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  1. Literary Girls, by K*Thleen St*Ck: Chapter 2, the Low-High Culture Divide.Terence Rajivan Edward - manuscript
    This paper is a response to Kathleen Stock’s book Material Girls, by way of imitation. I have attempted to write a faux chapter in the book’s style, identifying four moments in overcoming the low-high culture divide in responses to the arts.
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  2. Ethics and Video Games.Christopher Bartel - forthcoming - In James Harold (ed.), Oxford Handbook of Ethics and Aesthetics. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
    Ethics in video gaming is broad topic that extends beyond the familiar instances of “moral panics”. This chapter will first divide ethical issues into internal and external moral questions. Roughly, this equates to a distinction between the ethics in games and the ethics of games. The ethical issues internal to video games arise due to both their status as fictions and their status as games. Many games afford players the opportunity to perform violent and vicious acts; however, these are of (...)
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  3. What Does ‘New Wave’ Mean?Peter Groff - forthcoming - In Andrew Krivine (ed.), Reversing into the Future: New Wave Graphics. London, UK: Pavilion Books.
    A philosophical examination of 'new wave' as a musical genre, focusing on its developmental history and relation to punk as well as its unique ethos and aesthetic. Forthcoming 2021.
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  4. Diaectic of Pop.Robin James - forthcoming - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism.
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  5. Music as Misdirection.Jason Leddington - forthcoming - In Jake Johnson (ed.), Viva Las Vegas: Music and Myth in America's City of Second Chances. Champaign, IL, USA:
    Magic and Vegas have a lot in common. Both have a reputation for bad taste and cheap thrills, and they’ve both generally been ignored—or at best ridiculed—by the art-critical establishment. It’s fitting, then, that no city loves magic like Vegas loves magic. Today, more than one-third of its top-selling shows feature magic, and this means that no complete treatment of art and entertainment in Sin City can afford to ignore it. But what’s at risk here is more than theoretical completeness. (...)
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  6. Pornography and Melancholy.Hans Maes - forthcoming - Apa Newsletter on Feminism and Philosophy.
    Section 1 proposes a new philosophical account of melancholy. Section 2 examines the reasons why one might think that pornography and melancholy are incompatible. Section 3 discusses some successful examples of melancholic pornography and makes the case that feminist pornographers are particularly well-placed to produce such material.
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  7. Immoral Artists.Erich Hatala Matthes - forthcoming - In James Harold (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Ethics and Art.
    This chapter offers an overview of issues posed by the problem of immoral artists, artists who in word or deed violate commonly held moral principles. I briefly consider the question of whether the immorality of an artist can render their work aesthetically worse (making connections to chapters in the Theory section of the handbook), and then turn to questions about what the audience should do and feel in response to knowledge of these moral failings. I discuss questions such as whether (...)
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  8. Arthur Danto’s Andy Warhol: The Embodiment of Theory in Art and the Pragmatic Turn.Stephen Snyder - forthcoming - Leitmotiv:135-151.
    Arthur Danto’s recent book, Andy Warhol, leads the reader through the story of the iconic American’s artistic life highlighted by a philosophical commentary, a commentary that merges Danto’s aesthetic theory with the artist himself. Inspired by Warhol’s Brillo Box installation, art that in Danto’s eyes was indiscernible from the everyday boxes it represented, Danto developed a theory that is able to differentiate art from non-art by employing the body of conceptual art theory manifest in what he termed the ‘artworld’. The (...)
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  9. Becoming Afflicted, Becoming Virtuous: 'Darkest Dungeon' and the Human Response to Stress.James Cartlidge - 2022 - Games and Culture (OnlineFirst):19.
    The developers of Red Hook Studios’ 2016 gothic horror game ‘Darkest Dungeon’ said that they wanted to ‘capture the human response to stress’. This paper analyses how the game does this with its ‘stress’, ‘affliction’ and ‘virtue’ mechanics. With reference to research literature on stress, I show how these mechanics, which could easily have been cheap gimmicks, approach the topic of stress with admirable detail, offering a complex reflection on the various aspects, positive and negative, of several possible human responses (...)
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  10. Drawing the Line: What to Do with the Work of Immoral Artists From Museums to the Movies.Erich Hatala Matthes - 2022 - New York: Oxford University Press, USA.
    Can we still watch Woody Allen's movies? Can we still laugh at Bill Cosby's jokes? Woody Allen, Kevin Spacey, Dave Chappelle, Louis C. K., J.K. Rowling, Michael Jackson, Roseanne Barr. Recent years have proven rife with revelations about the misdeeds, objectional views, and, in some instances, crimes of popular artists. Spurred in part by the #metoo movement, and given more access than ever thanks to social media and the internet in general, the public has turned an alert and critical eye (...)
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  11. Let It Go? Elsa, Stoicism, and the “Lazy Argument”.Brendan Shea - 2022 - AndPhilosophy.Com: The Blackwell Philosophy and Pop Culture Series.
    Disney’s Frozen (2013) and Frozen 2 (2019) are among the highest-grossing films of all time (IMDb 2021) and are arguably among the most influential works of fantasy produced in the last decade in any medium. The films, based loosely on Hans Christensen Andersen’s “The Snow Queen” (Andersen 2014) focus on the adventures of the sisters Anna and Elsa as they, together with their companions, seek to safeguard their people both from external threats and (importantly) from Elsa’s inabilities to control her (...)
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  12. Artistas mecánicos: Una mirada a la capacidad estética de máquinas y algoritmos desde la música pop y el pop art.Leonardo Arriagada - 2021 - Calle 14 Revista De Investigación En El Campo Del Arte 16 (29):54-66.
    A pesar de los enormes avances que ha tenido la inteligencia artificial (IA) y la robótica, aún es polémico afirmar que una máquina pueda crear arte. Contrario a esta visión, propongo que tras la negación de las capacidades estéticas de las máquinas subyace un sesgo antropocéntrico. Para ilustrar lo anterior tomo ejemplos sobre el rol de las máquinas en la música y arte pop. He seleccionado estos géneros pues históricamente han incorporado de buena forma las novedades tecnológicas. En definitiva, este (...)
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  13. Dave Chappelle Says He Doesn't Mean It So Just Shut Up Already.Steven Burgess - 2021 - In Mark Ralkowski (ed.), Dave Chappelle and Philosophy: When Keeping It Wrong Gets Real.
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  14. “Teach Me To Do What’s Right”: Faith, Hope, and Love as Post-Religious Virtues.A. G. Holdier - 2021 - Journal for Cultural and Religious Theory 20 (3).
    According to Thomas Aquinas, what distinguishes the theological from the cardinal virtues is the nature of their object: the latter aim at the natural excellence of humans, while the former direct us beyond ourselves to focus on the Divine. This paper considers the cinematic work of Drew Goddard — in particular, his 2018 film _Bad Times at the El Royale_ — as a post-religious response to Aquinas, insofar as it retains and re-presents Faith, Hope, and Love as valuable elements of (...)
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  15. Rache. Über einen blinden Fleck der Moderne.Fabian Bernhardt - 2020 - Berlin, Deutschland: Matthes & Seitz.
    Die Moderne nimmt für sich in Anspruch, die Rache glücklich überwunden und durch die Herrschaft des Rechts ersetzt zu haben. Seit der Aufklärung gilt die Rache nicht nur als Gegenspielerin des Rechts, sondern als das dunkle Andere der Moderne überhaupt. In seiner groß angelegten kulturgeschichtlichen Studie liest Fabian Bernhardt diese bislang kaum hinterfragte Fortschrittserzählung gegen den Strich. Batman tritt neben Achilles, der Potlatsch neben 9/11, Marcel Mauss trifft auf Immanuel Kant – in einer Verbindung aus philosophischer Reflexion, kulturanthropologischem Zugriff und (...)
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  16. Subversive Humor as Art and the Art of Subversive Humor.Chris A. Kramer - 2020 - The Philosophy of Humor Yearbook 1 (1):153–179.
    This article investigates the relationships between forms of humor that conjure up possible worlds and real-world social critiques. The first part of the article will argue that subversive humor, which is from or on behalf of historically and continually marginalized communities, constitutes a kind of aesthetic experience that can elicit enjoyment even in adversarial audiences. The second part will be a connecting piece, arguing that subversive humor can be constructed as brief narrative thought experiments that employ the use of fictionalized (...)
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  17. The Arts of Action.C. Thi Nguyen - 2020 - Philosophers' Imprint 20 (14):1-27.
    The theory and culture of the arts has largely focused on the arts of objects, and neglected the arts of action – the “process arts”. In the process arts, artists create artifacts to engender activity in their audience, for the sake of the audience’s aesthetic appreciation of their own activity. This includes appreciating their own deliberations, choices, reactions, and movements. The process arts include games, urban planning, improvised social dance, cooking, and social food rituals. In the traditional object arts, the (...)
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  18. Games: Agency as Art.C. Thi Nguyen - 2020 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Games occupy a unique and valuable place in our lives. Game designers do not simply create worlds; they design temporary selves. Game designers set what our motivations are in the game and what our abilities will be. Thus: games are the art form of agency. By working in the artistic medium of agency, games can offer a distinctive aesthetic value. They support aesthetic experiences of deciding and doing. -/- And the fact that we play games shows something remarkable about us. (...)
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  19. Fake News and Ecstatic Truths: Alternative Facts in Lessons of Darkness.Kyle Novak - 2020 - In M. Blake Wilson & Christopher Turner (eds.), The Philosophy of Werner Herzog. Lanham, MD 20706, USA: Rowman & Littlefield.
    This chapter draws a connection between Herzog’s falsified epigraph to Lessons of Darkness and Kellyanne Conway’s claim that there are “alternative facts”. Philosophers have a commitment to the truth, but in cases like Herzog’s quote or Trump’s inauguration it’s very easy to fact-check. Being a good citizen may require that from us, but doing so leaves little to resolve philosophically. Thus, if Herzog raises a question about finding truth in an age of “alt-facts” and “fake news”, then it must be (...)
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  20. Art Works for Isolates.Paul O'Halloran - 2020 - Dissertation, University of Melbourne
    In a Covid-19 world, everyone’s circumstances changed. Most of us are living and or working in quarantine or lockdown. There is evidence that lockdown itself can have serious negative psychological impact (Brooks et al., 2020). Nonetheless, strategies are being proposed which, arguably, mitigate these harms. Artmaking is one such strategy. As ‘art therapy’, it has been usefully deployed to address a wide range of mental health challenges including anxiety, depression, fatigue and post-traumatic stress (Regev & Cohen-Yatziv, 2018). Given that these (...)
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  21. Kiss the Ship of Theseus Goodbye!Shane J. Ralston - 2020 - In Courtland Lewis (ed.), Kiss and Philosophy: Wiser than Hell. Portland: Microcosm Publishing. pp. 105-111.
    The American rock band KISS is notorious. Its notoriety derives not only from the band’s otherworldly costumes (except for of course during the unmasked period), the fact that they were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, their numerous hit records or the amazing stage theatrics and pyrotechnics of their live shows. It’s also related to the band’s constantly changing makeup (and I don’t mean the kind on their faces!). Of the four members, only Paul Stanley and Gene (...)
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  22. A Comedian and a Fascist Walk Into Freud's Bar: On the Mass Character of Stand‐Up Comedy.Martin Shuster - 2020 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 78 (4):525-534.
    This article explores the psychoanalytic points of commonality between stand‐up comedy shows and fascist rallies, arguing that both are concerned with the creation of a “mass” audience. The article explores the political significance of this analogy by arguing that while stand‐up shows are not as regressive as fascist rallies, their “mass” character does run counter to any political aspirations they may have toward the end of critical consciousness raising.
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  23. From Tomas Kulka on Kitsch and Art to Art as a Singular Rule.Doron Avital & Karolina Dolanska - 2019 - Espes. The Slovak Journal of Aesthetics 9 (2):17-27.
    The article takes as its starting point the work of Tomas Kulka on Kitsch and Art to further a philosophical move aiming at the very logical core of the question of art. In conclusion, the idea of Singular Rule is offered as capturing the defining logic of art. In so doing, the logical structure of a singular rule is uncovered and in that also the sense in which the idea of singular rule both explains and justifies the role that art (...)
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  24. Seeing Things and Screening Reality. A Review of “Philosophy and Film. Bridging Divides”. [REVIEW]Diana Bulzan - 2019 - Revista de Filosofie Aplicata 2 (3):124-131.
  25. La encrucijada axiológica de la reproductibilidad técnica del arte.José Ramón Fabelo Corzo - 2019 - In José Ramón Fabelo Corzo & Mayra Sánchez Medina (eds.), Coordenadas epistemológicas para una estética en construcción. Puebla, Pue., México: pp. 227-244.
    La obra de arte en la época de su reproductibilidad técnica es, sin dudas, la más emblemática aportación de Walter Benjamin a la estética y la teoría del arte. Un aspecto problemático que aflora en su lectura es el del impacto axiológico que el teórico marxista judío-alemán le atribuía a la nueva época. Es significativo el hecho de que, mientras para unos, este texto alberga una crítica negativa a la reproductibilidad técnica y una mirada nostálgica al pasado, para otros, la (...)
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  26. La sociedad del espectáculo de Guy Debord: 50 años después.José Ramón Fabelo Corzo - 2019 - In José Ramón Fabelo Corzo & Mayra Sánchez Medina (eds.), Coordenadas epistemológicas para una estética en construcción. Puebla, Pue., México: pp. 259-274.
    En 1967, el francés Guy Debord escribía un resonante texto, La sociedad del espectáculo, en el que nos ofrece una penetrante y aguda reflexión sobre la sociedad de consumo —cuya experiencia directa vive en la Francia de la posguerra—, donde florece la economía de la abundancia, la industria del ocio, la generalización de los medios de comunicación audiovisual y la propagación del llamado american way of life. Anclado fuertemente en las ideas de Marx sobre la alienación y el fetichismo mercantil, (...)
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  27. Spierig Brothers' Jigsaw (2017) - Torture Porn Rebooted?Steve Jones - 2019 - In Simon Bacon (ed.), Horror: A Companion. Oxford, UK: Peter Lang. pp. 85-92.
    After a seven-year hiatus, the Saw franchise returned. Critics overwhelming disapproved of the franchise’s reinvigoration, and much of that dissention centred around a label that is synonymous with Saw: ‘torture porn’. Numerous critics pegged the original Saw (2004) as torture porn’s prototype. Accordingly, critics characterised Jigsaw’s release as heralding an unwelcome ‘torture porn comeback’. This chapter investigates the legitimacy of this concern in order to determine what ‘torture porn’ is and means in the Jigsaw era.
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  28. RuPaul's Drag Race and Philosophy: Sissy That Thought.Hendrik Kempt & Megan Volpert (eds.) - 2019 - Open Court.
    The first truly philosophical exploration of the drag queen in the context of this ground-breaking reality TV showAs RuPaul has said, this is the Golden Age of Drag-and that's chiefly the achievement of RuPaul's Drag Race, which in its eleventh year is more popular than ever, and has now become fully mainstream in its appeal. The show has an irresistible allure for folks of all persuasions and proclivities. Yet serious or philosophical discussion of its exponential success has been rare. Now (...)
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  29. Who'd Rick Kill? Or, Who Killed Rick?Elliot Knuths - 2019 - In Wayne Yuen & Lester Abesamis (eds.), Rick and Morty and Philosophy. Open Court.
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  30. El Infierno y Salvando al soldado Pérez. Entre el realismo macabro y el ridículo mágico.Mario Edmundo Chávez Tortolero - 2019 - In Carlos Oliva Mendoza & Luis Guillermo Martínez Gutiérrez (eds.), Cine mexicano y filosofía. Editorial Itaca.
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  31. There's No Place Like Home: Dwelling and Being at Home in Digital Games.Daniel Vella - 2019 - In Espen Aarseth & Stephan Günzel (eds.), Ludotopia: Spaces, Places and Territories in Computer Games. Bielefeld, Germany: pp. 141-166.
    This chapter considers the presence, in digital games, of experiences of dwelling. Starting with an engagement with the philosopher Edward S. Casey's distinction between hestial and hermetic spatial modes, the chapter argues that the player's spatial engagement with digital game worlds has tended to align with the hermetic pole, emphasizing movement, traversal and exploration. By contrast, hestial spatial practices, characterized by centrality, lingering and return, are far less prevalent both in digital games themselves and in discussions on spatiality in the (...)
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  32. Post- i transhumanizm w kontekście wybranych zjawisk artystycznych technokultury.Przemysław Zawadzki & Agnieszka K. Adamczyk - 2019 - Avant: Trends in Interdisciplinary Studies 10 (3).
    Creations of many contemporary artists indicate the emergence of technoculture. Although artistic manifestations of technoculture may appear to be a provocation, they encourage fundamental ontological questions, such as whether a person has unchanging nature; what was and is our relationship to the Other, and what it should be; to what extent can body and mind be altered before they stop being “human”; what is the future of our species. To properly understand the works of technoculture artists, it appears necessary to (...)
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  33. Символизация успеха в современном кинематографе.Gennady Bakumenko - 2018 - Dissertation, Armavir State Pedagogical University
    The set of symbols of success is a set of cultural determinants of activity and their functioning is connected with the fundamental functions of culture as a system of historically developing supra-biological programs of life. The relevance of considering the symbolization of success in modern cinema is due to several factors. First, according to the majority of art historians and film theorists, cinema remains the leading, most widespread form of art throughout the 20th and 21st centuries. If we understand art (...)
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  34. ‘It’s Just a Story’: Pornography, Desire, and the Ethics of Fictive Imagining.Christopher Bartel & Anna Cremaldi - 2018 - British Journal of Aesthetics 58 (1):37-50.
    Is it ever morally wrong for a consumer to imagine something immoral in a work of fiction, or for an author to prompt such imagining? Brandon Cooke has recently argued that it cannot be. On Cooke’s account, fictive imagining is immune to moral criticism because such cases of imagining do not amount to the endorsement of the immoral content, nor do they imply that the authors of such fictions necessarily endorse their contents. We argue against Cooke that in fact fictively (...)
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  35. Ruines à l’œuvre.Filippo Fimiani - 2018 - Nouvelle Revue D’Esthétique 21 (1):121.
    The Seven Heavenly Palaces were created by Anselm Kiefer to inaugurate the HangarBicocca in Milan in 2004, and, after an intervention on the site in 2008, were transferred, preserved and repaired, finally relocated differently for a new and definitive exhibition, with some paintings, in 2015. Erected around prefabricated containers, these monumental ruins in reinforced concrete, are in fact assembled, reconstructed and restored ruins, nonarchitectural and metaphorical buildings with a mass of complementary materials considered an integral part of the work and (...)
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  36. On Superhero Stories: The Marvel Cinematic Universe as Tolkienesque Fantasy.A. G. Holdier - 2018 - Mythlore: A Journal of J.R.R. Tolkien, C.S. Lewis, Charles Williams, and Mythopoeic Literature 36 (2):Article 6.
    By considering the movies in the Marvel Cinematic Universe as a case study, I bring Tolkien’s explication of mythopoesis in “On Fairy Stories” to bear on the current popularity of superhero films to argue that such works qualify as cinematic examples of Tolkienesque fantasy tales. After summarizing Tolkien’s criteria for the genre in Nietzschean aesthetic terms, I both demonstrate how the builders of the MCU have crafted a sub-created fictional world and defend the existence of fairy stories in visual media (...)
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  37. Sex and Horror.Steve Jones - 2018 - In Feona Attwood, Clarissa Smith & Brian McNair (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Media, Sex and Sexuality. New York: Routledge. pp. 290-299.
    The combination of sex and horror may be disquieting to many, but the two are natural (if perhaps gruesome) bedfellows. In fact, sex and horror coincide with such regularity in contemporary horror fiction that the two concepts appear to be at least partially intertwined. The sex–horror relationship is sometimes connotative rather than overt; examples of this relationship range from the seduction overtones of 'Nosferatu' and the juxtaposition of nudity and horror promised by European exploitation filmmakers to the sadomasochistic iconography of (...)
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  38. George Kubler and the Biological Metaphor of Art.Bence Nanay - 2018 - British Journal of Aesthetics 58 (4):423-434.
    George Kubler was one of the most important art historians of the twentieth century who is especially relevant today mainly for shifting the emphasis from high art to what is now known as ‘visual culture’ and for being the first genuinely global art historian. But what he has been most widely known for is the rejection of the biological metaphor of art—the general idea that artistic styles and movements grow, flower and then wither away. I argue that Kubler did not (...)
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  39. Diane, I Am Now Upside Down.Kristopher G. Phillips & Veronica McMullen - 2018 - In Richard Greene & Rachel Robison-Greene (eds.), Twin Peaks and Philosophy: That's Damn Fine Philosophy! Chicago, IL, USA: pp. 165-178.
    Using Twin Peaks' Agent Dale Cooper as an example, we explore the paradox of fiction. Employing resources from Aimee Thomasson's account of fictional characters in conjunction with some research on parasocial interaction, we make offer a potential solution for the paradox.
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  40. Albert Among the Chowder-Head Yokels and Blithering Hayseeds.Kristopher G. Phillips & Jeffrey G. Phillips - 2018 - In Richard Greene & Rachel Robison-Greene (eds.), Twin Peaks and Philosophy: That's Damn Fine Philosophy. Chicago, IL, USA: pp. 51-66.
    We examine Twin Peaks' minor character Albert Rosenfeld's peculiar moral code. We make the case that Albert is the perfect exemplification of a perfect Kantian in an imperfect world.
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  41. Outline of a Theory of Scientific Aesthetics.Gustavo Romero - 2018 - Foundations of Science 23 (4):795-807.
    I offer a theory of art that is based on science. I maintain that, as any other human activity, art can be studied with the tools of science. This does not mean that art is scientific, but aesthetics, the theory of art, can be formulated in accord with our scientific knowledge. I present elucidations of the concepts of aesthetic experience, art, work of art, artistic movement, and I discuss the ontological status of artworks from the point of view of scientific (...)
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  42. Contemporary Kitsch: The Death of Pseudo-Art and the Birth of Everyday Cheesiness (A Postcolonial Inquiry).Max Ryynänen - 2018 - Terra Aestheticae: Journal of Russian Society for Aesthetics 1 (1):70-86.
    The discourse on kitsch has changed tone. The concept, which in the early 20th century referred more to pretentious pseudo-art than to cute everyday objects, was attacked between the World Wars by theorists of modernity (e.g. Greenberg on Repin). The late 20th century scholars gazed at it with critical curiosity (Eco, Kulka, Calinescu). What we now have is a profound interest in and acceptance of cute mass-produced objects. It has become marginal to use the concept to criticize pseudo-art. Scholars who (...)
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  43. Popular Culture in (and Out of) American Political Science: A Concise Critical History, 1858–1950.Nick Dorzweiler - 2017 - History of the Human Sciences 30 (1):138-159.
    Historically, American political science has rarely engaged popular culture as a central topic of study, despite the domain’s outsized influence in American community life. This article argues that this marginalization is, in part, the by-product of long-standing disciplinary debates over the inadequate political development of the American public. To develop this argument, the article first surveys the work of early political scientists, such as John Burgess and Woodrow Wilson, to show that their reformist ambitions largely precluded discussion of mundane activities (...)
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  44. Othered Body, Obscene Self(Ie): A Sartrean Reading of Kim Kardashian-West.Elese Dowden - 2017 - Hecate 43 (2):117-130.
    In this existential reading of Kim Kardashian-West's International Women's Day selfie of 2016, I focus on the rise of selfie culture and public discourse around emerging digital representations of women's bodies. The selfie is a relatively new phenomenon, and is particularly curious because of the subject/object paradox it creates; in taking a selfie, a person asserts control over their own image, but at the same time, becomes object in their own gaze. My argument is that selfies, like other assertions of (...)
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  45. Rorschach Tests and Rorschach Vigilantes: Queering the History of Psychology in Watchmen.Katherine Hubbard & Peter Hegarty - 2017 - History of the Human Sciences 30 (4):75-99.
    One of the clearest signs that Psychology has impacted popular culture is the public’s familiarity with the Rorschach ink-blot test. An excellent example of the Rorschach in popular culture can be found in Watchmen, the comic/graphic novel written by Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons. In the mid-20th century Psychology had an especially contentious relationship with comics; some psychologists were very anxious about the impact comics had on young people, whereas others wrote comics to subvert dominant norms about gender and sexuality. (...)
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  46. Holograms: The Story of a Word and its Cultural Uses.Sean F. Johnston - 2017 - Leonardo 50 (5):493-499.
    Holograms reached popular consciousness during the 1960s and have since left audiences alternately fascinated, bemused or inspired. Their impact was conditioned by earlier cultural associations and successive reimaginings by wider publics. Attaining peak public visibility during the 1980s, holograms have been found more in our pockets (as identity documents) and in our minds (as video-gaming fantasies and “faux hologram” performers) than in front of our eyes. The most enduring, popular interpretations of the word “hologram” evoke the traditional allure of magic (...)
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  47. Signs of Morality in David Bowie's "Black Star" Video Clip.May Kokkidou & Elvina Paschali - 2017 - Philosophy Study 7 (12).
    “Black Star” music video was released two days before Bowie’s death. It bears various implications of dying and the notion of mortality is both literal and metaphorical. It is highly autobiographical and serves as a theatrical stage for Bowie to act both as a music performer and as a self-conscious human being. In this paper, we discuss the signs of mortality in Bowie’s “Black Star” music video-clip. We focus on video’s cinematic techniques and codes, on its motivic elements and on (...)
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  48. What Kind of Revolutionary is Mr. Robot?Shane J. Ralston - 2017 - In Richard Greene & Rachel Robison-Greene (eds.), Mr. Robot and Philosophy: Beyond Good and Evil Corp. Chicago: Open Court. pp. 73-82.
    Besides being the title of an EP by The (International) Noise Conspiracy, “Bigger cages, longer chains!” is an anarchist rallying cry. It’s meant to ridicule those political activists who compromise their ideals, make demands and then settle for partial concessions or, to put it bluntly, bargain with the Man. In the T.V. series Mr. Robot, Christian Slater plays the anarchist leader of a hacktivist group known as fsociety. Mr. Robot won’t negotiate with the FBI and E(vil) Corp for bigger cages (...)
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  49. On Being Awesome: A Unified Theory of How Not to Suck.Nick Riggle - 2017 - New York: Penguin Books.
    I develop a theory of social virtue around the concept of a "social opening" and argue that a range of contemporary terms track various modes of success and failure with respect to social openings: ‘awesome’, ‘down’, ‘chill’, ‘sucks’, ‘wack’, ‘lame’, ‘douchebag’, and others. A basic idea is that the normative character of contemporary social life cannot be fully understood in traditional philosophical terms: ‘obligation’, ‘demand’, ‘duty’, ‘right’, ‘just’, ‘requirement’. ‘Sucks’ and ‘awesome’ (and their ilk) capture a special mode of interpersonal (...)
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  50. New Television: The Aesthetics and Politics of a Genre.Martin Shuster - 2017 - University of Chicago Press.
    Even though it’s frequently asserted that we are living in a golden age of scripted television, television as a medium is still not taken seriously as an artistic art form, nor has the stigma of television as “chewing gum for the mind” really disappeared. -/- Philosopher Martin Shuster argues that television is the modern art form, full of promise and urgency, and in New Television, he offers a strong philosophical justification for its importance. Through careful analysis of shows including The (...)
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