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  1. Symposium.Plato . (ed.) - 2008 - Oxford University Press UK.
    In his celebrated masterpiece, Symposium, Plato imagines a high-society dinner-party in Athens in 416 BC at which the guests - including the comic poet Aristophanes and, of course, Plato's mentor Socrates - each deliver a short speech in praise of love. The sequence of dazzling speeches culminates in Socrates' famous account of the views of Diotima, a prophetess who taught him that love is our means of trying to attain goodness. And then into the party bursts the drunken Alcibiades, the (...)
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  2. Plato, Republic II. 368 A and Symposium 174B.J. Adam - 1896 - The Classical Review 10 (05):237-239.
  3. A Note on the Elenchus of Agathon.R. E. Allen - 1966 - The Monist 50 (3):460-463.
  4. Tacitus' Dialogus and Plato's Symposium.June Allison - 1999 - Hermes 127 (4):479-492.
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  5. The Failed Seduction.James M. Ambury - 2013 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 17 (2):257-274.
    In this paper I argue that Plato’s Alcibiades is the embodiment of what I call the epithumetic comportment, a way of life made possible by the naïve ontological assumption that appearance is all that is. In the first part of the paper, I read select portions of the Alcibiades I and establish a distinction between the epithumetic comportment, which desires gratification in exchange for flattery, and the erotic comportment, which desires care of the soul. In the second half of the (...)
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  6. The Masks of Dionysos: A Commentary on Plato's Symposium.Daniel E. Anderson - 1993 - State University of New York Press.
    The metaphysical center of Plato’s work has traditionally been taken to be his Doctrine of Forms; the epistemological center, the Doctrine of Recollection. The Symposium has been viewed as one of the clearest explanations of the first and Meno as one of the clearest explanations of the other. The Masks of Dionysos challenges these traditional interpretations.
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  7. The Secret of Plato'ssymposium.John P. Anton - 1974 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 12 (3):277-293.
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  8. Review of Frisbee C. C. Sheffield, Plato’s Symposium: The Ethics of Desire (Oxford University Press, 2006). [REVIEW]John M. Armstrong - 2009 - Ancient Philosophy 29 (1):208–212.
    The purpose of Sheffield’s careful study is to increase scholarly appreciation of the Symposium as a ‘substantive work in Platonic ethics’ (3). Among the book’s highlights are a persuasive response to Vlastos’ criticism of Plato on love for individuals, an eminently reasonable assessment of the evidence for and against the presence of tripartite psychology in the Symposium, and a delightful interpretation of Alcibiades’ speech at the dialogue’s end—one that reveals elements of satyr play and corroborates rather than undermines Diotima’s account (...)
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  9. Symposium.Archie J. Bahm - 1982 - Philosophical Topics 13 (Supplement):153-179.
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  10. Calpurnia's Dinner-Party.Maurice Baring - 2009 - The Chesterton Review 35 (1/2):36-43.
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  11. Kalmyk-Oirat Symposium.C. R. Bawden, Arash Bormanshinov & John R. Krueger - 1967 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 87 (4):613.
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  12. Symposium: Philosophical Argument.W. Bednarowski & J. R. Tucker - 1965 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 39:19 - 64.
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  13. C. Gill (Trans): Plato , The Symposium. Pp. Xlvi + 90. Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1999. Paper, £5099. ISBN: 0-14-044616-.Elizabeth Belfiore - 2000 - The Classical Review 50 (02):583-.
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  14. The symposium L. Brisson (trans.): Platon : Le banquet. Pp. 261. PAris: G. F. flammarion, 1998. Paper, frs. 21. isbn: 2-08070987-9. C. J. Rowe: Il symposio di Platone. Cinque lezioni sul dialogo con un ulteriore contributo sul fedone E Una breve discussione con Maurizio Migliori E Arianna fermani. A cura di Maurizio Migliori . Pp. 115. Sankt Augustin: Academia verlag, 1998. Cased. Isbn: 3-89665-091-2. C. J. Rowe: Plato: Symposium (classical texts). Pp. VIII + 231. Warminster: Aris & Phillips, 1998. Paper, £16.50. Isbn: 0-85668-615-. [REVIEW]Elizabeth Belfiore - 2000 - The Classical Review 50 (01):20-.
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  15. Socrates' Daimonic Art: Love for Wisdom in Four Platonic Dialogues.Elizabeth S. Belfiore - 2016 - Cambridge University Press.
    Despite increasing interest in the figure of Socrates and in love in ancient Greece, no recent monograph studies these topics in all four of Plato's dialogues on love and friendship. This book provides important new insights into these subjects by examining Plato's characterization of Socrates in Symposium, Phaedrus, Lysis and the often neglected Alcibiades I. It focuses on the specific ways in which the philosopher searches for wisdom together with his young interlocutors, using an art that is 'erotic', not in (...)
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  16. Leo Strauss on Plato's Symposium.Seth Benardete (ed.) - 2003 - University of Chicago Press.
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  17. Plato's Symposium: A Translation by Seth Benardete with Commentaries by Allan Bloom and Seth Benardete.Seth Benardete (ed.) - 2001 - University of Chicago Press.
    Plato, Allan Bloom wrote, is "the most erotic of philosophers," and his Symposium is one of the greatest works on the nature of love ever written. This new edition brings together the English translation of the renowned Plato scholar and translator, Seth Benardete, with two illuminating commentaries on it: Benardete's "On Plato's _Symposium_" and Allan Bloom's provocative essay, "The Ladder of Love." In the _Symposium,_ Plato recounts a drinking party following an evening meal, where the guests include the poet Aristophanes, (...)
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  18. Eros and Logos. [REVIEW]Eugenio Benitez - 1994 - Review of Metaphysics 48 (1):176-177.
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  19. The Moral of the Story: On Fables and Philosophy in Plato's 'Symposium'.Rick Benitez - 2015 - Modern Greek Studies (Australia and New Zealand) 1:1-14.
    Scholars have puzzled over the fact that Plato’s criticisms of poetry are themselves contained in mimetic works. This paper sheds light on that phenomenon by examining an analogous one. The Symposium contains one fable which is criticised by means of another which is thought to represent Plato’s own view. Diotima’s fable, however, is suspended within a larger narrative that invites us to examine and question it. The Symposium thus affords opportunity to observe Plato’s criticisms of a genre and the qualifications (...)
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  20. Symposium: On Being Forced to a Conclusion.Jonathan Bennett & O. P. Wood - 1961 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 35:15 - 44.
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  21. Eros and the Intoxications of Enlightenment: On Plato's Symposium.Steven Berg - 2011 - State University of New York Press.
    _Provocative reinterpretation of Plato's Symposium._.
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  22. Eros and the Intoxications of Enlightenment: On Plato's Symposium.Steven Berg - 2010 - State University of New York Press.
    Author Steven Berg offers an interpretation of this dialogue wherein all the speakers at the banquetwith the exception of Socratesnot only offer their views on ...
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  23. Plato's Critique of Poetry in the Symposium.Martin Black - 2009 - Literature & Aesthetics 19 (1):51-73.
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  24. The Interpersonal Aspect of Eros in Plato's "Symposium.".Donald N. Blakeley - 1978 - Dissertation, University of Hawai'i
  25. Where is Socrates on the "Ladder of Love"?Ruby Blondell - 2006 - In J. H. Lesher, Debra Nails & Frisbee C. C. Sheffield (eds.), Plato's Symposium: Issues in Interpretation and Reception. Harvard University Press. pp. 147--178.
  26. K. Sier: Die Rede der Diotima: Untersuchungen zum platonischen Symposion . (Beiträge zum Altertumskunde, 86). Pp. xvi + 329. Stuttgart and Leipzig: B. G. Teubner, 1997. Cased, DM 98. ISBN: 3-519-07635-. [REVIEW]Dougal Blyth - 2000 - The Classical Review 50 (02):621-.
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  27. Leaders in the Years to Come: Attitudes and Opinions of Party Delegates in Italy.Paola Bordandini, Aldo Di Virgilio & Rosa Mulé - 2011 - Polis: Research and studies on Italian society and politics 25 (2):159-170.
  28. Diotima Tells a Story: A Narrative Analysis of Plato's Symposium'.Anne-Marie Bowery - 1996 - In Julie K. Ward (ed.), Feminism and Ancient Philosophy. Routledge.
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  29. Thinking with Drinking: Wine and the Symposium in Aristophanes.A. M. Bowie - 1997 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 117:1-21.
  30. Early Greek Elegy, Symposium and Public Festival.Ewen Lyall Bowie - 1986 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 106:13-35.
  31. Agathon, Pausanias, and Diotima in Plato's Symposium : Paiderastia and Philosophia.Luc Brisson - 2006 - In J. H. Lesher, Debra Nails & Frisbee C. C. Sheffield (eds.), Plato's Symposium: Issues in Interpretation and Reception. Harvard University Press.
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  32. Symposium: Seeming.Karl Britton, H. H. Price & A. Quinton - 1952 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 26 (1):195 - 252.
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  33. The Symposium of Plato.R. G. Bury - 1910 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 30 (74):183.
  34. Eros, Paideia and Arete: The Lesson of Plato's Symposium.Jason St John Oliver Campbell - unknown
    Commentators of Plato's Symposium rarely recognize the importance of traditional Greek conceptions of Eros, paideia and arete in understanding Plato's critique of the various educational models presented in the dialogue. I will show how Plato contests these models by proposing that education should consist of philosophy. On this interpretation, ancient Greek pedagogy culminates in a philosophical education. For this new form of education, the dialogical model supplants the traditional practices of kleos and poetic mimsis, inextricably bound to archaia paideia and (...)
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  35. Ludwig von Sybel on the Symposium of Plato Platon's Symposion: Ein Programm der Academie, von L. V. Sybel. 1888. Marburg: Elwert. Pp. Viii. 122. 3 Mk. [REVIEW]L. Campbell - 1890 - The Classical Review 4 (05):209-210.
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  36. Review of Thomas L. Cooksey, Plato's Symposium: A Reader's Guide, Continuum, London-New York. 2010. [REVIEW]Laura Candiotto - 2013 - Plato: The Internet Journal of the International Plato Society (Plato 12 (2012)).
    The book consists of four chapters (1.Context; 2. Overview of Themes; 3. Reading the Text; 4. Reception and Influence) that offer the reader guidance in reading Plato's Symposium. Secondary literature is mostly in English. The line of interpretation may be defined as partly literary and partly thematic — being aware of the philosophical significance of the adopted style. The literary part contains a detailed description of the characters and the frame story; the thematic part comprises: (…) - 12. Plato 12 (...)
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  37. Review of Cooksey T. L., Plato’s Symposium: A Reader's Guide, Continuum, London-New York 2010. [REVIEW]Laura Candiotto - unknown
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  38. Love as a Problem of Knowledge in Kierkegaard's Either/Or and Plato's Symposium.Ulrika Carlsson - 2010 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 53 (1):41-67.
    At the end of the essay “Silhouettes” in Either/Or , Kierkegaard writes, “only the person who has been bitten by snakes knows what one who has been bitten by snakes must suffer.” I interpret this as an allusion to Alcibiades' speech in Plato's Symposium. Kierkegaard invites the reader to compare Socrates to Don Giovanni, and Alcibiades to the seduced women. Socrates' philosophical method, in this light, is a deceptive seduction: just as Don Giovanni's seduction leads his conquests to unhappy love—what (...)
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  39. Plato in the Courtroom: The Surprising Influence of the Symposium on Legal Theory.Jeffrey Carnes - 2006 - In J. H. Lesher, Debra Nails & Frisbee C. C. Sheffield (eds.), Plato's Symposium: Issues in Interpretation and Reception. Harvard University Press.
  40. Plato in the Courtroom: The Surprising Influence of the Symposium on Legal Theory.Jeffrey Carries - 2006 - In J. H. Lesher, Debra Nails & Frisbee C. C. Sheffield (eds.), Plato's Symposium: Issues in Interpretation and Reception. Harvard University Press. pp. 22--272.
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  41. Chairing a Symposium.Peter Caws - 1988 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 61 (5):863 -.
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  42. Plato's Form of the Beautiful in the Symposium Versus Aristotle's Unmoved Mover in the Metaphysics ( ).K. -C. Chang - 2002 - Classical Quarterly 52 (2):431-446.
  43. Acquiring Knowledge of the Ideas: A Study of Plato's Methods in the Phaedo, the Symposium and the Central Books of the Republic.Kang Chen - 1992 - F. Steiner.
  44. Knowledge of Beauty in Plato's Symposium.Ludwig C. H. Chen - 1983 - Classical Quarterly 33 (01):66-.
    Plato's Symposium consists of six speeches on Eros with the addition of Alcibiades' praise of Socrates. Of these speeches Socrates' speech is philosophically most important. It is true that the speech is given as a report of Diotima's view on Eros, but ‘she is a double of the Platonic Socrates’, and we take her view as the theory of Socrates in this dialogue.
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  45. The Comic Poet of Plato's Symposium.Diskin Clay - 2005 - Skepsis: A Journal for Philosophy and Interdisciplinary Research 16 (1-2).
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  46. Plato's Dialectic at Play: Argument, Structure, and Myth in the Symposium.Kevin Corrigan & Elena Glazov-Corrigan - 2005 - Pennsylvania State University Press.
    The _Symposium_ is one of Plato’s most accessible dialogues, an engrossing historical document as well as an entertaining literary masterpiece. By uncovering the structural design of the dialogue, _Plato’s Dialectic at Play _aims at revealing a Plato for whom the dialogical form was not merely ornamentation or philosophical methodology but the essence of philosophical exploration: his dialectic is not only argument, it is also play. Careful analysis of each layer of the text leads cumulatively to a picture of the dialogue’s (...)
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  47. Plato and Medical Texts: Symposium 185c-193d1.E. M. Craik - 2001 - Classical Quarterly 51 (1):109-114.
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  48. The Play of Anticipation and Competition in Plato’s Symposium.Joseph Cummins - 2005 - Skepsis: A Journal for Philosophy and Interdisciplinary Research 16 (1-2).
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  49. Hunter (R.) Plato's Symposium. Pp. Xiv + 150. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004. Paper, £9.99 (Cased, £45). ISBN: 978-0-19-516080-2 (978-0-19-516079-6 Hbk). [REVIEW]Armand D'angour - 2007 - The Classical Review 57 (01):38-.
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  50. André Höhn: Beobachtungen zur Formung des Sokratesbildes im platonischen 'Symposion'. [REVIEW]Gregor Damschen & Rafael Ferber - 2014 - Gnomon 86 (7):644-646.
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