Pleasure

Edited by Chris Heathwood (University of Colorado, Boulder)
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Subcategories:See also:History/traditions: Pleasure

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  1. Pleasure is Goodness; Morality is Universal.Neil Sinhababu - forthcoming - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice.
    This paper presents the Universality Argument that pleasure is goodness. The first premise defines goodness as what should please all. The second premise reduces 'should' to perceptual accuracy. The third premise invokes a universal standard of accuracy: qualitative identity. Since the pleasure of all is accurate solely about pleasure, pleasure is goodness, or universal moral value. The argument proceeds from a moral sense theory that analyzes moral concepts as concerned with what all should hope for, feel guilty about, and admire. (...)
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  2. Meaning in the Pursuit of Pleasure.David Matheson - 2022 - Journal of the American Philosophical Association 8 (3):552-566.
    Here I speak in favor of the view that life's meaning can be found in the pursuit of pleasure. I first present an argument for this view that is grounded in a traditional concept of meaning. To help ease remaining concerns about accepting it, I then draw attention to four things the view does not imply: that we have a reason to take hedonistic theories of meaning seriously; that meaning can be found in the deeply immoral, the deeply ignorant, or (...)
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  3. Traces of Ecocritical Elements in Lord Byron’s “There is Pleasure in the Pathless Wood”.Shahad Raheem Magtoof, Jawad Kadhim Hussein & Ragheed Jasim Mohammed - unknown
    Eco-criticism as the scientific study of the relationship between nature and human beings plays an important role in the analysis of literary works. This theory is even more significant in Romanticism in which nature was of particular implication and Lord Byron was no exception. This research seeks to study “There Is Pleasure in the Pathless Wood” by Lord Byron from an ecocritical viewpoint in order to analyze the way nature is exemplified in this poem and how the beliefs conveyed in (...)
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  4. Technopolis as the Technologised Kingdom of God. Fun as Technology, Technology as Religion in the 21st Century. God Sive Fun.Marina Christodoulou - 2018 - Cahiers d'Études Germaniques 1 (74: 'La religion au XXIe siècle):119-132.
    Citation:Christodoulou, Marina. “Technopolis as the Technologised Kingdom of God. Fun as Technology, Technology as Religion in the 21st Century. God sive Fun.” Cahiers d'études germaniques N° 74, 2018. La religion au XXIe siècle - Perpectives et enjeux de la discussion autour d'une société post-séculière. Études reunites par Sébastian Hüsch et Max Marcuzzi, 119-132. -/- -------- -/- Neil Postman starts his book Technopoly: The Surrender of Culture to Technology (1993)1 with a quote from Paul Goodman’s New Reformation: “Whether or not it (...)
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  5. The Pleasure of the Word: Literary Discourse and Other Discourses.Beth Brait, Maria Helena Cruz Pistori, Bruna Lopes Dugnani, Paulo Rogério Stella & Carlos Gontijo Rosa - 2022 - Bakhtiniana 17 (3):2-7.
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  6. Bring Me My Alcohol!—On the Continuum of Pleasure and Pain.Regina Christiansen & Anette S. Nielsen - forthcoming - Nursing Philosophy.
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  7. The Philebus and the Philosophy of Pleasure in Thomas More’s Utopia.Judith Jones - 1971 - Moreana 8 (3-4):61-70.
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  8. Thomas More's “Rule” of Pleasure Before, After, and in Utopia.Gerard Wegemer - 2017 - Moreana 54 (1):36-56.
    After establishing a context of More's lifelong engagement with the “calculus” of pleasure, this essay shows how the section devoted to the Utopians' pleasure philosophy is structured around five formulations of a “rule” to calculate “true and honest [honesta]” pleasure in ways that playfully imitate and echo the “rule” Cicero formulates several times in De officiis to discern one's duty when there seems to be a conflict between honestas et utilitas. When followed, the Utopian pleasure calculus shows the necessary role (...)
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  9. Pleasure and Variety in Thomas More’s Utopia.Mariano A. Vilar - 2016 - Moreana 53 (1-2):147-170.
    The goal of this article is to provide a better understanding of the organization of pleasure in the moral philosophy and in the social practices of the inhabitants of Utopia, the fictional island created by Thomas More. For this purpose, we will focus on the classifications of pleasure into a series of species which tend to suppress the individual nature of pleasure and its connection to subjectivity in order to establish the traits of “natural pleasures,” which fit perfectly the social (...)
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  10. Beyond the Pleasure Principle: A Kantian Aesthetics of Autonomy.Dominic McIver Lopes - 2021 - Estetika: The European Journal of Aesthetics 1:1-18.
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  11. Denis Dutton, The Art Instinct: Beauty, Pleasure, and Human Evolution.Tomáš Hříbek - 2020 - Estetika: The European Journal of Aesthetics 48 (2):248.
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  12. Aristotle on How Pleasure Perfects Activity (Nicomachean Ethics X.5 1175a29-B14): The Optimising-View.David Machek - 2022 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 104 (3):448-467.
    This article offers a new interpretation of Aristotle’s ambiguous and much-discussed claim that pleasure perfects activity. This interpretation provides an alternative to the two main competing readings of this claim in the scholarship: the addition-view, which envisages the perfection conferred by pleasure as an extra perfection beyond the perfection of activity itself; and the identity-view, according to which pleasure just is the perfect activity itself. The proposed interpretation departs from both these views in rejecting their assumption that pleasure cannot perfect (...)
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  13. Evaluating Users’ Emotional Experience in Mobile Libraries: An Emotional Model Based on the Pleasure-Arousal-Dominance Emotion Model and the Five Factor Model.Yang Zhao, Dan Xie, Ruoxin Zhou, Ning Wang & Bin Yang - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13.
    As a part of user experience, user emotion has rarely been studied in mobile libraries. Specifically, with the proposed emotional model in combination with the Pleasure-Arousal-Dominance Emotion Model and the Five Factor Model, we evaluate user emotions on the mobile library’s three IS features. An experience procedure with three tasks has been designed to collect data. 50 participants were enrolled, and they were asked to fill in questionnaires right after the experience. The correlations among the PAD emotions were examined. Specifically, (...)
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  14. Should We Feel Guilty Pleasure?Elizabeth Dalevik - unknown
    Most people are in agreement that guilty pleasures exist, and that we feel them at some point in our life. In my masters thesis I am going to try and answer why guilty pleasure exists and if it should exist. I am going to do this by exploring three different types of situations where our aesthetic tastes may not align with what we think is correct to like. I will call these situations the self theory, the social theory and the (...)
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  15. “The Use of Pleasure” of Learning.André Fantin & Ivã Gurgel - 2022 - Transversal: International Journal for the Historiography of Science 12.
    In this article, we present the work of the French thinker Michel Foucault, which, it can be argued, is centred on the Subject as a guiding concept and is divided into three perspectives of this concept, or axes of analysis, which also constitute crude markers of a diachronic evolution of Foucault’s thought: the archaeological, the genealogical and the ethical. Among these three axes, the first is more strongly linked to the study of science and is associated with the historical epistemology (...)
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  16. From the Heterogeneity Problem to a Natural‐Kind Approach to Pleasure.Antonin Broi - forthcoming - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly.
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  17. Adam Smith on Beauty, Utility, and the Problem of Disinterested Pleasure.Eduard Ghita - 2021 - Journal of Early Modern Studies 10 (2):115-130.
    The large extent to which aesthetic terms pervade Adam Smith’s discussion of ethics would seem to suggest, in the least, that the spheres of aesthetics and ethics are interwoven in a way hardly possible to conceive in the wake of Kant. Despite this recognized closeness between the two areas, one account in the literature has claimed that Smith’s understanding of beauty anticipates Kant’s modern notion of disinterested pleasure. It is claimed that according to Smith, disinterested pleasure is aroused by the (...)
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  18. Cartesian Sensory Perception, Agreeability, and the Puzzle of Aesthetic Pleasure.Domenica Romagni - 2021 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 30 (3):434-455.
    In this paper, I address Descartes’ claims that sensory perceptions function to aid and preserve the subject in interacting with the world, and focus specifically on the ‘valence’, or agreeable/dis...
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  19. Limiting the Scope of the Neither-One-Nor-Many Argument: The Nirākāravādin’s Defense of Consciousness and Pleasure.Davey Tomlinson - forthcoming - Philosophy East and West.
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  20. Dimensions of Pleasure: A First Detailed Reconstruction of Plato’s ‘Tyrant Number’.Christoph Poetsch - 2022 - Apeiron 55 (3):391-416.
    In book IX of the Republic, Socrates offers a strange mathematical calculation, which claims to prove that the tyrant lives exactly 729 times less pleasantly than the king. For the first time, a complete and detailed reconstruction of this difficult text and its underlying structure is offered in the present article. It thereby proves that the distinction between ‘pleasure’ and the ‘image of pleasure’ is one among the keys to understanding the passage. It is furthermore shown how the whole calculation (...)
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  21. Possessed: The Cynics on Wealth and Pleasure.G. M. Trujillo - 2022 - Southwest Philosophy Review 38 (1):17-29.
    Aristotle argued that you need some wealth to live well. The Stoics argued that you could live well with or without wealth. But the Cynics argued that wealth is a hinderance. For the Cynics, a good life consists in self-sufficiency, or being able to rule and help yourself. You accomplish this by living simply and naturally, and by subjecting yourself to rigorous philosophical exercises. Cynics confronted people to get them to abandon extraneous possessions and positions of power to live better. (...)
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  22. Εudaimonia, Pleasure and the Defeat of Particularity.Višnja Knežević - 2020 - In The possibility of Eudaimonia (happiness and human flourishing) in the world today. Athens: International center of Greek philosophy and culture and K.B. pp. 148-161.
    In the times where the predominant description of the world has become that of the so-called “post-truth” reality, all the questions on the possibilities of leading a fulfilled life, the life of εὐδαιμονία, seem to have become irrelevant, if not unattainable. This is due to the reason that εὐδαιμονία, as such, intrinsically involves a connection with the truth and the universal. On the other hand, the concept of a fulfilled life should not exclude subjective happiness. The latter has always been (...)
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  23. Reading Freud’s Three Essays on the Theory of Sexuality: From Pleasure to the Object.Philippe Van Haute & Herman Westerink - 2020 - Routledge.
    Sigmund Freud's 1905 Three Essays on the Theory of Sexuality is a founding text of psychoanalysis and yet it remains to a large extent an "unknown" text. In this book Freud's 1905 theory of sexuality is reconstructed in its historical context, its systematic outline, and its actual relevance. This reconstruction reveals a non-oedipal theory of sexuality defined in terms of autoerotic, non-objectal, physical-pleasurable activities originating from the "drive" and the excitability of erogenous zones. This book, consequently, not only calls for (...)
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  24. Epiphenomenal Mind: An Integrated Outlook on Sensations, Beliefs, and Pleasure.William S. Robinson - 2018 - Routledge.
    According to epiphenomenalism, our behavior is caused by events in our brains that also cause our mentality. This resulting mentality reflects our brains¿ organization, but does not in turn cause anything. This book defends an epiphenomenalist account of philosophy of mind. It builds on the author¿s previous work by moving beyond a discussion of sensations to apply an epiphenomenalist outlook to other aspects of mental causation such as beliefs, desires, pleasure, and displeasure. The first four chapters of the book argue (...)
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  25. From Class Struggle to the Politics of Pleasure: The Effects of Gramscianism on Cultural Studies.David Harris - 1992 - Routledge.
    This book examines the rise of cultural studies and evaluates its strengths and weaknesses. The author raises searching questions about the originality of cultural studies and its political motivation. Written with zest and a judicious sense of purpose it is a landmark work in cultural studies media and the sociology of culture.
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  26. Pleasure, Judgment and the Function of the Painter-Scribe Analogy.Emily Fletcher - 2022 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 104 (2):199-238.
    This paper puts forward a new interpretation of the argument at Philebus 36c–40d that pleasures can be false. Protarchus raises an objection at 37e–38a, and in response Socrates presents the elaborate painter-scribe analogy. Most previous interpretations do not explain how the analogy answers Protarchus’ objection. On my account, Protarchus’ objection relies on the plausible intuition that pleasure is simply not in the business of assessing the world, and so it cannot be charged with doing so incorrectly. Socrates responds by demonstrating (...)
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  27. This Side of the Pleasure Principle.Peter E. Gordon - 2021 - Krisis | Journal for Contemporary Philosophy 41 (2):89-90.
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  28. The Troubling Relationship Between Pleasure and Universality in Kant’s Impure Aesthetic Judgements.James Phillips - 2022 - Kant Studien 113 (2):219-237.
    Kant calls judgements of adherent beauty impure aesthetic judgements because they presuppose the empirical concept of the object and are thus not determined exclusively by a feeling of pleasure. Glossed over in Kant’s account is what kind of universality these judgements have. This article argues that the subjective universality of pure aesthetic judgements and the objective universality of cognitive judgements do not merge in impure aesthetic judgements and that the tension between them reaches also into Kant’s pure aesthetic judgements with (...)
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  29. This Side of the Pleasure Principle.Peter E. Gordon - 2021 - Krisis 41 (2):89-90.
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  30. Intentionality Sui Generis of Pleasure in Mere Reflection.Igor Cvejic - 2021 - In Kant on Emotions Critical Essays in the Contemporary Context. Berlin, Boston: pp. 87-106.
    In the following chapter, I will attempt to argue that feelings, and, above all, pleasure in mere reflection, ought to be understood as intentional states, and moreover, as feeling-intentionality sui generis. In the first portion of the text, I present the fundamentals of the Kantian understanding of feelings, and attempt to demonstrate why we should reject some of the conclusions of interpretations offered by Paul Guyer and Rachel Zuckert. In part two, I outline some of the particulars of pleasure in (...)
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  31. The Ethics of Sexual Pleasure.Raja Halwani - 2022 - In David Boonin (ed.), The Palgrave Handbook of Sexual Ethics. Cham, Switzerland: Palgrave Macmillan. pp. 37-54.
    This papers explains the sexual pleasure view of sexual desire, and argues that the moral evaluation of sexual pleasure depends on the moral evaluation of the sexual activity on which the pleasure supervenes. Thus, ethical talk of sexual pleasure as such, regardless of the type of activity on which it supervenes is misguided. The essay also argues that the ethics of sexual desires also depends on the sexual activities that the desires seek, but that the sexual desires and pleasures can (...)
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  32. The Pleasure of Weeping: The Novelty of a Research.Maddalena Mazzocut-Mis - 2021 - In Paola Giacomoni, Nicolò Valentini & Sara Dellantonio (eds.), The Dark Side: Philosophical Reflections on the “Negative Emotions”. Springer Verlag. pp. 159-175.
    Remembering Lucretius, Du Bos recalled that “watching a ship from the shore fighting the waves that want to swallow it up is exciting”. One of the features of Burke’s thought is to push to the limits the subjective possibilities of a spectator, who is explicitly required to bear a horror show rather than to appreciate its intrinsic mimetic-representative qualities. Mendelssohn openly admits having criticized Du Bos’s theory too hastily, and his definition of mixed feelings – pleasure and displeasure – also (...)
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  33. On The Concept of Pleasure.Ezra Heymann - 2015 - Apuntes Filosóficos 24 (46).
    We distinguish between the Aristotelian conception under which pleasure is understood as the feeling of the accomplished exercise of the active tendencies of a living being, and a conception according to which the search for pleasure or the removal of uneasiness determines every activity. Freud is considered as a representative of this second conception and more often than not he presents himself in that way. However, we find conclusive statements in Freud’s work according to which the principle of pleasure, considered (...)
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  34. The Replenishment Thesis as a Key Element of Platonic Psychology of Pleasure Through the Gorgias, the Republic and the Philebus.Gabriela Silva - 2018 - Apuntes Filosóficos 27 (53):130-146.
    We find the Platonic replenishment theory for the first time in the Gorgias, but it definitely can be find at its clearest in the Republic and the Philebus,where it plays a key role in the Platonic psychology of pleasure. According to thereplenishment theory, pleasure is defined as a movement or process or fulfillmentthat satisfies a previous lack, amounting to the recovery of our natural humanbalance state. Also, replenishment theory underpins ethical issues on the necessity ofpleasure in a good life. The (...)
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  35. What is Pleasure? The Relation Between the Two Definitions of Pleasure Given by Aristotle in His Nicomachean Ethics.Adrian Alexander Lawrence - 2020 - Alpha Omega 23 (3):483-499.
    This article discusses the nature of “pleasure” in Aristotle. It is an attempt to reconcile and integrate the two different definitions that Aristotle gives in 1153a12–15 and 1174b31–33 of his Nichomachean Ethics. It exams the analysis and proposals of three contemporary philosophers: G.E.L. Owen, David Bostock, and Michael Pakaluk. It then passes to the exegesis of the medieval Thomas Aquinas. Thomas’s reading of the texts is presented as a way to answer the difficulties brought up earlier and provide a solid (...)
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  36. Between Desire and Pleasure: A Deleuzian Theory of Sexuality.Frida Beckman - 2013 - Edinburgh University Press.
    Explores the political, cultural and conceptual significance of sexual pleasure through Deleuze's philosophy. How is sexual pleasure inscribed into conceptions of the body, gender, health and the human? What is its role in the construction of these notions? And, most importantly, how can it contribute to an expansion of what they mean?Intervening into fields including posthumanist, disability, animal and feminist studies, and current critiques of capitalism and consumerism, Frida Beckman addresses these questions to recover a theory of sexuality from Deleuze's (...)
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  37. Cartesian Sensory Perception, Agreeability, and the Puzzle of Aesthetic Pleasure.Domenica Romagni - forthcoming - Tandf: British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-22.
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  38. Rape and the Inordinate Quest for Pleasure: Implications for Social Cohesion and National Development.Victor Olusegun Adefarasin - 2012 - Caribbean Journal of Philosophy 4 (1).
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  39. On Pleasure: Why Man is Innately Selfish.Jeremy Kalfus - manuscript
    In this paper, I will argue that man is a slave to his pleasure and nothing he does is not to serve it. I will use this conclusion to argue that man is incapable of acting in true altruism and thus is incapable of being, in any way, altruistic. The argument goes as follows: -/- (i) Every act man makes throughout his entire life is to experience a form pleasure; (ii) If man only acts to experience pleasure, man’s acts cannot (...)
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  40. Recuperando una ética afectiva de la alegría.Sergio Casado Chamizo - 2021 - Isegoría 65:24-24.
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  41. "Hedonic Reasons as Ultimately Justifying and the Relevance of Neuroscience", in Moral Psychology, Vol. 3, Walter Sinnott-Armsgtrong, Ed., The Neuroscience of Morality: Emotion, Brain Disorders, and Development, Cambridge, Mass., MIT Press, 2007, Pp. 409-17.Leonard David Katz - 2007 - In Walter Sinnott Armstrong (ed.), Moral Psychology, Vol. 3, The Neuroscience of Morality: Emotion, Brain Disorders, and Development. Cambridge, MA, USA: pp. pp. 409-17..
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  42. Phenomenal Roles: A Dispositional Account of Bodily Pain.Simone Gozzano - 2021 - Synthese 199 (3-4):8091-8112.
    In this paper I argue that bodily pain, as a phenomenal property, is an essentially and substantial dispositional property. To this end, I maintain that this property is individuated by its phenomenal roles, which can be internal -individuating the property per se- and external -determining further phenomenal or physical properties or states. I then argue that this individuation allows phenomenal roles to be organized in a necessarily asymmetrical net, thereby overcoming the circularity objection to dispositionalism. Finally, I provide reasons to (...)
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  43. Alexander of Aphrodisias on Pleasure and Pain in Aristotle.Wei Cheng - 2018 - In Pleasure and Pain in Classical Time. Leiden: Brill. pp. 174-200.
  44. The Relationship Between Pleasure and Happiness From the Point of View of Ibn Sina and Mulla Sadra.Zahra Ganjipour, Farajullah Barati & Meysam Amani - 2021 - Philosophical Investigations 15 (35):268-292.
    From the time human beings are born, they are forever confronted with the phenomena of pleasure and happiness. These two concepts are very close but there are major differences and that is that pleasure is also used in momentary cases, and happiness is used only for lasting or relatively lasting pleasures. Ibn Sina and Mulla Sadra completely separated these two concepts and provided separate definitions for them. There is a deep relationship between pleasure and happiness. Psychology has a direct effect (...)
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  45. Lives of Pleasure: A Comparative Essay on Cārvāka and Epicurean Ethics.Christopher Paone - forthcoming - Philosophy East and West 72 (4).
    A long-lived and lively tradition of materialist philosophers flourished in classical India and in classical Greece. Due to the condition of their texts, however, they do not often receive close study. This essay compares the views of the classical Indian materialists, the Cārvākas, and the classical Greek materialists, the Epicureans. The first section introduces their philosophies. The second outlines their doctrines of empiricism and materialism. The third and fourth turn to two comparative topics in Cārvāka and Epicurean ethics: their views (...)
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  46. The Pleasure Problem and the Spriggean Solution.Daniel Pallies - forthcoming - Journal of the American Philosophical Association:1-20.
    Some experiences—like the experience of drinking a cool sip of water on a hot day—are good experiences to have. But when we try to explain why they are good, we encounter a clash of intuitions. First, we have an objectivist intuition: plausibly, the experience is non-derivatively good for me just because it feels the way that it does. It ‘feels good’. Thus, any experience of the same kind would be good for the person who has it. That experience would also (...)
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  47. Moved by Sad Music: Pleasure and Emotion in Sad Music Listening Experiences.Matthew Dunaway - unknown
    In this thesis, I consider the dialectic surrounding the Puzzle of Musical Tragedy i.e. why do people listen to sad music that makes them sad? I agree with Sizer that the best solutions to this puzzle construe the listening experience itself as pleasant. However, against Sizer, I argue that the feelings music induces are best construed as emotions, not moods. Since sad music can promote the perception of a sad person, I argue that music can be an unconscious object of (...)
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  48. Aquinas, Sense Pleasure, and the State of Grace.O. P. Maria Suso Rispoli - 2021 - New Blackfriars 102 (1100):459-471.
    New Blackfriars, Volume 102, Issue 1100, Page 459-471, July 2021.
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  49. The Authority of Pleasure.Keren Gorodeisky - 2021 - Noûs 55 (1):199-220.
    The aim of the paper is to reassess the prospects of a widely neglected affective conception of the aesthetic evaluation and appreciation of art. On the proposed picture, the aesthetic evaluation and appreciation of art are non-contingently constituted by a particular kind of pleasure. Artworks that are valuable qua artworks merit, deserve, and call for a certain pleasure, the same pleasure that reveals (or at least purports to reveal) them to be valuable in the way that they are, and constitutes (...)
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Pleasure and Pain
  1. Philosophy of Suffering: Metaphysics, Value, and Normativity.Michael S. Brady, David Bain & Jennifer Corns (eds.) - 2019 - London: Routledge.
    A collection, edited by David Bain, Michael Brady, and Jennifer Corns, originating in our Value of Suffering Project. Table of Contents: Michael Wheeler - ‘How should affective phenomena be studied?’; Julien Deonna & Fabrice Teroni – ‘Pleasures, unpleasures, and emotions’; Hilla Jacobson – ‘The attitudinal representational theory of painfulness fleshed out’; Tim Schroeder – ‘What we represent when we represent the badness of getting hurt’; Hagit Benbaji – ‘A defence of the inner view of pain’; Olivier Massin – ‘Suffering pain’; (...)
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