Related categories

160 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 160
  1. Population Structure in the Western Pyrenees: I. Population Density, Social Class Composition, and Migration, 1850–1915.Andrew Abelson - 1979 - Journal of Biosocial Science 11 (3):353-362.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. Towards a Synthesis: Population Concepts in Russian Evolutionary Thought, 1925?1935.Mark B. Adams - 1970 - Journal of the History of Biology 3 (1):107-129.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. Paul R. Moorcraft and Mark A. Lewis, Mechanistic Home Range Analysis.R. M. Alexander - 2006 - Biological Theory 1 (4):433.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. Organism-Environment Mutuality Epistemics, and the Concept of an Ecological Niche.Thomas R. Alley - 1985 - Synthese 65 (3):411 - 444.
    The concept of an ecological niche (econiche) has been used in a variety of ways, some of which are incompatible with a relational or functional interpretation of the term. This essay seeks to standardize usage by limiting the concept to functional relations between organisms and their surroundings, and to revise the concept to include epistemic relations. For most organisms, epistemics are a vital aspect of their functional relationships to their surroundings and, hence, a major determinant of their econiche. Rejecting the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   27 citations  
  5. Estimates of Future Population.C. F. Arden-Close - 1943 - The Eugenics Review 35 (3-4):94.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. Effects of Individual Activity Sequences on Prey-Predator Models.Pierre M. Auger & Bruno Faivre - 1993 - Acta Biotheoretica 41 (1-2):13-22.
    We study the influence of the individual behaviour of animals on predator-prey models. Populations of preys and predators are divided into sub-populations corresponding to different activity classes. The animals are assumed to do many activities all day long such as searching for food of different types. The preys are more vulnerable when doing some activities during which they are very exposed to predators attacks rather than for others during which they are hidden. We study activity sequences of the animals and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. Complex Ecological Models with Simple Dynamics: From Individuals to Populations.Pierre M. Auger & Robert Roussarie - 1994 - Acta Biotheoretica 42 (2-3):111-136.
    The aim of this work is to study complex ecological models exhibiting simple dynamics. We consider large scale systems which can be decomposed into weakly coupled subsystems. Perturbation Theory is used in order to get a reduced set of differential equations governing slow time varying global variables. As examples, we study the influence of the individual behaviour of animals in competition and predator-prey models. The animals are assumed to do many activities all day long such as searching for food of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  8. Geometry and Dynamics of Populations.Melvin Avrami - 1941 - Philosophy of Science 8 (1):115-132.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. Zero Population Growth, Inc.: A Second Study.Larry D. Barnett - 1974 - Journal of Biosocial Science 6 (1):1.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. A Study of the Relationship Between Attitudes Towards World Population Growth and USA Population Growth.Larry D. Barnett - 1973 - Journal of Biosocial Science 5 (1):61.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. Towards an Ecological View of Immunity. [REVIEW]Swiatczak Bartlomiej - forthcoming - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science.
    The immune system does not just fight pathogens but also engages in interactions with beneficial microbes and non-immune cells of the body to harmonize their behavior by means of cytokines, antibodies and effector cells (Dinarello, 2007; Moticka, 2015, pp. 217e226, 261e267). However, the importance of these “housekeeping” functions has not been fully appreciated (Cohen, 2000). In his new book Immunity: The Evolution of an Idea Alfred I. Tauber traces the history of fundamental ideas in immunology and refers to recent advances (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. Neutral Theory, Biased World.William Bausman - 2016 - Dissertation, University of Minnesota
    The ecologist today finds scarce ground safe from controversy. Decisions must be made about what combination of data, goals, methods, and theories offers them the foundations and tools they need to construct and defend their research. When push comes to shove, ecologists often turn to philosophy to justify why it is their approach that is scientific. Karl Popper’s image of science as bold conjectures and heroic refutations is routinely enlisted to justify testing hypotheses over merely confirming them. One of the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. Ocular Refraction and Inbreeding: A Population Study in Newfoundland.J. C. Bear & A. Richler - 1981 - Journal of Biosocial Science 13 (4):391.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14. The Population Ecology of Despotism.Adrian Viliami Bell & Bruce Winterhalder - 2014 - Human Nature 25 (1):121-135.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. Linear Discrete Population Models with Two Time Scales in Fast Changing Environments II: Non-Autonomous Case.Ángel Blasco, Luis Sanz, Pierre Auger & Rafael Bravo de la Parra - 2002 - Acta Biotheoretica 50 (1):15-38.
    As the result of the complexity inherent in nature, mathematical models employed in ecology are often governed by a large number of variables. For instance, in the study of population dynamics we often deal with models for structured populations in which individuals are classified regarding their age, size, activity or location, and this structuring of the population leads to high dimensional systems. In many instances, the dynamics of the system is controlled by processes whose time scales are very different from (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16. The 1992 Indonesia Norplant Use-Dynamics Study: Final Report. Population Council Contract No. CI91. 99A. December 1 1991-April 30 1993. [REVIEW]D. S. Bratakoesoema, A. Rodjak, S. Sastrawinata, F. R. Djamal, H. Bachtiar, N. B. Azwar, J. W. Goldzieher, J. L. Beaumont, S. R. Levine & T. Luukkainen - 1993 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 36 (3):363-8.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17. Levins and the Lure of Artificial Worlds.Seth Bullock - 2014 - The Monist 97 (3):301-320.
    What is it about simulation models that has led some practitioners to treat them as potential sources of empirical data on the real-world systems being simulated; that is, to treat simulations as ‘artificial worlds’within which to perform computational ‘experiments’? Here we use the work of Richard Levins as a starting point in identifying the appeal of this model building strategy, and proceed to account for why this appeal is strongest for computational modellers. This analysis suggests a perspective on simulation modelling (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  18. Admixture and Heterozygosity in West Alaskan Populations.Pamela J. Byard, M. S. Schanfield & Michael H. Crawford - 1983 - Journal of Biosocial Science 15 (2):207.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19. Le Modele Matriciel Deterministe de Leslie Et Ses Applications En Dynamique Des Populations.Jorge Paulo Cancela & Kimon Hadjibiros - 1977 - Acta Biotheoretica 26 (4).
    The Leslie matrix model (Leslie, 1945) for discrete population growth has been modified and used several times in population dynamics. A review is given of the basic model (n t + 1 = An t) and of its principal modifications. The modifications relating to the influences of internal or external factors to the population are studied with greater detail. The same applies to models where the population is divided in stages rather than in age classes.In the same line, Hadjibiros (1975, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20. The Population Explosion.C. O. Carter - 1966 - The Eugenics Review 58 (1):53.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21. Biological Conservation of a Prey–Predator System Incorporating Constant Prey Refuge Through Provision of Alternative Food to Predators: A Theoretical Study.Kunal Chakraborty & Sankha Das - 2014 - Acta Biotheoretica 62 (2):183-205.
    We describe a prey–predator system incorporating constant prey refuge through provision of alternative food to predators. The proposed model deals with a problem of non-selective harvesting of a prey–predator system in which both the prey and the predator species obey logistic law of growth. The long-run sustainability of an exploited system is discussed through provision of alternative food to predators. We have analyzed the variability of the system in presence of constant prey refuge and examined the stabilizing effect on predator–prey (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22. Population Dynamics Modelling in an Hierarchical Arborescent River Network: An Attempt with Salmo Trutta.S. Charles, R. Bravo de la Parra, J. P. Mallet, H. Persat & P. Auger - 1998 - Acta Biotheoretica 46 (3):223-234.
    The balance between births and deaths in an age-structured population is strongly influenced by the spatial distribution of sub-populations. Our aim was to describe the demographic process of a fish population in an hierarchical dendritic river network, by taking into account the possible movements of individuals. We tried also to quantify the effect of river network changes (damming or channelling) on the global fish population dynamics. The Salmo trutta life pattern was taken as an example for.We proposed a model which (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23. A Cohort Approach to the Study of Population Growth in Australia.Christabel M. Young - 1972 - Journal of Biosocial Science 4 (1):75.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24. A Sociologist's View on the Meaning of the Strains in the Relationship Between a High Population Growth Rate and Environment.S. P. Cilliers - 1978 - Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa 43 (1):79-83.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25. The Undeniable Effectiveness of Mathematics in the Special Sciences.Mark Colyvan - unknown
    In many of the special sciences, mathematical models are used to provide information about specified target systems. For instance, population models are used in ecology to make predictions about the abundance of real populations of particular organisms. The status of mathematical models, though, is unclear and their use is hotly contested by some practitioners. A common objection levelled against the use of these models is that they ignore all the known, causally-relevant details of the often complex target systems. Indeed, the (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  26. Idealisations in Normative Models.Mark Colyvan - 2013 - Synthese 190 (8):1337-1350.
    In this paper I discuss the kinds of idealisations invoked in normative theories—logic, epistemology, and decision theory. I argue that very often the so-called norms of rationality are in fact mere idealisations invoked to make life easier. As such, these idealisations are not too different from various idealisations employed in scientific modelling. Examples of the latter include: fluids are incompressible (in fluid mechanics), growth rates are constant (in population ecology), and the gravitational influence of distant bodies can be ignored (in (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  27. Probability and Ecological Complexity.Mark Colyvan - 2004 - Biology and Philosophy 20 (4):869-879.
    There is something genuinely puzzling about large-scale simplicity emerging in systems that are complex at the small scale. Consider, for example, a population of hares. Clearly, the number of hares at any given time depends on hare fertility rates, the weather, the number of predators, the health of the predators, availability of hare resources, motor vehicle traffic, individual hare locations, colour of individual hares, and so on. Indeed, given the incredibly complexity of the hares’ environment at the small-scale, it is (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  28. The Galilean Turn in Population Ecology.Mark Colyvan & Lev R. Ginzburg - 2003 - Biology and Philosophy 18 (3):401-414.
    The standard mathematical models in population ecology assume that a population's growth rate is a function of its environment. In this paper we investigate an alternative proposal according to which the rate of change of the growth rate is a function of the environment and of environmental change. We focus on the philosophical issues involved in such a fundamental shift in theoretical assumptions, as well as on the explanations the two theories offer for some of the key data such as (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  29. Philosophical Issues in Ecology: Recent Trends and Future Directions.Mark Colyvan, William Grey, Paul E. Griffiths, Jay Odenbaugh & Stefan Linquist - 2009 - Ecology and Society 14 (2).
    A good philosophical understanding of ecology is important for a number of reasons. First, ecology is an important and fascinating branch of biology, with distinctive philosophical issues. Second, ecology is only one small step away from urgent political, ethical, and management decisions about how best to live in an apparently fragile and increasingly-degraded environment. Third, philosophy of ecology, properly conceived, can contribute directly to both our understanding of ecology and help with its advancement. Philosophy of ecology can thus be seen (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  30. An Extensionist Environmental Ethic.L. Comstock Gary - 1995 - Biodiversity and Conservation 4 (8):827-837.
    Environmental ethics consists of a set of competing theories about whether human actions and attitudes to nature are morally right or wrong. Ecocentrists are holists whose theory locates the primary site of value in biological communities or ecosystems and who tend to regard actions interfering with the progress of an ecosystem toward its mature equilibrium state as prima facie wrong. I suggest that this form of ecocentrism may be built on a questionable scientific foundation, organismic ecology, and that a better (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31. Must There Be a Balance of Nature?Gregory Cooper - 2001 - Biology and Philosophy 16 (4):481-506.
    The balance of nature concept is an old idea that manifests itself in anumber of forms in population and community ecology. This paper focuseson population ecology, where controversy surrounding the balance ofnature takes the form of perennial debates over the significance ofdensity dependence, population regulation, and species interactions suchas competition. One of the most striking features of these debates, overthe course of the previous century in ecology, is the tendency to arguethe case on largely conceptual grounds. This paper explores twoquestions. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  32. The World Population Conference.R. Cox Peter - 1954 - Eugenics Review 46 (4):205-211.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33. The “Balance of Nature” Metaphor and Equilibrium in Population Ecology.Kim Cuddington - 2001 - Biology and Philosophy 16 (4):463-479.
    I claim that the balance of nature metaphoris shorthand for a paradigmatic view of natureas a beneficent force. I trace the historicalorigins of this concept and demonstrate that itoperates today in the discipline of populationecology. Although it might be suspected thatthis metaphor is a pre-theoretic description ofthe more precisely defined notion ofequilibrium, I demonstrate that balance ofnature has constricted the meaning ofmathematical equilibrium in population ecology.As well as influencing the meaning ofequilibrium, the metaphor has also loaded themathematical term with values.Environmentalists (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  34. Les modeLes Sigmoides En Biologie Vegetale.Gérard Cusset - 1991 - Acta Biotheoretica 39 (3-4):197-205.
    Observed biological growth curves generally are sigmoid in appearance. It is common practice to fit such data with either a Verhulst logistic or a Gompertz curve. This paper critically considers the conceptual bases underlying these descriptive models.The logistic model was developed by Verhulst to accommodate the common sense observation that populations cannot keep growing indefinitely. A justification for using the same equation to describe the growth of individuals, based on considerations from chemical kinetics (autocatalysis of a monomolecular reaction), was put (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35. Philosophy of Ecology.Kevin deLaplante, Bryson Brown & Kent A. Peacock (eds.) - 2011 - North-Holland.
    The most pressing problems facing humanity today - over-population, energy shortages, climate change, soil erosion, species extinctions, the risk of epidemic disease, the threat of warfare that could destroy all the hard-won gains of civilization, and even the recent fibrillations of the stock market - are all ecological or have a large ecological component. in this volume philosophers turn their attention to understanding the science of ecology and its huge implications for the human project. To get the application of ecology (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  36. Stability, Complexity and Robustness in Population Dynamics.J. Demongeot, H. Hazgui, H. Ben Amor & J. Waku - 2014 - Acta Biotheoretica 62 (3):243-284.
    The problem of stability in population dynamics concerns many domains of application in demography, biology, mechanics and mathematics. The problem is highly generic and independent of the population considered . We give in this paper some examples of population dynamics concerning nucleic acids interacting through direct nucleic binding with small or cyclic RNAs acting on mRNAs or tRNAs as translation factors or through protein complexes expressed by genes and linked to DNA as transcription factors. The networks made of these interactions (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37. Untangling the Conceptual Issues Raised in Reydon and Scholz's Critique of Organizational Ecology and Darwinian Populations.Denise E. Dollimore - 2014 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 44 (3):282-315.
    Reydon and Scholz raise doubts about the Darwinian status of organizational ecology by arguing that Darwinian principles are not applicable to organizational populations. Although their critique of organizational ecology’s typological essentialism is correct, they go on to reject the Darwinian status of organizational populations. This paper claims that the replicator-interactor distinction raised in modern philosophy of biology but overlooked for discussion by Reydon and Scholz provides a way forward. It is possible to conceptualize evolving Darwinian populations providing that the inheritance (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  38. Stochastic Population Dynamics in Ecology and Conservation. [REVIEW]John Drake - 2004 - Acta Biotheoretica 52 (3):219-220.
  39. Lande, R., S. Engen and B.-E. Sæther (2003). Stochastic Population Dynamics in Ecology and Conservation.John M. Drake - 2004 - Acta Biotheoretica 52 (3):219-220.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40. Studies of Animal Populations From Lamarck to Darwin.Frank N. Egerton - 1968 - Journal of the History of Biology 1 (2):225-259.
    Darwin's theory of evolution brought to an end the static view of nature. It was no longer possible to think of species as immortal, with secure places in nature. Fluctuation of population could no longer be thought of as occurring within definite limits which had been set at the time of creation. Nor was it any longer possible to generalize from the differential reproductive potentials, or from a few cases of mutualism between species, that everything in nature was “fitted to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  41. Leeuwenhoek as a Founder of Animal Demography.Frank N. Egerton - 1968 - Journal of the History of Biology 1 (1):1-22.
    Leeuwenhoek's observations relating to animal population, though scattered through many letters written during a period of over forty years, when seen in toto, were important contributions to the subject now known as animal demography. He maintained enough contact with other scientists to have received encouragement and some helpful suggestions, but the language barrier and the novelty of doing microscopic work forced him to be resourceful, inventive, and original. His multifarious investigations impinged upon population biology before he discovered a direct interest (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  42. 56 Impact of Population Growth.Paul R. Ehrlich & John P. Holdren - 2010 - Environmental Ethics: The Big Questions 171:426.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43. Discrete Conventional Signalling of a Continuous Variable.Magnus Enquist, Stefano Ghirlanda & Pete L. Hurd - forthcoming - Philosophical Explorations.
    In aggressive interactions, animals often use a discrete set of signals, while the properties being signalled are likely to be continuous, for example fighting ability or value of victory. Here we investigate a particular model of fighting which allows for conventional signalling of subjective resource value to occur. The result shows that neither perfect nor no signalling are evolutionarily stable strategies in the model. Instead, we find ESSs in which partial information is communicated, with discrete displays signalling a range of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44. World Population Prospects: The Impact of Ecological and Genetic Factors on Human Population Growth in the 21st Century.A. Falek & M. J. Konner - 1999 - Global Bioethics 12 (1-4):31-41.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45. Three Problems of Ecology: Population, Resources, Pollution.E. K. Fedorov - 1974 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 13 (2):8-14.
    In his speech Academician Fedorov expressed the opinion that the political and ideological meaning of the problem of interaction between man and nature is fundamental for our conference.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46. Egg Distributions of Insect Parasitoids: Modelling and Analysis of Temporal Data with Host Density Dependence.John S. Fenlon, Malcolm J. Faddy, Menia Toussidou & Michael E. Courcy Williamdes - forthcoming - Acta Biotheoretica.
    A simple numerical procedure is presented for the problem of estimating the parameters of models for the distribution of eggs oviposited in a host. The modelling is extended to incorporate both host density and time dependence to produce a remarkably parsimonious structure with only seven parameters to describe a data set of over 3,000 observations. This is further refined using a mixed model to accommodate several large outliers. Both models show that the level of superparasitism declines with increasing host density, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47. Egg Distributions of Insect Parasitoids: Modelling and Analysis of Temporal Data with Host Density Dependence.John Fenlon, Malcolm Faddy, Menia Toussidou & Michael de Courcy Williams - 2009 - Acta Biotheoretica 57 (3):309-320.
    A simple numerical procedure is presented for the problem of estimating the parameters of models for the distribution of eggs oviposited in a host. The modelling is extended to incorporate both host density and time dependence to produce a remarkably parsimonious structure with only seven parameters to describe a data set of over 3,000 observations. This is further refined using a mixed model to accommodate several large outliers. Both models show that the level of superparasitism declines with increasing host density, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48. Demography and Diffusion in Epidemics: Malaria and Black Death Spread.J. Gaudart, M. Ghassani, J. Mintsa, M. Rachdi, J. Waku & J. Demongeot - 2010 - Acta Biotheoretica 58 (2):277-305.
    The classical models of epidemics dynamics by Ross and McKendrick have to be revisited in order to incorporate elements coming from the demography (fecundity, mortality and migration) both of host and vector populations and from the diffusion and mutation of infectious agents. The classical approach is indeed dealing with populations supposed to be constant during the epidemic wave, but the presently observed pandemics show duration of their spread during years imposing to take into account the host and vector population changes (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49. Darwinian Populations and Natural Selection.Peter Gildenhuys - 2012 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 90 (1):192-195.
    Australasian Journal of Philosophy, Volume 90, Issue 1, Page 192-195, March 2012.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50. Ecological Orbits: How Planets Move and Populations Grow.Lev Ginzburg & Mark Colyvan - unknown
    The main focus of the book is the presentation of the 'inertial' view of population growth. This view provides a rather simple model for complex population dynamics, and is achieved at the level of the single species without invoking species interactions. An important part of this account is the maternal effect. Investment of mothers in the quality of their daughters makes the rate of reproduction of the current generation depend not only on the current environment, but also on the environment (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   11 citations  
1 — 50 / 160