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  1. added 2019-06-06
    The Ironic Defense of Socrates. Plato’s Apology. By David Leibowitz. [REVIEW]Paul Allen Miller - 2012 - Ancient Philosophy 32 (2):415-419.
  2. added 2019-06-06
    Plato’s Socrates as Educator. [REVIEW]Rebecca Benson - 2002 - Southwest Philosophy Review 18 (2):163-167.
  3. added 2019-06-06
    Listening to the Cicadas: A Study of Plato's Phaedrus.G. R. F. Ferrari - 1987 - Cambridge University Press.
    This full-length study of Plato's dialogue Phaedrus, now in paperback, is written in the belief that such concerted scrutiny of a single dialogue is an important part of the project of understanding Plato so far as possible 'from the inside' - of gaining a feel for the man's philosophy. The focus of this account is on how the resources both of persuasive myth and of formal argument, for all that Plato sets them in strong contrast, nevertheless complement and reinforce each (...)
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  4. added 2019-06-05
    I. Politics as Ironic Community: On the Themes of Descent and Return in Plato's "Republic".John Evan Seery - 1988 - Political Theory 16 (2):229-256.
  5. added 2018-06-22
    Unmastering Speech: Irony in Plato's Phaedrus.Matthew S. Linck - 2003 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 36 (3):264-276.
  6. added 2018-06-17
    Litotes, Irony and Other Innocent Lies.Ignace Haaz - 2018 - Globethics Global Series No. 16.
    In the following text we would like to present the philosophical discussion on untrusting lies, which introduces a space for innocent lie understood as figurative manipulation of the speech: a poetic trope that we would argue could not only be generously used to help us tolerating our sometime deceiving human condition—which is global and universally ours, that of the finitude of human capacity of knowledge and ethical action—but also to maximise our capacity for knowledge formation and adaptation to values. Concepts (...)
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  7. added 2017-11-24
    Atlantis.Eugen Schweitzer - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 10:375-385.
    It is proverbial that the European tradition of philosophy consists of a set of footnotes to Plato. However, one of his most informative works, the Atlantis story, had been totally neglected by the scientific community because for 2350 years it had simply not been understood. Plato wanted that only eligible persons shouldperceive his Atlantis story and therefore he codified it as an adventure tale. However, he placed a lot of ironical hints in his text. Anyhow, as irony isn’t everybody’s cup (...)
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  8. added 2017-10-09
    Plato, McLuhan, and the Technology of Irony.Scott Rubarth - 2002 - International Studies in Philosophy 34 (2):95-114.
  9. added 2017-09-25
    A Eironeía de Sócrates e a Ironia de Platão nos primeiros diálogos.Antônio José Vieira de Queirós Campos - 2016 - Dissertation, Puc-Rio, Brazil
  10. added 2017-02-27
    L'âme est un corps de femme.Giulia Sissa - 2000 - Paris: Odile Jacob.
  11. added 2017-01-21
    Socrates' Reverse Irony.Iakovos Vasiliou - 2002 - Classical Quarterly 52 (1):220-230.
  12. added 2016-11-01
    Irony and Opinion.Alex Priou - 2016 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 10 (2):151-167.
    _ Source: _Volume 10, Issue 2, pp 151 - 167 This paper considers the unity of Socrates’ twin apparitions of sophist and statesman, alluded to in the _Sophist_. Examining how these apparitions are at work in the _Theaetetus_, I argue that the difficulty is that of combining the nurturing or educative role of the statesman with the sophist’s practice of refutation. Beginning from Socrates’ shift in appearance early in the dialogue, I argue that the cause of this shift is Theaetetus’ (...)
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  13. added 2015-11-11
    The Portrait of Socrates in Plato's Symposium.William J. Prior - 2006 - In David Sedley (ed.), Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy Xxxi: Winter 2006. Oxford University Press. pp. 137-166.
    I argue that, when Alcibiades' encomium to Socrates is interpreted in light of Socrates' presentation of Diotima's speech, which immediately proceeds it, it shows Socrates to be at the top level of Diotima's "ladder of ascent" to Beauty. If Alcibiades is correct, Socrates' pretense of ignorance is an ironic sham. Socrates, as Plato's mystagogos, must have experiential knowledge of the Form of Beauty.
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  14. added 2015-04-29
    Plato and the "Socratic Fallacy".William Prior - 1998 - Phronesis 43 (2):97 - 113.
    Since Peter Geach coined the phrase in 1966 there has been much discussion among scholars of the "Socratic fallacy." No consensus presently exists on whether Socrates commits the "Socratic fallacy"; almost all scholars agree, however, that the "Socratic fallacy" is a bad thing and that Socrates has good reason to avoid it. I think that this consensus of scholars is mistaken. I think that what Geach has labeled a fallacy is no fallacy at all, but a perfectly innocent consequence of (...)
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  15. added 2015-04-26
    To What Extent Can Definitions Help Our Understanding? What Plato Might Have Said in His Cups.John W. Powell - 2012 - Metaphilosophy 43 (5):698-713.
    There are grounds for taking Plato's agenda of searching for definitions to be ironic, and he points toward good arguments for being wary of trust in definitions.
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  16. added 2015-04-19
    Irony and Shame in Socratic Ethics.Julie Piering - 2010 - International Philosophical Quarterly 50 (4):473-488.
    Socrates is both the first thoroughgoing moral philosopher and the first to employ irony as a philosophical tool. These innovative and foundational aspects of Socratic philosophy, however, lead to apparent inconsistencies and worrisome interactions. Socrates is charged with making his interlocutors look foolish, arrogant, self-serving, or ignorant. Worse still, he seems aware of these reactions. If Socrates knows his methods stir resentment, why does he continue with them? Furthermore, how should we view irony in light of Socratic ethics? I argue (...)
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  17. added 2015-04-12
    Retoryczność platońskiej "Obrony Sokratesa" (Rhetorical analysis of Plato's "Apology of Socrates").Zbigniew Nerczuk - 2005 - Studia Antyczne I Mediewistyczne 3:43-48.
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  18. added 2015-04-09
    “The Arguments I Seem To Hear”: Argument and Irony in the Crito.Mitchell Miller - 1996 - Phronesis 41 (2):121-137.
    A close reading of the Crito, with a focus on irony in Socrates' speech by the Laws and on the way this allows Socrates to chart a mean course between Crito's self-destructive resistance to the rule of Athenian law and Socrates' own philosophical reservations about its ethical limitations.
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  19. added 2015-04-03
    Unmastering Speech: Irony in Plato's.Matthew S. Linck - unknown
  20. added 2015-03-30
    The Ironic Defense of Socrates: Plato’s Apology, David Leibowitz, Cambridge University Press, 2010. [REVIEW]Mehmet Karabela - 2012 - Political Studies Review 10 (3):401-402.
  21. added 2015-03-29
    Socrates' Ironic Image of Meno.Dale Jacquette - 1996 - The Personalist Forum 12 (2):123-134.
  22. added 2015-03-28
    Taking the Longer Road : The Irony of Plato's "Republic".Drew A. Hyland - 1988 - Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale 93 (3):317 - 335.
    The article begins with a brief discussion of the ways in which Platonic irony, and specifically the irony of the Republic, has been interpreted : as part of Plato's liberary style, as a consequence of political or prudential considerations, and as a pedagogical technique. These are criticized as stopping short of an interpretation of irony which makes it part of Plato's philosophic intentions. Using several seminal examples of irony in the Republic, it is shown, 1) that Plato's philosophical irony is (...)
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  23. added 2015-03-26
    Humor, Dialectic, and Human Nature in Plato.Edward C. Halper - 2011 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (2):319-330.
    Drawing principally on the Symposium, this paper argues that humor in Plato’s dialogues serves two serious purposes. First, Plato uses puns and other devices to disarm the reader’s defenses and thereby allow her to consider philosophical ideas that she would otherwise dismiss. Second, insofar as human beings can only be understood through unchanging forms that we fail to attain, our lives are discontinuous and only partly intelligible. Since, though, the discontinuity between expectation and actual occurrence is the basis for humor, (...)
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  24. added 2015-03-23
    Socrate était-il un ironiste ?Michel Gourinat - 1986 - Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale 91 (3):339 - 353.
    Le mot grec ironie signifiait primitivement dissimulation, et plus précisément imposture comprise comme dissimulation de l'incompétence et prétention au savoir. Appliquée à Socrate, l'ironie en est venue à désigner une dissimulation du savoir destinée à triompher plus facilement du prétendu savoir d'un adversaire. Ce retournement dans la signification du mot est un contresens — dont nous suivons l'évolution de l'Apologie au Lucullus — sur la maïeutique, qui résulte de l'usage fait par Socrate de cette méthode, dans sa première rivalité avec (...)
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  25. added 2015-03-19
    Laughing to Learn: Irony in the Republic as Pedagogy.Jonathan Fine - 2011 - Polis 28 (2):235-49.
    Recent commentators have attended to dramatic and ironic aspects of Plato’s Republic. But a more sustained examination of the relation between irony and the exchanges of Socrates and Glaucon is required because a crucial purpose and presentation of the irony have largely gone unnoticed. I argue that Socrates employs irony in part to parody Glaucon’s extremism and that he does so to exhort Glaucon to think critically. I examine how Socrates uses the term makaria (blessedness) primarily ironically and pedagogically. A (...)
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  26. added 2015-03-06
    Love as a Problem of Knowledge in Kierkegaard's Either/Or and Plato's Symposium.Ulrika Carlsson - 2010 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 53 (1):41-67.
    At the end of the essay “Silhouettes” in Either/Or , Kierkegaard writes, “only the person who has been bitten by snakes knows what one who has been bitten by snakes must suffer.” I interpret this as an allusion to Alcibiades' speech in Plato's Symposium. Kierkegaard invites the reader to compare Socrates to Don Giovanni, and Alcibiades to the seduced women. Socrates' philosophical method, in this light, is a deceptive seduction: just as Don Giovanni's seduction leads his conquests to unhappy love—what (...)
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  27. added 2015-03-03
    The Paradox of Socratic Ignorance in Plato's Apology.Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith - 1984 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 1 (2):125 - 131.
  28. added 2015-02-27
    Socrates Agonistes: The Case of the Cratylus Etymologies.Rachel Barney - 1998 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 16:63-98.
    Are the long, wildly inventive etymologies in Plato’s Cratylus just some kind of joke, or does Plato himself accept them? This standard question misses the most important feature of the etymologies: they are a competitive performance, an agôn by Socrates in which he shows that he can play the game of etymologists like Cratylus better than they can themselves. Such show-off performances are a recurrent feature of Platonic dialogue: they include Socrates’ speeches on eros in the Phaedrus, his rhetorical discourse (...)
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  29. added 2015-02-25
    Dietrich Roloff: Platonische Ironie–Das Beispiel: Theaitetos. Pp. Vi + 422. Heidelberg: Carl Winter, 1975. Cloth, DM.85 (Paper, DM.72). [REVIEW]Jonathan Barnes - 1977 - The Classical Review 27 (02):289-.
  30. added 2015-02-17
    Socrates.Terry Penner - 2000 - In C. J. Rowe Malcolm Schofield (ed.), Cambridge History of Ancient Political Thought. pp. 164-189.