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  1. Karl Popper's Defense of the Autonomy of Sociology.Richard Lichtman - forthcoming - Social Research: An International Quarterly.
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  2. A Critical Perspective on a Critical Perspective on Social Science: Kei Yoshida's: Rationality and Cultural Interpretivism. Lexington Books, 2014, 156pp, $ 75 HB, $ 74.99 eBook.David K. Henderson - 2015 - Metascience 24 (3):457-461.
    Yoshida considers two broad understandings of how social scientists can and should “describe and explain other cultures or their aspects under concepts of rationality” . In the one corner is a family of approaches that Yoshida finds deeply flawed: cultural interpretivist approaches. Five authors representative of this family are given fine chapter length examinations: Winch, Taylor, Geertz, Sahlins, and Obeyesekere. In the other corner is Yoshida’s favored approach: critical rationalism. This approach is associated with the intellectual descendants of Karl Popper—notably (...)
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  3. Popper and Hayek on Reason and Tradition.Jack Birner - 2014 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 44 (3):263-281.
    Karl Popper and Friedrich von Hayek became close friends soon after they first met in the early 1930s. Ever since, they discussed their ideas intensively on many occasions. But even though an analysis of the origins and contents of their ideas and correspondence reveals a number of important and fundamental differences, they rarely criticize each other in their published work. The article analyzes in particular the different ideas they have on the role of reason in society and on rationalism and (...)
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  4. Popper, Rationality and the Possibility of Social Science.Danny Frederick - 2013 - Theoria : An International Journal for Theory, History and Fundations of Science 28 (1):61-75.
    Social science employs teleological explanations which depend upon the rationality principle, according to which people exhibit instrumental rationality. Popper points out that people also exhibit critical rationality, the tendency to stand back from, and to question or criticise, their views. I explain how our critical rationality impugns the explanatory value of the rationality principle and thereby threatens the very possibility of social science. I discuss the relationship between instrumental and critical rationality and show how we can reconcile our critical rationality (...)
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  5. Tres miradas realistas para acceder al mundo social.Agustina Borella - 2012 - Revista de Instituciones, Ideas y Mercados 56:181-209.
    Even though Popper, Lawson and Mäki are realists, the three of them understand by realism something different and support different positions on the use of models in economics. In this article we will compare the three proposals on their conceptions of reality, the function and the nature of economic models and their use to study the social world.
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  6. The Rationality Principle Idealized.Boaz Miller - 2012 - Social Epistemology 26 (1):3-30.
    According to Popper's rationality principle, agents act in the most adequate way according to the objective situation. I propose a new interpretation of the rationality principle as consisting of an idealization and two abstractions. Based on this new interpretation, I critically discuss the privileged status that Popper ascribes to it as an integral part of all social scientific models. I argue that as an idealization, the rationality principle may play an important role in the social sciences, but it also has (...)
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  7. Bühler and Popper: Kantian Therapies for the Crisis in Psychology.Thomas Sturm - 2012 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 43 (2):462-472.
    I analyze the historical background and philosophical considerations of Karl Bühler and his student Karl Popper regarding the crisis of psychology. They share certain Kantian questions and methods for reflection on the state of the art in psychology. Part 1 outlines Bühler’s diagnosis and therapy for the crisis in psychology as he perceived it, leading to his famous theory of language. I also show how the Kantian features of Bühler’s approach help to deal with objections to his crisis diagnosis and (...)
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  8. Comprensión Hermenéutica y Análisis Situacional En Karl R. Popper.José de Lira Bautista - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 46:129-135.
    In this paper I expose the hermeneutic turn in Popperian philosophy of science. It is a milestone in the search of scientific rationality because permit us explain and understand both the method of deductive test of theories and the growth of knowledge. Especially, incorporating hermeneutics parameters, build up from Popper’s point of view, like situational logic, supported on the third world theory and the scientific tradition theory, open a door to another form of understand the scientific rationality. It expands the (...)
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  9. Book Review: Gorton, William A. (2006). Karl Popper and the Social Sciences. Albany: State University of New York Press. [REVIEW]Raphael Sassower - 2008 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 38 (3):409-411.
  10. The Method of Situational Analysis.V. Cerník & J. Viceník - 2007 - Filozofia 62:765-776.
    The paper offers a reconstruction of Popper’s conception of the logical situation. It provides the analysis of the structure of this conception, its genesis, and the attempts at its explication, as well as its critical discussion. The authors confront Popper’s method of situational logic with Kmita’s method of humanistic interpretation.
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  11. Escape From Evidence?: Popper, Social Science, and Psychoanalytic Social Theory.Neil Mclaughlin - 2007 - Dialogue 46 (4):761-780.
  12. Philosophical Anthropology Can Help Social Scientists Learn From Empirical Tests.John Wettersten - 2007 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 37 (3):295–318.
    Popper's theory of demarcation has set the standard of falsifiability for all sciences. But not all falsifiable theories are part of science and some tests of scientific theories are better than others. Popper's theory has led to the banning of metaphysical and/or philosophical anthropological theories from science. But Joseph Agassi has supplemented Popper's theory to explain how such theories are useful as research programs within science. This theory can also be used to explain how interesting tests may be found. Theories (...)
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  13. Popper's Conception of the Rationality Principle in the Social Sciences.Boudewijn de Bruin - 2006 - In Ian Jarvie, David Miller & Karl Milford (eds.), Karl Popper: A Centenary Assessment: Selected Papers from Karl Popper 2002: Volume III: Science. Ashgate.
    In this paper I criticize Popper's conception of the rationality principle in the social sciences. First, I survey Popper's outlook on the role of a principle of rationality in theorizing in the social sciences. Then, I critically examine his view on the status of the principle of rationality concluding that the arguments supporting it are quite weak. Finally, I contrast his standpoint with an alternative conception. This, I show, helps us understand better Popper's reasons for adopting his perspective on rationality.
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  14. Karl Popper and the Social Sciences.William A. Gorton - 2006 - State University of New York Press.
    The first systematic treatment of Karl Popper’s contribution to the philosophy of the social sciences.
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  15. Poppers Methodologischer Individualismus Und Die Sozialwissenschaften.Marco Buzzoni - 2004 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 35 (1):157-173.
    Popper's methodological individualism and the social sciences. Popper's philosophy of social sciences poses a dilemma that arises out of the two theses of methodological individualism and situational logic. In order to find a way out of this dilemma, one must raise the question concerning the epistemological and methodological status of the `laws' of the human sciences. There are indeed `rules' from which human actions depart mostly to a negligible extent, but they remain valid or stay in effect without exception only (...)
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  16. An Epistemic Free-Riding Problem?Christian List & Philip Pettit - 2004 - In Philip Catton & Graham Macdonald (eds.), Karl Popper: Critical Appraisals. Routledge. pp. 128-158.
    One of the hallmark themes of Karl Popper’s approach to the social sciences was the insistence that when social scientists are members of the society they study, then they are liable to affect that society. In particular, they are liable to affect it in such a way that the claims they make lose their validity. “The interaction between the scientist’s pronouncements and social life almost invariably creates situations in which we have not only to consider the truth of such pronouncements, (...)
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  17. Popper’s Ontology of Situated Human Action.Allen Oakley - 2002 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 32 (4):455-486.
    Popper's version of situational analysis, with its focus on the logic of situations and the rationality principle, fails to provide cogent explanations of the human decisions and actions underpinning social phenomena. It so fails because where he demanded objectivism and formalism in the social sciences, his substantive arguments lost contact with the psychological and subjectivist realities of the human realm. But Popper also devised some key elements of a social ontology. It is argued that although there are crucial gaps in (...)
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  18. Karl Popper's Philosophy of Social Science and the Problem of Tyranny.Rafael Tomas Indart - 1999 - Dissertation, York University (Canada)
    This dissertation is a discussion of Popper's attempt at solving the problem of tyranny, which is the problem that inspires Popper's writings on social science and institutional change. In his view, both political apathy and radical social change are a threat to freedom. A serious consideration of the questions he raises and the answers he advances would benefit the reader, regardless of his or her political persuasion. ;In applying 'situational analysis' or 'rational reconstruction', I followed Popper's methodological recommendations. This approach (...)
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  19. How Can We Increase the Fruitfulness of Popper’s Methodological Individualism?John Wettersten - 1999 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 29 (4):517-526.
  20. Knowledge Personal or Social.Joseph Agassi - 1998 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 28 (4):522-551.
    Karl Popper's methodology can be seen as the situational logic of research. Popper called his method "Epistemology without a Knowing Subject." It was dismissed as metaphysical by those who refuse to give up an ideal knowing subject (a perfect human inductive processor). This article surveys the failure of modem discussions of this ideal, from the earliest (the writings of Sir Francis Bacon) to the latest (Kripke). The knowing subject exits at last, but leaves behind interesting results. The ideal knowing subject (...)
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  21. Popper's Situational Analysis and Contemporary Sociology.Peter Hedström, Richard Swedberg & Lars Udéhn - 1998 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 28 (3):339-364.
    This article assesses the value of Karl Popper's situational analysis for contem porary sociology We maintain that this element of Popper's social science methodology has been largely neglected by sociologists and suggest that this is because it is borrowed from economics. As such, situational analysis has much in common with recent attempts to introduce rational choice in sociology. Our main question is this: What is the contribution of situational analysis to the current debate about rational choice in sociology? Our answer (...)
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  22. Situational Logic and its Reception.I. C. Jarvie - 1998 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 28 (3):365-380.
    Popper holds to the unity of scientific method: any differences between natural and social science are a product of theory, not a pretheoretical premise. Distin guishing instead pure and applied generalizing sciences, Popper focuses on the different role of laws in each. In generalizing social science, our tools are the logic of the situation, including the rationality principle, and unintended conse quences. Situations contain individuals, but also social entities not reducible to individuals: conspiracy theory is the extreme form of individualism. (...)
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  23. The Socioeconomic Context: An Alternative Approach to Popper's Situational Analysis.Egon Matzner & Amit Bhaduri - 1998 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 28 (4):484-497.
    This article raises the question of whether standard economics with the general equilibrium model at its core applies situational analysis in a Popperian sense. Contrary to Popper's own view, the authors come to the conclusion that this is not the case. Standard economics fails to represent elements essential to any social situation in an adequate manner. It comprises uncertainty, time and space, social interaction, unintended effects, as well as culture and institutions. The authors suggest, therefore, the socioeconomic context as an (...)
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  24. Truth, Rationality, and the Situation.Mark A. Notturno - 1998 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 28 (3):400-421.
    The Rationality Principle says that people act adequately to their situation, but does not specify how they must act in order to do so. Situational Analysis uses the Rationality Principle, together with a model of the social situation, to explain actions in the past. Unlike Rational Choice Theory, Situational Analysis does not try to predict or influence actions in the future. Popper regarded the Rationality Principle as false, but thought that we should use it nonetheless. This poses a problem for (...)
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  25. Emphasizing Culture in Social Science in Light of Karl Popper's Three Worlds Metaphysics.Andrew Lee Gluck - 1997 - Dissertation, Columbia University Teachers College
    The problem addressed by this dissertation is the subject matter and methods of social science vis-a-vis the natural sciences and the humanities. It is commonly believed that the methodology of the social sciences is basically the same as that of the natural sciences, but that the subject matter--humanity--overlaps with the humanities. According to that view, the often-discussed gap between science and the humanities affects the social sciences as well. ;This project attempts to redirect our way of looking at this problem (...)
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  26. Popper's Contributions to Our Understanding of Social Science.Noretta Koertge - 1997 - Foundations of Science 2 (2):365-370.
  27. The Poverty of Rhetoricism: Popper, Mises and the Riches of Historicism.Keaney Michael - 1997 - History of the Human Sciences 10 (1):1-22.
    The attacks on historicism by radical individualists such as Popper and Mises have had lasting repercussions in the social sciences. Specifically, the term is used to connote deterministic, teleological theories of history, associated with Hegelian notions of destiny and positivist ideas of historical laws. This article argues that historicism is very different in character, in that it essentially amounts to the belief that social science and history are one and the same, whilst emphasizing the separate epis temology of natural science. (...)
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  28. The Quixotic Element in the Open Society.Peter Munz - 1997 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 27 (1):39-55.
    While the ethics and the sociology of The Open Society can stand up to criticism after 50 years, it is argued that Popper's thesis that closed societies are prompted and promoted by "historicism" cannot. Moreover, Popper's conceptions of "historicism" and of "developmental law" are based on a misunderstanding of our knowledge of history, the practice of historical writing, and the discipline of sociology. In conclusion there is an attempt to explain why, of all people Popper ever criticized for their historicism, (...)
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  29. Popper's Criticism of Methodology of Social Sciences.Nenad Cekić - 1993 - Theoria 36 (2):21-48.
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  30. Popper and the Rationality Principle.Maurice Lagueux - 1993 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 23 (4):468-480.
    Popper's short essay about the rationality principle has been the target of many criticisms which have raised serious doubts about its consistency. How could the well-known promoter of falsificationism suggest that we not reject a principle that he himself describes as false? Nonetheless, the essay can be read in a way that makes it appear much more consistent. Better sense can be made of Popper's own examples, by taking seriously his view that the rationality principle might be "approximately true" and (...)
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  31. Confuting Popper on the Rationality Principle.Robert Nadeau - 1993 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 23 (4):446-467.
    Many methodologists are firmly convinced that Popper's arguments concerning the status of the rationality principle are incoherent or incompatible with the essentials of falsificationism. The present essay first shows that the accusation of incompatibility of situational logic with falsificationism does not hold up to scrutiny but then shows that Popper's arguments are nonetheless flimsy if not indefensible. For it seems that one can distinguish between two different versions of the RP in Popper's writings. If the first version is plainly "objectivist" (...)
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  32. G. Currie and A. Musgrave : "Popper and the Human Sciences". [REVIEW]C. Behan Mccullagh - 1988 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 66:266.
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  33. The Idea of Rationality and its Relationship to Social Science: Comments on Popper's Philosophy of the Social Sciences.Michael Schmid - 1988 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 31 (4):451 – 469.
    Popper has proposed a ?theory of situational rationality? as a basis for the social sciences. This theory of rational action is reconstructed and its methodological and substantial implications discussed. It is shown that methodologically Popper's idea of rational action leads to a version of theoretical instrumentalism which is incompatible with his general philosophy of science, and that substantially it implies an unacceptable theory of social institutions. Instrumentalism can be avoided by a more contentful theory of human action encompassing ?non?rational? or (...)
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  34. Book Reviews : Popper and the Human Sciences. Edited by Gregory Curiue and Alan Musgrave. The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, 1985. Pp. VII + 218. 29.25, $41.50. [REVIEW]Burleigh T. Wilkins - 1988 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 18 (3):418-419.
  35. Popper and the Human Sciences. Gregory Currie, Alan Musgrave.Douglas E. Williams - 1988 - Ethics 98 (3):602-604.
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  36. CURRIE, GREGORY and MUSGRAVE, ALAN : "Popper and the Human Sciences". [REVIEW]J. Agassi - 1987 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 38:414.
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  37. Popper and the Human Sciences. G. Currie, A. Musgrave. [REVIEW]C. A. Hooker - 1987 - Philosophy of Science 54 (2):313-315.
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  38. Popper and the Human Sciences. Edited by Gregory Currie and Alan Musgrave.Paul Trainor - 1987 - Modern Schoolman 65 (1):72-74.
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  39. Popper and the Human Sciences.Gregory Currie & Alan Musgrave (eds.) - 1985 - Kluwer Academic Publishers.
    ... THIRD WORLD EPISTEMOLOGY L. Jonathan Cohen . Sir Karl Popper's striking hypothesis about a third world of objective knowledge deserves careful scrutiny ...
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  40. Transactional Analysis as Good Social Science: An Investigation Into the Work of Eric Berne, Stephen Toulmin, and Karl Popper.Edward Lewis Macalmon - 1985 - Dissertation, University of Missouri - Columbia
    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the scientific merit of the psychotherapy called Transactional Analysis, developed by Eric Berne in the mid 1960s. ;The investigation uses Stephen Toulmin and Karl Popper as chief critics of this social science system, though the concepts borrowed from them for the critique were originally aimed at the analysis of natural science. ;The first chapter is devoted to an analysis of the chief concepts of Berne's system with emphasis on the philosophical connections with (...)
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  41. Comments on Farr's Paper (II) Some Critical Remarks on Popper's Hermeneutics.Karl-Otto Apel - 1983 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 13 (2):183-193.
  42. The Application of the Hypothetico-Deductive Method in Sociology Popper's Conception of Sociology.Emmanuel Joy Bonaparte - 1983
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  43. Popper's Hermeneutics.James Farr - 1983 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 13 (2):157-176.
  44. Tilley and Popper's Alleged Historicism.Struan Jacobs - 1983 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 13 (2):203-205.
  45. Popper, Historicism and Emergence.Nicholas Tilley - 1982 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 12 (1):59-67.
  46. Popper, Winch, and Individualism.Clifton Perry - 1980 - International Philosophical Quarterly 20 (1):59-71.
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  47. The Methodological Status of Popper's Rationality Principle.Noretta Koertge - 1979 - Theory and Decision 10 (1-4):83-95.
  48. Critical Theory and Positivism: Popper and the Frankfurt School.L. J. Ray - 1979 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 9 (2):149-173.
  49. II. The Rationality Principle and Action Explanations: Koertge's Reconstruction of Popper's Logic of Action Explanations.Peter Glück & Michael Schmid - 1977 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 20 (1-4):72-81.
    Reconstructing Popper's research programme for the Human Sciences, Noretta Koertge (Inquiry, Vol. 18 [1975]) has given a deductive?nomological account of explanations of actions by means of a Rationality Principle. It is argued here that such a Rationality Principle is fundamentally redundant. Neither is it logically necessary in order to deduce a cognitive action?explanandum, nor can it be given a semantic non?empty interpretation, at least not within Koertge's own syllogism. Any attempt to save the Rationality Principle as unfalsifiablc but nevertheless indispensable (...)
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  50. A Further Comment on Karl Popper and Marxian Laws.Donald McQuarie - 1977 - Science and Society 41 (4):477 - 484.
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