Contents
1385 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 1385
  1. Plato, the Intimacies Project.Carolina Drake - manuscript
    I explore the role of intimacy and chance in Republic and their function as dangerous or threatening to self-sufficiency. I argue that both intimacy and chance are wrongly construed as a burden, or as disruptive to the regime of the just city and that, ultimately, the job of philosophy is to regulate affect and the risk of chance in the city. I conclude that the repercussions of Plato’s strong account of self-sufficiency can be found to this day in our contemporary (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. The Main Topics of Plato’s Republic.Sfetcu Nicolae - manuscript
    In the traditional interpretation, The Republic is a continuation of the discussions in Gorgias, according to which virtue and polis laws are tricks invented by a mass of weak people to capture the lust for power of the best individuals, few in number but naturally inclined to leads. The theses of Calicles of Gorgias resemble the ideas set forth by Trasymachus in Book I of The Republic. The central political theses expressed by Socrates in The Republic are: the best rulers (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Plato's Political Philosophy.Abdollāh Niksirat - unknown - Kheradnameh Sadra Quarterly 44.
    The writer of this paper has tried to portray Plato's ideal government on the basis of his Republic. Apparently, Plato's main purpose in this dialogue was to define true justice rather than have his intended ideal government realized. The gist of his words concerning justice is that everyone must do the job that conforms to his nature. Of course, as Plato himself has pointed out, introducing and defining such an ideal city or utopia will inspire people to model it and (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. City walls.Staatliche Museen zu Berlin - unknown - The Classical Review 62 (2).
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Philosophers in the Republic: Plato's Two Paradigms.Sophia Connell - forthcoming - Philosophical Quarterly:pqv043.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Review of Crotty's "The City-State of the Soul". [REVIEW]Joseph M. Forte - forthcoming - Review of Metaphysics.
  7. Introduction: Myths of Plato, myths of modernity.Tae-Yeoun Keum - forthcoming - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy.
    This introduction presents an overview of Plato and the Mythic Tradition in Political Thought and its central arguments. I situate the contributions of the book within theoretical work on political myth, both traditional and more recent, and also within scholarship on the philosophical function of Plato’s myths. Whereas political theorists have long conceived of myth in pathological terms, Plato and the Mythic Tradition joins a growing body of work envisioning a more constructive role for myth in politics and philosophy. This (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. Plato's Republic, Books Three & Four. Plato - forthcoming - Audio CD.
    In Books Three and Four of The Republic, Socrates and Plato's brothers, Glaucon and Adeimantus, discuss the best way to educate leaders for a just republic. In the course of their dialogue, the meaning of justice in individuals and in society shifts from external order imposed through rules and regulations to the harmony and balance internal to every person in the republic. Only then will an individual be ready to act—whether in acquiring wealth, in the care of the body, or (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Plato's Republic, Books Five & Six. Plato - forthcoming - Audio CD.
    In Books Five and Six of The Republic, the quest for justice that has guided the dialogue from the beginning now shifts to the search for an even more encompassing quality—goodness. But what is the nature of goodness? Can human beings know it and teach it to others? How can it be manifested in the republic? To answer such questions requires a genuine lover of wisdom. How can such people be distinguished from those who simply pretend to know? This dramatized (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. Plato's Republic, Books One & Two. Plato - forthcoming - Audio CD.
    In Books One and Two of The Republic presents a discussion of the nature of justice by Socrates, the aging Cephalus, his son Polemarchus, and the sophist Thrasymachus. Plato's brothers, Glaucon and Adeimantus, take over in Book Two, challenging Socrates to convince them that a just life is preferable to an unjust life with power, fame, and riches. They imagine and evaluate different ways of creating the best possible human life. First, they consider a republic based on health and simplicity. (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. Plato's Republic, Books Seven & Eight. Plato - forthcoming - Audio CD.
    Book Seven of The Republic begins with the famous Allegory of the Cave, an exploration of the natural process of being educated. Socrates and Glaucon probe the meaning of this story both as it relates to the discussion of knowledge and reality developed earlier and to the concept of dialectic, the over-all method of Plato's dialogues. In Book Eight, Socrates and Plato's brothers explore five different kinds of republic and five different kinds of individual, showing how aristocracy becomes timocracy and (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. The Ethical Critique of Art in the Republic.D. Robinson - forthcoming - Dianoia.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. Sean Sayers, Plato's Republic: An Introduction.S. Sandford - forthcoming - Radical Philosophy.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. Review of "Plato's Pragmatism: Rethinking the Relationship Between Ethics and Epistemology," written by Baima, N.R. and Paytas, T. [REVIEW]Ryan M. Brown - 2024 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 27:1-10.
  15. Protagoras’s Great Speech and the Republic.Bela Egyed - 2024 - Open Journal of Philosophy 14 (1):132-140.
    This paper argues, first, that one can render Protagoras’s view on the teach ability of political virtue coherent by distinguishing between the affect required for achieving it and the capacity for developing these affect into fully fledged virtues. Second, the paper argues that by focusing on Books II - III of the Republic one might see an affinity between between Protagoras’s suggestion that virtuous citizens might give advice, without ruling it, in the affairs of the city and Plato’s conservative practical (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. The Optimal Times for Incarnation: Let Me Count the Ways.Dirk Baltzly & Dorothy Gieseler Greenbaum - 2023 - In Sara Ahbel-Rappe, Danielle A. Layne & Crystal Addey (eds.), Soul Matters: Plato and Platonists on the Nature of the Soul. Society for Biblical Literature. pp. 345-84.
    In this paper we examine some of the astrological content in Proclus' exegesis of the 'nuptial number' in Republic 545d, ff. The downfall of the best city-state is said by Socrates to be due to the fact that the Guardians, for all their wisdom, make a mistake about the timing of the breeding of future rulers and this mistake is somehow due to perception. We argue that Proclus' Republic Commentary is best understood as supposing that the Guardians are highly capable (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. Plato's Use of Mogis (Scarcely, With Toil) and the Accessibility of the Divine.Ryan M. Brown - 2023 - Apeiron 56 (3):519-554.
    At key moments in the Phaedrus and the Republic, Socrates qualifies our capacity to “see” the highest realities (the “place of being,” the “Good beyond being”) with the adverb “mogis” (mogis kathorosa, Phdr. 248a; mogis horisthai, Rep. 517b). Mogis can be used to indicate either the toilsome difficulty of some undertaking or the subject’s proximity to failing to accomplish the undertaking. Socrates uses mogis to qualify the nature of the human soul’s capacity to make the intellectual ascent and see the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. Plato's Moral Realism.Lloyd P. Gerson - 2023 - Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    Plato's moral realism rests on the Idea of the Good, the unhypothetical first principle of all. It is this, as Plato says, that makes just things useful and beneficial. That Plato makes the first principle of all the Idea of the Good sets his approach apart from that of virtually every other philosopher. This fact has been occluded by later Christian Platonists who tried to identify the Good with the God of scripture. But for Plato, theology, though important, is subordinate (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. Plato’s Republic 515a5: Prisoners ‘Like Us’.Thanassis Gkatzaras - 2023 - Méthexis 35 (1):156–166.
    This paper questions the traditional interpretation of Plato’s Republic 515a5. When Socrates claims that the prisoners in the simile of the Cave are ‘like us’, he does not imply any sort of similarity or analogy between their cognitive state and ours. Rather, I argue he says that we should imagine a cave inhabited by ordinary human beings, instead of some fictitious creatures. Among other things, Plato’s intent is to highlight the weakness of our human nature in both parts of the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. Hypothetical Inquiry in Plato's Timaeus.Jonathan Edward Griffiths - 2023 - Ancient Philosophy Today 5 (2):156-177.
    This paper re-constructs Plato's ‘philosophy of geometry’ by arguing that he uses a geometrical method of hypothesis in his account of the cosmos’ generation in the Timaeus. Commentators on Plato's philosophy of mathematics often start from Aristotle's report in the Metaphysics that Plato admitted the existence of mathematical objects in-between ( metaxu) Forms and sensible particulars ( Meta. 1.6, 987b14–18). I argue, however, that Plato's interest in mathematics was centred on its methodological usefulness for philosophical inquiry, rather than on questions (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. Are Plato's Myths Philosophical?Tae-Yeoun Keum - 2023 - Think 22 (64):39-43.
    Plato is often regarded as a founding figure for Western philosophy, and specifically as the inventor of a way of doing philosophy grounded in critical, argumentative reason. This article asks whether Plato's practice of writing myths in his dialogues comes into tension with his canonical reputation. I suggest that resolving this tension may require us to revise our standing ideas about the nature of philosophy and its relationship to myth. Against interpretations that minimize the significance of Plato's myths to his (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. Crowds and Crowd-Pleasing in Plato.Tae-Yeoun Keum - 2023 - The Review of Politics 85 (2):188-206.
    Plato's antipathy to crowds is a commonplace that reinforces a prevailing portrait of the Socratic method as a practice that centers on individuals, to the exclusion of crowds and the many. This canonical view, however, comes into tension with the tendency of Plato's Socrates to conduct his dialogues in the presence of collective audiences. I argue that Plato's position on crowds is at once more complex and more ambivalent than has been commonly accepted. I distinguish between two distinct lines of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. Divine Epiphany and Political Authority in Plato's Republic.Avshalom M. Schwartz - 2023 - History of Political Thought 44 (2):213-233.
    This article offers a new interpretation of the second ‘theological’ pattern in Plato’s Republic. Situating Plato within his religious context, it argues that this pattern calls into question the traditional ancient model of divine epiphany. Divine epiphany was a central element in Greek religion. Yet, in the absence of a centralized religious organization, this model threatened the philosophers’ authoritative position. Plato’s second pattern seeks not only to undermine this potential threat but also to pave the way towards a new, philosophicalmodel (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24. The Myth of Er and Female Guardians in Proclus’ Republic Commentary.Dirk Baltzly - 2022 - In Jana Schultz & James Wilberding (eds.), Women and the Female in Neoplatonism. Boston: BRILL. pp. 104-121.
    Proclus takes the Republic’s (Book V) recommendation that there should be both male and female Guardians as a serious political proposal, but like Plato, he gives few specifics. A recurring theme in Proclus’ commentary is that political arrangements are just to the extent that they effectively mirror the providential administration of the cosmos. Thus the Myth of Er is not merely an adornment at the end of the dialogue, but contains important information about the cosmic paradigm to which the just (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. Proclus Commentary on Plato's Republic volume 2.Dirk Baltzly, Graeme Miles & John Finamore - 2022 - Cambridge: CUP.
    The commentary on Plato's Republic by Proclus (d. 485 CE), which takes the form of a series of essays, is the only sustained treatment of the dialogue to survive from antiquity. This three-volume edition presents the first complete English translation of Proclus' text, together with a general introduction that argues for the unity of Proclus' Commentary and orients the reader to the use which the Neoplatonists made of Plato's Republic in their educational program. Each volume is completed by a Greek (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26. Plato and the mythic tradition in political thought.P. E. Digeser, Rebecca LeMoine, Jill Frank, David Lay Williams, Jacob Abolafia & Tae-Yeoun Keum - 2022 - Contemporary Political Theory 21 (4):611-639.
  27. Why Is Plato’s Good Good?Aidan R. Nathan - 2022 - Peitho 13 (1):125-136.
    The form of the Good in Plato’s Phaedo and Republic seems, by our standards, to do too much: it is presented as the metaphysical princi­ple, the epistemological principle and the principle of ethics. Yet this seemingly chimerical object makes good sense in the broader context of Plato’s philosophical project. He sought certain knowledge of neces­sary truths (in sharp contrast to the contingent truth of modern science). Thus, to be knowable the cosmos must be informed by timeless princi­ples; and this leads (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28. A Long Lost Relative in the Parmenides? Plato’s Family of Hypothetical Methods.Evan Rodriguez - 2022 - Apeiron 55 (1):141-166.
    The Parmenides has been unduly overlooked in discussions of hypothesis in Plato. It contains a unique method for testing first principles, a method I call ‘exploring both sides’. The dialogue recommends exploring the consequences of both a hypothesis and its contradictory and thematizes this structure throughout. I challenge the view of Plato’s so-called ‘method of hypothesis’ as an isolated stage in Plato’s development; instead, the evidence of the Parmenides suggests a family of distinct hypothetical methods, each with its own peculiar (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29. The Soul-Turning Metaphor in Plato’s Republic Book 7.Damien Storey - 2022 - Classical Philology 177 (3):525-542.
    This paper examines the soul-turning metaphor in Book 7 of Plato’s Republic. It argues that the failure to find a consistent reading of how the metaphor is used has contributed to a number of long-standing disagreements, especially concerning the more famous metaphor with which it is intertwined, the Cave allegory. A full reading of the metaphor, as it occurs throughout Book 7, is offered, with particularly close attention to what is one of the most difficult and stubbornly divisive passages in (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  30. Dianoia & Plato’s Divided Line.Damien Storey - 2022 - Phronesis 67 (3):253-308.
    This paper takes a detailed look at the Republic’s Divided Line analogy and considers how we should respond to its most contentious implication: that pistis and dianoia have the same degree of ‘clarity’ (σαφήνεια). It argues that we must take this implication at face value and that doing so allows us to better understand both the analogy and the nature of dianoia.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31. Two Kinds of Mental Conflict in Republic IV.Galen Barry & Edith Gwendolyn Nally - 2021 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 25 (2):255-281.
    Plato’s partition argument infers that the soul has parts from the fact that the soul experiences mental conflict. We consider an ambiguity in the concept of mental conflict. According to the first sense of conflict, a soul is in conflict when it has desires whose satisfaction is logically incompatible. According to the second sense of conflict, a soul is in conflict when it has desires which are logically incompatible even when they are unsatisfied. This raises a dilemma: if the mental (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32. Fenomenología de la polis y torsión del Dasein: dialéctica y hermenéutica en la temprana interpretación gadameriana de la ética platónica.Facundo Norberto Bey - 2021 - Daimon: Revista Internacional de Filosofía 1 (82):63-80.
    English title: Phenomenology of the pólis and torsion of Dasein: dialectic and hermeneutics in the early Gadamerian interpretation of Plato's ethics. Abstract: The aim of this paper is to present and analyse the main hypotheses of Hans-Georg Gadamer in his 1931 book Platos dialektische Ethik. Phänomenologische Interpretationen zum Philebos regarding the notions of pólis, aretḗ, tó agathṓn y Dasein. Then, it will be attempted to show that in this early book of Gadamer is his first relevant philosophical-political work, expressed in (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  33. Plato and the dangerous pleasures of poikilia.Jonathan Fine - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (1):152-169.
    A significant strand of the ethical psychology, aesthetics and politics of Plato's Republic revolves around the concept of poikilia, ‘fascinating variety’. Plato uses the concept to caution against harmful appetitive pleasures purveyed by democracy and such artistic or cultural practices as mimetic poetry. His aim, this article shows, is to contest a prominent conceptual connection between poikilia and beauty (kallos, to kalon). Exploiting tensions in the archaic and classical Greek concept, Plato associates poikilia with dangerous pleasures to redirect admiration toward (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  34. Politics in Socrates’ Cave: Comments on Adriel M. Trott.Thornton Lockwood - 2021 - In Gary Gurtler & Daniel Maher (eds.), Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium on Ancient Philosophy, vol. 36. pp. 57-62.
    In her “Saving the Appearances in Plato’s Cave,” Dr. Adriel M. Trott argues that “the philosopher’s claim to true knowledge always operates within the realm of the cave.” In order to probe her claim, I challenge her to make sense of “politics in the cave,” namely the status and practices of two categories of people in the cave: “woke” cave dwellers (namely, those who recognize shadows as shadows but have not left the cave) and “woke” puppeteers (namely, philosophers ruling within (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35. Reading Plato's Dialogues to Enhance Learning and Inquiry: Exploring Socrates' Use of Protreptic for Student Engagement.Mason Marshall - 2021 - New York, NY, USA: Routledge.
    Along with fresh interpretations of Plato, this book proposes a radically new approach to reading him, one that can teach us about protreptic, as it is called, by reimagining the ways in which Socrates engages in it. Protreptic, as it is conceived in the book, is an attempt to bring about a fundamental change of heart in people so that they want truth more than anything else. In taking the approach developed in this book, one doesn't try to get Plato (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  36. Analytic Philosophy, the Ancient Philosopher Poets and the Poetics of Analytic Philosophy.Catherine Rowett - 2021 - Rhizomata 8 (2):158-182.
    The paper starts with reflections on Plato’s critique of the poets and the preference many express for Aristotle’s view of poetry. The second part of the paper takes a case study of analytic treatments of ancient philosophy, including the ancient philosopher poets, to examine the poetics of analytic philosophy, diagnosing a preference in Analytic philosophy for a clean non-poetic style of presentation, and then develops this in considering how well historians of philosophy in the Analytic tradition can accommodate the contributions (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  37. The Political Soul: Plato on Thumos, Spirited Motivation, and the City.Josh Wilburn - 2021 - Oxford University Press.
    Josh Wilburn examines the relationship between Plato's views on psychology and his political philosophy. Focusing on his reflections on the spirited part of the tripartite soul, or thumos, and spirited motivation, he explores the social and political challenges that occupy Plato throughout his works.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  38. Mathematics in Plato's Republic.Sarah Broadie - 2020 - Milwaukee, Wisconsin: Marquette University Press.
    A discussion of Plato's evaluation of mathematics as an intellectual discipline, and his reasons for training his philosopher-rulers to be mathematical experts.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39. A Wolf in the City: Tyranny and the Tyrant in Plato's Republic. [REVIEW]Jason W. Carter - 2020 - Philosophical Quarterly 70 (279):419-421.
    In this dense, intelligent, but often frustrating work, Cinzia Arruzza argues that Plato's depiction of tyranny and the character of the tyrant in the Republic is best interpreted as, ‘an intervention in a debate concerning the transformed relation between political leaders and demos in Athenian democracy’ (p. 9) in the last decades of the fifth century BCE. Her central claim is that Plato's critique of tyranny in the Republic was aimed at showing that this particular historical form of Athenian democracy, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40. The One over Many Principle of Republic 596a.José Edgar González-Varela - 2020 - Apeiron 53 (4):339-361.
    Republic 596a introduces a One over Many principle that has traditionally been considered as an argument for the existence of Forms, according to which, one Form should be posited for each like-named plurality. This interpretation was challenged by (Smith, J. A. 1917. “General Relative Clauses in Greek.” Classical Review 31: 69–71.), who interpreted it rather as a statement that each Form is unique and correlated to a plurality of things that have the same name as it. (Sedley, D. 2013. “Plato (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41. Why Liberalism Failed. By Patrick J.Deneen. Pp. xxxi, 225, New Haven/London, Yale University Press, 2018, $13.07. [REVIEW]Patrick Madigan - 2020 - Heythrop Journal 61 (1):195-196.
  42. Why Does Socrates Shame Thrasymachus?Mason Marshall - 2020 - Philosophy of Education 76 (3):98-110.
  43. What is Eikasia?Damien Storey - 2020 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 58:19-57.
    This paper defends a reading of eikasia—the lowest kind of cognition in the Divided Line—as a kind of empirical cognition that Plato appeals to when explaining, among other things, the origin of ethical error. The paper has two central claims. First, eikasia with respect to, for example, goodness or justice is not different in kind to eikasia with respect to purely sensory images like shadows and reflections: the only difference is that in the first case the sensory images include representations (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  44. Book Review: Poetic Justice: Rereading Plato’s “Republic,” by Jill Frank. [REVIEW]Jonny Thakkar - 2020 - Political Theory 48 (1):121-126.
  45. Review of Samuel Scolnicov, Plato’s Method of Hypothesis in the Middle Dialogues, edited by Harold Tarrant. [REVIEW]Evan Rodriguez - 2019 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 57 (3):549-550.
    This volume, a lightly-edited version of Professor Samuel Scolnicov’s 1974 Ph.D. thesis, is a fitting tribute to his impressive career. It will perhaps be most useful for those interested in better understanding Scolnicov’s work and his views on Plato as a whole, not least for the comprehensive list of his publications that requires a full twelve pages of print. Scholars with an interest in Plato’s method of hypothesis will also find some useful remarks on key passages in the Meno, Phaedo, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46. The Translation of Republic 606a3–b5 and Plato's Partite Psychology.Damien Storey - 2019 - Classical Philology 114 (1):136-141.
    In this paper I discuss the translation of a line in Plato's description of the ‘greatest accusation’ against imitative poetry, Republic 606a3–b5. This line is pivotal in Plato's account of how poetry corrupts its audience and is one of the Republic's most complex and interesting applications of his partite psychology, but it is misconstrued in most recent translations, including the most widely used. I argue that an examination of the text and reflections on Platonic psychology settle the translation decisively.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47. Reason and Dreaming in Republic_ IX and the _Timaeus.Karel Thein - 2019 - Rhizomata 7 (1):1-32.
    The article discusses two passages,Republic IX 571d6–572b1, andTimaeus71a3–72b5, where Plato does not use dream as a metaphor for the soul’s deficit in knowledge but, instead, focuses on the actual process of dreaming during sleep, and the origin and nature of the images involved. In both texts, Plato’s account is closely connected to the soul’s tripartition, with the resulting emphasis on reason’s capacity to control, and even to create, the dream images that influence the lower parts of the soul. While taking (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48. A READING OF PLATO'S REPUBLIC - Frank Poetic Justice. Rereading Plato's Republic. Pp. xii + 251. Chicago and London: The University of Chicago Press, 2018. Paper, US$30 . ISBN: 978-0-226-51577-9. [REVIEW]Roslyn Weiss - 2019 - The Classical Review 69 (1):54-56.
  49. Plato as Critical Theorist.Tristan Bradshaw - 2018 - Contemporary Political Theory 19 (2):108-111.
  50. How to play the Platonic flute: Mimêsis and Truth in Republic X.Gene Fendt - 2018 - In Heather L. Reid & Jeremy C. DeLong (eds.), The Many Faces of Mimēsis: Selected Essays from the Third Interdisciplinary Symposium on the Heritage of Western Greece,. Sioux City, IA, USA: Parnassos Press. pp. 37-48.
    The usual interpretation of Republic 10 takes it as Socrates’ multilevel philosophical demonstration of the untruth and dangerousness of mimesis and its required excision from a well ordered polity. Such readings miss the play of the Platonic mimesis which has within it precisely ordered antistrophes which turn its oft remarked strophes perfectly around. First, this argument, famously concluding to the unreliability of image-makers for producing knowledge begins with two images—the mirror (596e) and the painter. I will show both undercut the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 1385