics 36 (2):343 - 374.
  36. Self-Predication and Plato's Theory of Forms.Alexander Nehamas - 1979 - American Philosophical Quarterly 16 (2):93 - 103.
    This paper offers an interpretation of self-Predication (the idea that justice is just) in plato, Given that self-Predication is accepted as obvious both by plato and by his audience, Which entails that "all" self-Predications are clearly, Though not trivially, True. More strongly, It is suggested that "only" self-Predications can be accepted as clearly true by plato. This is to deny that plato had at his disposal an articulated notion of predication, And his middle theory of forms, Primarily the relation of (...)
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  37. The Science of Philosophy: Discourse and Deception in Plato’s Sophist.Pettersson Olof - 2018 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 22 (2):221-237.
    At 252e1 to 253c9 in Plato’s Sophist, the Eleatic Visitor explains why philosophy is a science. Like the art of grammar, philosophical knowledge corresponds to a generic structure of discrete kinds and is acquired by systematic analysis of how these kinds intermingle. In the literature, the Visitor’s science is either understood as an expression of a mature and authentic platonic metaphysics, or as a sophisticated illusion staged to illustrate the seductive lure of sophistic deception. By showing how the Visitor’s account (...)
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  38. Dangerous Voices: On Written and Spoken Discourse in Plato’s Protagoras.Pettersson Olof - 2017 - In Olof Pettersson & Vigdis Vigdis Songe-Møller (eds.), Plato’s Protagoras: Essays on the Confrontation of Philosophy and Sophistry. Springer. pp. 177-198.
    Plato’s Protagoras contains, among other things, three short but puzzling remarks on the media of philosophy. First, at 328e5–329b1, Plato makes Socrates worry that long speeches, just like books, are deceptive, because they operate in a discursive mode void of questions and answers. Second, at 347c3–348a2, Socrates argues that discussion of poetry is a presumptuous affair, because, the poems’ message, just like the message of any written text, cannot be properly examined if the author is not present. Third, at 360e6–361d6, (...)
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  39. Propositional Perception.Michael B. Papazian - 2004 - Ancient Philosophy 24 (1):235 - 238.
  40. How to Say Goodbye to the Third Man.Francis Jeffry Pelletier & Edward N. Zalta - 2000 - Noûs 34 (2):165–202.
    In (1991), Meinwald initiated a major change of direction in the study of Plato’s Parmenides and the Third Man Argument. On her conception of the Parmenides , Plato’s language systematically distinguishes two types or kinds of predication, namely, predications of the kind ‘x is F pros ta alla’ and ‘x is F pros heauto’. Intuitively speaking, the former is the common, everyday variety of predication, which holds when x is any object (perceptible object or Form) and F is a property (...)
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  41. The Legacy of Hermes: Deception and Dialectic in Plato’s Cratylus.Olof Pettersson - 2016 - Journal of Ancient Philosophy 10 (1):26-58.
    Against the background of a conventionalist theory, and staged as a defense of a naturalistic notion of names and naming, the critique of language developed in Plato’s Cratylus does not only propose that human language, in contrast to the language of the gods, is bound to the realm of myth and lie. The dialogue also concludes by offering a set of reasons to think that knowledge of reality is not within the reach of our words. Interpretations of the dialogue’s long (...)
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  42. Relations as Plural-Predications in Plato.Theodore Scaltsas - 2013 - Studia Neoaristotelica 10 (1):28-49.
    Plato was the first philosopher to discover the metaphysical phenomenon of plural-subjects and plural-predication; e.g. you and I are two, but neither you, nor I are two. I argue that Plato devised an ontology for plural-predication through his Theory of Forms, namely, plural-partaking in a Form. Furthermore, I argue that Plato used plural-partaking to offer an ontology of related individuals without reifying relations. My contention is that Plato’s theory of plural-relatives has evaded detection in the exegetical literature because his account (...)
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  43. Semantik und Ontologie. Drei Studien zu Aristoteles.Gianluigi Segalerba - 2013 - Peter Lang.
    The focus of the book, that consists in three studies, can be described in the following aspects: Considerations on Aristotle's universals, reconstruction of Aristotle's critics to Plato' s ideas in Aristotle's lost work “On Ideas”, analysis of Aristotle's substance in the works Categories, Metaphysics, On the Soul, Posterior Analytics, Physics. My point of view is that Aristotle refuses every aspect of Plato's ideas in a radical way. I analyze Aristotle's conditions for a synonymy of predication and compare them with the (...)
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  44. The Anatomy of an Illusion: On Plato's Purported Commitment to Self-Predication.Ravi Sharma - 2007 - Apeiron 40 (2):159-198.
  45. Plato on the Self-Predication of Forms: Early and Middle Dialogues. By John Malcolm. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 1991. Pp. 231. $55. [REVIEW]Christopher Shields - 1995 - Ancient Philosophy 15 (1):203-211.