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1 — 50 / 83
  1. added 2019-05-17
    James A. Arieti: Interpreting Plato: The Dialogues as Drama. Pp. X+270. Savage, Maryland: Rowman & Littlefield, 1991. $46.25. [REVIEW]G. B. Kerferd - 1992 - The Classical Review 42 (2):455-456.
  2. added 2019-05-08
    G. A. Press : Who Speaks for Plato? Studies in Platonic Anonymity. Pp. Vi + 245. Lanham, Boulder, New York, and Oxford: Rowman & Littlefield, 2000. Paper, $23.95. ISBN: 0-8476-9219-1. [REVIEW]G. Boys-Stones - 2002 - The Classical Review 52 (1):173-174.
  3. added 2019-02-20
    Protreptic and Apotreptic: Aristotle's Dialogue Protrepticus.Monte Johnson - 2018 - In Olga Alieva, Annemare Kotze & Sophie Van der Meeren (eds.), When Wisdom Calls: Philosophical Protreptic in Antiquity. Turnhout. Belgium: Brepols Publishers. pp. 111-154.
    This paper has three major aims. The first is to defend the hypothesis that Aristotle’s lost work Protrepticus was a dialogue. The second is to explore the genres of ancient apotreptics, speeches that argue against doing philosophy and show the need for protreptic responses; our exploration is guided by Aristotle’s own analysis of apotreptics as well as protreptics in his Rhetorica. The third aim is to restore to the evidence base of Aristotle’s Protrepticus an apotreptic speech that argues against doing (...)
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  4. added 2018-12-17
    Grenzen des Gesprächs Über Ideen. Die Formen des Wissens Und Die Notwendigkeit der Ideen in Platons "Parmenides".Gregor Damschen - 2003 - In Gregor Damschen, Rainer Enskat & Alejandro G. Vigo (eds.), Platon und Aristoteles – sub ratione veritatis. Festschrift für Wolfgang Wieland zum 70. Geburtstag. Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht. pp. 31-75.
    Limits of the Conversation about Forms. Types of Knowledge and Necessity of Forms in Plato's "Parmenides". - Forms (ideas) are among the things that Plato is serious about. But about these things he says in his "Seventh Letter": "There neither is nor ever will be a treatise of mine on the subject." (341c, transl. J. Harward). Plato's statement suggests the question, why one does not and never can do justice to the Platonic forms by means of a written text about (...)
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  5. added 2018-12-16
    Das Prinzip des performativen Widerspruchs. Zur epistemologischen Bedeutung der Dialogform in Platons "Euthydemos".Gregor Damschen - 1999 - Méthexis 12:89–101.
    The principle of performative contradiction. On the epistemological significance of the dialogue form in Plato's "Euthydemus". - In this study, an analysis of the section 285d-288a of Plato's "Euthydemus" shall show two things: (1) The sophistic model of a world in which there is no contradiction, in which every linguistic utterance is true and every action correct, has no semantic inconsistencies, but can only be rejected with the help of the principle of performative contradictions. (2) It is precisely these performative (...)
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  6. added 2018-10-05
    Questionner, savoir, ignorer: réflexions sur les dialogues socratiques de Platon (leçon inaugurale à l'Université de Neuchâtel).Daniel Schulthess - 1986-1987 - Annales de l'Université de Neuchâtel:p.256-272.
    The author focuses on the role that the epistemic practice of questioning, as it is presented in the Platonic dialogues, plays by Socrates. A comparison with Hintikka’s theory of questioning in proposed: in Hintikka’s account it is the questioner who endeavours to obtain new knowledge by asking someone who presumptively possesses that knowledge, whereas Socrates questions his interlocutors to wake in them the awareness of a knowledge they don’t know to possess. The origin of this knowledge is to be searched (...)
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  7. added 2018-08-26
    Die komplexe Anlage von Vorgespräch und Rahmenhandlung und andere literarisch-formale Aspekte des Symposion (172a1-178a5).Jula Wildberger - 2012 - In Christoph Horn (ed.), Platon, Symposion (Series: Klassiker Auslegen). Berlin: Akademie Verlag. pp. 17-34.
    Reads the frame of Plato’s Symposium and analyses this dialogue’s humor and literary form with a view to the philosophical import of such means of expression. Argues that the frame introduces the Symposium as an over-the-top parody of Platonic dialogue. Multiple layers of reporting and the leitmotif of mirror-imitation points the reader to the futility of such forms of reception.
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  8. added 2018-07-28
    On Plato's Use of Socrates as a Character in His Dialogues.Hallvard Fossheim - 2008 - Rhizai. A Journal for Ancient Philosophy and Science 5:239-263.
    In this essay, it is first argued that there are several important motivations for considering as wholly legitimate the question concerning the presence of Socrates in Plato’s work. After sketching how reason in Plato’s dialogues is generally portrayed as embedded in the soul as a whole, I then apply these insights in arguing that this relation between character and thinking should inform our understanding of Plato’s Socrates as well. Socrates is present in the texts because reason, according to Plato, is (...)
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  9. added 2018-06-14
    (D.) Bostock Plato's "Phaedo". Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1986. Pp. X + 225. £22.50 (Bound), £9.95 (Paper). - (M. C.) Stokes Plato's Socratic Conversations: Drama and Dialectic in Three Dialogues. London: Athlone Press, 1986. Pp. Xiii + 520. £28.00. [REVIEW]R. W. Sharples - 1989 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 109:224-225.
  10. added 2018-06-04
    The Philosopher in Plato's Statesman. [REVIEW]Kenneth Seeskin - 1984 - Ancient Philosophy 4 (2):234-237.
  11. added 2018-05-19
    R. B. Rutherford. The Art of Plato: Ten Essays in Platonic Interpretation. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1995. Pp. Xv + 335. Cloth, $45.00. [REVIEW]Kenneth Seeskin - 1997 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 35 (3):457-458.
  12. added 2018-04-01
    Platonic Myth and Platonic Writing.Robert Zaslavsky - 1978 - Dissertation, Graduate Faculty of the New School for Social Research
  13. added 2018-03-04
    Sophist 237-239.George Rudebusch - 1991 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 29 (4):521-531.
    The text of Sophist 237-9 is aporetic and shares with many other dialogues this structure: A question is asked and an answer, given in a single sentence, is reached and accepted by the interlocutor. The the interlocutor is examined further and his assent undermined. I argue that the Stranger does not share Theaetetus' perplexity and holds the rejected answer. I explain the Stranger's behavior by appealing to his pedagogy.
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  14. added 2018-03-04
    Plato's Aporetic Style.George Rudebusch - 1989 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 27 (4):539-547.
    I describe an aporetic structure found in certain dialogues and explain the structure by showing how it serves, better than expository writing, the pedagogical goal of avoiding giving readers a false sense of knowledge in producing understanding of a philosophical account.
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  15. added 2018-02-17
    Unifying Plato: Charles Kahn on Platonic Prolepsis.Charles L. Griswold - 1990 - Ancient Philosophy 10 (2):243 - 262.
  16. added 2017-10-15
    Plato and Lit. Crit. [REVIEW]R. B. Rutherford - 1988 - Phronesis 33 (1):216-224.
  17. added 2017-10-14
    The Art of Plato: Ten Essays in Platonic Interpretation.R. B. Rutherford - 1995 - Harvard University Press.
    This book is not a study of Plato's philosophy, but a contribution to the literary interpretation of the dialogues, through analysis of their formal structure, ...
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  18. added 2017-10-14
    Review: Plato and Lit. Crit. [REVIEW]R. B. Rutherford - 1988 - Phronesis 33 (2):216 - 224.
  19. added 2017-10-12
    Making Dialogues - Nightingale A. W.: Genres in Dialogue: Plato and the Construct of Philosophy. Pp. Xiv + 222. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1995. Cased, £32.50/$49.95. ISBN: 0-521-48264-X. [REVIEW]R. B. Rutherford - 1997 - The Classical Review 47 (2):279-281.
  20. added 2017-10-06
    “Trialogical“ Duals In Plato's Euthydemus: Dramatic Influence on Plato's Illusion of the Dialogue.Wolfgang Polleichtner - 2011 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 14 (1):34-56.
  21. added 2017-10-06
    Contemplation and Virtue in Plato.F. Rosen - 1980 - Religious Studies 16 (1):85 - 95.
    This paper has been prompted by the conviction that a number of ethical and political doctrines in Plato remain obscure and somewhat unintelligible unless related to the contemplative experience of the Platonic philosopher. 1 I shall concentrate here on one such doctrine, the distinction between philosophic and popular virtue, especially as it appears in the Phaedo and the Gorgias . But in order first to clarify our conception of the relationship between contemplation and virtue, I shall examine the fourteenth-century English (...)
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  22. added 2017-10-01
    Plato and His Readers. A.K. Cotton Platonic Dialogue and the Education of the Reader. Pp. X + 330. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014. Cased, £70, Us$125. Isbn: 978-0-19-968405-2. [REVIEW]Alex Long - 2015 - The Classical Review 65 (1):49-51.
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  23. added 2017-10-01
    Form and Content in Plato's Philosophy.Philip Merlan & The Editors - 1947 - Journal of the History of Ideas 8 (4):406.
  24. added 2017-09-29
    Unifying Plato.Charles L. Griswold - 1990 - Ancient Philosophy 10 (2):243-262.
  25. added 2017-09-25
    Why Plato Wrote by Danielle S. Allen. [REVIEW]Lloyd P. Gerson - 2013 - Common Knowledge 19 (2):391-391.
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  26. added 2017-09-22
    Platonic Dialogue and the Education of the Reader.A. K. Cotton - 2014 - Oxford University Press.
    Cotton examines Plato 's ideas about education and learning, with a particular focus on the experiences a learner must go through in approaching philosophical understanding.
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  27. added 2017-09-22
    Christopher Rowe, Plato and the Art of Philosophical Writing. [REVIEW]Chloe Balla - 2009 - Rhizai. A Journal for Ancient Philosophy and Science 11:71-75.
    Review of Christopher Rowe, Plato and the Art of Philosophical Writing, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2007.
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  28. added 2017-02-27
    L'âme est un corps de femme.Giulia Sissa - 2000 - Paris: Odile Jacob.
  29. added 2017-02-14
    Turning Toward Philosophy: Literary Device and Dramatic Structure in Plato's Dialogues.Jill Gordon - 1999 - Pennsylvania State University Press.
    Acknowledging the powerful impact that Plato's dialogues have had on readers, Jill Gordon shows how the literary techniques Plato used function philosophically to engage readers in doing philosophy and attracting them toward the philosophical life. The picture of philosophical activity emerging from the dialogues, as thus interpreted, is a complex process involving vision, insight, and emotion basic to the human condition rather than a resort to pure reason as an escape from it. Since the literary features of Plato's writing are (...)
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  30. added 2017-02-12
    Plato and the Socratic Dialogue: The Philosophical Use of a Literary Form (Review).David Sider - 1999 - American Journal of Philology 120 (4):624-628.
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  31. added 2017-02-10
    Turning Toward Philosophy: Literary Device and Dramatic Structure in Plato's Dialogues, by Jill Gordon; X & 182 Pp. University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1999, $32.50. [REVIEW]Kenneth Seeskin - 2000 - Philosophy and Literature 24 (2):500-502.
  32. added 2017-02-08
    The Historical Reader of Plato's Protagoras1.D. Wolfsdorf - 1998 - Classical Quarterly 48 (01):126-.
    The popular question why Plato wrote dramatic dialogues, which is motivated by a just fascination and perplexity for contemporary scholars about the unique form of the Platonic texts, is confused and anachronistic; for it judges the Platonic texts qua philosophical texts in terms of post–Platonic texts not written in dramatic dialogic form. In comparison with these, the form of Platos early aporetic dialogues is highly unusual. Yet, in its contemporary milieu, the form of Platonic literature is relatively normal. Dramatic dialogue (...)
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  33. added 2017-02-03
    Plato and the Art of Philosophical Writing.Christopher Rowe - 2007 - Cambridge University Press.
    Plato's dialogues are usually understood as simple examples of philosophy in action. In this book Professor Rowe treats them rather as literary-philosophical artefacts, shaped by Plato's desire to persuade his readers to exchange their view of life and the universe for a different view which, from their present perspective, they will barely begin to comprehend. What emerges is a radically new Plato: a Socratic throughout, who even in the late dialogues is still essentially the Plato (and the Socrates) of the (...)
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  34. added 2017-01-12
    Cross-Examining Socrates: A Defense of the Interlocutors in Plato's Early Dialogues.John Beversluis - 2004 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book is a rereading of Plato's early dialogues from the point of view of the characters with whom Socrates engages in debate. Socrates' interlocutors are generally acknowledged to play important dialectical and dramatic roles, but no previous book has focused mainly on them. Existing studies are thoroughly dismissive of the interlocutors and reduce them to the status of mere mouthpieces for views which are hopelessly confused or demonstrably false. This book takes interlocutors seriously and treats them as genuine intellectual (...)
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  35. added 2016-12-12
    Plato and His Predecessors: The Dramatisation of Reason.Mary Margaret McCabe - 2007 - Cambridge University Press.
    How does Plato view his philosophical antecedents? Plato and his Predecessors considers how Plato represents his philosophical predecessors in a late quartet of dialogues: the Theaetetus, the Sophist, the Politicus and the Philebus. Why is it that the sophist Protagoras, or the monist Parmenides, or the advocate of flux, Heraclitus, are so important in these dialogues? And why are they represented as such shadowy figures, barely present at their own refutations? The explanation, the author argues, is a complex one involving (...)
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  36. added 2016-12-12
    The Play of Character in Plato's Dialogues.Ruby Blondell - 2002 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book attempts to bridge the gulf that still exists between 'literary' and 'philosophical' interpreters of Plato by looking at his use of characterization. Characterization is intrinsic to dramatic form and a concern with human character in an ethical sense pervades the dialogues on the discursive level. Form and content are further reciprocally related through Plato's discursive preoccupation with literary characterization. Two opening chapters examine the methodological issues involved in reading Plato 'as drama' and a set of questions surrounding Greek (...)
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  37. added 2016-12-12
    Genres in Dialogue: Plato and the Construct of Philosophy.Andrea Wilson Nightingale - 1995 - Cambridge University Press.
    This 1995 book takes as its starting point Plato's incorporation of specific genres of poetry and rhetoric into his dialogues. The author argues that Plato's 'dialogues' with traditional genres are part and parcel of his effort to define 'philosophy'. Before Plato, 'philosophy' designated 'intellectual cultivation' in the broadest sense. When Plato appropriated the term for his own intellectual project, he created a new and specialised discipline. In order to define and legitimise 'philosophy', Plato had to match it against genres of (...)
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  38. added 2015-05-01
    Plato: Dramatist of the Life of Reason.John Herman Randall - 1970 - New York: Columbia University Press.
  39. added 2015-04-30
    Why Did Plato Write Socratic Dialogues?William J. Prior - 1997 - Apeiron 30 (4):109 - 123.
    I argue that it was not Plato's intention in his Socratic dialogues to provide a biography of Socrates. Rather, his intention was to describe and defend the philosophical life against its critics. The Socratic dialogues are "unhappy encounters" between Socrates, defender of the life of philosophy, and those who do not comprehend or who reject that life.
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  40. added 2015-04-29
    The Play of the Platonic Dialogues.Gerald A. Press - 1998 - Ancient Philosophy 18 (2):477-480.
  41. added 2015-04-26
    Plato's Philosophers: The Coherence of the Dialogues.Gerald A. Press - 2012 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 50 (1):133-135.
    For most of the twentieth century, interpreters of Plato took little interest in the dramatic aspects of the dialogues, assumed Plato's teachings were directly expressed by their leading speakers, and sought to understand prima facie absences and inconsistencies among apparent teachings through a developmental picture of Plato's thought. Rarely did they explain why Plato occasionally used philosophical characters as different from each other and from Socrates as Parmenides, Timaeus, and the Eleatic Stranger, leaving Socrates present but largely silent. Nor did (...)
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  42. added 2015-04-20
    Plato and so On. A Dialogue on Philosophical Dialogues.Alois Pichler - unknown
    What have Plato's, Hume's and Wittgenstein's dialogues in common? And what can we learn from this question for our understanding of Wittgenstein? – This paper is a transcript of a lecture given in Bergen on May 4th, 2001.
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  43. added 2015-04-17
    Plato and His Predecessors: The Dramatisation of Reason.J. Palmer - 2002 - Philosophical Review 111 (2):299-302.
  44. added 2015-04-15
    Book Review: Genres in Dialogue: Plato and the Construct of Philosophy. [REVIEW]Andrea Wilson Nightingale - 1996 - Philosophy and Literature 20 (2).
  45. added 2015-04-13
    Le Dialogue Socratique. By Livio Rossetti.David J. Murphy - 2012 - Ancient Philosophy 32 (2):429-433.
  46. added 2015-04-13
    Philosophy (C.) Rowe Plato and the Art of Philosophical Writing. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2007. Pp. Ix + 290. £55. 9780521859325. [REVIEW]Penelope Murray - 2009 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 129:231-.
  47. added 2015-04-11
    Plato's Dialogue Form and the Cure of the Soul.Mark Matthew Moes - 1991 - Dissertation, University of Notre Dame
    Scholars often assume that Plato could have accomplished his purposes by employing an essay format, and that most of the views presented and defended by the philosophic masters in the dialogues are views he held when he composed those dialogues. Chapter 1 of this dissertation raises problems with these assumptions and discusses how Kenneth Sayre, Mitchell Miller, and Stanley Rosen assess the significance of Plato's dialogue form in the face of such problems. ;After providing a brief sketch of medical and (...)
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  48. added 2015-04-09
    Plato as Author: The Rhetoric of Philosophy.Ann N. Michelini (ed.) - 2003 - Brill.
    This collection presents stimulating and diverse essays by scholars from several different fields; the contributors have made important contributions to the ...
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  49. added 2015-04-08
    Plato and the Art of Philosophical Writing.Marina McCoy - 2011 - Ancient Philosophy 31 (1):203-208.
  50. added 2015-04-08
    Alcidamas, Isocrates, and Plato on Speech, Writing, and Philosophical Rhetoric.Marina Berzins McCoy - 2009 - Ancient Philosophy 29 (1):45-66.
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