About this topic
Summary Under construction. This category will primarily index works discussing the peculiar principle known as "the idea/form of the good" (he tou agathou idea) or "the good itself," in Plato, which cuts across distinctions of ethics, metaphysics, epistemology, and logic. For usefulness' sake, it will not index works on, e.g., ethics in general, justice, the good life, or the best regime in Plato, as intimately connected to the question of the capital-G Good as these admittedly are, unless they significantly discuss this principle. (These works can be found in the branch categories Plato: Ethics and Plato: Political Philosophy, which would otherwise be entirely reproduced here.) For discussion of the One, with which, per Aristotle's report, Plato eventually came to identify the Good, see especially Plato: Parmenides and Plato: One and Many. 
Key works [Under construction.] Gadamer 1988 is a classic hermeneutical study minimizing the distance between Plato and Aristotle. Important anthologies include Reale & Scolnicov 2002 and Cairns et al 2007.  
Introductions Ferber 2012
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125 found
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1 — 50 / 125
  1. The Philosopher’s Reward: Contemplation and Immortality in Plato’s Dialogues.Suzanne Obdrzalek - forthcoming - In Alex Long (ed.), Immortality in Ancient Philosophy.
    In dialogues ranging from the Symposium to the Timaeus, Plato appears to propose that the philosopher’s grasp of the forms may confer immortality upon him. Whatever can Plato mean in making such a claim? What does he take immortality to consist in, such that it could constitute a reward for philosophical enlightenment? And how is this proposal compatible with Plato’s insistence throughout his corpus that all soul, not just philosophical soul, is immortal? In this chapter, I pursue these questions by (...)
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  2. Platonische Aufsätze.Rafael Ferber - 2020 - Berlin / Boston: De Gruyter.
    The volume contains a selection of essays on Plato from his Socratic beginnings to his aftermath in the works of Donald Davidson and Hans Georg Gadamer. Particular attention is paid to the Idea of the Good and the question of its transcendence and immanence.
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  3. The Telos Problem in Plato’s Symposium.Edith Gwendolyn Nally - 2020 - In Evan Keeling & Georgia Sermamoglou (eds.), Wisdom, Love and Friendship in Ancient Philosophy. De Gruyter.
  4. On Socrates' Project of Philosophical Conversion.Jacob Stump - 2020 - Philosophers' Imprint 20 (32):1-19.
    There is a wide consensus among scholars that Plato’s Socrates is wrong to trust in reason and argument as capable of converting people to the life of philosophy. In this paper, I argue for the opposite. I show that Socrates employs a more sophisticated strategy than is typically supposed. Its key component is the use of philosophical argument not to lead an interlocutor to rationally conclude that he must change his way of life but rather to cause a certain affective (...)
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  5. Measuring Humans Against Gods: On the Digression of Plato’s Theaetetus.Jens Kristian Larsen - 2019 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 101 (1):1-29.
    The digression of Plato’s Theaetetus (172c2–177c2) is as celebrated as it is controversial. A particularly knotty question has been what status we should ascribe to the ideal of philosophy it presents, an ideal centered on the conception that true virtue consists in assimilating oneself as much as possible to god. For the ideal may seem difficult to reconcile with a Socratic conception of philosophy, and several scholars have accordingly suggested that it should be read as ironic and directed only at (...)
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  6. The Emerging Good in Plato’s Philebus. [REVIEW]Colin C. Smith - 2018 - Ancient Philosophy 38 (2):451-454.
    Review of 'The Emerging Good in Plato's' Philebus by John V. Garner (Northwestern University Press, 2017).
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  7. Philosopher Rulers and False Beliefs.Nicholas Baima - 2017 - Ancient Philosophy 37 (1):19-37.
    Many scholars have viewed the noble lie as fundamentally a device for educating the non-philosophers in the Kallipolis. On this reading, the elite and sophisticated philosopher rulers lie to the non-philosophers, who are unable to fully grasp the truth; such lies help motivate the non-philosophers towards virtuous activity and the promotion of the common good. Hence, according to many scholars, the falsehoods of the noble lie play no role in motivating fully accomplished adult philosophers towards virtue. The motivation for this (...)
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  8. The Aristotelian Reception of the Idea of the Good According to Heidegger and Gadamer.Francisco J. Gonzalez - 2017 - Chôra 15:611-628.
    Pendant l’ete de 1928 Heidegger a offert un seminaire sur le troisieme livre de la Physique d’Aristote et donc sur l’explication aristotelicienne de la nature du mouvement. La derniere seance de ce cours, qui eut lieu le 25 juillet, est d’une grande importance parce que c’est a cette occasion que Heidegger va au livre neuf de la Metaphysique pour essayer de comprendre la notion ontologique qui est a la base de l’interpretation aristotelicienne du mouvement : l’energeia. Mais dans les protocoles (...)
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  9. What’s Next in Plato’s Clitophon?Brian Marrin - 2017 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (2):307-319.
    The Clitophon has posed a riddle to its readers: Why does Socrates not respond to the criticisms levelled against him? A careful reading of the dialogue shows that Clitophon’s criticism of Socrates already contains its own rebuttal. It is not, as many have suggested, certain beliefs of Clitophon’s that make a Socratic response impossible. Rather, Socrates’s silence is itself the response, intended to force Clitophon to turn back to what has already been said. It is Clitophon’ lack of self-knowledge, or (...)
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  10. Is the Idea of the Good Beyond Being? Plato's "Epekeina Tês Ousias" Revisited.Rafael Ferber & Gregor Damschen - 2015 - In Debra Nails, Harold Tarrant, Mika Kajava & Eero Salmenkivi (eds.), SECOND SAILING: Alternative Perspectives on Plato. Wellprint Oy. pp. 197-203.
    The article tries to prove that the famous formula "epekeina tês ousias" has to be understood in the sense of being beyond being and not only in the sense of being beyond essence. We make hereby three points: first, since pure textual exegesis of 509b8–10 seems to lead to endless controversy, a formal proof for the metaontological interpretation could be helpful to settle the issue; we try to give such a proof. Second, we offer a corollary of the formal proof, (...)
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  11. Evaluating the Goodness of Actions on Plato's Ethical Theory.Elizabeth Jelinek - 2015 - Philosophical Inquiry 39 (3-4):56-72.
  12. Plato's Republic as a Philosophical Drama on Doing Well.Ivor Ludlam - 2014 - Lexington Books.
    The Republic is widely recognized to be Plato’s masterpiece, but for centuries it has been the subject of much debate. Is it about the ideal state, or the soul, or art, or education, or something else altogether? Interpretations have been many and various, for two main reasons: studies have tended to concentrate on parts of this very long dialogue to the exclusion of other parts; and some of the opinions expressed in the dialogue are routinely regarded as being those of (...)
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  13. Was jede Seele sucht und worumwillen sie alles tut.Rafael Ferber - 2013 - Elenchos 34 (1):5-31.
    The article first (i) gives an exegesis of the famous passage in the Republic, 505d11-506a2. Attention is drawn to the fact that the principle that every soul does everything for the Good (panta prattei) can be translated in two ways: Every soul does everything for the sake of the Good, or goes to all lengths for the sake of the Good. Depending on the different translations, we have a different picture of the platonic Socrates in the Republic, an intellectualistic Socrates (...)
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  14. Goodness.Rafael Ferber - 2012 - In Associate Editors: Francisco Gonzalez Gerald A. Press (ed.), The Continuum Companion to Plato. pp. 177-179.
    This is a short overview of Plato’s „greatest thing to be learned“ or the „greatest lesson“ – the Idea of the Good.
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  15. The Concept of the Good (Tagathon) in Philosophy Before Plato.Artur Pacewicz - 2012 - Studia Philosophica Wratislaviensia 7.
    The aim of the article is to outline an interpretation of the philosophical understanding of the concept of the good in pre-Platonic thought. The interpretation is based on those fragments only in which the concept actually appears. As a result of the adopted assumption, the ideas of the first philosophers, i.e. Thales, Anaximander and Anaximenes, were outside the scope of the investigation, as well as those of Xenophanes, Eleatics, Empedocles, Anaxagoras and Leucippus. In the case of the first philosophical systems (...)
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  16. Gaita and Plato : Goodness, Love, and Beauty.Christopher Cordner - 2011 - In Christopher Cordner & Raimond Gaita (eds.), Philosophy, Ethics, and a Common Humanity: Essays in Honour of Raimond Gaita. Routledge.
  17. The Division of Goods and Praising Justice for Itself in Republic II.Andrew Payne - 2011 - Phronesis 56 (1):58-78.
    In Republic II Glaucon assigns to Socrates the task of praising justice for itself. What it means to praise justice for itself is unclear. A new interpretation is offered on the basis of an analysis of Glaucon's division of goods. A distinction is developed between criterial benefits, those valuable consequences of a thing which provide a standard for evaluating a thing as a good instance of its type, and fringe benefits, valuable consequences which do not provide such a standard. Socrates (...)
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  18. Review of Sarah Allen, The Philosophical Sense of Transcendence: Levinas and Plato on Loving Beyond Being[REVIEW]Deborah Achtenberg - 2010 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (9).
  19. Gorgias' Defense: Plato and His Opponents on Rhetoric and the Good.Rachel Barney - 2010 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 48 (1):95-121.
    This paper explores in detail Gorgias' defense of rhetoric in Plato 's Gorgias, noting its connections to earlier and later texts such as Aristophanes' Clouds, Gorgias' Helen, Isocrates' Nicocles and Antidosis, and Aristotle's Rhetoric. The defense as Plato presents it is transparently inadequate; it reveals a deep inconsistency in Gorgias' conception of rhetoric and functions as a satirical precursor to his refutation by Socrates. Yet Gorgias' defense is appropriated, in a streamlined form, by later defenders of rhetoric such as Isocrates (...)
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  20. Notes on the Kalon and the Good in Plato.Rachel Barney - 2010 - Classical Philology 105:363-377.
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  21. Plato on the Desire for the Good.Rachel Barney - 2010 - In Sergio Tenenbaum (ed.), Desire, Practical Reason, and the Good. Oxford University Press. pp. 34--64.
  22. Plato's "Side Suns" : Beauty, Symmetry and Truth. Comments Concerning Semantic Monism and Pluralism of the "Good" in the "Philebus".Rafael Ferber - 2010 - Elenchos: Rivista di Studi Sul Pensiero Antico 31 (1):51-76.
    Under semantic monism I understand the thesis “The Good is said in one way” and under semantic pluralism the antithesis “The Good is said in many ways”. Plato’s Socrates seems to defend a “semantic monism”. As only one sun exists, so the “Good” has for Socrates and Plato only one reference. Nevertheless, Socrates defends in the Philebus a semantic pluralism, more exactly trialism, of “beauty, symmetry and truth” . Therefore, metaphorically speaking, there seem to exist not only one sun, but (...)
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  23. Seeking the Truth and Taking Care for Common Goods – Plato on Expertise and Recognizing Experts.Jörg Hardy - 2010 - Episteme 7 (1):7-22.
    In this paper I discuss Plato's conception of expertise as a part of the Platonic theory of a good, successful life (eudaimonia). In various Platonic dialogues, Socrates argues that the good life requires a certain kind of knowledge that guides all our good, beneficial actions: the “knowledge of the good and bad”, which is to be acquired by “questioning ourselves and examining our and others’ beliefs”. This knowledge encompasses the particular knowledge of how to recognize experts in a given technical (...)
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  24. The Ranking of the Goods at Philebus 66a-67b.P. M. Lang - 2010 - Phronesis 55 (2):153-169.
    At the very end of Plato's Philebus Socrates and Protarchus place the goods of a human life in a hierarchy (66a-67b). Previous interpretations of this passage have concentrated upon its relevance to the good human life, including the allowance of (true and pure) pleasures. This view picks up Plato's metaphor of a mixture of reason and pleasure, but the ranking of the goods is emphatically a vertical stratification and not a mixture in which all elements are equally fundamental. In this (...)
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  25. Technê_ and the Good in Plato’s _Statesman_ and _Philebus.George Harvey - 2009 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (1):1-33.
    My paper addresses a number of questions raised in the Statesman by the Eleatic Visitor’s identification of certain ontological conditions for the existence of art of due measure, and therefore of all the technai. My view is that evidence relevant to these questions can be found in the Philebus, and specifically, in an ontological doctrine presented at 23c–27c. What emerges from an examination of the Statesman and Philebus is a highly developed conception of technê, one that affords a place for (...)
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  26. The Other of Contemporary Discourse About the Other: Plato's (Not the Platonic) Idea of the Good.Burt Hopkins - 2009 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 1 (1):105-117.
    For all its diversity, contemporary discourse about the Other shares the following suppositions: the Other in its radicality eludes the economy of the logic of the Same; it is beyond Being; its alterity is tied to the infinite in a manner that exceeds the ambit of thematization; and the problem it presents to philosophy is novel, in the precise sense that the dominant logic of the Western tradition, the so-called “logic of the Same” , is incapable of recognizing the full (...)
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  27. Douglas Cairns, Fritz-Gregor Hermann and Terry Penner (Eds.), Pursuing The Good: Ethics and Metaphysics in Plato's Republic.Jakub Jirsa - 2009 - Rhizai. A Journal for Ancient Philosophy and Science 11:77-88.
    Review of Douglas Cairns, Fritz-Gregor Hermann and Terry Penner , Pursuing The Good: Ethics and Metaphysics in Plato’s Republic, Edinburgh University Press, Edinburgh, 2007.
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  28. Philosophy (D.) Cairns, (F.) Hermann and (T.) Penner Eds Pursuing the Good: Ethics and Metaphysics in Plato's Republic. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2007. Pp. 327. £75. 9780748628117. [REVIEW]Jessica Moss - 2009 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 129:232-.
  29. Review of Le Philèbe de Platon: Introduction À L’Agathologie Platonicienne. [REVIEW]George Rudebusch - 2009 - Ancient Philosophy 29 (1):212-216.
  30. The Carpenter and the Good.Rachel Barney - 2008 - In D. Cairns, F. G. Herrmann & T. Penner (eds.), Pursuing the Good: Ethics and Metaphysics in Plato's Republic. University of Edinburgh.
    Among Aristotle’s criticisms of the Form of the Good is his claim that the knowledge of such a Good could be of no practical relevance to everyday rational agency, e.g. on the part of craftspeople. This critique turns out to hinge ultimately on the deeply different assumptions made by Plato and Aristotle about the relation of ‘good’ and ‘good for’. Plato insists on the conceptual priority of the former; and Plato wins the argument.
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  31. Good and Pleasure in the Protagoras.Panos Dimas - 2008 - Ancient Philosophy 28 (2):253-284.
  32. The Generosity of the Good.Joseph Grange - 2008 - Review of Metaphysics 62 (1):111-121.
    This paper presents a reflection upon Plato’s good that surpasses even being. It looks for parallels between Western and Asian sources and examines aspects of Pierce and Whitehead’s philosophy in some detail. Ultimately, it attempts to vindicate metaphysics from accusations of death.
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  33. The Lover of the Beautiful and the Good: Platonic Foundations of Aesthetic and Moral Value.John Neil Martin - 2008 - Synthese 165 (1):31-51.
    Though acknowledged by scholars, Plato’s identification of the Beautiful and the Good has generated little interest, even in aesthetics where the moral concepts are a current topic. The view is suspect because, e.g., it is easy to find examples of ugly saints and beautiful sinners. In this paper the thesis is defended using ideas from Plato’s ancient commentators, the Neoplatonists. Most interesting is Proclus, who applied to value theory a battery of linguistic tools with fixed semantic properties—comparative adjectives, associated gradable (...)
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  34. Daniel Russell, Plato on Pleasure and the Good Life. [REVIEW]Nickolas Pappas - 2008 - Ancient Philosophy 28 (1):227-232.
  35. Review: Daniel Russell: Plato on Pleasure and the Good Life. [REVIEW]N. Reshotko - 2008 - Mind 117 (465):218-223.
  36. The Good and the Just in Plato's Gorgias.Christopher Rowe - 2008 - Philosophical Inquiry 30 (3-4):55-75.
  37. Pursuing the Good: Ethics and Metaphysics in Plato's Republic.D. Cairns, F. G. Herrmann & T. Penner (eds.) - 2007 - University of Edinburgh.
  38. Review of Daniel Russell, Plato on Pleasure and the Good Life. [REVIEW]Sylvain Delcomminette - 2007 - The Classical Review 57 (01):40-41.
  39. Desire, Power and the Good in Plato's Gorgias.James Doyle - 2007 - Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 94 (1):15-36.
  40. Was Und Wie Hat Sokrates Gewusst.Rafael Ferber - 2007 - Elenchos 28 (1):5-40.
    The first part of the paper (p. 10-21) tries to answer the first question of the title and describes a set of seven “knowledge-claims” made by Socrates: 1. There is a distinction between right opinion and knowledge. 2. Virtue is knowledge. 3. Nobody willingly does wrong. 4. To do injustice is the greatest evil for the wrongdoer himself. 5. An even greater evil is if the wrongdoer is not punished. 6. The just person is happy; the unjust person is unhappy. (...)
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  41. The Unity of the Philebus: Metaphysical Assumptions of the Good Human Life.Cristina Ionescu - 2007 - Ancient Philosophy 27 (1):55-75.
  42. The Good, Advantage, Happiness, and the Form of the Good: How Continuous with Socratic Ethics is Platonic Ethics?Terry Penner - 2007 - In Terry Penner, Douglas Cairns & Fritz-Gregor Hermann (eds.), Pursuing the Good: Ethics and Metaphysics in Plato's Republic. Edinburgh University Press. pp. 93-123.
  43. What is the Form of the Good the Form Of: A Question About the Plot of the Republic.Terry Penner - 2007 - In Terry Penner, Douglas Cairnes & Fritz-Gregor Hermann (eds.), Pursuing the Good: Ethics an Metaphysics in Plato's Republic. Edinburgh University Press. pp. 42-60.
  44. Introduction.Terry Penner - 2007 - In Terry Penner, Douglas Cairns & Fritz-Gregor Hermann (eds.), 2007b. Edinburgh University Press. pp. 1-14.
  45. The Divided Soul and Desire for the Good in Plato's Republic.Mariana Anagnostopoulos - 2006 - In Gerasimos Xenophon Santas (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Plato's Republic. Blackwell. pp. 166--188.
  46. Le philèbe de Platon: Introduction À L’Agathologie Platonicienne.Sylvain Dr Delcomminette - 2006 - Brill.
    This book provides a comprehensive commentary of the Philebus designed to shed light on the nature and function of the good in Plato’s philosophy as a whole. Topics discussed include dialectic, pleasure, epistemology, and the relations between metaphysics and ethics.
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  47. Plato on the Attribution of Conative Attitudes.Rachana Kamtekar - 2006 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 88 (2):127-162.
    Plato’s Socrates famously claims that we want (bou9lesqai) the good, rather than what we think good (Gorgias 468bd). My paper seeks to answer some basic questions about this well-known but little-understood claim: what does the claim mean, and what is its philosophical motivation and significance? How does the claim relate to Socrates’ claim that we desire (e7piqumei=n)1 things that we think are good, which..
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  48. The Harmony of Plato and Aristotle.Matthew S. Linck - 2006 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 13 (2):38-44.
    The pervasive tendency to characterize Plato and Aristotle as philosophers who are fundamentally in opposition blocks an adequate contemporary reception of their writings. This tendency results in superficial presentations of the philosophical concerns of both thinkers and obscures the historical affinity between their global projects. This article provides an example of a reading that respects the accord between Plato and Aristotle on one crucial issue: the foundation of a good life. With respect to Plato’s Republic, I demonstrate that the harmonization (...)
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  49. Review of T. Penner and C. Rowe, "Plato's Lysis". [REVIEW]Suzanne Obdrzalek - 2006 - Bryn Mawr Classical Review 2006.
  50. Ist die Idee des Guten nicht transzendent oder ist sie es doch? Nochmals Platons ΕΠΕΚΕΙΝΑ ΤΗΣ ΟΥΣΙΑΣ.Rafael Ferber - 2005 - In Damir Barbaric (ed.), Platon über das Gute und die Gerechtigkeit / Plato on Goodness and Justice / Platone sul Bene e sulla Giustizia. Königshausen & Neumann. pp. 149-174.
    Plato scholars such as Matthias Baltes (1940-2003) and Luc Brisson have defended the thesis that Plato‘s Idea of the Good is on the one hand beyond being (epekeina tês ousias) in dignity and power, but is nevertheless not transcendent over being. The article gives first (I.), an introduction into the status questionis. Second (II.), it delivers the most important arguments for the thesis of Baltes and Brisson. Third (III.), it gives two counterarguments against the thesis. Fourth (IV), it deals with (...)
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