Poetry

Edited by Karen Simecek (University of Warwick)
About this topic
Key works Two recent collections of essays on the philosophy of poetry Gibson 2015 and French et al 2010 provide an excellent entry point into this field of study, with essays by key philosophers on poetry such as P Lamarque, A.C. Soy Ribeiro, J. Koethe and R. Eldridge. See also Critchley 2005 for a good example of philosophical inquiry focused on a particular poet and his works.
Introductions For a good introduction to the philosophy of poetry, see Gibson 2015 and Ribeiro's entry on Poetry in The Routledge Companion to the Philosophy of Literature Carroll & Gibson 2015. For an overview of current debates see Simecek 2019
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  1. added 2020-05-01
    Experience, Poetry and Truth: On the Phenomenology of Ernst Jünger’s The Adventurous Heart.Rasmus Gahrn-Andersen - 2017 - Phainomena (100-101):61-74.
    Ernst Jünger is known for his war writings, but is largely ignored by contemporary phenomenologists. In this essay, I explore his e Adventurous Heart which has recently been made available in English. is work consists of a set of fragments which, when related, disclose a coherent ow of philosophical thinking. Speci cally, I show that, beneath a highly poetic and obscure prose, Jünger posits how subjective experience and poetry allow individuals to realize truth. I relate parts of Jünger’s insights to (...)
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  2. added 2020-05-01
    Fearless?: Peter Weir, The Sage, and the Fragility of Goodness.Matthew Sharpe - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 41 (1):136-157.
    Who, if I cried out, would hear me among the Angelic Orders? And even if one were to suddenly take me to its heart, I would vanish into its stronger existence. For beauty is nothing but the beginning of terror, that we are still able to bear, and we revere it so, because it calmly disdains to destroy us...."So what are you telling me, there's no God, but there's you?"Peter Weir's film Fearless appeared in 1993 to critical acclaim and middling (...)
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  3. added 2020-05-01
    The Postmodern Split: Poetry, Theory, and the Metaphysics That Would Not Die.Bruce Bond - 2016 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (2):558-568.
    Postmodernism, in spite of its exaggerations and myopias, has left us with many gifts, including two strains of the critical tradition that struggle to reconcile with each other. Those strains grow from two undeniable truths: that the self can never occupy the space of the other, nor can the self extricate the other from its nature. Given the conflict between these truths, the postmodern resistance to metaphysics can never be quite as rigorous as it imagines, since the self, as inextricable (...)
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  4. added 2020-05-01
    Experiencia del pasado e imágenes poéticas: Edmund Husserl y Paul Celan.Guillermo Ferrer - 2011 - Investigaciones Fenomenológicas 8:169-208.
    El estudio de la fenomenología husserliana del recuerdo bien puede aportar elementos para la comprensión de la poetología de Paul Celan. Con tal pro-pósito subrayamos la facticidad del proceso de rememoración y de constitución del pasado distante: durante tal proceso la intuición se mezcla inevitablemente con imágenes. A su vez, la poetología de Paul Celan puede contribuir a esclarecer la alteridad que antecede la consideración propiamente estética, a saber el conflicto entre objeto-imagen y tema de la imagen, el cual se (...)
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  5. added 2020-04-27
    Richards and Williams: Spring and All and the Invention of Modernist Form.Dongho Cha - 2018 - Philosophy and Literature 42 (1):217-221.
    "The chief characteristic of poets," writes I. A. Richards in his well-known essay, "Science and Poetry," "is their amazing command of words".1 By this Richards does not mean that poetry can be written "by cunning and study, by craft and contrivance," that is, by "the technique of poetry added to a desire to write some"; his point is rather that "the ordering of the words" must spring from "an actual supreme ordering of experience." The true vocation of "genuine poetry" consists (...)
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  6. added 2020-04-27
    Shelley's Vestimentary Poetics.Alexander Freer - 2018 - Philosophy and Literature 42 (2):292-310.
    Poetry appears in veils but is not concealed. The subjects of poetry are "clothed in its Elysian light" not to serve the vanity of poets but to make visible a measure of their inspiration.1 This claim, central to Percy Shelley's Defence of Poetry, finds few sympathetic ears. The metaphor of poetry's dress suggests to some that poets engage in obfuscation, if not reckless cover-up. William Hazlitt says as much in an 1824 review of Shelley's Posthumous Poems: "His Muse offers her (...)
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  7. added 2020-04-27
    The Promethean Form: A Poet's Ontological Metamorphosis in Emerson's "Self-Reliance" and "The Poet".Trent Michael Sanders - 2018 - Philosophy and Literature 42 (1):222-229.
    What does Emerson want for himself and for us, or, put another way, what does he do in his writings as a whole? Can we understand Emerson's writings today? One critic, F. O. Matthiessen, in his American Renaissance: Art and Expression in the Age of Emerson and Whitman, pithily remarks that some of Emerson's philosophical essays are "generally unreadable";1 Len Gougeon, however, argues that we can know something about Emerson. Gougeon suggests that Emerson emphasizes the individual and the American political (...)
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  8. added 2020-04-27
    Narrative Rhyme and the Good Life.John E. MacKinnon - 2018 - Philosophy and Literature 42 (1):1-29.
    "Quite otherwise than the scientist, and far more than the historian," writes R. G. Collingwood, "the philosopher must go to school with the poets in order to learn the use of language, and must use it in their way: as a means of exploring one's own mind, and bringing to light what is obscure and doubtful in it." Whereas the poet "yields himself to every suggestion that his language makes," however, the philosopher's words are assembled "only to reveal the thought (...)
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  9. added 2020-04-27
    Rehearsing Better Worlds: Poetry as A Way of Happening in the Works of Tomlinson and MacDiarmid.Duncan Gullick Lien - 2018 - Philosophy and Literature 42 (1):185-200.
    W. H. Auden's dictum "poetry makes nothing happen" has an enduring currency in poetic criticism, quoted ad nauseam to support the view that poetic discourse must never fall subservient to political ends.1 Conventional wisdom would hold that Hugh MacDiarmid, a poet more often noted for his obstinate commitment to communism, patently failed to heed this dictum. Indeed, as Scott Lyall notes, MacDiarmid's political poems are almost never anthologized, suggesting that the poems in which MacDiarmid's political views are made explicit are (...)
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  10. added 2020-04-27
    "Horn-Handed and Pig-Headed": British Reception of The Poets and Poetry of America.Albert D. Pionke - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 41 (2):319-337.
    Before he became infamous for character assassination disguised as literary executorship, Rufus W. Griswold established his reputation in America as a critic and early literary anthologist. In 1842, Griswold released the first edition of his massive Poets and Poetry of America with prominent Philadelphia publisher Carey and Hart. At nearly five hundred royal octavo pages—complete with elaborate frontispiece; ornamental title page with an etching by George Hewitt Cushman after Thomas Creswick; twelve-page, double-columned “historical introduction”; authorial headnotes; and selections of verse (...)
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  11. added 2020-04-27
    The Poetry Machine: How the Alexandrian Avant-Garde Created a Library.Ole Olesen-Bagneux - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 41 (2):304-318.
    When it comes to cataloging, a poem is a far cry from a card index.1 The historical origins of storing and retrieving of literature can be traced back to the Library of Alexandria. Within the walls of this library, complex knowledge organizational techniques and practices arose in regards to classification and retrieval of text.2 Such practices had been at play in human culture before,3 but the level of literacy and the organizational qualities this literacy brought about reached a new height (...)
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  12. added 2020-04-27
    The Consequences of Particularity.Brett Bourbon - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 41 (2):416-430.
    A poem is not particular in the way a painting is particular. A copy of a poem is still the poem, while a copy of a painting is not the painting. But a poem is still particular, since it seems to be constituted by a specific set of words in a specific order such that to alter that order or any of those words is to make a new poem. Marianne Moore begins her poem “An Egyptian Pulled Glass Bottle in (...)
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  13. added 2020-04-27
    "All the Shadows / Whisper of the Sun": Carnevali's Whitmanesque Simplicity.Achille C. Varzi - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 41 (2):360-374.
    Dear Harriet Monroe:—Your recent issue of Poetry is quite interesting. The first poem of that young Italian chap is very good, the rest—unsuccessful. You are certainly the clearinghouse for a lot of mediocre stuff—so you should be: very democratic—keep up the good work. Yours,Williams This is William Carlos Williams writing to the editor of Poetry magazine on March 12, 1918.1 We know who the young Italian chap is: Emanuel Carnevali, age twenty, who had just made his debut in Monroe’s magazine (...)
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  14. added 2020-04-27
    How Can Each Word Be Irreplaceable?: Is Coleridge's Claim Absurd?Paul Magee - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 41 (2):400-415.
    One often hears a version of the following: “A poem is never finished, just abandoned.” I have always found this proposition irksome. The fact that Paul Valéry seems to be the source of it, in something like the above form, makes me feel a certain trepidation in writing this. But I do find myself thinking, when I hear people say that their poems are never finished, only abandoned: why don’t you just finish them? I want a poem to be finished. (...)
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  15. added 2020-04-27
    Poems as Reportive Avowals.Stefán Snævarr - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 41 (2):375-391.
    In this article, I focus on the way one can avow emotions and beliefs in poetry, with an emphasis on emotional expression. I want to show how the so-called Neo-Expressivism concerning self-attributions and avowals can help us understand the nature of emotional expression in poetry. The emphasis is on the way people use poems as vehicles for avowals of emotion and the way that emotions can shine through poems even though the poets did not intend to show those emotions. In (...)
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  16. added 2020-04-27
    Towards a Poetics of Literary Biography. Benton - 2011 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 45 (3):67.
    Biography is an ancient literary genre. First of all—chronologically and logically it is a part of historiography. Whether we think of biography as more like history or more like fiction, what we want from it is a vivid sense of the person. The cover illustration of the fortieth anniversary edition of E. H. Carr’s What is History?1 is a close-up of an eye with fluffy white clouds against a blue iris and a dramatic black pupil in the center. Magritte called (...)
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  17. added 2020-04-27
    Book Review: Lyrics of Lament: From Tragedy to TransformationLyrics of Lament: From Tragedy to Transformation by LeeNancy C.Fortress, Minneapolis, 2010. 256 Pp. $26.00. ISBN 978-0-8006-6301-8. [REVIEW]Carleen Mandolfo - 2011 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 65 (3):329-330.
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  18. added 2020-04-27
    The Offense of Poetry. [REVIEW]Zachary Gartenberg - 2009 - MLN 125:1211-1215.
    Review of Hazard Adams, The Offense of Poetry. For the Comparative Literature Edition of MLN (2009).
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  19. added 2020-04-27
    Poetry and Medicine.J. G. Brueggemann - 1985 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 28 (3):370.
  20. added 2020-04-27
    Modern American CriticismThe Contexts of Poetry.Emerson R. Marks, Walter Sutton & Hazard Adams - 1964 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 22 (4):485.
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  21. added 2020-04-27
    A Study of Literature for Readers and CriticsSense and Sensibility in Modern Poetry.Richard Eberhart, David Daiches & William van O'Connor - 1950 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 8 (3):198.
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  22. added 2020-04-18
    Modern Magic: Jean-Eugène Robert-Houdin and Stéphane Mallarmé.Joshua Landy - 2009 - In Joshua Landy & Michael Saler (eds.), The Re-Enchantment of the World: Secular Magic in a Rational Age. Stanford, CA, USA: pp. 102-29.
    This chapter outlines a response to the world's thoroughgoing arbitrariness, looking at the poetry of Stéphane Mallarmé and the performances of Jean-Eugène Robert-Houdin and Mallarmé set out to remedy the predicament by creating an alternative world, one which exists only in and through poetry, one where everything has to be exactly what and where it is. He also provided his readers with a formal model and the skills required for the creation of their own. In pointing to their own fictionality, (...)
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  23. added 2020-02-12
    Underwriting: The Poetics of Insurance in America, 1722-1872.Chad Mccracken - 2008 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 66 (4):407-409.
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  24. added 2020-02-11
    : The Wallace Stevens Case: Law and the Practice of Poetry. Thomas C. Grey.David Sanua - 1992 - Cardozo Studies in Law and Literature 4 (1):85-92.
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  25. added 2020-02-11
    Elements of Marxian Economic Theory and Its Criticism. By Theodore Brameld.Theodore Brameld - 1939 - Ethics 50 (3):350-350.
  26. added 2020-02-11
    War: Its Nature, Cause, and Cure. G. Lowes Dickinson.P. J. Baker - 1924 - International Journal of Ethics 34 (4):399-400.
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  27. added 2020-02-11
    The Poetry and Philosophy of George Meredith. G. M. Trevelyan.F. Melian Stawell - 1906 - International Journal of Ethics 17 (1):128-131.
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  28. added 2020-02-11
    Antimachus of Colophon and the Position of Women in Greek Poetry.E. F. M. Benecke.F. Melian Stawell - 1897 - International Journal of Ethics 7 (3):396-396.
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  29. added 2020-02-11
    An Introduction to the History of Religion.Frank Byron Jevons.W. F. Trotter - 1897 - International Journal of Ethics 8 (1):128-128.
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  30. added 2020-02-10
    The Philosophical Lectures of Samuel Taylor Coleridge.Sholom J. Kahn - 1950 - Journal of Philosophy 47 (13):394-395.
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  31. added 2020-01-13
    "The Meaning of the Liar Paradox in Randall Jarrell's 'Eighth Air Force'".Richard Michael McDonough - forthcoming - Philosophy and Literature 43.
    Do logical paradoxes, like Eubulides’s Liar Paradox (the claim that the sentence “I am now lying” is true if and only if it is false), have any “existential” significance or are they mere brain puzzles for the mathematically minded? The paper argues that Randall Jarrell’s poem, “Eighth Air Force”, contains a poetic use of Eubulides’ Liar Paradox, spoken by Pontius Pilate’s wife in her statements about the “murder” of Jesus, in order to capture, symbolically, the inherent universal duplicity (inauthenticity) of (...)
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  32. added 2020-01-13
    Deconstruction: A Misprision of Saussure and Charles Sanders Peirce.Leon Surette - 2019 - Philosophy and Literature 43 (2):411-440.
    Poetic influence—when it involves two strong, authentic poets—always proceeds by a misreading of the prior poet, an act of creative correction that is actually, and necessarily, a misinterpretation. The history of fruitful poetic influence, which is to say the main tradition of Western poetry since the Renaissance, is a history of anxiety, and self-saving caricature, of distortion, of perverse, wilful revisionism without which modern poetry as such could not exist.1Jacques Derrida is a philosopher, not a poet, but his co-optation of (...)
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  33. added 2020-01-13
    The Rift in the Lute: Attuning Poetry and Philosophy.Richard Eldridge - 2019 - British Journal of Aesthetics 59 (2):236-239.
    The Rift in the Lute: Attuning Poetry and Philosophy. GaynesfordMaximilian De OUP. 2017. pp. 320. £50.00.
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  34. added 2020-01-13
    "Poetry" Versus "History" in Aristotle's Poetics.David Gallop - 2018 - Philosophy and Literature 42 (2):420-433.
    History, according to Aristotle, relates "things that happen ; whereas poetry's function is to relate the kinds of things that happen—that is, are possible in terms of probability or necessity."1 A generic clause, expressing "the kinds of things that happen" to certain kinds of agents, distinguishes the task of the poet from that of the historian.2 History speaks of "particulars," whereas poetry speaks more of "universals." A historian might assert, for example, that Alcibiades urged the Athenians to invade Sicily, or (...)
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  35. added 2019-12-13
    La Saudade Abrasada: Una Mirada al Saudosismo de Teixeira de Pascoaes desde el Amor y la Nostalgia en Emilio Prados.David Fernández Navas - 2019 - Viagens da Saudade.
    [español] En primer lugar, el texto ofrece un acercamiento al papel que amor y nostalgia cumplen en la poesía de Emilio Prados, así como a su íntimo nexo con la muerte como aniquilación mística. Como herramienta interpetativa, recurriré a la razón poética de María Zambrano, autora profundamente emparentada, vital y teóricamente, con la poesía pradiana. Este enfoque permitirá una visión de conjunto sobre la obra del poeta español y en segundo lugar, trazar una comparativa con el saudosismo de Teixeira de (...)
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  36. added 2019-11-10
    Almost-Poetics: Prose Rhythm in George Berkeley’s Siris.Chris Townsend - 2019 - Philosophy and Literature 43 (2):336-349.
    Did George Berkeley think about the sounds of words? In his extraordinary 1912 work A History of English Prose Rhythm, the literary critic and prosodist George Saintsbury implies that such was indeed the case.1 Berkeley, more familiar to us as an idealist philosopher and as Bishop of Cloyne from 1734 to 1753, was also the author of a number of strange and often surprising texts. Saintsbury quotes, and metrically scans, one such work in his History.Saintsbury’s approach here, as elsewhere in (...)
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  37. added 2019-10-30
    Cultivating Intimacy: The Use of the Second Person in Lyric Poetry.Karen Simecek - 2019 - Philosophy and Literature 43 (2):501-518.
    Lyric poetry is often associated with expression of the personal. For instance, the work of the so-called “confessional” poets, such as Sylvia Plath and Anne Sexton, is often thought to reveal inmost thoughts and feelings of the poetic voice through first personal expression. The lyric poem, with its use of personal pronouns and singularity of voice, appears to invite the reader to experience the unfolding of the words as the intimate expression of another.Intimacy itself is associated with attention to another (...)
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  38. added 2019-10-15
    De Omni Re Scibili: Kevin Hart Philosopher, Theologian, Poet.Christopher Watkin - 2013 - Parrhesia: A Journal of Critical Philosophy 18:36-40.
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  39. added 2019-09-29
    Figuration: A Philosophy of Dance.Joshua M. Hall - 2012 - Dissertation, Vanderbilt University
    Dance receives relatively little attention in the history of philosophy. My strategy for connecting that history to dance consists in tracing a genealogy of its dance-relevant moments. In preparation, I perform a phenomenological analysis of my own eighteen years of dance experience, in order to generate a small cluster of central concepts or “Moves” for elucidating dance. At this genealogical-phenomenological intersection, I find what I term “positure” most helpfully treated in Plato, Aristotle and Nietzsche; “gesture” similarly in Condillac, Mead and (...)
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  40. added 2019-09-28
    Leopardi “Everything Is Evil”.Silvia De Toffoli - 2019 - In Andrew P. Chignell (ed.), Evil: A History. Oxford, UK: pp. 351-357.
    Giacomo Leopardi, a major Italian poet of the nineteenth century, was also an expert in evil to whom Schopenhauer referred as a “spiritual brother.” Leopardi wrote: “Everything is evil. That is to say, everything that is, is evil; that each thing exists is an evil; each thing exists only for an evil end; existence is an evil.” These and other thoughts are collected in the Zibaldone, a massive collage of heterogeneous writings published posthumously. Leopardi’s pessimism assumes a polished form in (...)
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  41. added 2019-09-28
    Empowering Poetic Defiance: Baudelaire, Kant, and Poetic Agency in the Classroom.Joshua M. Hall - 2018 - In Frank Jacob, Shannon Kincaid & Amy E. Traver (eds.), Poetry across the Curriculum. Leiden, Netherlands: pp. 141-157.
    Many strategies for incorporating poetry into non-poetry classes, especially outside of English and associated disciplines, appear to make poetry subservient and secondary in relation to the prose content of the course. The poet under consideration becomes a kind of involuntary servant to one or more prose authors, forced to “speak only when spoken to,” and effectively prevented from challenging the ideas of the course’s prose writers, and thereby the instructor. Fortunately, this is not the only strategy for incorporating poetry into (...)
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  42. added 2019-09-28
    The Necessary Pain of Moral Imagination: Lonely Delegation in Richard Wright's White Man, Listen! And Haiku.Joshua M. Hall - 2018 - Evental Aesthetics 1 (7):63-89.
    Richard Wright gave a series of lectures in Europe from 1950 to 1956, collected in the following year in the volume, White Man, Listen! One dominant theme in all four essays is that expanding the moral imagination is centrally important in repairing our racism-benighted globe. What makes Wright’s version of this claim unique is his forthright admission that expanding the moral imagination necessarily involves pain and suffering. The best place to hear Wright in regard to the necessary pain of expanding (...)
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  43. added 2019-09-28
    Toward a New Conception of Socially-Just Peace.Joshua M. Hall - 2017 - In Fuat Gursozlu (ed.), Peace, Culture, and Violence. Leiden, Netherlands: pp. 248-272.
    In this chapter, I approach the subject of peace by way of Andrew Fiala’s pioneering, synthetic work on “practical pacifism.” One of Fiala’s articles on the subject of peace is entitled “Radical Forgiveness and Human Justice”—and if one were to replace “Radical Forgiveness” with “Peace,” this would be a fair title for my chapter. In fact, Fiala himself explicitly makes a connection in the article between radical forgiveness and peace. Also in support of my project, Fiala’s article names four of (...)
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  44. added 2019-09-28
    Slanted Truths: The Gay Science as Nietzsche's Ars Poetica.Joshua M. Hall - 2016 - Evental Aesthetics 5 (1):98-117.
    This essay derives its focus on poetry from the subtitle of Die Fröhliche Wissenschaft: “la gaya scienza.” Nietzsche appropriated this phrase from the phrase “gai saber” used by the Provençal knight-poets (or troubadours) of the eleventh through thirteenth centuries — the first lyric poets of the European languages — to designate their Ars Poetica or “art of poetry.” I will begin with an exploration of Nietzsche’s treatment of poets and poetry as a subject matter, closely analyzing his six aphorisms which (...)
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  45. added 2019-09-28
    Tyrannized Childhood of the Liberator-Philosopher: J. S. Mill and Poetry as Second Childhood.Joshua M. Hall - 2015 - In Brock Bahler & David Kennedy (eds.), Philosophy of Childhood Today: Exploring the Boundaries. Lanham, MD 20706, USA: pp. 117-132.
    In this chapter, I will explore the intersection of philosophy and childhood through the intriguing case study of J. S. Mill, who was almost completely denied a childhood—in the nineteenth-century sense of a qualitatively distinct period inclusive of greater play, imaginative freedom, flexibility, and education. For his part, Mill’s lack of such a childhood was the direct result of his father, James Mill (economic theorist and early proponent of Utilitarianism), who in a letter to Jeremy Bentham explicitly formulates a plan (...)
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  46. added 2019-09-28
    Nancy and Neruda: Poetry Thinking Love.Joshua M. Hall - 2014 - Contemporary Aesthetics 12.
    My intention in this paper is to respond to Jean-Luc Nancy’s claim that poetry, along with philosophy, is essentially incapable of what Nancy describes as "thinking love." To do so, I will first try to come to an understanding of Nancy’s thinking regarding love and then of poetry as presented in his essay "Shattered Love." Having thus prepared the way, I will then respond, via Pablo Neruda’s poem "Oda al Limón," to Nancy’s understanding of poetry vis-à-vis "Shattered Love." This response, (...)
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  47. added 2019-09-25
    Функційність топоніма Москва в українському поетичному дискурсі.Yuliia Brailko - 2018 - Language: Classic – Modern – Postmodern 4:5-19.
    У статті наведено результати дослідження функційного призначення топоніма Москва в українському поетичному дискурсі від давньої доби до сьогодні. Визначено, що найважливіша його функція – ідеологічна, вона є різновекторною та безпосередньо пов’язана з авторською оцінкою. Конотації власної назви Москва детерміновані інтерлінгвальними чинниками та мають великий діапазон – від максимально меліоративних до максимально пейоративних.
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  48. added 2019-09-21
    Heidegger and the Poetics of Time.Rebecca A. Longtin - 2017 - Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual 7:124 - 141.
    Heidegger’s engagement with the poet Friedrich Hölderlin often dwells on the issue of temporality. For Heidegger, Hölderlin is the most futural thinker (zukünftigster Denker) whose poetry is necessary for us now and must be wrested from being buried in the past. Heidegger frames his reading of Hölderlin in terms of past, present, and future and, more importantly, describes him as being able to poetize time. This paper examines what it means to poetize time and why Hölderlin’s poetry in particular allows (...)
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  49. added 2019-09-20
    Poetry as Dark Precursor: Nietzschean Poetics in Deleuze's "Literature and Life".Joshua M. Hall - 2018 - Philosophy Today 62 (1):235-251.
    The present article utilizes the Nietzschean “poetics” distilled from Nietzsche’s Gay Science as an interpretive strategy for considering Deleuze’s essay “Literature and Life” in Essays Critical and Clinical. The first section considers Deleuze’s overarching project in that essay, and then repositions his thought from literature in general to “poetry” in particular, indicating both resonances between Deleuze’s understanding of “literature” and Nietzsche’s understanding of “poetry” as well as their dissonances. The second section focuses on the places in Deleuze’s analyses where he (...)
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  50. added 2019-09-20
    A Darkly Bright Republic: Milton's Poetic Logic.Joshua M. Hall - 2018 - South African Journal of Philosophy 37 (2):158-170.
    My first section considers Walter J. Ong’s influential analyses of the logical method of Peter Ramus, on whose system Milton based his Art of Logic. The upshot of Ong’s work is that philosophical logic has become a kind monarch over all other discourses, the allegedly timeless and universal method of mapping and diagramming all concepts. To show how Milton nevertheless resists this tyrannical result in his non-Logic writings, my second section offers new readings of Milton’s poems Il Penseroso and Sonnet (...)
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