Plato

Edited by Hugh Benson (University of Oklahoma)
Assistant editor: Mark Hallap (University of Toronto, St. George Campus)
About this topic
Summary Plato (ca. 427-347 B.C.E.) was an Athenian philosopher who is widely recognized among the most important philosophers of the Western world.  Plato can be plausibly credited with the invention of philosophy as we understand it today – the rational, rigorous, and systematic study of fundamental questions concerning ethics, politics, psychology, theology, epistemology, and metaphysics.  He wrote primarily in dialogue form.  Among his most influential views are a commitment to the distinction between changeless, eternal forms and changeable, observable ordinary objects, the immortality of the soul, the distinction between knowledge and true belief and the view that knowledge is in some way recollection, that philosophers should be rulers and rulers philosophers, and that justice is in some way welcomed for its own sake.  He was a follower of Socrates, significantly influenced Aristotle, the Stoics, the Academic skeptics, Plotinus, among others, and founded the Academy, perhaps the first institution of higher learning in the west.
Key works Among the most well-known of Plato’s works (26 generally acknowledged dialogues and 13 more doubtful letters) are the Apology, Crito, Euthyphro, Protagoras, Gorgias, Meno, Phaedo, Republic, Symposium, Theaetetus, and Timaeus.  The standard English translations of the complete works can be found in Cooper 1997.
Introductions A good place to start studying Plato in general is the entry in Stanford Encyclopedia, Kraut 2008, Hare 1982, and Annas 2003.  Important collections of essays include Vlastos 1973, Kraut 1992, Fine 1999, Fine 1999, Fine 2008, and Benson 2006.
Related categories
Subcategories:
Plato, Misc (822)
History/traditions: Plato

19088 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 19088
Material to categorize
  1. Anito e o suborno de jurados (dekázein) nos processos atenienses.Carlos Carvalhar - 2021 - Calíope: Presença Clássica 40:167-188.
    Anito é mais conhecido por ser um dos acusadores de Sócrates, mas este político teve outra proeza: sua sagacidade o fez criar um método obscuro de identificar os jurados e assim saber exatamente a quem subornar em um processo legal, ou seja, ele conseguia identificar quem eram os dikastaí que estariam agrupados no dikastḗrion específico que julgaria determinado caso em um tribunal. Com essa metodologia ele conseguiu se safar de uma condenação em 409 a.e.c., quando por sua falha Atenas perdeu (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Dialectic After Plato and Aristotle.O. Yu Goncharko - forthcoming - History and Philosophy of Logic:1-6.
    The general content of the book is dedicated to the dialectical practices and their logical tools and techniques developed after Plato and Aristotle within the philosophical schools of the Hellenis...
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. The Role of the Educator in the Just Society.Oxenberg Richard - 2007 - CAEC 12.
    In this brief article I reflect on our culture's moral ambiguity, as reflected in the popularity of such shows as The Sopranos, and argue for the need for a morally attuned philosophical education to address it.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Marek Piechowiak: Plato’s Conception of Justice and the Question of Human Dignity. [REVIEW]Szymon Mazurkiewicz - 2020 - Archiv für Rechts- Und Sozialphilosophie 106 (3):477-481.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Genizah Ms. 17: An Extract From an Early Version of the Passio of St Plato of Ancyra, Part 2.Alexandra Trachsel - 2021 - Philologus: Zeitschrift für Antike Literatur Und Ihre Rezeption 165 (1):25-36.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Plato on the Possibility of Hedonic Mistakes.Matthew Evans - 2008 - In Brad Inwood (ed.), Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy Xxxv: Winter 2008. Oxford University Press.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Body, Soul and Tripartition in Plato's Timaeus.Thomas Johansen - 2000 - In David Sedley (ed.), Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy: Volume Xix Winter 2000. Clarendon Press.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. The Secret Doctrine: Plato's Defence of Protagoras in the Theaetetus.M. M. Lee - 2000 - In David Sedley (ed.), Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy: Volume Xix Winter 2000. Clarendon Press.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Plato on the Pleasures and Pains of Knowing.James Warren - 2010 - In Brad Inwood (ed.), Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy Volume 39. Oxford University Press.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. Aiming and Determining: A Discussion of Iakovos Vasiliou, Aiming at Virtue in Plato.Christopher Taylor - 2010 - In Brad Inwood (ed.), Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy, Volume 38. Oxford University Press.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. 'Is the World One?' A New Interpretation of Plato's Parmenides.Luc Brisson - 2002 - In David Sedley (ed.), Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy Volume Xxii: Summer 2002. Oxford University Press.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. Ancient Greek Philosophy I: The Pre-Socratics and Plato.Christopher Janaway - 1998 - In A. C. Grayling (ed.), Philosophy 1: A Guide Through the Subject. Oxford University Press.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. Relativism and Self-Refutation: Plato, Protagoras, and Burnyeat.Gail Fine - 2001 - In Jyl Gentzler (ed.), Method in Ancient Philosophy. Clarendon Press.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  14. Utopia and Fantasy: The Practicability of Plato's Ideally Just City.M. F. Burnyeat - 1999 - In Gail Fine (ed.), Plato 2: Ethics, Politics, Religion, and the Soul. Oxford University Press.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. Jewish Socratic Questions in an Age Without Plato: Permitting and Forbidding Open-Inquiry in 12-15th Century Europe and North Africa. [REVIEW]Yehuda Halper - 2021 - Brill.
    Halper's study traces how the open-questioning of the divine arises in the works of Maimonides, Jacob Anatoli, Immanuel of Rome, Gersonides, and Abraham Bibago.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. Review of Balot, Greek Political Thought. [REVIEW]Thornton Lockwood - 2007 - Bryn Mawr Classical Review 8:13.
    Balot’s (B.) Greek Political Thought aims to provide an “introductory guide” for undergraduate and graduate students to ancient Greek thinkers (broadly construed) from Homer through Epicurus who wrote in both systematic and unsystematic ways about life in the Greek polis (viii). B. notes that he has not tried to locate his arguments within current scholarly discussions (although he does include a 19 page bibliographic essay that provides an overview of Anglophone scholarship on Greek political thought). Nonetheless, he states that he (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. Review of Destrée and Giannopoulou, Eds., Plato's Symposium: A Critical Guide. [REVIEW]Thornton Lockwood - 2018 - Classical Journal 10:03.
    Destrée and Giannopoulou have provided scholars with thirteen exegetically rich and philosophically sophisticated chapters on Plato’s Symposium, written for the most part by scholars with numerous publications (in several cases, numerous books) on Plato, classical Greek moral psychology, and ancient Greek philosophy. Many of the chapters warrant discussion at least to the length that I am allotted for my review of the entire volume, which alas I cannot provide here. Running through the volume is a commitment to understanding Plato’s Symposium (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. Speech of Greek Philosophy. [REVIEW]Abduljaleel Kadhim Alwali - 2018 - Arab Journal for the Humanities 36:307-318.
    The book Speech of Greek Philosophy is worth reading for a number of reasons, including: It covers history of Greek philosophy from its early days, Thales and his natural school to the Hellenistic age. In addition, the modern world admits, whether in the East or the West, that it owes the Greek mentality the overwhelming majority of its philosophical, literary and artistic products. It is the special belief of European scholars that the Greeks are masters of the modern world in (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. Cervantes’s “Republic”: On Representation, Imitation, and Unreason.Rolando Perez - 2021 - eHumanista 47:89-111.
    ABSTRACT This essay deals with the relation between representation, imitation, and the affects in Don Quixote. In so doing, it focuses on Cervantes’s Platonist poetics and his own views of imitation and the books of knighthood. Although most readers, translators, and critics have until now deemed Cervantes’s use of the word “republic” in Don Quixote unimportant, the word “república” or republic is in fact the entry point to Cervantes’ Platonist critique of the novels of knighthood, and his notions of writing, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. Speech of Greek Philosophy. [REVIEW]Abduljaleel Alwali - 2018 - Arab Journal for the Humanities 36 (143):307-318.
    The book Speech of Greek Philosophy is worth reading for a number of reasons, including: It covers history of Greek philosophy from its early days, Thales and his natural school to the Hellenistic age. In addition, the modern world admits, whether in the East or the West, that it owes the Greek mentality the overwhelming majority of its philosophical, literary and artistic products. It is the special belief of European scholars that the Greeks are masters of the modern world in (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. Greek Philosophy.Abduljaleel Alwali - 2009 - Amman, Jordan: Dar Alwarq Publishing House.
    In this book the author presented the history of the Greek philosophy that extends from the six century BC till the six century AC. He divided the book into three main stages: Philosophy before Socrates: It extended from 6th century BC to mid 5th century BC. This stage began with Thales and his school of Physics; Heraclitus; Pythagoras school; Eleaties School; then Empedocles and Anaxagoras; Democritus and Sophists school. The themes of philosophical contemplation were nature, universe and man. Socratic Method (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. Keeping Company with the Gods: Plato on Prayer and the Journey to the Divine.Terence Sweeney - 2021 - Heythrop Journal 62 (2):243-256.
  23. Self-Motion and Cognition: Plato's Theory of the Soul.Douglas R. Campbell - forthcoming - Southern Journal of Philosophy.
    I argue that Plato believes that the soul must be both the principle of motion and the subject of cognition because it moves things specifically by means of its thoughts. I begin by arguing that the soul moves things by means of such acts as examination and deliberation, and that this view is developed in response to Anaxagoras. I then argue that every kind of soul enjoys a kind of cognition, with even plant souls having a form of Aristotelian discrimination (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24. Zeami’s Reply to Plato: Mastering the Art of Sarugaku.Susan V. H. Castro - 2017 - Japan Studies Association Journal 15 (1):1-22.
    Mae Smethurst’s work has largely aimed to articulate nō theater in Western terms from their early roots, primarily through Aristotle’s On Tragedy. Her detailed examination of the shared structure of the content of these independent and superficially dissimilar arts reveals their mutual intelligibility and effectiveness through shared underlying universals. In this spirit, I outline how Zeami answers Plato’s first challenge to artistic performance, as expressed in Ion where Plato argues that rhapsody is not an art [techné] because it requires no (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. Theokritos Kouremenos. Plato’s Forms, Mathematics, and Astronomy. (Trends in Classics—Supplementary Volumes, 67.) Vi + 152 Pp., Bibl., Index. Berlin: De Gruyter, 2018. €99.95 (Cloth); ISBN 9783110601435. Paper and E-Book Available. [REVIEW]Luca Simeoni - 2020 - Isis 111 (4):864-866.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26. Bad Education as the Main Cause of Social Disruption [TRANSLATION].Carlos Carvalhar - 2020 - Revista Enunciação 5 (1):102-117.
    This article aims to explore the question of education in Plato from the historical context, thinking the model of Athens, Lesbos and Sparta, and from the perspective where a bad paideía, the low quality in the formation of citizens, becomes the main cause generating social disruption. Then, a reflection was made on the educational possibilities that Athenians from different social classes would have and on the Platonic proposal based on the combination of gymnastics and music, so that a citizen profile (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27. An Intertextual Reading of Paris’ (Re)Actions in the Iliad 6 Based on Plato’s Tripartite Theory of Soul.Pedro Proscurcin Junior - 2020 - Eleuthería - Revista Do Curso de Filosofia - UFMS 5 (Jul.-Dez. 2020):06-23.
    This paper aims to elucidate some intricate (re-)actions of Paris in the Iliad 6 based on Plato’s tripartite theory of soul. Due to certain philosophical prejudices, some interpretations cannot identify certain nuances related to the characters’ intrapsychic activities and tend to label the Homeric character as “simple” or “incomplete”. Since the problem of “anachronism” is insurmountable, interpreters have to ensure the best philosophical model to understand some aspects of the Homeric psychology. For different reasons, I shall argue that an intertextual (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28. Living Info: Notes on the Exegesis.Paul Bali - manuscript
  29. Euclid’s Kinds and (Their) Attributes.Benjamin Wilck - 2020 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 23 (2):362-397.
    Relying upon a very close reading of all of the definitions given in Euclid’s Elements, I argue that this mathematical treatise contains a philosophical treatment of mathematical objects. Specifically, I show that Euclid draws elaborate metaphysical distinctions between substances and non-substantial attributes of substances, different kinds of substance, and different kinds of non-substance. While the general metaphysical theory adopted in the Elements resembles that of Aristotle in many respects, Euclid does not employ Aristotle’s terminology, or indeed, any philosophical terminology at (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30. From Physical World to Transcendent God(S): Mediatory Functions of Beauty in Plato, Dante and Rupa Gosvami.Dragana Jagušić - 2020 - In Martino Rossi Monti & Davor Pećnjak (eds.), What is Beauty? A Multidisciplinary Approach to Aesthetic Experience. pp. 189-212.
    In various philosophical, religious and mystical traditions, beauty is often related to intellectual upliftment and spiritual ascent, which suggests that besides its common aesthetic value it may also acquire an epistemic, metaphysical and spiritual meaning or value. I will examine in detail three accounts in which beauty, at times inseparable from desire and love, mediates between physical, intellectual and spiritual levels of existence. Since beauty, in all three accounts, takes on a mediatory role or function,1 I will name these mediations (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31. Plato's Pragmatism: Rethinking the Relationship Between Ethics and Epistemology.Nicholas Baima & Tyler Paytas - 2021 - New York, NY, USA: Routledge.
    Plato’s Pragmatism offers the first comprehensive defense of a pragmatist reading of Plato. According to Plato, the ultimate rational goal is not to accumulate knowledge and avoid falsehood but rather to live an excellent human life. The book contends that a pragmatic outlook is present throughout the Platonic corpus. The authors argue that the successful pursuit of a good life requires cultivating certain ethical commitments, and that maintaining these commitments often requires violating epistemic norms. In the course of defending the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32. Al encuentro con Platón: los primeros pasos de Gadamer en Marburgo.Facundo Bey - 2020 - Anales Del Seminario de Historia de la Filosofía 37 (3):457-472.
    This article aims to readdress Hans-Georg Gadamer's first encounter with Plato's philosophy through his earlier academic journey, the direct and indirect influence exerted by his celebrated mentors at the University of Marburg, and his early publications. For this, I will resort not only to his intellectual biography, but also to neglected texts of Gadamer, such as his 1922 doctoral thesis, reviews and articles published between 1924 and 1928, correspondence, both edited and unpublished, philosophical interviews, as well as archive footage. I (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33. Knowledge and Voluntary Injustice in the Hippias Minor.Natalie Hannan - forthcoming - Apeiron.
    Plato’s Hippias Minor proposes a thesis that I call the Superiority of the Voluntary Wrongdoer (SVW), which states that the person doing something wrong voluntarily is better than the person doing it wrong involuntarily. This claim has long unsettled scholars, who have tried to determine whether Socrates is serious about SVW or disavows it. The primary strategy among interpreters is to appeal to Socrates’ prior commitment to the “Socratic paradox” that no one does injustice voluntarily; with the Socratic paradox in (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34. Enthusiasm and Platonic Furor in the Origins of Cartesian Science: The Olympian Dreams.Susana Gómez López - 2020 - Early Science and Medicine 25 (5):507-535.
    In the Olympica, the lost manuscript wherein Descartes described his famous three dreams, he wrote that on the night of Saint Martin in 1619 he felt asleep in a state of enthusiasm. He interpreted the dreams that ensued as the divine revelation of the principles of a new and admirable science. I here propose that the Olympica were a literary fiction devised by Descartes to legitimize his arrival on the philosophical scene by proposing the principles of a new science. The (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35. Review of Bate, Boese, Steel, Steel, Steel, Van de Vyver, Steel & Guldentops (1990/1993/1994/1996): Speculum Divinorum Et Quorundam Naturalium. Parts XI-XII: On Platonic Philosophy Parts IV-V: On the Nature of Matter. On the Intellect as Form of Man Parts VI-VII: On the Unity of Intellect. On the Platonic Doctrine of the Ideas Parts XX-XXIII: On the Heavens, the Divine Movers, and the First Intellect. [REVIEW]Burkhard Mojsisch - 1998 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 3 (1):243-245.
  36. Kritik über Schefer (2001): Platons unsagbare Erfahrung. Ein anderer Zugang zu Platon.Marcel van Ackeren - 2003 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 8 (1):236-238.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37. Kritik über Schefer (2001): Platons unsagbare Erfahrung. Ein anderer Zugang zu Platon.Marcel van Ackeren - 2003 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 8 (1):236-238.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38. Hope in Ancient Greek Philosophy.G. Scott Gravlee - 2020 - In Historical and Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Hope. Cham: pp. 3-23.
    This chapter aims to illuminate ways in which hope was significant in the philosophy of classical Greece. Although ancient Greek philosophies contain few dedicated and systematic expositions on the nature of hope, they nevertheless include important remarks relating hope to the good life, to reason and deliberation, and to psychological phenomena such as memory, imagination, fear, motivation, and pleasure. After an introductory discussion of Hesiod and Heraclitus, the chapter focuses on Plato and Aristotle. Consideration is given both to Plato’s direct (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39. Ancient Modes of Philosophical Inquiry.Jens Kristian Larsen & Philipp Steinkrüger - 2020 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 1 (23).
    At least since Socrates, philosophy has been understood as the desire for acquiring a special kind of knowledge, namely wisdom, a kind of knowledge that human beings ordinarily do not possess. According to ancient thinkers this desire may result from a variety of causes: wonder or astonishment, the bothersome or even painful realization that one lacks wisdom, or encountering certain hard perplexities or aporiai. As a result of this basic understanding of philosophy, Greek thinkers tended to regard philosophy as an (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40. The Soul's Tomb: Plato on the Body as the Cause of Psychic Disorders.Douglas Campbell - forthcoming - Apeiron: A Journal for Ancient Philosophy and Science.
    I argue that, according to Plato, the body is the sole cause of psychic disorders. This view is expressed at Timaeus 86b in an ambiguous sentence that has been widely misunderstood by translators and commentators. The goal of this article is to offer a new understanding of Plato’s text and view. In the first section, I argue that although the body is the result of the gods’ best efforts, their sub-optimal materials meant that the soul is constantly vulnerable to the (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41. Plato’s Persona: Marsilio Ficino, Renaissance Humanism, and Platonic Traditions, Written by Denis J.-J. Robichaud, 2018.H. Darrel Rutkin - 2019 - Early Science and Medicine 24 (3):289-291.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42. The Aborted Object of Comedy and the Birth of the Subject: Plato and Aristophanes’ Alliance.Rachel Aumiller - 2020 - In Jamila Mascat & Gregor Moder (eds.), The Object of Comedy: Philosophies and Performances. New York, NY, USA: pp. 75-92.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43. Philosophy as Art in Aristotle’s Protrepticus.Refik Güremen - 2020 - Metaphilosophy 51 (4):571-592.
    Observing certain affinities with Plato’s Alcibiades I , this paper argues that a distinction between care (epimeleia ) of the soul and philosophy as its art (technê ) is reflected in Aristotle’s Protrepticus . On the basis of this distinction, it claims that two notions of philosophy can be distinguished in the Protrepticus : philosophy as epistêmê and philosophy as technê . The former has the function of contemplating the truth of nature, and Aristotle praises it as the natural telos (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44. Socrates' Versatile Rhetoric and the Soul of the Crowd.David Lévystone - 2020 - Rhetorica 38 (2):135–155.
    In Plato’s early dialogues, the impossibility of talking to the crowd appears as a constitutive element of the opposition between rhetoric and dialectic and raises the understudied question of the role of the audience in Socratic thought. However, Xenophon’s Socrates constantly identifies public and private speech. But this likening is also found in the Alcibiades Major, which gives a key to understand the true meaning of this assimilation: one can convince an audience, by talking to each individual in the crowd. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45. Review of Marek Piechowiak, Plato's Conception of Justice and the Question of Human Dignity: Peter Lang Academic Publishers, 2019, ISBN: 978-3-631-65970-0, hbk, 296pp. [REVIEW]Szymon Mazurkiewicz - 2020 - Sophia 59 (1):177-179.
  46. Responses to Divine Communication.Octavian Gabor - forthcoming - Philosophy and Theology.
    Sophocles’s Oedipus Tyrannus shows that humans' problems do not appear when they listen to the gods, but when they listen to themselves imagining that they follow the gods. Instead of placing themselves in the service of the god, as Socrates does in Plato’s Apology, they only think that they follow the divinity, while they actually act according to their own understanding. If Sophocles’s play is a synopsis of this danger, Plato’s dialogue proposes a different attitude before divinity: instead of interpreting (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47. Puntos de Vista de la Verdad: Sobre El Carácter Polifónico Del Pensamiento Platónico.Cristián De Bravo Delorme - 2020 - Kriterion: Journal of Philosophy 61 (145):131-149.
    RESUMEN El siguiente artículo tiene como objetivo destacar el carácter polifónico del pensamiento platónico y poner en cuestión el sentido de la autoría de Platón. Suponer, a partir de obstinados prejuicios modernos, que Platón, tal como cualquier escritor moderno, habría expuesto su propia doctrina, es ignorar la importancia de la forma dramática de su pensamiento. El testimonio de la variedad de interlocutores y de puntos de vista que se suceden en los diferentes diálogos, nos invita a prestar atención a la (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48. Das Potências da Memória. A Afirmação da Transitoriedade Histórica E da Eternidade Das Ideias.Augusto B. De Carvalho Dias Leite - 2020 - Kriterion: Journal of Philosophy 61 (145):107-129.
    RESUMO A partir do exame da tradição heraclitiana e platônica sobre a transitoriedade e a imortalidade - conceitos compreendidos como universais - este artigo defende a seguinte antinomia como tese: para haver temporalidade é preciso haver eternidade. Essa tese é demonstrada por meio do estudo e atualização das noções de alma, espírito, ideia e memória, as quais estão conectadas invariavelmente ao tempo passado como princípio ontológico do fenômeno histórico. Para além do ponto de vista filosófico, portanto, da perspectiva específica do (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49. Philosophy as Agôn: A Study of Plato’s Gorgias and Related Texts, Written by Robert Metcalf. [REVIEW]Tushar Irani - 2020 - Polis 37 (2):373-377.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50. The Gatekeeper: Narrative Voice in Plato’s Dialogues, Written by Margalit Finkelberg.Paul O’Mahoney - 2020 - Polis 37 (2):368-372.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 19088