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  1. The Old Linguistic Problem of 'Reference' in a Modern Reading of Plato's Sophist.Sepehr Ehsani - manuscript
    This paper is about interpreting the aim of Plato's Sophist in a linguistic framework and arguing that in its attempt at resolving the conundrum of what the true meaning and essence of the word "sophist" could be, it resembles a number of themes encountered in contemporary linguistics. I think it is important to put our findings from the Sophist in a broader Platonic context: in other words, I assume—I think not too unreasonably—that Plato pursued (or at least had in mind) (...)
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  2. The Sophists.John Gibert - forthcoming - Ancient Philosophy.
  3. Plato: Hippias Major.Lucas Angioni - 2019 - Archai: Revista de Estudos Sobre as Origens Do Pensamento Ocidental 26:1-51.
    Trata-se de tradução do Hípias Maior de Platão para o Português, com algumas notas de elucidação e justificação das opções.
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  4. Review of Olof Pettersson & Vigdis Songe-Møller (Eds.) Plato's Protagoras: Essays on the Confrontation of Philosophy and Sophistry. [REVIEW]Evan Rodriguez - 2017 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 201704.
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  5. The Wax Tablet, Logic and Protagoreanism.Terry Penner - 2013 - In George Boys-Stones, Dimitri El Murr & C. J. Gill (eds.), The Platonic Art of Philosophy: Essays in honnor of Christopher Rowe.
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  6. The Eleatic Visitor's Method of Division.Laura Grams - 2012 - Apeiron 45 (2):130-156.
  7. Sophists, Names and Democracy.Jakub Jirsa - 2012 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 12 (2):125-138.
    The article argues that the Euthydemus shows the essential connection between sophistry, right usage of language, and politics. It shows how the sophistic use of language correlates with the manners of politics which Plato associates with the sophists. First, it proceeds by showing the explicit criticism of both brothers, for they seem unable to fulfill the task given to them. Second, several times in the dialogue Socrates criticizes the sophists’ use of language, since it is totally inappropriate to fulfill the (...)
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  8. Plato's Counterfeit Sophists (Review).Bruce Krajewski - 2012 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 45 (3):343-350.
  9. “Justice is Happiness”?—An Analysis of Plato's Strategies in Response to Challenges From the Sophists.Limin Bao - 2011 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 6 (2):258-272.
    The challenge from the sophists with whom Plato is confronted is: Who can prove that the just man without power is happy whereas the unjust man with power is not? This challenge concerns the basic issue of politics: the relationship between justice and happiness. Will the unjust man gain the exceptional happiness of the strong by abusing his power and by injustice? The gist of Plato’s reply is to speak not of justice but of intrinsic justice, i.e., the strength of (...)
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  10. Empeiria Kai Tribē.Jeremy R. Bell - 2011 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (2):379-394.
    In this essay I trace the terms empeiria and tribē throughout the Platonic corpus in order to expose their central position within Plato’s critique of the sophists and rhetoricians. I find that these two terms—both of which indicate a knack or habitude that has been developed through experiential familiarity with certain causal tendencies—are regularly deployed in order to account for the effectiveness of these speakers even in the absence of a technē; for, what Plato identifies with these terms is the (...)
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  11. Four Educators in Plato's Theaetetus.Avi I. Mintz - 2011 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 45 (4):657-673.
    Scholars who have taken interest in Theaetetus' educational theme argue that Plato contrasts an inferior, even dangerous, sophistic education to a superior, philosophical, Socratic education. I explore the contrasting exhortations, methods, ideals and epistemological foundations of Socratic and Protagorean education and suggest that Socrates' treatment of Protagoras as educator is far less dismissive than others claim. Indeed, Plato, in Theaetetus, offers a qualified defence of both Socrates and Protagoras. Socrates and Protagoras each dwell in the middle ground between the extremes (...)
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  12. Socrates and the Sophists: Plato's Protagoras, Euthydemus, Hippias Major and Cratylus. Plato - 2010 - Focus Publishing/ R. Pullins Co..
    This is an English translation of four of Plato’s dialogue (Protagoras, Euthydemus, Hippias Major, and Cratylus) that explores the topic of sophistry and philosophy, a key concept at the source of Western thought. Includes notes and an introductory essay. Focus Philosophical Library translations are close to and are non-interpretative of the original text, with the notes and a glossary intending to provide the reader with some sense of the terms and the concepts as they were understood by Plato’s immediate audience.
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  13. Relativism and Self-Refutation in the Theaetetus.Mehmet M. Erginel - 2009 - In Brad Inwood (ed.), Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy Volume 37. Oxford University Press. pp. 1-45.
    Plato argues, at Theaetetus 170e-171c, that Protagoras’ relativism is self-refuting. This argument, known as the ‘exquisite argument’, and its merits have been the subject of much controversy over the past few decades. Burnyeat (1976b) has argued in defense of Plato’s argument, but his reconstruction of the argument has been criticized as question-begging. After offering an interpretation of Protagoras’ relativism, I argue that the exquisite argument is successful, for reasons that Burnyeat hints at but fails to develop sufficiently. I consider Protagorean (...)
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  14. Plato on the Rhetoric of Philosophers and Sophists.Lloyd P. Gerson - 2009 - International Philosophical Quarterly 49 (4):525-526.
  15. Le logos du sophiste. Image et parole dans le Sophiste de Platon.Felipe Ledesma - 2009 - Elenchos: Rivista di Studi Sul Pensiero Antico 30 (2):207-254.
    The logos question, one of the most important among the subjects that traverse the Plato's Sophist, has in fact some different aspects: the criticism of father Parmenides' logos, that is unable to speak about the not-being, but also about the being; the relations between logos and its cognates, phantasia, doxa and dianoia; the logos’ complex structure, that is a compound with onoma and rema; the difference between naming and saying, two distinct but inseparable actions; the logical and ontological conditions that (...)
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  16. Protagoras (U.) Zilioli Protagoras and the Challenge of Relativism. Plato's Subtlest Enemy. Pp. Xii + 160, Ills. Aldershot and Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2007. Cased, £50, US$99.95. ISBN: 978-0-7546-6078-. [REVIEW]Dana Miller - 2009 - The Classical Review 59 (2):375-.
  17. Marina McCoy, Plato on the Rhetoric of Philosophers and Sophists.Patrick Mooney - 2009 - Philosophy in Review 29 (1):48-50.
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  18. Miarą Jest Każdy Z Nas: Projekt Zwolenników Zmienności Rzeczy W Platońskim Teajtecie Na Tle Myśli Sofistycznej (Each of us is a measure. The project of advocates of change in Plato’s Theaetetus as compared with sophistic thought).Zbigniew Nerczuk - 2009 - Wydawn. Nauk. Uniwersytetu Mikołaja Kopernika.
    Each of us is a measure. The project of advocates of change in Plato’s Theaetetus as compared with sophistic thought -/- Summary -/- One of the most intriguing motives in Plato’s Theaetetus is its historical-based division of philosophy, which revolves around the concepts of rest (represented by Parmenides and his disciples) and change (represented by Protagoras, Homer, Empedocles, and Epicharmus). This unique approach gives an opportunity to reconstruct the views of marginalized trend of early Greek philosophy - so called „the (...)
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  19. Plato on the Rhetoric of Philosophers and Sophists (Review).Richard D. Parry - 2009 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (1):pp. 131-132.
    Marina McCoy defends three interrelated claims about the topic mentioned in her title. First, the distinction between philosophy and rhetoric in the dialogues is not as clear as some commentators seem to think. Second, since philosophy as practiced by Socrates includes important rhetorical dimensions, there is no important methodological distinction between philosophy and rhetoric. Third, it is his virtues—and not any particular method—that differentiate Socrates the philosopher from sophists and rhetoricians. McCoy pursues different aspects of her theses through the Apology, (...)
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  20. Plato on the Rhetoric of Philosophers and Sophists (Review).Michael Svoboda - 2009 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 42 (2):pp. 191-196.
  21. Plato on the Rhetoric of Philosophers and Sophists. By Marina McCoy and Plato and the Art of Philosophical Writing. By Christopher Rowe: Book Reviews. [REVIEW]Robin Waterfield - 2009 - Heythrop Journal 50 (3):511-511.
  22. Review of Marina McCoy, Plato on the Rhetoric of Philosophers and Sophists[REVIEW]Eugene Garver - 2008 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (9).
  23. Sophistry In and As Its Course.Kenneth Liberman - 2008 - Argumentation 22 (1):59-70.
    Although sophistry has been characterized as separable from real philosophy, formal analysis does not work without it and one cannot always identify just where philosophy leaves off and sophistry begins. Whether sophistry offers anything to thinking reason has to do with what parties in dialogue do with sophistries. Sophistries can close down or open up philosophical perspectives, depending on the local work that sophistic strategies accomplish. Such local work of philosophers is rarely available to analyses of docile texts, but they (...)
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  24. Review of Marina McCoy, Plato on the Rhetoric of Philosophers and Sophists. [REVIEW]Evan Rodriguez & Ravi Sharma - 2008 - Bryn Mawr Classical Review 2008 (12.36).
  25. Image and Paradigm in Plato's Sophist.David Ambuel - 2007 - Las Vegas: Parmenides.
    The book is a translation of the Sophist with a running commentary. Three main points are argued: the dialogue does not present positive doctrine but has the structure of a reductio ad absurdum, Plato's point is to criticize the metaphysics of Parmenides. By failing to account for resemblance, Eleaticism implies an inadequate theory of relations, which makes impossible any understanding of "essence." Consequently, Eleaticism can be taken as the philosophical underpinning for the antithesis of philosophy, lending legitimacy to sophistry, the (...)
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  26. ""Philosophical Training Grounds: Socratic Sophistry and Platonic Perfection in" Symposium" and" Gorgias".Joshua Landy - 2007 - Arion 15 (1):63-122.
    Plato’s character Socrates is clearly a sophisticated logician. Why then does he fall, at times, into the most elementary fallacies? It is, I propose, because the end goal for Plato is not the mere acquisition of superior understanding but instead a well-lived life, a life lived in harmony with oneself. For such an end, accurate opinions are necessary but not sufficient: what we crucially need is a method, a procedure for ridding ourselves of those opinions that are false. Now learning (...)
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  27. Plato on the Rhetoric of Philosophers and Sophists.Marina McCoy - 2007 - Cambridge University Press.
    Marina McCoy explores Plato's treatment of the rhetoric of philosophers and sophists through a thematic treatment of six different Platonic dialogues, including Apology, Protagoras, Gorgias, Republic, Sophist, and Phaedras. She argues that Plato presents the philosopher and the sophist as difficult to distinguish, insofar as both use rhetoric as part of their arguments. Plato does not present philosophy as rhetoric-free, but rather shows that rhetoric is an integral part of philosophy. However, the philosopher and the sophist are distinguished by the (...)
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  28. Review: Epistemology After Protagoras: Responses to Relativism in Plato, Aristotle and Democritus. [REVIEW]D. T. J. Bailey - 2006 - Mind 115 (460):1151-1153.
  29. Reading the Περιτρoπη: Theaetetus 170c-171c. Chappell - 2006 - Phronesis 51 (2):109-139.
    Two readings of the much-discussed περιτροπή argument of "Theaetetus" 170c-171c have dominated the literature. One I call "the relativity reading". On this reading, the argument fails by ignoratio elenchi because it "carelessly" omits "the qualifications 'true for so-and-so' which [Protagoras'] theory insists on" (Bostock 1988: 90). The other reading I call "the many-worlds interpretation". On this view, Plato's argument succeeds in showing that "Protagoras' position becomes utterly self-contradictory" because "he claims that everyone lives in his own relativistic world, yet at (...)
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  30. Refutation and Relativism in Theaetetus 161-171.Alex Long - 2004 - Phronesis 49 (1):24 - 40.
    In this paper I discuss the dialogues between 'Protagoras', Theodorus and Socrates in "Theaetetus" 161-171 and emphasise the importance for this passage of a dilemma which refutation is shown to pose for relativism at 161e-162a. I argue that the two speeches delivered on Protagoras' behalf contain material that is deeply Socratic and suggest that this feature of the speeches should be interpreted as part of Plato's philosophical case against relativism, reflecting the relativist's own inability to defend his theory from attempts (...)
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  31. Why Does Protagoras Rush Off?: Self-Refutation and Haste in Plato, Theaetetus 169a-171d.Richard Bemelmans - 2002 - Ancient Philosophy 22 (1):75-86.
  32. Sophistic Travel: Inheriting the Simulacrum Through Plato's "the Sophist".John Muckelbauer - 2001 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 34 (3):225-244.
  33. Plato’s Sophist. [REVIEW]Daniel R. Ahern - 2000 - International Philosophical Quarterly 40 (1):107-109.
  34. Plato on Philosophy and Money.Paul W. Gooch - 2000 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 7 (4):13-20.
    For Plato, one mark of the difference between sophistry and philosophy is that the sophist takes fees for service. His Socrates does not. However, this paper points out that Socrates' attitude to money reflects his unique indifference to things bodily, and a more satisfactory understanding of Plato on money needs to turn to his discussion of the love of money or avarice, especially in the Republic. Plato locates money-loving in appetitive soul along with physical cravings like hunger and lust; why (...)
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  35. Plato’s Dream of Sophistry.Giles Hibbert - 2000 - International Philosophical Quarterly 40 (1):120-121.
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  36. Review. Sophistical Rhetoric in Classical Greece. J Poulakos\The Birth of Rhetoric: Gorgias, Plato and Their Successors. R Wardy. [REVIEW]N. Livingstone - 1999 - The Classical Review 49 (2):424-426.
  37. Plato's Refutation of Protagoras in the Theaetetus.Gail Fine - 1998 - Apeiron 31 (3):201-34.
  38. Relativism and Self-Refutation: Plato, Protagoras, and Burnyeat.Gail Fine - 1998 - In Jyl Gentzler (ed.), Method in Ancient Greek Philosophy. Clarendon Press.
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  39. Le Non-Être: Deux Études Sur le Sophiste de Platon. [REVIEW]Peter Lautner - 1998 - Ancient Philosophy 18 (2):480-484.
  40. Plato and the "Socratic Fallacy".William Prior - 1998 - Phronesis 43 (2):97 - 113.
    Since Peter Geach coined the phrase in 1966 there has been much discussion among scholars of the "Socratic fallacy." No consensus presently exists on whether Socrates commits the "Socratic fallacy"; almost all scholars agree, however, that the "Socratic fallacy" is a bad thing and that Socrates has good reason to avoid it. I think that this consensus of scholars is mistaken. I think that what Geach has labeled a fallacy is no fallacy at all, but a perfectly innocent consequence of (...)
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  41. Socrates on the Strength of Knowledge: Protagoras 351B-357E.Terry Penner - 1997 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 79 (2):117-149.
  42. Sophistry Exposed.Scott R. Hemmenway - 1996 - Ancient Philosophy 16 (1):1-23.
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  43. Protagoras and Logos.Gerald A. Press - 1996 - Ancient Philosophy 16 (1):159-161.
  44. Does Protagoras Refute Himself?T. D. J. Chappell - 1995 - Classical Quarterly 45 (02):333-.
    Protagoras believes that all beliefs are true. Since Protagoras' belief that all beliefs are true is itself a belief, it follows from Protagoras' belief that all beliefs are true that Protagoras' belief is true. But what about the belief that Protagoras' belief is false? Doesn't it follow, by parallel reasoning and not at all trivially, that if all beliefs are true and there is a belief that Protagoras' belief is false, then Protagoras' belief is false?
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  45. The Sophistic Cross-Examination of Callicles in the Gorgias.Jyl Gentzler - 1995 - Ancient Philosophy 15 (1):17-43.
    Socrates' cross-examination of Callicles in the 'Gorgias' has traditionally been viewed as a paradigm of the Socratic method. I argue that, when he cross examines Callicles, Socrates behaves out of character. In fact, he acts like a Sophist and violates the very principles of persuasion that he advocates in the 'Gorgias'. I offer an explanation of Socrates' temporary transformation into a Sophist, and suggest that his role-reversal reinforces Plato's representation of Socrates as the model of the virtuous philosopher.
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  46. Protagorean Relativisms.Gail Fine - 1994 - Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy 10:211-43.
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  47. Socrates and Gorgias at Delphi and Olympia: Phaedrus 235d6–236b4.Kathryn A. Morgan - 1994 - Classical Quarterly 44 (02):375-.
    It is a commonplace of modern criticism that every text is to be located within a complex network of cultural practices and material. Students of the ancient world may sometimes feel at a disadvantage; we simply do not have as much information as we would like in order to contextualize thoroughly. This has been especially true in the study of Platonic dialogues. The meagre remains of the writings of the sophists against whom Plato measured himself and of the art to (...)
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  48. Philosophy as Performed in Plato's "Theaetetus".Eugenio Benitez & Livia Guimaraes - 1993 - Review of Metaphysics 47 (2):297 - 328.
    We examine the "Theaetetus" in the light of its juxtaposition of philosophical, mathematical and sophistical approaches to knowledge, which we show to be a prominent feature of the drama. We suggest that clarifying the nature of philosophy supersedes the question of knowledge as the main ambition of the "Theaetetus". Socrates shows Theaetetus that philosophy is not a demonstrative science, like geometry, but it is also not mere word-play, like sophistry. The nature of philosophy is revealed in Socrates' activity of examination (...)
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  49. Rereading the Sophists: Classical Rhetoric Refigured.Susan C. Jarratt - 1991 - Southern Illinois University Press.
    This book is a critically informed challenge to the traditional histories of rhetoric and to the current emphasis on Aristotle and Plato as the most significant classical voices in rhetoric. In it, Susan C. Jarratt argues that the first sophists—a diverse group of traveling intellectuals in the fifth century B.C.—should be given a more prominent place in the study of rhetoric and composition. Rereading the ancient sophists, she creates a new lens through which to see contemporary social issues, including the (...)
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  50. Argument and Sophistry in the Republic. [REVIEW]R. S. W. Hawtrey - 1990 - The Classical Review 40 (2):317-319.
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