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1 — 50 / 332
  1. added 2020-04-18
    ""Philosophical Training Grounds: Socratic Sophistry and Platonic Perfection in" Symposium" and" Gorgias".Joshua Landy - 2007 - Arion 15 (1):63-122.
    Plato’s character Socrates is clearly a sophisticated logician. Why then does he fall, at times, into the most elementary fallacies? It is, I propose, because the end goal for Plato is not the mere acquisition of superior understanding but instead a well-lived life, a life lived in harmony with oneself. For such an end, accurate opinions are necessary but not sufficient: what we crucially need is a method, a procedure for ridding ourselves of those opinions that are false. Now learning (...)
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  2. added 2019-10-13
    STUDIES OF EROS - Sanders, Thumiger, Carey, Lowe Erôs in Ancient Greece. Pp. Xiv + 349, Ills. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013. Cased, £75, US$160. ISBN: 978-0-19-960550-7. [REVIEW]Simon Goldhill - 2014 - The Classical Review 64 (1):39-41.
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  3. added 2019-10-11
    The Functions of Apollodorus.Matthew D. Walker - 2016 - In Mauro Tulli & Michael Erler (eds.), The Selected Papers of the Tenth Symposium Platonicum. 53757 Sankt Augustin, Germany: pp. 110-116.
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  4. added 2019-08-23
    Aristophanic Tragedy.Suzanne Obdrzalek - 2017 - In Z. Giannopoulou & P. Destrée (eds.), The Cambridge Critical Guide to Plato’s Symposium. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. pp. 70-87.
    In this paper, I offer a new interpretation of Aristophanes’ speech in Plato’s Symposium. Though Plato deliberately draws attention to the significance of Aristophanes’ speech in relation to Diotima’s (205d-206a, 211d), it has received relatively little philosophical attention. Critics who discuss it typically treat it as a comic fable, of little philosophical merit (e.g. Guthrie 1975, Rowe 1998), or uncover in it an appealing and even romantic treatment of love that emphasizes the significance of human individuals as love-objects to be (...)
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  5. added 2019-08-22
    Moral Transformation and the Love of Beauty in Plato's Symposium.Suzanne Obdrzalek - 2010 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 48:415-44.
    This paper offers an intellectualist interpretation of Diotima’s speech in Plato’s Symposium. Diotima’s purpose, in discussing the lower lovers, is to critique their erōs as aimed at a goal it can never secure, immortality, and as focused on an inferior object, themselves. By contrast, in loving beauty, the philosopher gains a mortal sort of completion; in turning outside of himself, he also ceases to be preoccupied by his own incompleteness.
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  6. added 2019-06-06
    The Unwritten Teachings in Plato’s Symposium: Socrates’ Initiation Into the Ἀριϴμός of Ἔρως.Burt C. Hopkins - 2011 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (2):279-298.
    The paper argues that the ontology of Self behind Descartes’s paradigmatic modern account of passion is an obstacle to interpreting properly the account Socrates gives in the Symposium of the truth of Eros’s origin, nature, and gift to the philosophical initiate into his truth. The key to interpreting this account is located in the relation between Eros and the arithmos-structure of the community of kinds, which is disclosed in terms of the Symposium’s dramatic mimesis of the two Platonic sources of (...)
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  7. added 2019-06-06
    Poetry, Socratic Dialectic, and the Desire of the Beautiful in Plato’s Symposium.P. Christopher Smith - 2005 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 9 (2):233-253.
    I attempt in this paper to argue a thesis that is the opposite of the standard reading of Plato’s Symposium. I maintain that it is not the persuasive speech of thecomic or tragic poets that is criticized and undermined in the dialogue, but Socratic dialectic and dialogical argumentation. This is to say, it is not Aristophanes’ and Agathon’s speeches that are the object of Plato’s critique, but Socrates’ minimalist and rather unpoetic elenchos. My anaysis leads to the conclusion that Diotima’s (...)
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  8. added 2019-06-06
    Plato’s Form of the Beautiful in the Symposium Versus Aristotle’s Unmoved Mover in the Metaphysics.Kyung-Choon Chang - 2002 - Classical Quarterly 52 (2):431-446.
  9. added 2019-06-06
    On the Relationship of Alcibiades' Speech to the Other Speeches in Plato's Symposium.Friedrich Nietzsche - 1991 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 15 (2):3-5.
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  10. added 2019-06-06
    Plato's Symposium. [REVIEW]W. D. T. - 1968 - Review of Metaphysics 22 (2):387-388.
  11. added 2019-06-06
    Ludwig von Sybel on the Symposium of Plato. [REVIEW]L. Campbell - 1890 - The Classical Review 4 (5):209-210.
  12. added 2019-06-05
    VIII—Beyond Eros: Friendship in the "Phaedrus".Frisbee C. C. Sheffield - 2011 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 111 (2pt2):251-273.
    It is often held that Plato did not have a viable account of interpersonal love. The account of eros—roughly, desire—in the Symposium appears to fail, and, though the Lysis contains much suggestive material for an account of philia—roughly, friendship—this is an aporetic dialogue, which fails, ultimately, to provide an account of friendship. This paper argues that Plato's account of friendship is in the Phaedrus. This dialogue outlines three kinds of philia relationship, the highest of which compares favourably to the Aristotelian (...)
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  13. added 2019-06-05
    Plato: The Symposium.Frisbee C. C. Sheffield (ed.) - 2008 - Cambridge University Press.
    Plato's Symposium, written in the early part of the 4th century BC, is set at a drinking party attended by some of the leading intellectuals of the day, including Aristophanes, the comic dramatist, Socrates, Plato's mentor, and Alcibiades, the brilliant but treacherous politician. Each guest gives a speech in praise of the benefits of desire and its role in the good and happy human life. At the core of the work stands Socrates' praise of philosophical desire, and an argument for (...)
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  14. added 2019-05-30
    Sir Kenneth Dover: Plato, Symposium. Pp. X + 185. Cambridge University Press, 1980. £15.50.F. H. Sandbach - 1981 - The Classical Review 31 (1):126-127.
  15. added 2019-05-14
    R. Waterfield : Plato Symposium. A New Translation. Pp. Xlv+104. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1994. Paper, £4.99.Elizabeth Pender - 1995 - The Classical Review 45 (2):437-437.
  16. added 2019-05-09
    K. Sier: Die Rede der Diotima: Untersuchungen zum platonischen Symposion. . Pp. xvi + 329. Stuttgart and Leipzig: B. G. Teubner, 1997. Cased, DM 98. ISBN: 3-519-07635-7. [REVIEW]Dougal Blyth - 2000 - The Classical Review 50 (2):621-622.
  17. added 2019-05-09
    C. Gill: Plato, The Symposium. Pp. Xlvi + 90. Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1999. Paper, £5099. ISBN: 0-14-044616-8.Elizabeth Belfiore - 2000 - The Classical Review 50 (2):583-583.
  18. added 2019-04-10
    Two Passions in Plato’s Symposium: Diotima’s To Kalon as a Reorientation of Imperialistic Erōs.Mateo Duque - 2019 - In Heather L. Reid & Tony Leyh (eds.), Looking at Beauty to Kalon in Western Greece: Selected Essays from the 2018 Symposium on the Heritage of Western Greece. Sioux City, IA, USA: Parnassos Press – Fonte Aretusa. pp. 95-110.
    In this essay, I propose a reading of two contrasting passions, two kinds of erōs, in the "Symposium." On the one hand, there is the imperialistic desire for conquering and possessing that Alcibiades represents; and on the other hand, there is the productive love of immortal wisdom that Diotima represents. It’s not just what Alcibiades says in the Symposium, but also what he symbolizes. Alcibiades gives a speech in honor of Socrates and of his unrequited love for him, but even (...)
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  19. added 2019-02-19
    Epoché as the Erotic Conversion of One Into Two.Rachel Aumiller - 2017 - In Giuseppe Veltri (ed.), Yearbook of the Maimonides Centre for Advanced Studies. Berlin, Germany: pp. 3-13.
    This essay interprets the epoché of ancient scepticism as the perpetual conversion of the love of one into the love of two. The process of one becoming two is represented in Plato’s Symposium by Diotima’s description of the second rung of ‘the ladder,’ by which one ascends to the highest form of philosophical devotion (Pl. Sym. 209e-210e). Diotima’s ladder offers a vision of philosophy as a total conversion of both the lover and the object of love (or philosopher and object (...)
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  20. added 2018-12-16
    André Höhn: Beobachtungen zur Formung des Sokratesbildes im platonischen 'Symposion'. [REVIEW]Gregor Damschen & Rafael Ferber - 2014 - Gnomon 86 (7):644-646.
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  21. added 2018-08-26
    Die komplexe Anlage von Vorgespräch und Rahmenhandlung und andere literarisch-formale Aspekte des Symposion (172a1-178a5).Jula Wildberger - 2012 - In Christoph Horn (ed.), Platon, Symposion (Series: Klassiker Auslegen). Berlin: Akademie Verlag. pp. 17-34.
    Reads the frame of Plato’s Symposium and analyses this dialogue’s humor and literary form with a view to the philosophical import of such means of expression. Argues that the frame introduces the Symposium as an over-the-top parody of Platonic dialogue. Multiple layers of reporting and the leitmotif of mirror-imitation points the reader to the futility of such forms of reception.
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  22. added 2018-06-26
    Poietical Subjects in Heidegger, Kristeva, and Aristotle.Melissa Shew - 2010 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 2 (1):63-80.
    Prompted by Eryximachus’ speech about the relationship between Eros and health in Plato’s Symposium, this paper engages the nature of poiēsis as it arises in the works of Martin Heidegger, Julia Kristeva, and Aristotle. All three address poiēsis as a human activity that points beyond an individual person, and in so doing speaks to what’s possible for human life. Section I addresses Heidegger, whose insistance on the interplay between “earth” and “world” in “The Origin of a Work of Art” speaks (...)
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  23. added 2018-06-23
    The Role of the Earlier Speeches in the "Symposium": Plato's Endoxic Method?Frisbee C. C. Sheffield - 2006 - In J. H. Lesher, Debra Nails & Frisbee C. C. Sheffield (eds.), Plato's Symposium: Issues in Interpretation and Reception. Harvard University Press.
  24. added 2018-06-13
    Friendship - (M.P.) Nichols Socrates on Friendship and Community. Reflections on Plato's Symposium, Phaedrus, and Lysis. Pp. Viii + 229. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2009. Paper, £17.99, US$28.99 (Cased, £45, US$80). ISBN: 978-0-521-14883-2 (978-0-521-89973-4 Hbk). [REVIEW]Mary Shanahan - 2011 - The Classical Review 61 (2):404-406.
  25. added 2018-04-05
    Tragedy Off-Stage.Debra Nails - 2006 - In J. H. Lesher, Debra Nails & Frisbee C. C. Sheffield (eds.), Plato's Symposium: Issues in Interpretation and Reception. Harvard University Press.
    I argue that the tragedies envisioned by the Symposium are two, both of which are introduced in the dialogue: (i) within months of Agathon's victory, half the characters who celebrated with him suffer death or exile on charges of impiety; (ii) Socrates is executed weeks after the dramatic date of the frame. Thus the most defensible notion of tragedy across Plato's dialogues is a fundamentally epistemological one: if we do not know the good, we increase our risk of making mistakes (...)
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  26. added 2018-03-06
    Plato: Symposium. [REVIEW]Gary Alan Scott - 1995 - Ancient Philosophy 15 (2):632-633.
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  27. added 2018-02-09
    Bad Luck to Take a Woman Aboard.Debra Nails - 2015 - In Debra Nails & Harold Tarrant (eds.), Second Sailing: Alternative Perspectives on Plato. Helsinki, Finland: Societas Scientiarum Fennica. pp. 73-90.
    Despite Diotima’s irresistible virtues and attractiveness across the millennia, she spells trouble for philosophy. It is not her fault that she has been misunderstood, nor is it Plato’s. Rather, I suspect, each era has made of Diotima what it desired her to be. Her malleability is related to the assumption that Plato invented her, that she is a mere literary fiction, licensing the imagination to do what it will. In the first part of my paper, I argue against three contemporary (...)
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  28. added 2017-11-13
    Plato's Theory of Desire.Charles H. Kahn - 1987 - Review of Metaphysics 41 (1):77 - 103.
    My aim here is to make sense of Plato's account of desire in the middle dialogues. To do that I need to unify or reconcile what are at first sight two quite different accounts: the doctrine of eros in the Symposium and the tripartite theory of motivation in the Republic. It may be that the two theories are after all irreconcilable, that Plato simply changed his mind on the nature of human desire after writing the Symposium and before composing the (...)
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  29. added 2017-11-12
    Die Rede der Diotima. [REVIEW]H. S. Schibli - 1999 - Ancient Philosophy 19 (1):159-165.
  30. added 2017-10-27
    Passionate Platonic Love in the Phaedrus.Gerasimos Santas - 1982 - Ancient Philosophy 2 (2):105-114.
  31. added 2017-10-27
    Plato's Theory of Eros in the Symposisum: Abstract.Gerasimos Santas - 1979 - Noûs 13 (1):67-75.
  32. added 2017-10-09
    The Symposium as a Socratic Dialogue.Christopher Rowe - 2006 - In J. H. Lesher, Debra Nails & Frisbee C. C. Sheffield (eds.), Plato's Symposium: Issues in Interpretation and Reception. Harvard University Press.
  33. added 2017-09-22
    Zum Begriff der Liebe in Platons Symposion oder: Warum ist Diotima eine Frau?Eva-Maria Engelen - 2001 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 6:1-20.
    The feminine component which can be identified with creativity is, according to Plato, crucial for education and knowledge. This essay examines how Plato in the Symposium expresses his conception of educational and cognitive relationships in analogy to amorous relationships. This analogy makes it evident why Diotima is a woman. The essay shows in addition how Eros leads to knowledge and immortality, as well as how Socrates incarnates Eros in this Platonic conception. The question is also considered whether Plato subscribed to (...)
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  34. added 2017-02-16
    The Object of Alcibiades' Love.Harold Tarrant - 2009 - Literature & Aesthetics 19 (1):74-87.
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  35. added 2017-02-15
    Review of Cooksey T. L., Plato’s Symposium: A Reader's Guide, Continuum, London-New York 2010. [REVIEW]Laura Candiotto - unknown
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  36. added 2017-02-15
    Eros, Paideia and Arete: The Lesson of Plato's Symposium.Jason St John Oliver Campbell - unknown
    Commentators of Plato's Symposium rarely recognize the importance of traditional Greek conceptions of Eros, paideia and arete in understanding Plato's critique of the various educational models presented in the dialogue. I will show how Plato contests these models by proposing that education should consist of philosophy. On this interpretation, ancient Greek pedagogy culminates in a philosophical education. For this new form of education, the dialogical model supplants the traditional practices of kleos and poetic mimsis, inextricably bound to archaia paideia and (...)
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  37. added 2017-02-15
    Plato's Symposium: A Translation by Seth Benardete with Commentaries by Allan Bloom and Seth Benardete.Seth Benardete (ed.) - 2001 - University of Chicago Press.
    Plato, Allan Bloom wrote, is "the most erotic of philosophers," and his Symposium is one of the greatest works on the nature of love ever written. This new edition brings together the English translation of the renowned Plato scholar and translator, Seth Benardete, with two illuminating commentaries on it: Benardete's "On Plato's _Symposium_" and Allan Bloom's provocative essay, "The Ladder of Love." In the _Symposium,_ Plato recounts a drinking party following an evening meal, where the guests include the poet Aristophanes, (...)
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  38. added 2017-02-15
    Plato’s Bond of Love : Erôs as Participation in Beauty.Lauren Patricia Wenden Ware - unknown
    In his dialogues, Plato presents different ways in which to understand the relation between Forms and particulars. In the Symposium, we are presented with yet another, hitherto unidentified Form-particular relation: the relation is Love, which binds together Form and particular in a generative manner, fulfilling all the metaphysical requirements of the individual’s qualification by participation. Love in relation to the beautiful motivates human action to desire for knowledge of the Form, resulting in the lover actively cultivating and bringing into being (...)
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  39. added 2017-02-14
    Gary Allan Scott and William A. Welton, Erotic Wisdom: Philosophy and Intermediacy in Plato's Symposium.James Stillwaggon - 2009 - Philosophy in Review 29 (5):375.
  40. added 2017-02-14
    Kevin Corrigan and Elena Glazov-Corrigan, Plato's Dialectic at Play: Argument, Structure and Myth in the Symposium Reviewed By.Aara Suksi - 2006 - Philosophy in Review 26 (6):397-399.
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  41. added 2017-02-14
    I. Reception: Interpretation, Assbiilation and Elaboration Around The.German Phenomenology Fltom - 2003 - In Anna-Teresa Tymieniecka (ed.), Phenomenology World-Wide. Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 255.
  42. added 2017-02-13
    Virtue as the Love of Knowledge in Plato's Symposium and Republic'.Melissa Lane - 2007 - In Myles Burnyeat & Dominic Scott (eds.), Maieusis: Essays in Ancient Philosophy in Honour of Myles Burnyeat. Oxford University Press. pp. 44--67.
  43. added 2017-02-13
    Reception and Interpretation.Simon Swain - 2000 - In Dio Chrysostom: Politics, Letters, and Philosophy. Oxford University Press. pp. 13--50.
  44. added 2017-02-13
    The Masks of Dionysus: A Commentary on Plato's Symposium. [REVIEW]Elizabeth Pender & D. Anderson - 1993 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 115:206-207.
    The metaphysical center of Plato’s work has traditionally been taken to be his Doctrine of Forms; the epistemological center, the Doctrine of Recollection. The Symposium has been viewed as one of the clearest explanations of the first and Meno as one of the clearest explanations of the other. The Masks of Dionysos challenges these traditional interpretations.
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  45. added 2017-02-13
    The Twelve Olympians and Their Guests.P. G. Mason & C. Seltman - 1957 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 77 (2):341-342.
  46. added 2017-02-13
    Agathon. By P. Lévêque. Pp. 176. Paris: ‘Les Belles Lettres’, 1955. Price Not Stated.T. B. L. Webster & P. Leveque - 1956 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 76:115-116.
  47. added 2017-02-12
    Middle-Level Party Elite Members' Attitudes Toward Candidate Selection Within Italian Parties.Aldo Di Virgilio & Daniela Giannetti - 2011 - Polis: Research and studies on Italian society and politics 25 (2):205-234.
  48. added 2017-02-12
    Leaders in the Years to Come: Attitudes and Opinions of Party Delegates in Italy.Paola Bordandini, Aldo Di Virgilio & Rosa Mulé - 2011 - Polis: Research and studies on Italian society and politics 25 (2):159-170.
  49. added 2017-02-12
    Participation and Parties: The Positions of Party Congress Delegates.Francesco Raniolo - 2011 - Polis: Research and studies on Italian society and politics 25 (2):235-262.
  50. added 2017-02-12
    Turning the Cup: Thematic Balance in the Greek Symposium.Matthew Naglak - 2010 - Inquiry: The University of Arkansas Undergraduate Research Journal 11.
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