This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories

151 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 151
  1. Pleasure.William P. Alston - 1967 - In Paul Edwards (ed.), The Encyclopedia of Philosophy. New York: Macmillan. pp. 6--341.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  2. The Pleasure of the Surface.Thordis Arrhenius - 2009 - In Eva Ebersberger, Daniela Zyman & Thordis Arrhenius (eds.), Jorge Otero-Pailos: The Ethics of Dust. Dist. By Art Publishers.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. Pleasure and Happiness.Jean Austin - 1968 - Philosophy 43 (163):51 - 62.
    First a word about my title: ‘Happiness’ is ground upon which so many angels have feared to tread that it seemed not inappropriate for me to rush in. It is a subject to which we all do give thought, not only with the force majeure of professional philosophising, but in our personal lives; however, in trying to sort the subject out a little, and it is one about which both our literature and our thinking are notoriously muddled, I fear I (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  4. Pleasure and Instinct. By A. H. B. Allen (London: Kegan Paul, Trench, Trübner & Co. 1930. Pp. Lx + 336. Price 12s. 6d.).F. Aveling - 1931 - Philosophy 6 (22):267-.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. A Contemporary Account of Sensory Pleasure.Murat Aydede - forthcoming - In Lisa Shapiro (ed.), Pleasure: A History. Oxford University Press.
    [This is the penultimate version, please send me an email for the final version]. Some sensations are pleasant, some unpleasant, and some are neither. Furthermore, those that are pleasant or unpleasant are so to different degrees. In this essay, I want to explore what kind of a difference is the difference between these three kinds of sensations. I will develop a comprehensive three-level account of sensory pleasure that is simultaneously adverbialist, functionalist and is also a version of a satisfied experiential-desire (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. A Proper Arbiter of Pleasure: Rousseau on the Control of Sexual Desire.Glen Baier - 1999 - Philosophical Forum 30 (4):249–268.
  7. Pleasure and Belief, Part II.E. Bedford - 1959 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 73:73-92.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  8. Pleasure, Knowledge, and Being.E. E. Benitez - 1991 - Review of Metaphysics 45 (2):401-404.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. Varieties of Joy-Related Pleasurable Activities and Feelings.Howard Berenbaum - 2002 - Cognition and Emotion 16 (4):473-494.
  10. Extrinsic Attitudinal Pleasure.Thomas Blackson - 2012 - Philosophical Studies 159 (2):277-291.
    I argue for an alternative interpretation of some of the examples Fred Feldman uses to establish his theory of happiness. According to Feldman, the examples show that certain utterances of the form S is pleased/glad that P and S is displeased/sad that P should be interpreted as expressions of extrinsic attitudinal pleasure and displeasure and hence must be excluded from the aggregative sum of attitudinal pleasure and displeasure that constitutes happiness. I develop a new interpretation of Feldman’s examples. My interpretation (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. A Note on Pleasure.Alex Blum - 1991 - Journal of Value Inquiry 25 (October):367-70.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. A New Defense of Hedonism About Well-Being.Ben Bramble - 2016 - Ergo, an Open Access Journal of Philosophy 3.
    According to hedonism about well-being, lives can go well or poorly for us just in virtue of our ability to feel pleasure and pain. Hedonism has had many advocates historically, but has relatively few nowadays. This is mainly due to three highly influential objections to it: The Philosophy of Swine, The Experience Machine, and The Resonance Constraint. In this paper, I attempt to revive hedonism. I begin by giving a precise new definition of it. I then argue that the right (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. Like the Bloom on Youths: How Pleasure Completes Our Lives.Johan Brannmark - 2006 - In T. D. J. Chappell (ed.), Values and Virtues: Aristotelianism in Contemporary Ethics. Oxford University Press.
  14. Pleasure-Seeking Behavior and the Drive-Reduction Hypothesis.Judson S. Brown - 1955 - Psychological Review 62 (3):169-179.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  15. Pleasure and Reason as Adaptations to Nature's Requirements.Ralph Wendell Burhoe - 1982 - Zygon 17 (2):113-131.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  16. The Nature of Pleasure and Pain.Paul Carus - 1896 - The Monist 6 (3):432-442.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17. Pleasure as a Sign You Can Attend to Something Else: Placing Positive Feelings Within a General Model of Affect.Charles Carver - 2003 - Cognition and Emotion 17 (2):241-261.
  18. Sexual Dilemmas and Moral Reasoning an Approach to Girls' Sexuality and Sexual Pleasure.Vimala Chenginimattam - 2009 - Journal of Dharma 34 (1):107-116.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19. The Concept of Pleasure. [REVIEW]S. Marc Cohen - 1969 - Philosophical Review 78 (3):386-390.
    Review of The Concept of Pleasure, by David L. Perry (Mouton:1967).
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20. Pleasure's Role in Evolution: A Response to Robinson.Joseph Corabi - 2008 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 15 (7):78-86.
    In this paper, I reconstruct and sketch an evolutionary argument against epiphenomenalism in the spirit of William James'. This version of the argument is more charitable to James than the one attributed to him in William Robinson's recent article 'Evolution and Epiphenomenalism' and here I show how it bypasses Robinson's criticisms.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21. Pleasure and Hedonism in Sidgwick.Roger Crisp - 2011 - In Thomas Hurka (ed.), Underivative Duty: British Moral Philosophers From Sidgwick to Ewing. Oxford University Press.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22. Make Love, Not War: Both Serve to Defuse Stress-Induced Arousal Through the Dopaminergic “Pleasure” Network.Mary F. Dallman - 2006 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (3):227-228.
    Nell restricts cruelty to hominids, although good evidence suggests that secondary aggression in rodents and particularly primates may be considered cruel. A considerable literature shows that glucocorticoid secretion stimulated by stress facilitates learning, memory, arousal, and aggressive behavior. Either secondary aggression (to a conspecific) or increased affiliative behavior reduces stressor-induced activity, suggesting the reward system can be satisfied by other behaviors than cruelty.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  23. Is Pleasure Objective?Durant Drake - 1919 - Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 16 (24):665-668.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24. Pain and Pleasure: An Evidential Problem for Theists.Paul Draper - 1989 - Noûs 23 (3):331-350.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   12 citations  
  25. The Content and Structure of Laypeople's Concept of Pleasure.Laurette Dubé & Jordan Le Bel - 2003 - Cognition and Emotion 17 (2):263-295.
  26. Esthetic Contemplation and Sense Pleasure--A Reply.C. J. Ducasse - 1943 - Journal of Philosophy 40 (6):156-159.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27. Desire, Love, and Happiness.Steven M. Duncan - manuscript
    In this paper, I explore the concept of happiness by relating it to those of desire, pleasure, and love, arriving at the classical view that objective happiness consists in the possession and enjoyment of the good.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28. On Pleasure, Emotion, and Striving.Karl Duncker - 1940 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 1 (June):391-430.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   15 citations  
  29. Precis of Pleasure and the Good Life: Concerning the Nature, Varieties, and Plausiblity of Hedonism.Fred Feldman - 2007 - Philosophical Studies 136 (3):405-408.
  30. Reply to Elinor Mason and Alastair Norcross.Fred Feldman - 2007 - Utilitas 19 (3):398-406.
    In comments originally presented at the ISUS conference at Dartmouth College in 2005, Elinor Mason and Alastair Norcross raised a number of objections to various things I said in Pleasure and the Good Life. One especially interesting objection concerns one of my central claims about the nature of pleasure. I distinguished between sensory pleasure and attitudinal pleasure. I said that a feeling counts as a sensory pleasure if the one who feels it takes intrinsic attitudinal pleasure in the fact that (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  31. Pleasure and the Good Life: Concerning the Nature, Varieties and Plausibility of Hedonism.Fred Feldman - 2004 - Clarendon Press.
    Fred Feldman's fascinating new book sets out to defend hedonism as a theory about the Good Life. He tries to show that, when carefully and charitably interpreted, certain forms of hedonism yield plausible evaluations of human lives. Feldman begins by explaining the question about the Good Life. As he understands it, the question is not about the morally good life or about the beneficial life. Rather, the question concerns the general features of the life that is good in itself for (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   61 citations  
  32. Two Questions About Pleasure.Fred Feldman - 1988 - In D. F. Austin (ed.), Philosophical Analysis. Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 59--81.
    In this paper, I present my solutions to two closely related questions about pleasure. One of these questions is fairly well known. The second question seems to me to be at least as interesting as the first, but it apparently hasn't interested quite so many philosophers.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  33. The Science of Pleasure: Cosmos and Psyche in the Bourgeois World View.Harvie Ferguson - 1990 - Routledge.
    Examines the formation, structure and collapse of the bourgeois world view, exploring the concepts of fun, happiness, pleasure, and excitement.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  34. The Production of Pleasure by Stimulation of the Brain: An Alleged Conflict Between Science and Philosophy.Alan E. Fuchs - 1976 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 36 (June):494-505.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35. Pleasure, Part II.W. B. Gallie - 1954 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 147:147-164.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  36. Catamania: The Dissonance of Female Pleasure and Dissent.Adèle Olivia Gladwell - 1995 - Distributors to the Us Book Trade, Subterranean Company.
  37. The Rationality of Pleasure-Seeking Animals.Irwin Goldstein - 1988 - In Sander Lee (ed.), Inquiries Into Value. Edwin Mellen Press.
    Reason guides pleasure-seeking animals in leading them to prefer pleasure to pain.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38. Hedonic Pluralism.Irwin Goldstein - 1985 - Philosophical Studies 48 (1):49 - 55.
    Hedonic pluralism is the thesis that 'pleasure' cannot be given a single, all-embracing definition. In this paper I criticize the reasoning people use to support this thesis and suggest some plausible all-encompassing analyses that easily avoid the kinds of objections people raise to all-encompassing analyses.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  39. The Pursuit of Pleasure by Lionel Tiger. [REVIEW]Jeff Gorbski - 1997 - Utopian Studies 8 (1):242-244.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40. Pleasure Now.Dane Gordon - 1997 - Philosophy Now 19:15-19.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41. Pleasure.Justin Gosling - 1992 - In Lawrence C. Becker & Charlotte B. Becker (eds.), The Encyclopedia of Ethics. Garland Publishing. pp. 978--981.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  42. Intentionality and the Neurobiology of Pleasure.P. Hadreas - 1999 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 30 (2):219-236.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43. Intentionality and the Neurobiology of Pleasure.Peter Hadreas - 1999 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 30 (2):219-236.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44. Quantity of Pleasure.John C. Hall - 1966 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 67:35 - 52.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  45. Philosophy of Love, Sex, and Marriage: An Introduction.Raja Halwani - 2010 - Routledge.
    How is love different from lust or infatuation? Do love and marriage really go together “like a horse and carriage”? Does sex have any necessary connection to either? And how important are love, sex, and marriage to a well-lived life? In this lively, lucid, and comprehensive textbook, Raja Halwani pursues the philosophical questions inherent in these three important aspects of human relationships, exploring the nature, uses, and ethics of romantic love, sexuality, and marriage. The book is structured in three parts: (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46. Pleasure and Action.Edwin Hartman - 1996 - The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:125-127.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47. Happiness and Pleasure.Daniel M. Haybron - 2001 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 62 (3):501-528.
    This paper argues against hedonistic theories of happiness. First, hedonism is too inclusive: many pleasures cannot plausibly be construed as constitutive of happiness. Second, any credible theory must count either attitudes of life satisfaction, affective states such as mood, or both as constituents of happiness; yet neither sort of state reduces to pleasure. Hedonism errs in its attempt to reduce happiness, which is at least partly dispositional, to purely episodic experiential states. The dispositionality of happiness also undermines weakened nonreductive forms (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  48. The Concept of Pleasure and the Thesis of Hedonism.William Smith Heald - 1984 - Dissertation, The University of Iowa
    One of the most enduring claims of philosophy is the assertion that people are motivated to act only from a desire for pleasure. It is an assertion, a "theory" if you like, which has been proposed, assumed, discussed, debated, refuted and proved as long as people have reflected on people's motives for doing what they do. Aside from its pedigree, the issue of the truth of this thesis is both interesting and important in its own right. It is a thesis (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49. Review of Roger Crisp, Reasons and the Good[REVIEW]Chris Heathwood - 2007 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2007 (7).
  50. Desire Satisfactionism and Hedonism.Chris Heathwood - 2006 - Philosophical Studies 128 (3):539-563.
    Hedonism and the desire-satisfaction theory of welfare are typically seen as archrivals in the contest over identifying what makes one's life go best. It is surprising, then, that the most plausible form of hedonism just is the most plausible form of desire satisfactionism. How can a single theory of welfare be a version of both hedonism and desire satisfactionism? The answer lies in what pleasure is: pleasure is, in my view, the subjective satisfaction of desire. This thesis about pleasure is (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   17 citations  
1 — 50 / 151