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  1. Evaluative Illusion in Plato's Protagoras.Suzanne Obdrzalek - forthcoming - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy.
    In the Protagoras, Socrates argues that what appears to be akrasia is, in fact, the result of a hedonic illusion: proximate pleasures appear greater than distant ones. On the face of it, his account is puzzling: why should proximate pleasures appear greater than distant ones? Certain interpreters argue that Socrates must be assuming the existence of non-rational desires that cause proximate pleasures to appear inflated. In this paper, I argue that positing non-rational desires fails to explain the hedonic error. However, (...)
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  2. Review of "Plato's Pragmatism: Rethinking the Relationship Between Ethics and Epistemology," written by Baima, N.R. and Paytas, T. [REVIEW]Ryan M. Brown - 2024 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 27:1-10.
  3. Protagoras’s Great Speech and the Republic.Bela Egyed - 2024 - Open Journal of Philosophy 14 (1):132-140.
    This paper argues, first, that one can render Protagoras’s view on the teach ability of political virtue coherent by distinguishing between the affect required for achieving it and the capacity for developing these affect into fully fledged virtues. Second, the paper argues that by focusing on Books II - III of the Republic one might see an affinity between between Protagoras’s suggestion that virtuous citizens might give advice, without ruling it, in the affairs of the city and Plato’s conservative practical (...)
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  4. Two Portraits of Protagoras in Plato: Theaetetus vs. Protagoras.Mateo Duque - 2023 - Illinois Classical Studies 47 (2):359-382.
    This article will contrast two portrayals of Protagoras: one in the "Theaetetus," where Socrates discusses Protagorean theory and even comes to his defense by imitating the deceased sophist; and another in the "Protagoras," where Socrates recounts his encounter with the sophist. I suggest that Plato wants listeners and readers of the dialogues to hear the dissonance between the two portraits and to wonder why Socrates so distorts Protagoras in the "Theaetetus." Protagoras in the "Protagoras" behaves and speaks in ways that (...)
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  5. Orphic Sophistry in the Protagoras.Juliana Kazemi - 2023 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 28 (1):11-22.
    This paper investigates a reference to the voice of the legendary musician Orpheus in Plato’s Protagoras. I propose that the Orpheus image does serious philosophical work in the text. Understanding the mythic and religious elements of the Orpheus tradition can help us conceptualize the harms of sophistry from a Platonic viewpoint. In the light of the image, the sophist emerges as a quasi-magical manipulator of rhetorical beauty who charms his students into subrational creatures. Furthermore, the image provides insight into Plato’s (...)
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  6. Political, All Too Political. Again on Protagoras’ Myth in Its Intellectual Context.Mauro Bonazzi - 2022 - Polis 39 (3):425-445.
    The paper argues for an analytic interpretation of Protagoras’ myth in Plato’s dialogue by showing that its goal is not so much to reconstruct the origins of civilization as to identify some essential features of humankind. Against the widespread opinion that human progress depends on the development of technai, Protagoras claims that political art is the most important one, insofar as it is the condition for the existence of society. More concretely, the emphasis on the political art also serves to (...)
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  7. Aristotle and Protagoras against Socrates on Courage and Experience.Marta Jimenez - 2022 - In Claudia Marsico (ed.), Socrates and the Socratic Philosophies: Selected Papers from Socratica IV. Baden-Baden: Academia Verlag. pp. 361-376.
  8. Ignorance in Plato’s Protagoras.Wenjin Liu - 2022 - Phronesis 67 (3):309-337.
    Ignorance is commonly assumed to be a lack of knowledge in Plato’s Socratic dialogues. I challenge that assumption. In the Protagoras, ignorance is conceived to be a substantive, structural psychic flaw—the soul’s domination by inferior elements that are by nature fit to be ruled. Ignorant people are characterized by both false beliefs about evaluative matters in specific situations and an enduring deception about their own psychic conditions. On my interpretation, akrasia, moral vices, and epistemic vices are products or forms of (...)
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  9. Protágoras de Platón y la pregunta por quiénes somos.Irina Deretić - 2021 - Archai: Revista de Estudos Sobre as Origens Do Pensamento Ocidental 31:1-23.
    En el Gran Discurso de Protágoras, en el diálogo platónico que lleva su nombre, Platón pone en boca de Protágoras un mito acerca del origen, desarrollo y naturaleza del ser humano, que es de gran relevancia filosófica. Se expresa que los dioses crearon a los seres mortales desde dos elementos: la tierra y el fuego. A su vez, también asignaron dos titanes, Epimeteo y Prometeo, para que proveyeran a los mortales de sus facultades. ¿Acaso esto implica que la creación no (...)
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  10. The Structure of Courage in the Laches, Meno and Protagoras.Jakub Jirsa - 2021 - Elenchos: Rivista di Studi Sul Pensiero Antico 42 (1):143-164.
    The following article provides an interpretation of the structure of courage in Plato’s Laches, Meno and Protagoras. I argue that these dialogues present courage (ἀνδρεία) in the soul according to the same scheme: that there is a normatively neutral psychic state which is informed by the knowledge of good and evil. The knowledge (ἐπιστήμη) which informs this normatively neutral psychic state is called practical wisdom (which Plato refers to as φρόνησις or sometimes σοφία). This interpretation seems to negate the claim (...)
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  11. Is Protagoras’ Great Speech on Democracy?James Kierstead - 2021 - Polis 38 (2):199-207.
    The Great Speech of Protagoras in Plato’s dialogue is now widely seen as an expression of democratic theory, one of the earliest substantial expressions of democratic theory on record. At the same time, there have long been arguments to the contrary, the most formidable presentation of which is an article by Peter Nicholson that appeared in these pages in 1981. In this short piece, I address Nicholson’s skeptical arguments head-on and in full, in a way that has not yet been (...)
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  12. Educación y comunicación en el Protágoras de Platón.Fernando Pascual - 2020 - Alpha Omega 23 (1):123-153.
    This article seeks to present some elements of the theory of education and communication that appear in the Plato’s Protagoras. For this, a general presentation of the text is offered at the beginning. Then an analysis is elaborated, according to the main sections of the Protagoras, of those passages that are more pertinent to the subject of this work. In the end, some synthetic reflections are offered.
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  13. Community with Nothing in Common? Plato's Subtler Response to Protagoras.Mark Sentesy - 2020 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 25 (1):155-183.
    The Protagoras examines how community can occur between people who have nothing in common. Community, Protagoras holds, has no natural basis. Seeking the good is therefore not a theoretical project, but a matter of agreement. This position follows from his claim that “man is the measure of all things.” For Socrates community is based on a natural good, which is sought through theoretical inquiry. They disagree about what community is, and what its bases and goals are. But Plato illustrates the (...)
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  14. “Cheaters Win When They Make the Rules: Sophistic Ethics in Protagoras’ Prometheus Myth.”.Daniel Silvermintz - 2018 - Electra 4:153-174.
    Despite Protagoras’ infamous reputation for corrupting his students, his “Great Speech” (Plato, Protagoras 320c-328d) presents one of the most important arguments in the history of ethics. Refuting Socrates’ contention that virtue must be unteachable since even the best of men cannot raise good children, Protagoras argues that everyone is capable of learning the difference between right and wrong.
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  15. Sex, Wealth, and Courage: Kinds of Goods and the Power of Appearance in Plato's Protagoras.Damien Storey - 2018 - Ancient Philosophy 38 (2):241-263.
    I offer a reading of the two conceptions of the good found in Plato’s Protagoras: the popular conception—‘the many’s’ conception—and Socrates’ conception. I pay particular attention to the three kinds of goods Socrates introduces: (a) bodily pleasures like food, drink, and sex; (b) instrumental goods like wealth, health, or power; and (c) virtuous actions like courageously going to war. My reading revises existing views about these goods in two ways. First, I argue that the many are only ‘hedonists’ in a (...)
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  16. Sophistry and Political Philosophy: Protagoras’ Challenge to Socrates, written by Robert C. Bartlett.Anders Dahl Sørensen - 2018 - Polis 35 (2):587-590.
  17. Praising the Unjust: The Moral Psychology of Patriotism in Plato’s Protagoras.Emily A. Austin - 2017 - Apeiron 50 (1):21-44.
    Journal Name: Apeiron Issue: Ahead of print.
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  18. The Myth of Protagoras: A Naturalist Interpretation.Refik Güremen - 2017 - Méthexis 29 (1):46-58.
    Protagoras’ Grand Speech is traditionally considered to articulate a contractualist approach to political existence and morality. There is, however, a newly emerging line of interpretation among scholars, which explores a naturalist layer in Protagoras’ ethical and political thought. This article aims to make a contribution to this new way of reading Protagoras’ speech, by discussing one of its most elaborate versions.
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  19. Protagoras’ great speech.A. R. Nathan - 2017 - Classical Quarterly 67 (2):380-399.
    This article seeks to present a detailed textual analysis of Protagoras’ Great Speech in Plato's Protagoras. I will argue that the concept of ἀρετή as it appears in the Great Speech is whittled down to a vague notion of civic duty. In this respect, Protagoras is bringing himself in line with the democracy, but in doing so the ἀρετή he claims to teach loses much of its initial appeal, particularly in the eyes of his aristocratic clientele. Nevertheless, if thecontentof Protagoras’ (...)
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  20. Dangerous Voices: On Written and Spoken Discourse in Plato’s Protagoras.Pettersson Olof - 2017 - In Plato’s Protagoras: Essays on the Confrontation of Philosophy and Sophistry. Springer. pp. 177-198.
    Plato’s Protagoras contains, among other things, three short but puzzling remarks on the media of philosophy. First, at 328e5–329b1, Plato makes Socrates worry that long speeches, just like books, are deceptive, because they operate in a discursive mode void of questions and answers. Second, at 347c3–348a2, Socrates argues that discussion of poetry is a presumptuous affair, because, the poems’ message, just like the message of any written text, cannot be properly examined if the author is not present. Third, at 360e6–361d6, (...)
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  21. Introduction.Pettersson Olof - 2017 - In Plato’s Protagoras: Essays on the Confrontation of Philosophy and Sophistry. Springer. pp. 1-8.
    Guided by the bold ambition to reexamine the nature of philosophy, questions about the foundations and origins of Plato’s dialogues have in recent years gained a new and important momentum. In the wake of the seminal work of Andrea Nightingale and especially her book Genres in Dialogue from 1995, Plato’s texts have come to be reconsidered in terms of their compositional and intergeneric fabric. Supplementing important research on the argumentative structures of the dialogues, it has been argued that Plato’s philosophizing (...)
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  22. The protagoras. J.c. Shaw Plato's anti-hedonism and the protagoras. Pp. VIII + 222. Cambridge: Cambridge university press, 2015. Cased, £65, us$99. Isbn: 978-1-107-04665-8. [REVIEW]Jonathan Lavery - 2016 - The Classical Review 66 (2):355-358.
  23. Making the Best of Plato's Protagoras.Matthew Evans - 2015 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 48:61-106.
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  24. Plato's Anti-Hedonism and the "Protagoras".J. Clerk Shaw - 2015 - Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.
    This book takes on two main tasks. The first is to argue that anti-hedonism lies at the center of Plato's critical project in both ethics and politics. Plato sees pleasure and pain as our sole sources of empirical evidence about good and bad. But as sources of evidence they are highly fallible; contrast effects with pain intensify certain pleasures, including most pleasures related to the body and social standing. This leads us to believe that the causes of such pleasures (e.g. (...)
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  25. The Virtue of Dialogue, Dialogue as Virtue in Plato's Protagoras.Francisco J. Gonzalez - 2014 - Philosophical Papers 43 (1):33-66.
  26. Hedonism and the Divided Soul in Plato’s Protagoras.Jessica Moss - 2014 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 96 (3).
  27. Deliberation and moral knowledge in the Protagoras.Timothy Chappel - 2013 - Philosophical Inquiry 37 (1-2):82-104.
  28. Protagoras oder der Irrweg der Demokratie. Platons Opposition zum sophistischen Verständnis von Politik und Tugend im Protagoras.Dirk Cürsgen - 2013 - Perspektiven der Philosophie 39 (1):109-130.
    Der Beitrag untersucht die Bedeutung des Protagoras für die Entwicklung von Platons politischer Philosophie und Ethik anhand des gleichnamigen Dialogs. Im Mittelpunkt steht zunächst die epideiktische Rede des Protagoras, die die Fragen nach dem Wesen und der Lehrbarkeit der Tugend, nach der besten Erziehung sowie der besten politischen Verfassung aufwirft. Konkret werden in diesem Kontext die Auseinandersetzung um die Bewertung der Demokratie, das Verständnis der politischen Technik, das Verhältnis von Natur und Satzung und die Antizipation der späteren Aristotelischen Differenzierung zwischen (...)
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  29. Musing Protagoras.Cheon-Hoan Park - 2013 - The Journal of Moral Education 25 (3):107-131.
  30. The wax tablet, logic and Protagoreanism.Terry Penner - 2013 - In G. Boys-Stones, C. Gill & D. El-Murr (eds.), The Platonic Art of philosophy. New York: Cambridge University Press.
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  31. Relativism in Plato's Protagoras.Catherine Rowett - 2013 - In Verity Harte & Melissa Lane (eds.), Politeia in Greek and Roman Philosophy. New York: Cambridge University Press. pp. 191-211.
    The character Protagoras in Plato's Protagoras holds similar views to the one in the Theaetetus, and faces similar problems. The dialogue considers issues in epistemology and moral epistemology, as a central theme. The Protagorean position is immune from Socrates' attacks, and Socrates needs Protagorean methods to make any impact.
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  32. A Note to Protagoras 353de. Bizoń, Michał, Sokoł & Kamil Owski - 2012 - Phronesis 57 (4):319-331.
    At Protagoras 353de, Socrates gives three possible reasons for calling some pleasures ‘wrong’. Scholarly attention has focused on the second of these, according to which pleasures are ‘wrong’ when they have negative consequences. This paper argues that the first reason corresponds to beliefs held by Democritus, among others; and that the third reason is the view adopted by Socrates in the dialogue.
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  33. The pragmatics of "Myth" in Plato's Dialogues: the story of Prometheus in the Protagoras.Claude Calame - 2012 - In Catherine Collobert, Pierre Destrée & Francisco J. Gonzalez (eds.), Plato and myth: studies on the use and status of Platonic myths. Boston: Brill.
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  34. The Strength of Knowledge in Plato’s Protagoras.Justin Clark - 2012 - Ancient Philosophy 32 (2):237-255.
  35. What do the Arguments in the Protagoras Amount to?Vasilis Politis - 2012 - Phronesis 57 (3):209-239.
    Abstract The main thesis of the paper is that, in the coda to the Protagoras (360e-end), Plato tells us why and with what justification he demands a definition of virtue: namely, in order to resolve a particular aporia . According to Plato's assessment of the outcome of the arguments of the dialogue, the principal question, whether or not virtue can be taught , has, by the end of the dialogue, emerged as articulating an aporia , in that both protagonists, Socrates (...)
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  36. A Note to Protagoras 353de.Kamil Sokołowski & Michał Bizoń - 2012 - Phronesis 57 (4):319-331.
    At Protagoras 353de, Socrates gives three possible reasons for calling some pleasures `wrong'. Scholarly attention has focused on the second of these, according to which pleasures are `wrong' when they have negative consequences. This paper argues that the first reason (the pleasures are fleeting) corresponds to beliefs held by Democritus, among others; and that the third reason (the pleasant things “give pleasure in whatever way and for whatever reason“) is the view adopted by Socrates in the dialogue.
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  37. Formen des Wissens in Platons Protagoras.Martin F. Meyer - 2011 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 14 (1):57-83.
  38. Protágoras jako teoretik společenské smlouvy.Stanislav Myškčka - 2011 - Filozofia 66 (3).
    In his theory of society Protagoras, one of the most influential sophists thinkers, applies a contractarian approach, similar in many respects to those of Locke, Hobbes and Rousseau. Protagoras, unlike Aristotle or Plato, was convinced that individual perceptions and beliefs as well as those of the body political are relative, because there is no uniform ground on which things could be perceived or experienced. He offers an evolutionary account of the development of human species, arguing that society is a result (...)
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  39. Socrates and the Sophists: Plato's Protagoras, Euthydemus, Hippias major and Cratylus. Plato & Joe Sachs - 2011 - Newburyport, MA: Focus Publishing/ R. Pullins Co.. Edited by Joe Sachs & Plato.
    This is an English translation of four of Plato’s dialogue (Protagoras, Euthydemus, Hippias Major, and Cratylus) that explores the topic of sophistry and philosophy, a key concept at the source of Western thought. Includes notes and an introductory essay. Focus Philosophical Library translations are close to and are non-interpretative of the original text, with the notes and a glossary intending to provide the reader with some sense of the terms and the concepts as they were understood by Plato’s immediate audience.
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  40. Nicholas Denyer. Plato: Protagoras. [REVIEW]J. Andrew Foster - 2010 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 104 (1):123-124.
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  41. How Philosophy Became Socratic: A Study of Plato's "Protagoras," "Charmides," and "Republic".Laurence Lampert - 2010 - University of Chicago Press.
    Plato’s dialogues show Socrates at different ages, beginning when he was about nineteen and already deeply immersed in philosophy and ending with his execution five decades later. By presenting his model philosopher across a fifty-year span of his life, Plato leads his readers to wonder: does that time period correspond to the development of Socrates’ thought? In this magisterial investigation of the evolution of Socrates’ philosophy, Laurence Lampert answers in the affirmative. The chronological route that Plato maps for us, Lampert (...)
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  42. Gorgias, Menexenus, Protagoras.Malcolm Schofield - 2010 - New York: Cambridge University Press. Edited by Malcolm Schofield & Tom Griffith.
    Presented in the popular Cambridge Texts format are three early Platonic dialogues in a new English translation by Tom Griffith that combines elegance, accuracy, freshness and fluency. Together they offer strikingly varied examples of Plato's critical encounter with the culture and politics of fifth and fourth century Athens. Nowhere does he engage more sharply and vigorously with the presuppositions of democracy. The Gorgias is a long and impassioned confrontation between Socrates and a succession of increasingly heated interlocutors about political rhetoric (...)
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  43. Protagoras (U.) Zilioli Protagoras and the Challenge of Relativism. Plato's Subtlest Enemy. Pp. xii + 160, ills. Aldershot and Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2007. Cased, £50, US$99.95. ISBN: 978-0-7546-6078-. [REVIEW]Dana Miller - 2009 - The Classical Review 59 (2):375-.
  44. Socrates.George Rudebusch - 2009 - Oxford, UK: Wiley-Blackwell.
    _Socrates_ presents a compelling case for some life-changing conclusions that follow from a close reading of Socrates' arguments. Offers a highly original study of Socrates and his thought, accessible to contemporary readers Argues that through studying Socrates we can learn practical wisdom to apply to our lives Lovingly crafted with humour, thought-experiments and literary references, and with close reading sof key Socratic arguments Aids readers with diagrams to make clear complex arguments.
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  45. Plato: Protagoras.Nicholas Denyer (ed.) - 2008 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    The Protagoras is one of Plato's most entertaining dialogues. It represents Socrates at a gathering of the most celebrated and highest-earning intellectuals of the day, among them the sophist Protagoras. In flamboyant displays of both rhetoric and dialectic, Socrates and Protagoras try to out-argue one another. Their arguments range widely, from political theory to literary criticism, from education to the nature of cowardice; but in view throughout this literary and philosophical masterpiece are the questions of what part knowledge plays in (...)
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  46. Good and Pleasure in the Protagoras.Panos Dimas - 2008 - Ancient Philosophy 28 (2):253-284.
  47. The Paradox of Refuting Socrates' Paradox.Thomas Giourgas - 2008 - Dissertation, Edinburgh
    What is paradoxical about the Socratic paradoxes is that they are not paradoxical at all. Socrates famously argued that knowledge is sufficient for virtue and that no one errs willingly. Both doctrines are discussed in the Protagoras between Socrates and the Abderian sophist, however the argumentative line that Socrates chooses to follow in order to refute ‘the many’ has raised a serious degree of controversy among scholars. Is Socrates upholding the hedonistic view? Or, is he only trying to show the (...)
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  48. Socrates Unbound: Plato’s Protagoras.Martin J. Plax - 2008 - Polis 25 (2):285-304.
    Literature devoted to analyses of Plato's Protagoras focus on topics such as Protagoras' hedonism, the unity of virtue, akrasia, and the distinction between philosophy and sophistry. They pass over the fact that the political atmosphere in Athens and the character of the comrade together compel Socrates to be cautious about what he repeats. The dialogue with Hippocrates allows him to claim that he met with and dethroned Protagoras, not of his own choosing, but as a result of chance. The essay (...)
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  49. Epistemology After Protagoras. [REVIEW]Luca Castagnoli - 2007 - Ancient Philosophy 27 (2):405-418.
  50. Law And Nature In Protagoras' Great Speech.Andrew Shortridge - 2007 - Polis 24 (1):12-25.
    Reading Protagoras' Great Speech as an honest statement of that Sophist's beliefs, it is argued that nowhere therein does Protagoras make any appeal to an antithesis of nomos and phusis . This paper argues that Protagoras understands civic virtue as the result of a process of socialization that works on existing predispositions to be virtuous, that are naturally possessed by each individual citizen. On Protagoras' analysis, prudence and virtue might sometimes conflict, and it is tempting to think that this conflict (...)
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