Plato

Edited by Hugh Benson (University of Oklahoma)
Assistant editor: Mark Hallap (University of Western Ontario)
About this topic
Summary Plato (ca. 427-347 B.C.E.) was an Athenian philosopher who is widely recognized among the most important philosophers of the Western world.  Plato can be plausibly credited with the invention of philosophy as we understand it today – the rational, rigorous, and systematic study of fundamental questions concerning ethics, politics, psychology, theology, epistemology, and metaphysics.  He wrote primarily in dialogue form.  Among his most influential views are a commitment to the distinction between changeless, eternal forms and changeable, observable ordinary objects, the immortality of the soul, the distinction between knowledge and true belief and the view that knowledge is in some way recollection, that philosophers should be rulers and rulers philosophers, and that justice is in some way welcomed for its own sake.  He was a follower of Socrates, significantly influenced Aristotle, the Stoics, the Academic skeptics, Plotinus, among others, and founded the Academy, perhaps the first institution of higher learning in the west.
Key works Among the most well-known of Plato’s works (26 generally acknowledged dialogues and 13 more doubtful letters) are the Apology, Crito, Euthyphro, Protagoras, Gorgias, Meno, Phaedo, Republic, Symposium, Theaetetus, and Timaeus.  The standard English translations of the complete works can be found in Cooper 1997.
Introductions A good place to start studying Plato in general is the entry in Stanford Encyclopedia, Kraut 2008, Hare 1982, and Annas 2003.  Important collections of essays include Vlastos 1973, Kraut 1992, Fine 1999, Fine 1999, Fine 2008, and Benson 2006.
Related categories
Subcategories:
Plato, Misc (767)
History/traditions: Plato

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  1. Review of Marek Piechowiak, Plato's Conception of Justice and the Question of Human Dignity: Peter Lang Academic Publishers, 2019, ISBN: 978-3-631-65970-0, hbk, 296pp. [REVIEW]Szymon Mazurkiewicz - 2020 - Sophia 59 (1):177-179.
  2. Responses to Divine Communication.Octavian Gabor - forthcoming - Philosophy and Theology.
    Sophocles’s Oedipus Tyrannus shows that humans' problems do not appear when they listen to the gods, but when they listen to themselves imagining that they follow the gods. Instead of placing themselves in the service of the god, as Socrates does in Plato’s Apology, they only think that they follow the divinity, while they actually act according to their own understanding. If Sophocles’s play is a synopsis of this danger, Plato’s dialogue proposes a different attitude before divinity: instead of interpreting (...)
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  3. On the Value of Drunkenness in the Laws.Nicholas R. Baima - 2017 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 20 (1):65-81.
    Plato’s attitude towards drunkenness (μέθη) is surprisingly positive in the Laws, especially as compared to his negative treatment of intoxication in the Republic. In the Republic, Plato maintains that intoxication causes cowardice and intemperance (3.398e-399e, 3.403e, and 9.571c-573b), while in the Laws, Plato holds that it can produce courage and temperance (1.635b, 1.645d-650a, and 2.665c-672d). This raises the question: Did Plato change his mind, and if he did, why? Ultimately, this paper answers affirmatively and argues that this marks a substantive (...)
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  4. Puntos de Vista de la Verdad: Sobre El Carácter Polifónico Del Pensamiento Platónico.Cristián De Bravo Delorme - 2020 - Kriterion: Journal of Philosophy 61 (145):131-149.
    RESUMEN El siguiente artículo tiene como objetivo destacar el carácter polifónico del pensamiento platónico y poner en cuestión el sentido de la autoría de Platón. Suponer, a partir de obstinados prejuicios modernos, que Platón, tal como cualquier escritor moderno, habría expuesto su propia doctrina, es ignorar la importancia de la forma dramática de su pensamiento. El testimonio de la variedad de interlocutores y de puntos de vista que se suceden en los diferentes diálogos, nos invita a prestar atención a la (...)
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  5. Das Potências da Memória. A Afirmação da Transitoriedade Histórica E da Eternidade Das Ideias.Augusto B. De Carvalho Dias Leite - 2020 - Kriterion: Journal of Philosophy 61 (145):107-129.
    RESUMO A partir do exame da tradição heraclitiana e platônica sobre a transitoriedade e a imortalidade - conceitos compreendidos como universais - este artigo defende a seguinte antinomia como tese: para haver temporalidade é preciso haver eternidade. Essa tese é demonstrada por meio do estudo e atualização das noções de alma, espírito, ideia e memória, as quais estão conectadas invariavelmente ao tempo passado como princípio ontológico do fenômeno histórico. Para além do ponto de vista filosófico, portanto, da perspectiva específica do (...)
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  6. Philosophy as Agôn: A Study of Plato’s Gorgias and Related Texts, Written by Robert Metcalf.Tushar Irani - 2020 - Polis 37 (2):373-377.
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  7. The Gatekeeper: Narrative Voice in Plato’s Dialogues, Written by Margalit Finkelberg.Paul O’Mahoney - 2020 - Polis 37 (2):368-372.
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  8. Plato's Republic.Rico Vitz - 2014 - In Steven Wilkens & Don Thorsen (eds.), Twelve Great Books that Changed the University. Eugene, OR, USA: pp. 17-35.
    The aims of this volume, Twelve Great Books that Changed the University, are to introduce a dozen great books to non-specialists and to explain the impact of these texts both on the academy and on Christian life. In this chapter, I attempt to do three things in order to provide a helpful introduction to Plato's Republic. I begin by providing an overview of the work. I continue by explaining the enduring significance of the text for the university itself, for philosophy, (...)
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  9. O anel de Giges e o Arconte: um estudo do diálogo República, de Platão.Fernando Machado - 2019 - Revista Filogênese – Revista Eletrônica de Pesquisa Na Graduação Em Filosofia da UNESP 12:46-65.
    The purpose of this article is to promote a debate around Plato's work Republic, aiming to situate and establish: 1) the author's arguments in favor of an ideal pólis model; 2) the characteristics of Archon's political making as dominant and effective behavior among the leaders of the pólis government, insurgent against the desire for improper possession (pleonexia) on the part of the men who held the ring of Gyges and were invisible, which would believe, of those who are around him, (...)
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  10. Narrative Order and the Cosmo-Political Representations of the Characters in the Timaeus.Daniel Alejandro Restrepo - 2020 - Méthexis 1 (32):86-109.
    In this essay, I argue that the ordering of the speeches in Plato’s Timaeus indicates two things. First, each speech represents one of the three genera or principles Timaeus discusses. Socrates’ summary represents the forms, Critias’ Atlantis story embodies Becoming, and Timaeus’ cosmology serves as χώρα. Second, Timaeus responds to the other speakers in the order in which they were presented before beginning again with χώρα. Once Timaeus introduces χώρα, one of his tasks is laying the groundwork for Critias’ war (...)
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  11. Philosophy as Agon: A Study of Plato's Gorgias and Related Texts.Robert Metcalf - 2018 - Evanston, IL, USA: Northwestern University Press.
    A careful reading of the Gorgias along with related dialogues, such as the Apology, the Theaetetus, and other texts, shows that agonism is indispensable to the critique of prevailing opinions, to the transformation of the interlocutor through shame-inducing elenchos, and to philosophy as an ongoing, lifelong ‘training’ (askêsis) of oneself in relation to others. In this way, following Plato’s texts in understanding philosophy as agôn involves rethinking philosophy as an engaged contestation of one’s peers and the received opinions that are (...)
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  12. The Problem of Intermediates, an Introduction.Nicholas Baima - 2018 - Plato Journal: The Journal of the International Plato Society 18:41-44.
    Provides a brief introduction to the Problem of Intermediates in Plato and the stances taken toward this issue in this volume of the Plato Journal.
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  13. Plato on Pleasures Mixed with Pains: An Asymmetrical Account.Mehmet M. Erginel - 2019 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 56:73-122.
    In this paper I aim to show that the restoration model of pleasure as we find it in Plato’s Gorgias, Republic, Timaeus, and Philebus contain a common psychological core, despite the substantial developments and greater sophistication in the later works. I argue that, contrary to the scholarly consensus, all four dialogues take the necessary condition for pain to be a state of imbalance or disharmony rather than a process of destruction or deterioration. Given that the necessary condition for pleasure is (...)
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  14. Socrates' Defensible Devices in Plato's Meno.Mason Marshall - 2019 - Theory and Research in Education 17 (2):165-180.
    Despite how revered Socrates is among many educators nowadays, he can seem in the end to be a poor model for them, particularly because of how often he refutes his interlocutors and poses leading questions. As critics have noted, refuting people can turn them away from inquiry instead of drawing them in, and being too directive with them can squelch independent thought. I contend, though, that Socrates' practices are more defensible than they often look: although there are risks in refuting (...)
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  15. Aporia as Pedagogical Technique.Derek McAllister - 2018 - American Association of Philosophy Teachers Studies in Pedagogy 4:15-34.
    In this essay, I muse upon aporia’s value as a pedagogical technique in the philosophy classroom using as a guide examples of aporia that are found in Plato’s Socratic dialogues. The word aporia, translated as “without passage” or “without a way,” is used metaphorically to describe the unsettling state of confusion many find themselves in after engaging in philosophical discourse. Following a brief introduction in which I situate aporia as a pedagogy amicable to experiential learning, I examine various ways in (...)
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  16. La Religion de la Cit.D. Tarrant - 1945 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 65:130.
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  17. Katja Maria Vogt, Belief and Truth: A Skeptic Reading of Plato , Ix + 209 Pp., $55.00, ISBN 9780199916818. [REVIEW]Harald Thorsrud - 2013 - Polis: The Journal for Ancient Greek Political Thought 30 (2):364-369.
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  18. Arnd Zimmerman: Tyche Bei Platon. (Bonn Diss.) Pp. 171. Bonn: Privately Printed. 1966. Stiff Paper.Norman Gulley - 1968 - The Classical Review 18 (2):237-237.
  19. Texnh and Apeth in Plato - Jörg Kube: Τέχνη und Ἀρετή: sophistisches und platonisches Tugendwissen. Pp. x+255. Berlin: de Gruyter, 1969. Cloth, DM.42. [REVIEW]J. B. Skemp - 1971 - The Classical Review 21 (1):28-30.
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  20. Platonic Studies - G. Müller : Platonische Studien. Pp. 223. Heidelberg: Winter, 1986. DM 100.R. F. Stalley - 1987 - The Classical Review 37 (2):209-210.
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  21. Plato on Knowledge and Truth - Rowett Knowledge and Truth in Plato. Stepping Past the Shadow of Socrates. Pp. XXII + 305. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018. Cased, £50, Us$65. Isbn: 978-0-19-969365-8. [REVIEW]Naoya Iwata - forthcoming - The Classical Review:1-2.
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  22. Platonic Dialogue - Charles L. Griswold : Platonic Writings, Platonic Readings. Pp. Xi + 321. New York and London: Routledge, 1988. £25. [REVIEW]Christopher Gill - 1989 - The Classical Review 39 (2):252-253.
  23. Francisco Oliveira : Plataõ Laques. Pp. 109. Lisbon: Edições 70, 1989. Paper.R. F. Stalley - 1991 - The Classical Review 41 (1):225-225.
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  24. Domenico Pesce: Il Platone di Tubinga, e duo studi sulla Stoicismo. (Antichità Classica e Cristiana, 30.) Pp. 107. Brescia: Paideia, 1990. Paper, L. 20,000.Harold Tarrant - 1993 - The Classical Review 43 (1):187-187.
  25. Luc Brisson (tr.): Platon: Timée, Critias. Traduction inédite, introduction et notes. Pp. 438; 7 ills. Paris: Flammarion, 1992. Paper. [REVIEW]R. F. Stalley - 1993 - The Classical Review 43 (1):169-169.
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  26. A. Taglia: Il concetto di pistis in Platone. Pp. xiii + 200. Florence: Casa Editrice Le Lettere, 1998. Paper, L. 38,000. ISBN: 88-7166-356-X. [REVIEW]Michael Gagarin - 2000 - The Classical Review 50 (1):333-333.
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  27. Lee Epistemology After Protagoras: Responses to Relativism in Plato, Aristotle, and Democritus. Pp. Xii + 291. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2005. Cased, £45. ISBN: 0-19-926222-5. [REVIEW]James Warren - 2006 - The Classical Review 56 (1):59-61.
  28. Callimachean Aesthetics - Acosta-Hughes, Stephens Callimachus in Context. From Plato to the Augustan Poets. Pp. XVI + 328, Maps. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2012. Cased, £60, Us$99. Isbn: 978-1-107-00857-1. [REVIEW]Evina Sistakou - 2014 - The Classical Review 64 (1):83-85.
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  29. Plato Vs the Rest - Schmitt Modernity and Plato. Two Paradigms of Rationality. Translated by Vishwa Adluri with the Assistance of Christine Melchart and Joydeep Bagchee. Pp. Xlii + 592. Rochester, Ny: Camden House, 2012 . Cased, £65, Us$99. Isbn: 978-1-57113-497-4. [REVIEW]E. C. Park - 2014 - The Classical Review 64 (2):610-612.
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  30. Platon und Aristoteles – sub ratione veritatis. Festschrift für Wolfgang Wieland zum 70. Geburtstag.Gregor Damschen, Rainer Enskat & Alejandro G. Vigo (eds.) - 2003 - Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht.
    With contributions by John J. Cleary, Gregor Damschen, Rainer Enskat, Francisco J. Gonzalez, Jürgen Mittelstraß and Carlo Natali (all on Plato) as well as by Enrico Berti, Nicolas Braun, Graciela M. Chichi, Wolfgang Kullmann, Helmut Mai, Alejandro G. Vigo, Franco Volpi and Hermann Weidemann (all on Aristotle).
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  31. The Choreography of the Soul: A Psychedelic Philosophy of Consciousness.Ed D'Angelo - manuscript
    This is a 2020 revision of my 1988 dissertation "The Choreography of the Soul" with a new Foreword, a new Conclusion, a substantially revised Preface and Introduction, and many improvements to the body of the work. However, the thesis remains the same. A theory of consciousness and trance states--including psychedelic experience--is developed. Consciousness can be analyzed into two distinct but generally interrelated systems, which I call System X and System Y. System X is the emotional-visceral-kinaesthetic body. System X is a (...)
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  32. Plato's Guide to Living with Your Body.Russell E. Jones & Patricia Marechal - 2018 - In Philosophy of Mind in Antiquity: The History of the Philosophy of Mind, Volume 1. pp. 84-100.
  33. Reler Platão. Ensaio sobre a Teoria das Ideias.António Pedro Mesquita - 1995 - Lisboa, Portugal: Imprensa Nacional - Casa da Moeda.
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  34. Platão e o Problema da Existência.António Pedro Mesquita - 2003 - Lisboa, Portugal: Centro de Filosofia da Universidade de Lisboa.
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  35. Die Aretê des Leibes. Die Stellung des Gesundheit in der Platonischen Güterlehre.Jan Szaif - 2009 - In Dorothea Frede & Burkhard Reis (eds.), Body and Soul in Ancient Philosophy. Berlin, Germany: De Gruyter. pp. 205-246.
    This essay on “The Status of Health in Plato’s Theory of Goods” discusses how health figures as a “good” in the framework of Plato’s general theory of human goods. It starts with meta-ethical distinctions regarding how things can be classified as “good,” including the conceptual distinctions between intrinsic, final, and constitutive goods. I then discuss passages in Plato that shed light on the function of health as an “instrumental good” that contributes to an undisturbed mode of existence free to pursue (...)
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  36. Plato and Aristotle on Truth and Falsehood.Jan Szaif - 2018 - In Michael Glanzberg (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Truth. Oxford, UK: pp. 9-49.
  37. Platons Begriff der Wahrheit (2., durchgesehene Auflage. Studienausgabe).Jan Szaif - 1996 - Freiburg, Germany: Alber.
  38. Reattaching Shadows: Dancing with Schopenhauer.Joshua Maloy Hall - 2014 - PhaenEx 9 (1):1.
    The structure of my investigation is as follows. I will begin with Schopenhauer’s very brief explicit mention of dance, and then try to understand the exclusion of dance from his extended discussion of the individual arts. Toward this latter end I will then turn to Francis Sparshott essay, which situates Schopenhauer’s thought in terms of Plato’s privileging of dance (in the Laws) as the consummate participatory art, and which observes that Schopenhauer’s dance is that of Shiva, lord of death. In (...)
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  39. A Unified Interpretation of the Varieties of False Pleasure in Plato's Philebeus.Matthew Strohl - manuscript
    Most commentators think that Plato's account of the varieties of false pleasure is disjointed and that various types of false pleasure he identifies are false in different ways. It really doesn't look that way to me: I think that the discussion is unified, and that Plato starts with less difficult cases to build up to a point about more important but less clear cases. In this paper, I do my best to show how this might work. I don't think I (...)
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  40. Plato and the Freedom of the New Academy.Charles E. Snyder - 2017 - In Harold Tarrant, François Renaud, Dirk Baltzly & Danielle A. Layne (eds.), Brill’s Companion to the Reception of Plato in Antiquity. Leiden/Boston: Brill. pp. 58–71.
    Scholars of Greek and Roman antiquity advance a variety of reasons to explain why the study of Hellenistic philosophy remains dependent on fragments and testimonies. Mansfeld observes such dependence in his use of the premise that philosophers of late antiquity based philosophical instruction and school curricula on a core set of writings from the classical period. On this basis, Mansfeld infers that schools of late antiquity continually transcribed and preserved writings of instructional significance. The schools routinely excluded other classical and (...)
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  41. James Warren, “The Pleasures of Reason in Plato, Aristotle, and the Hellenistic Hedonists.” Review by Facundo Bey. [REVIEW]Facundo Bey - 2016 - Boletín de Estética 36:71-76.
    The Pleasures of Reason in Plato, Aristotle, and the Hellenistic Hedonists se centra en la relación mutua entre las capacidades humanas de sentir placer y dolor y el carácter afectivo que las une con las facultades cognitivas de aprender, comprender, recordar, evocar, planificar y anticiparse. Para esto, Warren consagra toda su agudeza analítica a eminentes obras del pensamiento antiguo: particularmente nos referimos a los diálogos platónicos República, Protágoras y Filebo. Otro tanto hace con De Anima, De Memoria et Reminiscentia, Ética (...)
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  42. Figures Philosophiques du Conflit.Andreas Wilmes & Joan-Antoine Mallet (eds.) - 2015 - Paris, France: L'Harmattan.
    L'ambition de cet ouvrage est d'illustrer à la fois comment la philosophie conceptualise le conflit et comment elle s'efforce d'en résoudre les dangers inhérents. Plutôt que de proposer un aperçu purement abstrait de la notion de « conflit », l'ensemble des travaux se focalise sur la confrontation des philosophes à des problèmes historiques tels que la guerre, la dissension sociale, la tyrannie, ou encore le sport. -/- .
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  43. Anthropologie der Theorie.Thomas Jürgasch & Tobias Keiling - 2017 - Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck.
    Die Engführung von Muße und theoretischem Tun, die Aristoteles paradigmatisch in der Nikomachischen Ethik entwickelt, hat eine Vor- und eine lange Nachgeschichte bis in die gegenwärtige Philosophie und Theologie hinein. Begründet wird die Engführung von Muße und Theorie bei Aristoteles anthropologisch, weil sich in einer kontemplativen Lebensform die Möglichkeiten der menschlichen Natur auf vollendete Weise verwirklichen. Die Beiträge in diesem Band untersuchen ideengeschichtliche Modelle einer Verbindung von Theorie und Muße daraufhin, wie diese sich zur Frage einer anthropologischen Fundierung der Theorie (...)
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  44. Time, the Image of Absolute Logos: A Comparative Analysis of the Ideas of Augustine and Husserl.Lee Chun Lo - 2018 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 10 (1):50-61.
    ABSTRACTIn the Timaeus, Plato explicitly defines time as “the moving image of eternity”. This proposition affirms actually that time reflects the eternal that embodies the rational and lawful principle – namely the logos of proportionality – in the motion and change of visible objects in the universe. In other words,time determines the principle that every mutable being must follow to participate in the rational and nomological order of existence; the absolute logos which is given by God is hence intrinsic to (...)
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  45. Bradley's Concept of Metaphysics.Damian Ilodigwe - 2016 - EKPOMA Review 3 (2016):116-137.
    -/- Bradley is one of the most important philosophers in the 20th century. He contributed to virtually every area of the philosophical discipline. However, he is mostly known for his work in metaphysics which finds a systematic exposition in his magnum opus: Appearance and Reality: An Essay in Metaphysics (1893). Bradley’s concept of metaphysics is implicit in all his writings, especially in his account of morality as self-realization in Ethical Studies and of course the theory of judgement and inference he (...)
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  46. Knowledge and Ignorance of Self in Platonic Philosophy.Andy German & James M. Ambury (eds.) - 2018 - New York, USA: Cambridge University Press.
    Knowledge and Ignorance of Self in Platonic Philosophy is the first volume of essays dedicated to the whole question of self-knowledge and its role in Platonic philosophy. It brings together established and rising scholars from every interpretative school of Plato studies, and a variety of texts from across Plato's corpus - including the classic discussions of self-knowledge in the Charmides and Alcibiades I, and dialogues such as the Republic, Theaetetus, and Theages, which are not often enough mined for insights about (...)
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  47. Platons Gesprächsdramaturgie und der Leser: Zwei Beispiele aus derPoliteia.Alexander Becker - 2011 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 14 (1):84-102.
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  48. The Relationship of Idea and Particulars in Plato: Episteme Versus Doxa.Abdullah Demir - 2017 - Entelekya Logico-Metaphysical Review 1 (1-2):37--48.
    There are some terms which should be defined conceptually in the philosophy of values, such that they show us the quality of value judgments. As we have already pointed out, we have to start thinking about values with the essence of ethical concepts, and it is possible for us to create a norm of politics or law through these concepts. The Good as the basic concept of morality is the most comprehensive term that describes the reason for being in existence. (...)
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  49. Idealistic Groundwork for Plato’s Philosophy of Education.Özkan Fatih - 2017 - Entelekya Logico-Metaphysical Review 1 (1-2):19--36.
    There are some terms which should be defined conceptually in the philosophy of values, such that they show us the quality of value judgments. As we have already pointed out, we have to start thinking about values with the essence of ethical concepts, and it is possible for us to create a norm of politics or law through these concepts. The Good as the basic concept of morality is the most comprehensive term that describes the reason for being in existence. (...)
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  50. V.—Plato's Theory of EikaΣia.H. J. Paton - 1922 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 22 (1):69-104.
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