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  1. Community with Nothing in Common? Plato's Subtler Response to Protagoras.Mark Sentesy - 2020 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 25 (1):155-183.
    The Protagoras examines how community can occur between people who have nothing in common. Community, Protagoras holds, has no natural basis. Seeking the good is therefore not a theoretical project, but a matter of agreement. This position follows from his claim that “man is the measure of all things.” For Socrates community is based on a natural good, which is sought through theoretical inquiry. They disagree about what community is, and what its bases and goals are. But Plato illustrates the (...)
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  2. Sophistry and Political Philosophy: Protagoras’ Challenge to Socrates, Written by Robert C. Bartlett.Anders Dahl Sørensen - 2018 - Polis 35 (2):587-590.
  3. Dangerous Voices: On Written and Spoken Discourse in Plato’s Protagoras.Pettersson Olof - 2017 - In Olof Pettersson & Vigdis Vigdis Songe-Møller (eds.), Plato’s Protagoras: Essays on the Confrontation of Philosophy and Sophistry. Springer. pp. 177-198.
    Plato’s Protagoras contains, among other things, three short but puzzling remarks on the media of philosophy. First, at 328e5–329b1, Plato makes Socrates worry that long speeches, just like books, are deceptive, because they operate in a discursive mode void of questions and answers. Second, at 347c3–348a2, Socrates argues that discussion of poetry is a presumptuous affair, because, the poems’ message, just like the message of any written text, cannot be properly examined if the author is not present. Third, at 360e6–361d6, (...)
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  4. Introduction.Pettersson Olof - 2017 - In Olof Pettersson & Vigdis Songe-Møller (eds.), Plato’s Protagoras: Essays on the Confrontation of Philosophy and Sophistry. Springer. pp. 1-8.
    Guided by the bold ambition to reexamine the nature of philosophy, questions about the foundations and origins of Plato’s dialogues have in recent years gained a new and important momentum. In the wake of the seminal work of Andrea Nightingale and especially her book Genres in Dialogue from 1995, Plato’s texts have come to be reconsidered in terms of their compositional and intergeneric fabric. Supplementing important research on the argumentative structures of the dialogues, it has been argued that Plato’s philosophizing (...)
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  5. Plato's Anti-Hedonism and the "Protagoras".J. Clerk Shaw - 2015 - Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.
    Plato often rejects hedonism, but in the "Protagoras", Plato's Socrates seems to endorse hedonism. In this book, J. Clerk Shaw removes this apparent tension by arguing that the "Protagoras" as a whole actually reflects Plato's anti-hedonism. He shows that Plato places hedonism at the core of a complex of popular mistakes about value and especially about virtue: that injustice can be prudent, that wisdom is weak, that courage is the capacity to persevere through fear, and that virtue cannot be taught. (...)
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  6. The Virtue of Dialogue, Dialogue as Virtue in Plato's Protagoras.Francisco J. Gonzalez - 2014 - Philosophical Papers 43 (1):33-66.
  7. Hedonism and the Divided Soul in Plato’s Protagoras.Jessica Moss - 2014 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 96 (3).
  8. Deliberation and Moral Knowledge in the Protagoras.Timothy Chappel - 2013 - Philosophical Inquiry 37 (1-2):82-104.
  9. Protagoras of Abdera: The Man, His Measure.Johannes M. Van Ophuijsen, Marlein van Raalte & Peter Stork (eds.) - 2013 - Brill.
    Protagoras of Abdera: The Man, His Measure makes a case for the Sophist Protagoras as a philosopher in his own right, while at the same time giving due weight to the complicated doxographical situation.
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  10. The Wax Tablet, Logic and Protagoreanism.Terry Penner - 2013 - In George Boys-Stones, Dimitri El Murr & C. J. Gill (eds.), The Platonic Art of Philosophy: Essays in honnor of Christopher Rowe.
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  11. Relativism in Plato's Protagoras.Catherine Rowett - 2013 - In Verity Harte & Melissa Lane (eds.), Politeia in Greek and Roman Philosophy. Cambridge University Press. pp. 191-211.
    The character Protagoras in Plato's Protagoras holds similar views to the one in the Theaetetus, and faces similar problems. The dialogue considers issues in epistemology and moral epistemology, as a central theme. The Protagorean position is immune from Socrates' attacks, and Socrates needs Protagorean methods to make any impact.
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  12. A Note to Protagoras 353de. Bizoń, Michał, Sokoł & Kamil Owski - 2012 - Phronesis 57 (4):319-331.
    At Protagoras 353de, Socrates gives three possible reasons for calling some pleasures ‘wrong’. Scholarly attention has focused on the second of these, according to which pleasures are ‘wrong’ when they have negative consequences. This paper argues that the first reason (the pleasures are fleeting) corresponds to beliefs held by Democritus, among others; and that the third reason (the pleasant things “give pleasure in whatever way and for whatever reason”) is the view adopted by Socrates in the dialogue.
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  13. The Pragmatics of "Myth" in Plato's Dialogues: The Story of Prometheus in the Protagoras.Claude Calame - 2012 - In Catherine Collobert, Pierre Destrée & Francisco J. Gonzalez (eds.), Plato and Myth: Studies on the Use and Status of Platonic Myths. Brill.
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  14. The Strength of Knowledge in Plato’s Protagoras.Justin Clark - 2012 - Ancient Philosophy 32 (2):237-255.
  15. What Do the Arguments in the Protagoras Amount To?Vasilis Politis - 2012 - Phronesis 57 (3):209-239.
    Abstract The main thesis of the paper is that, in the coda to the Protagoras (360e-end), Plato tells us why and with what justification he demands a definition of virtue: namely, in order to resolve a particular aporia . According to Plato's assessment of the outcome of the arguments of the dialogue, the principal question, whether or not virtue can be taught , has, by the end of the dialogue, emerged as articulating an aporia , in that both protagonists, Socrates (...)
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  16. A Note to Protagoras 353de.Kamil Sokołowski & Michał Bizoń - 2012 - Phronesis 57 (4):319-331.
    At Protagoras 353de, Socrates gives three possible reasons for calling some pleasures `wrong'. Scholarly attention has focused on the second of these, according to which pleasures are `wrong' when they have negative consequences. This paper argues that the first reason (the pleasures are fleeting) corresponds to beliefs held by Democritus, among others; and that the third reason (the pleasant things “give pleasure in whatever way and for whatever reason“) is the view adopted by Socrates in the dialogue.
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  17. Formen des Wissens in Platons Protagoras.Martin F. Meyer - 2011 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 14 (1):57-83.
  18. Protagoras and His Theory of Social Contract.Stanislav Mysicka - 2011 - Filozofia 66 (3):258-267.
    In his theory of society Protagoras, one of the most influential sophists thinkers, applies a contractarian approach, similar in many respects to those of Locke, Hobbes and Rousseau. Protagoras, unlike Aristotle or Plato, was convinced that individual perceptions and beliefs as well as those of the body political are relative, because there is no uniform ground on which things could be perceived or experienced. He offers an evolutionary account of the development of human species, arguing that society is a result (...)
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  19. Protágoras Jako Teoretik Společenské Smlouvy.Stanislav Myškčka - 2011 - Filozofia 66 (3).
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  20. Nicholas Denyer. Plato: Protagoras. [REVIEW]J. Andrew Foster - 2010 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 104 (1):123-124.
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  21. How Philosophy Became Socratic: A Study of Plato's Protagoras, Charmides, and Republic.Laurence Lampert - 2010 - University of Chicago Press.
    Plato’s dialogues show Socrates at different ages, beginning when he was about nineteen and already deeply immersed in philosophy and ending with his execution five decades later. By presenting his model philosopher across a fifty-year span of his life, Plato leads his readers to wonder: does that time period correspond to the development of Socrates’ thought? In this magisterial investigation of the evolution of Socrates’ philosophy, Laurence Lampert answers in the affirmative. The chronological route that Plato maps for us, Lampert (...)
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  22. Socrates and the Sophists: Plato's Protagoras, Euthydemus, Hippias Major and Cratylus. Plato - 2010 - Focus Publishing/ R. Pullins Co..
    This is an English translation of four of Plato’s dialogue (Protagoras, Euthydemus, Hippias Major, and Cratylus) that explores the topic of sophistry and philosophy, a key concept at the source of Western thought. Includes notes and an introductory essay. Focus Philosophical Library translations are close to and are non-interpretative of the original text, with the notes and a glossary intending to provide the reader with some sense of the terms and the concepts as they were understood by Plato’s immediate audience.
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  23. Protagoras (U.) Zilioli Protagoras and the Challenge of Relativism. Plato's Subtlest Enemy. Pp. Xii + 160, Ills. Aldershot and Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2007. Cased, £50, US$99.95. ISBN: 978-0-7546-6078-. [REVIEW]Dana Miller - 2009 - The Classical Review 59 (2):375-.
  24. Socrates.George Rudebusch - 2009 - Oxford, UK: Wiley-Blackwell.
    _Socrates_ presents a compelling case for some life-changing conclusions that follow from a close reading of Socrates' arguments. Offers a highly original study of Socrates and his thought, accessible to contemporary readers Argues that through studying Socrates we can learn practical wisdom to apply to our lives Lovingly crafted with humour, thought-experiments and literary references, and with close reading sof key Socratic arguments Aids readers with diagrams to make clear complex arguments.
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  25. Protagoras.C. C. W. Taylor (ed.) - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
    In this dialogue Plato shows the pretensions of the leading sophist, Protagoras, challenged by the critical arguments of Socrates. The dialogue broadens out to consider the nature of the good life and the role of intellect and pleasure.
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  26. Plato: Protagoras.Nicholas Denyer (ed.) - 2008 - Cambridge University Press.
    The Protagoras is one of Plato's most entertaining dialogues. It represents Socrates at a gathering of the most celebrated and highest-earning intellectuals of the day, among them the sophist Protagoras. In flamboyant displays of both rhetoric and dialectic, Socrates and Protagoras try to out-argue one another. Their arguments range widely, from political theory to literary criticism, from education to the nature of cowardice; but in view throughout this literary and philosophical masterpiece are the questions of what part knowledge plays in (...)
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  27. Good and Pleasure in the Protagoras.Panos Dimas - 2008 - Ancient Philosophy 28 (2):253-284.
  28. The Paradox of Refuting Socrates' Paradox.Thomas Giourgas - 2008 - Dissertation, Edinburgh
    What is paradoxical about the Socratic paradoxes is that they are not paradoxical at all. Socrates famously argued that knowledge is sufficient for virtue and that no one errs willingly. Both doctrines are discussed in the Protagoras between Socrates and the Abderian sophist, however the argumentative line that Socrates chooses to follow in order to refute ‘the many’ has raised a serious degree of controversy among scholars. Is Socrates upholding the hedonistic view? Or, is he only trying to show the (...)
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  29. Socrates Unbound: PLATO'S PROTAGORAS.Martin Plax - 2008 - Polis 25 (2):285-304.
    Literature devoted to analyses of Plato's Protagoras focus on topics such as Protagoras' hedonism, the unity of virtue, akrasia, and the distinction between philosophy and sophistry. They pass over the fact that the political atmosphere in Athens and the character of the comrade together compel Socrates to be cautious about what he repeats. The dialogue with Hippocrates allows him to claim that he met with and dethroned Protagoras, not of his own choosing, but as a result of chance. The essay (...)
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  30. Protagoras the Atheist.Gábor Bolonyai - 2007 - Rhizai. A Journal for Ancient Philosophy and Science 2:247-269.
    By following up step by step the formation of the legend of Protagoras’ trial and death in the ancient biographic tradition, this paper provides internal arguments against accepting it as a historical fact. There are several reasons for taking these anecdotes, which are far from being uniform and unambiguous, as unauthentic; two features of the story formation are discussed in more detail. First, certain narrative elements make their appearance not in the order as they would be expected on the basis (...)
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  31. Epistemology After Protagoras.Luca Castagnoli - 2007 - Ancient Philosophy 27 (2):405 - 418.
  32. Law And Nature In Protagoras' Great Speech.Andrew Shortridge - 2007 - Polis 24 (1):12-25.
    Reading Protagoras' Great Speech as an honest statement of that Sophist's beliefs, it is argued that nowhere therein does Protagoras make any appeal to an antithesis of nomos and phusis . This paper argues that Protagoras understands civic virtue as the result of a process of socialization that works on existing predispositions to be virtuous, that are naturally possessed by each individual citizen. On Protagoras' analysis, prudence and virtue might sometimes conflict, and it is tempting to think that this conflict (...)
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  33. Dialectic and Virtue in Plato's Protagoras.James Allen - 2006 - In Burkhard Reis & Stella Haffmans (eds.), The Virtuous Life in Greek Ethics. Cambridge University Press. pp. 6--31.
  34. Review: Epistemology After Protagoras: Responses to Relativism in Plato, Aristotle and Democritus. [REVIEW]D. T. J. Bailey - 2006 - Mind 115 (460):1151-1153.
  35. Social and Political Thought of Sophists-Protagoras, Prodicus, Hippias and Antiphon.Cyprian Mielczarski - 2006 - Archiwum Historii Filozofii I Myśli Społecznej 50.
    By emphasising the role of the social factor in the human life, the sophists created the foundations of European sociopolitical thought which arose from the spirit of criticism, pervading the Athenian democratic culture in the second half of the 5th century B.C. They gave rise to the first anthropological breakthrough in the history of our civilisation by treating philosophy, education and upbringing as preparation for life in a free civil society. They also had their share in depriving the laws of (...)
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  36. Akrasia in the Protagoras and the Republic.Michael Morris - 2006 - Phronesis 51 (3):195-229.
    Although it is a commonplace that the "Protagoras" and the "Republic" present diffent views of akrasia, the nature of the difference is not well understood. I argue that the logic of the famous argument in the "Protagoras" turns just on two crucial assumptions: that desiring is having evaluative beliefs (or that valuing is desiring), and that no one can have contradictory preferences at the same time; hedonism is not essential to the logic of the argument. And the logic of the (...)
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  37. Courage and Knowledge at Protagoras 349e1–351b2.David Wolfsdorf - 2006 - Classical Quarterly 56 (02):436-.
  38. The Ridiculousness of Being Overcome by Pleasure: Protagoras 352b1–358d4.''.David Wolfsdorf - 2006 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 31:113-36.
  39. Extraneous Voices.Ryan Drake - 2005 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 10 (1):1-20.
    The Protagoras features the first known venture into detailed textual interpretation in the Western intellectual tradition. Yet if Socrates is to be taken at his wordat the close of his hermeneutic contest with Protagoras, this venture is to be regarded as a playful demonstration of the worthlessness of texts for aiding in the pursuit of knowledge. This essay is an attempt to view Socrates’ puzzling remarks on this point within their dramatic and historical contexts. I argue that, far from having (...)
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  40. Extraneous Voices: Orphaned and Adopted Texts in the Protagoras.Ryan Drake - 2005 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 10 (1):1-20.
    The Protagoras features the first known venture into detailed textual interpretation in the Western intellectual tradition. Yet if Socrates is to be taken at his wordat the close of his hermeneutic contest with Protagoras, this venture is to be regarded as a playful demonstration of the worthlessness of texts for aiding in the pursuit of knowledge. This essay is an attempt to view Socrates’ puzzling remarks on this point within their dramatic and historical contexts. I argue that, far from having (...)
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  41. The Unity of Virtue in Plato's Protagoras'.Bernd Manuwald - 2005 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 29:115-35.
  42. Il Protagora di Platone: Struttura E Problematiche.Giovanni Casertano (ed.) - 2004 - Loffredo.
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  43. Refutation and Relativism in Theaetetus 161-171.Alex Long - 2004 - Phronesis 49 (1):24 - 40.
    In this paper I discuss the dialogues between 'Protagoras', Theodorus and Socrates in "Theaetetus" 161-171 and emphasise the importance for this passage of a dilemma which refutation is shown to pose for relativism at 161e-162a. I argue that the two speeches delivered on Protagoras' behalf contain material that is deeply Socratic and suggest that this feature of the speeches should be interpreted as part of Plato's philosophical case against relativism, reflecting the relativist's own inability to defend his theory from attempts (...)
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  44. Protagoras and, Meno.Robert C. Plato & Bartlett - 2004
  45. Socrates Metaphysician.William Prior - 2004 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 27:1-14.
    Following R. E. Allen I argue, against the view of Gregory Vlastos that the Socrates of Plato's early dialogues was exclusively a moral philosopher, that there is a metaphysics, an early version of the theory of Forms, in the Euthyphro and other early dialogues. I respond to several of Vlastos's objections to this view.
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  46. Protagoras' Political Art.Heda Šegvić - 2004 - Rhizai. A Journal for Ancient Philosophy and Science 2:9-36.
  47. Socrates and Protagoras on Virtue.''.Denis O'Brien - 2003 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 24:59-131.
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  48. Why Does Protagoras Rush Off?: Self-Refutation and Haste in Plato, Theaetetus 169a-171d.Richard Bemelmans - 2002 - Ancient Philosophy 22 (1):75-86.
  49. Δiκαioσ? Νη And'oσióτη? At Protagoras 330-1.David Wolfsdorf - 2002 - Apeiron 35 (3):181-210.
  50. Aimiooúvri and F Ogióttiį at Protagoras 330-1'.David Wolfsdorf - 2002 - Apeiron 35 (3):181-210.
1 — 50 / 137